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#2881

Post by OldAle1 »

3eyes wrote: September 17th, 2021, 6:15 pm I saw Song of the Open Road in the theater. Don't remember much else about Jane Powell, though.
Looks like it was a small part, I suppose typical given that it was her first film - MGM had some faith in her, but not enough to make her a star right away - in fact that first film was a loan-out to UA. Did you get to see a lot of films when you were a kid? My mom, who grew up in a rural area and whose family was pretty poor, told me she never saw a movie until she was 14 or 15 - Green Grass of Wyoming in 1948.

Pretty sure I've confused Jane with Eleanor Powell more than once - both co-starred with Astaire, both had relatively small film careers, but both fairly big names to the classic musical lovers. I guess I'm still not a hardcore enough fan of the stuff to keep them straight all the time or to be able to call to mind what makes either of them distinctive, but I think some of that has to do with neither of them really being in many truly significant films. Still it shows just how much song and dance there is for me to still explore.
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#2882

Post by 3eyes »

OldAle1 wrote: September 17th, 2021, 6:50 pm
3eyes wrote: September 17th, 2021, 6:15 pm I saw Song of the Open Road in the theater. Don't remember much else about Jane Powell, though.
Looks like it was a small part, I suppose typical given that it was her first film - MGM had some faith in her, but not enough to make her a star right away - in fact that first film was a loan-out to UA. Did you get to see a lot of films when you were a kid? My mom, who grew up in a rural area and whose family was pretty poor, told me she never saw a movie until she was 14 or 15 - Green Grass of Wyoming in 1948.

Pretty sure I've confused Jane with Eleanor Powell more than once - both co-starred with Astaire, both had relatively small film careers, but both fairly big names to the classic musical lovers. I guess I'm still not a hardcore enough fan of the stuff to keep them straight all the time or to be able to call to mind what makes either of them distinctive, but I think some of that has to do with neither of them really being in many truly significant films. Still it shows just how much song and dance there is for me to still explore.
I seem to remember there was quite a bit of buzz about Jane Powell before this movie came out. (That would be via our local paper, I guess.) All I remember is her singing while riding a bike. But I think she was a major character in the movie. From the synopsis on IMDb I see that it was one of those patriotic wartime home front things -- I prolly didn't get that. (I would have been 9 or so at the time.)

We had 4 theaters in our town 2 of which I was allowed to go to - if anybody would take me. I was mad about movies even then and never got my fill, being at the mercy of my elders. But yeah, I saw quite a lot.
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#2883

Post by blocho »

Mario Camus, 86

Spanish director and screenwriter, best known for Los Santos Inocentes and La Colmena.
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#2884

Post by Mario Gaborović »

John Challis, dies of cancer at 79.

Best known as Boycie from Only Fools and Horses.
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#2885

Post by xianjiro »

Willie Garson
https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0308606/
https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/wil ... 47257.html

(he was also part of the SG-1 franchise as Martin Lloyd)
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#2886

Post by kongs_speech »

Melvin Van Peebles, 89.

Groundbreaking black independent filmmaker, best known as the writer/director of Sweet Sweetback's Baadassss Song and Watermelon Man. His work was recently honored with a Criterion Collection box set.
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#2887

Post by Torgo »

Oh. Good timing from Citerion then, in an (un)lucky way.
Did watch Sweet Sweet last month and absolutely didn't like it. The background info on the film's production are a romp though with stuff like this: "Van Peebles contracted gonorrhea when filming one of the many sex scenes, and successfully applied to the Directors Guild in order to get workers' compensation because he was "hurt on the job." Van Peebles used the money to purchase more film."
(And of course it has, as the LoC would call it, some certain cultural or (film) historical merit)
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#2888

Post by blocho »

Torgo wrote: September 22nd, 2021, 9:18 pm Oh. Good timing from Citerion then, in an (un)lucky way.
Did watch Sweet Sweet last month and absolutely didn't like it. The background info on the film's production are a romp though with stuff like this: "Van Peebles contracted gonorrhea when filming one of the many sex scenes, and successfully applied to the Directors Guild in order to get workers' compensation because he was "hurt on the job." Van Peebles used the money to purchase more film."
(And of course it has, as the LoC would call it, some certain cultural or (film) historical merit)
Yeah, the debates about Sweet Sweetback's, especially within the black community itself, is fascinating. I tend to be more sympathetic to views that are critical of the movie's value as a work of revolutionary art. But its cultural impact can't be overstated. For that alone, Melvin Van Peebles was a huge figure in American cinema.
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#2889

Post by yllow »

