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What are you reading at the moment?

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xianjiro
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#1281

Post by xianjiro »

I'm reading Comanche Moon currently. Finished Dead Man's Walk a couple weeks back. Plan to read McMurtry's other Lonesome Dove books in chronological order (not order written/released). I'm also watching the mini-series of each title after reading. I wasn't too big on the filmed Dead Man's Walk though. It seemed way too rushed, given the source material, it probably could have been twice as long. Some great acting in it though.
blocho
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#1282

Post by blocho »

Ali Winston and Darwin BondGraham, The Riders Come out at Night: Brutality, Corruption, and Cover-up in Oakland

This book has not yet been published. That will happen next January. I got a galley copy because one of the authors is a friend of mine.

This is a great book for anyone who wants to understand American policing in our current era or how the widespread paradigm of violent, criminal, unaccountable police departments came to be. It's crammed full of all the typical problems: brutal cops, police unions who fight accountability at every level, craven politicians, startling class and racial inequities. But it's also a story of reform. Very slow reform full of stops and starts and the occasional murder of a civilian by the police, but reform nonetheless. The book is focused on Oakland in particular, but the example is instructive for understanding the police on a national level.
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peeptoad
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#1283

Post by peeptoad »

xianjiro wrote: August 21st, 2022, 2:10 am I'm reading Comanche Moon currently. Finished Dead Man's Walk a couple weeks back. Plan to read McMurtry's other Lonesome Dove books in chronological order (not order written/released). I'm also watching the mini-series of each title after reading. I wasn't too big on the filmed Dead Man's Walk though. It seemed way too rushed, given the source material, it probably could have been twice as long. Some great acting in it though.
I enjoyed all of those when I read them. LD is my favorite and I'd put Comanche Moon second. Streets of Laredo was by far my least favorite... I read them in the order written back when they were new. It would be interesting to re-read them sometime in chrono order instead. Enjoy!
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mightysparks
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#1284

Post by mightysparks »

Currently listening to Jane Eyre (chapter 27). I was surprisingly enjoying it (the writing flows so nicely) until it got real into the romance. Possibly one of the worst ‘romances’ of all time. Rochester is revolting and abusive and Jane is an idiot. Can’t stand any of the dialogue or interactions between them after their feelings are admitted to each other. Really annoyed because I thought it could be a new favourite until it turned into Twilight.
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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blueboybob
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#1285

Post by blueboybob »

This year has been really good for books. 39 books done so far.

Currently Reading:
Jim Thorpe, Original All-American

Recently Finished:
The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps
The United States of Absurdity: Untold Stories from American History
Who Ate the First Oyster?: The Extraordinary People Behind the Greatest Firsts in History
I'd Like to Play Alone, Please: Essays
With Amusement for All: A History of American Popular Culture Since 1830
12 Books That Changed the World
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mightysparks
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#1286

Post by mightysparks »

Audible has really helped get me back into books this year. I'm at 23 for the year and my previous record was 27 in 2013.. I finished Jane Eyre yesterday but the last half was pretty horrible. I liked the book overall but the romantic elements were off-putting and unlikable. I listened to The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde today and didn't like it much more than I've liked any filmed adaptation (though the mini-series was pretty good). Just seemed to focus on all the uninteresting aspects until the end and it wasn't really worth the wait.

I'm now listening to Man's Search for Meaning which I'm liking so far. I've also been reading The Hidden Life of Trees and discovered trees are pretty cool.

I also found this group a few months ago which might interest the list planning fanatics here: Around the Year in 52 Books . The prompts for 2023 are being sorted out at the moment and I'm still hoping I can make it to 52 this year but I don't think I'll quite get there. This is my 2022 plan.
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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gunnar
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#1287

Post by gunnar »

That looks like a pretty interesting challenge. I've been doing the regular Goodreads Challenge the last few years. My niece and sister-in-law challenged me back in 2020 to read one recommendation from each of them every month. They would each give me two choices and I'd pick one from each. That's what led me to read Station Eleven plus other books like Doctors from Erich Segal, All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, Master of the Game by Sidney Sheldon, and others.

I see that you have books by Becky Chambers and Martha Wells book coming up soon. I liked the Wayfarers series from Chambers quite a bit. It's fairly laid back, but that seems to be her style for the most part. Her Monk & Robot novellas have been good, though not quite as good as Wayfarers. To Be Taught, if Fortunate was my least favorite of her books.

I started reading Martha Wells when I stumbled across her Murderbot novellas years ago. I loved them and have been keeping up with them ever since. It also inspired me to go check out her earlier books. I'd had a copy of her early novel, City of Bones, for 25+ years, but had never gotten around to reading it. Thanks to Audible, I gave it a go and loved it. I also really enjoyed her Raksura series (7 books) and Ile-Rien series (5 books), each of which fall into the fantasy genre. This week, I got around to reading her two Emilie novels which are more young adult fantasy, but still fun to read (listen to).
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Minkin
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#1288

Post by Minkin »

I decided to expand Cinema Safari once again into the realm of books!

So I spent quite awhile trying to find a book for the current location: Inyo County, California - where Death Valley and a good portion of the Sierras are. I was going to go with a book from this immeasurably helpful website (for my purposes), but in the process of research, I discovered that the author Mary Hunter Austin wrote a book whilst living in the county - and so that's what I'm currently reading: The Land of Little Rain. It's a series of essays on different aspects of life in this rain shadow high desert - that's still rugged and full of life, right before most of the boomtowns faded, and Los Angeles bought all the water rights (see Chinatown), and with the Indians still living nomadic lives off of the land. It's a celebration of the delicate balance of nature and how everything is so intertwined - from the scavengers who clean the country of waste, to the inhabitants who take their life here for granted. It's a great poetic read, and I've really been enjoying it and glad I came across it. She ended up moving to Santa Fe and put out a book with Ansel Adams about Taos, New Mexico. She's an excellent writer, who's quite knowledgeable about the plants in the area and her observations on just the goings-on of the life all around her. It turned out to be quite the read, I'm glad I stumbled upon it.

BTW, if anyone's interested here's my GoodReads account - I'd like to friend more people on it and see what everyone else is reading.
Cinema Safari (Currently working on Inyo County, CA + Zimbabwe upgrade) Help recommend me movies to watch) Letterboxd
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mightysparks
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#1289

Post by mightysparks »

I finished my Tree book the other night and enjoyed it. Felt a little un-scientific at times but I feel like I learnt to appreciate trees more.

I also listened to The Hobbit. The narration by Andy Serkis was amazing, I’d listen to him narrate anything after that, and I liked the book for the most part but found the climax disappointing.

I read All Systems Red and it took me a bit to get used to the main character but then I got into it and read it in one sitting. Definitely keen on checking out the rest of the series and other works by Martha Wells.

I’m now reading Leviathan Wakes (I haven’t watched The Expanse) and listening to Anna Karenina. Liking both so far but once Leviathan Wakes got going I was hooked and didn’t want to put it down. AK I’m happy to take in at a slower pace.
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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3eyes
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#1290

Post by 3eyes »

Chris Stirewalt - Broken news (about the antagonistic nature of the media)
Paul Hawken - Regeneration (about strategies for reducing and reversing atmostpheric CO2)
:run: STILL the Gaffer!
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