Nice he got the Criterion treatment while alive to appreciate the industry kudos but yeah RIP
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#2890

Post by blocho »

Roger Michell, 65

British TV and film director, best known for Notting Hill, Changing Lanes, Enduring Love, Venus, and Hyde Park on Hudson.
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#2891

Post by Nathan Treadway »

Tommy Kirk, 79, best known as a child star in a series of Disney films in the 50s and 60s, including Old Yeller.. :rip:

I believe he was the last Old Yeller star?
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#2892

Post by Good_Will_Harding »



I know he's been gone for over a month now, but I just rediscovered this old Ed Asner clip and had to share.
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#2893

Post by Redravenbell »

Eichii Yamamoto, 80, director of Belladonna of Sadness, Cleopatra, A Thousand and One Nights.

https://www.cartoonbrew.com/rip/rip-eii ... 09024.html
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#2894

Post by OldAle1 »

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Ruthie Thompson, American animator, 111.

Born in Portland, ME in 1910, Thompson relocated with her family to Los Angeles in 1918, where she met brothers Roy and Walt Disney, who lived a few doors down. She apparently appeared in some of the "Alice comedies", live action/animated shorts that were among Disney's first film efforts, several years before the creation of Mickey Mouse.

Thompson was one of the many unheralded workers - many of them women - who helped put together Walt Disney's early successes, working in the ink and paint department on his first several features starting with 1937's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. She worked for the mouse house for 40 years and later worked on Ralph Bakshi's The Lord of the Rings. It's unfortunate that probably only her extremely advanced age helped to get her any notice as one of the pioneers in American animation, and who knows what other stories from those early years are still in the dustbin of history, because their tellers didn't live to see a world that is (finally) starting to care a little bit more about the contributions of everybody.
Here's to the fools who dream.
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#2895

Post by blocho »

Gary Paulsen, 82

Prolific American writer of children's literature, including the young adult classic Hatchet (adapted to the screen in 1990 as A Cry in the Wild).
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#2896

Post by kongs_speech »

blocho wrote: October 14th, 2021, 2:28 am Gary Paulsen, 82

Prolific American writer of children's literature, including the young adult classic Hatchet (adapted to the screen in 1990 as A Cry in the Wild).
Read Hatchet in first grade and then a couple times after that. RIP.
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#2897

Post by blocho »

Khalid Al Siddiq, 76

Kuwaiti screenwriter/director, best known for Bas Ya Bahar (Cruel Sea) from 1972.
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#2898

Post by Lammetje »

OldAle1 wrote: October 12th, 2021, 1:47 pm Image

Ruthie Thompson, American animator, 111.

Born in Portland, ME in 1910, Thompson relocated with her family to Los Angeles in 1918, where she met brothers Roy and Walt Disney, who lived a few doors down. She apparently appeared in some of the "Alice comedies", live action/animated shorts that were among Disney's first film efforts, several years before the creation of Mickey Mouse.

Thompson was one of the many unheralded workers - many of them women - who helped put together Walt Disney's early successes, working in the ink and paint department on his first several features starting with 1937's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. She worked for the mouse house for 40 years and later worked on Ralph Bakshi's The Lord of the Rings. It's unfortunate that probably only her extremely advanced age helped to get her any notice as one of the pioneers in American animation, and who knows what other stories from those early years are still in the dustbin of history, because their tellers didn't live to see a world that is (finally) starting to care a little bit more about the contributions of everybody.
Wow, 111 years! Thanks for sharing, Aley.
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#2899

Post by blocho »

Paul Salata, 94

An American football player and actor of almost no renown. He played two seasons in the NFL and two more in the CFL and didn't accomplish much. He appeared in 17 movies, mostly in the 1950s, almost always as an extra.

So why do I mention him? Two reasons.
- First, he was one of only three living cast members from Stalag 17, one of my favorite movies ever. The other two were also uncredited extras (including Larry Storch, which may be a familiar name to some people).
- Second, Salata was the creator of Mr. Irrelevant, the mocking sobriquet given every year to the last pick in the NFL Draft. Over the years, it has grown into a cultural phenomenon, featuring a whole week of events and celebrations.
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#2900

Post by tirefeet »

Thanks for mentioning him blocho. Didn't know about Salata but learned plenty from your post.

If I had to guess Salata is a Czech or a Slovak name. The word "salata", unrelated to the name is used for salad in Turkish.
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#2901

Post by blocho »

Felipe Cazals, 84

Mexican screenwriter/director, probably best known for Canoa (1976).
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#2902

Post by Torgo »

Colin Powell, 84, politician, dying from Covid complications

https://edition.cnn.com/2021/10/18/poli ... index.html

Some might remember him from his career under George W. Bush. It's possible that another thread will be bumped for this.
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#2903

Post by kongs_speech »

Torgo wrote: October 18th, 2021, 1:06 pm It's possible that another thread will be bumped for this.
I would hope not. Powell was a good guy who stepped down when he found out the WMD thing was bullshit. They lied to him too. As someone who detests the Bush administration, I like and respect Colin Powell. Also, he was double vaccinated and still died, so that sucks.
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#2904

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#2905

Post by brokenface »

kongs_speech wrote: October 18th, 2021, 1:09 pm
Torgo wrote: October 18th, 2021, 1:06 pm It's possible that another thread will be bumped for this.
I would hope not. Powell was a good guy who stepped down when he found out the WMD thing was bullshit. They lied to him too. As someone who detests the Bush administration, I like and respect Colin Powell. Also, he was double vaccinated and still died, so that sucks.
He had myeloma and unfortunately those kind of blood cancers screw your immune system, which means vaccines will likely be much less effective.
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#2906

Post by blocho »

kongs_speech wrote: October 18th, 2021, 1:09 pm
Torgo wrote: October 18th, 2021, 1:06 pm It's possible that another thread will be bumped for this.
I would hope not. Powell was a good guy who stepped down when he found out the WMD thing was bullshit. They lied to him too. As someone who detests the Bush administration, I like and respect Colin Powell. Also, he was double vaccinated and still died, so that sucks.
I think it's a little more complicated. At the most crucial moment of his career, Powell made a choice. He did it under heavy pressure, but by his own account he went against his own judgment. It's a good reminder to all of us about doing the things which are right even when they're very difficult.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/maga ... q-war.html

Nor is it accurate to say he stepped down in protest. He remained in his office nearly two years after the invasion of Iraq. He only left because Bush told him he had to resign.

Still, Powell belongs in this thread because he lived a life of service, occasionally at considerable personal risk. Because he had good intentions. And because he's simply not comparable to the cretinous gnomes with which he occasionally served. But his legacy is complicated.
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#2907

Post by blocho »

Leslie Bricusse, 90

British songwriter with a long career in film. He wrote Feeling Good, which became a hit for Nina Simone, and all the songs for Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, including The Candy Man and Pure Imagination. He also provided the lyrics for the theme songs in two Bond movies, You Only Live Twice and ...

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#2908

Post by kongs_speech »

Halyna Hutchins, 42.

Cinematographer killed in a freak tragedy today on the set of the upcoming western Rust. Alec Baldwin was unknowingly handed a weapon with a live round. When he fired the gun for a scene, the bullet struck Hutchins and the film's director, Joel Souza. Souza is in emergency care.

Can't even imagine how Baldwin feels right now. A truly chilling scenario.
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#2909

Post by blocho »

Brandon Lee all over again. Sad and awful.
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#2910

Post by Torgo »

What the heck.
Sad.
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#2911

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

Why is this kind of shit still happening on movie sets…yikes. Crazy and sad.
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#2912

Post by pitchorneirda »

Unbelievable and shocking news
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#2913

Post by blocho »

George Butler, 78

British documentarian, probably best known for Pumping Iron, the movie that introduced Arnold Schwarzenegger to audiences beyond the body building community. For those who haven't seen it, Pumping Iron is very entertaining, but it's also a movie where a lot of the narrative was purposefully manufactured by the filmmakers.
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#2915

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

James Michael Tyler a.k.a. Gunther from "Friends", dead at 59 from prostate cancer

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#2916

Post by blocho »

Mort Sahl, 94

American comedian. I'm not personally familiar with his work, but I know he was one of the most successful stand-up comedians of the 50s and 60s.
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#2917

Post by Nathan Treadway »

Dean Stockwell :rip:
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#2918

Post by mightysparks »

Nathan Treadway wrote: November 9th, 2021, 8:28 am Dean Stockwell :rip:
:( Always enjoy his presence in film/TV... "died peacefully at home of natural causes" that's nice at least. :rip:
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#2919

Post by 3eyes »

Stockwell was just a baby - 9 months younger than me.

I most recently saw him in The Magic Garden, which enthralled my granddaughter. He was also in Wrong is Right, a little known (and very prescient) movie from the 80s which has long been a fave of mine.
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#2920

Post by St. Gloede »

Nathan Treadway wrote: November 9th, 2021, 8:28 am Dean Stockwell :rip:
I actually just started watching Quantum Leap as the post-Sunday family brunch/dinner show. He is undoubtedly the highlight. Sad news indeed.
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