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Which Films Did You See Last Week? [Week 36, 2022]

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Onderhond
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Which Films Did You See Last Week? [Week 36, 2022]

#1

Post by Onderhond »

First of all, a word from our founder:

"Please share with us which films you saw last week. It would be great if you could include some comments on each film. It would be awesome if you could also take some time to comment on everyone else's viewings. Please also note that this is intended as a movie discussion thread, not a large image posting thread. Having too many large images makes this thread difficult to navigate through. If you wish to include more than five images in a reply, please use spoiler tags - [ spoiler ][/ spoiler ] - to hide extra images." - sol

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01. 4.0* - Blazing Famiglia [Bakugyaku Famîria] by Kazuyoshi Kumakiri (2012)
Kumakiri's take on the Japanese brawler genre. He's a pretty good fit, placing his film somewhere between franchises like Crows Zero and more traditional gangster films. The visuals are pretty dark and gritty, the characters are slightly over-the-top yet remain grounded, and the drama is pleasant, without overpowering the crime and action elements. The start of the film is a little hectic, but once Kumakiri settles into his groove, there's a lot to love.

02. 4.0* - Aragami by Ryuhei Kitamura (2003)
Kitamura's entry in the Duel project. Aragami is a tricky film since it isn't inherently suited to the parameters of the project. A lot more weight rests on the shoulders of Kitamura, but that's no doubt what he was gunning for. A project to challenge himself. The build-up is meticulous, the setting kicks ass, and the ending is hilarious, even though it is somewhat of an in-joke. After revisiting both films, I'm still not really sure which one I prefer, but they're both equally strong examples of how to make a great film while working with strict limitations.

03. 3.5* - Veneciafrenia by Alex de la Iglesia (2021)
Álex de la Iglesia's latest. It's a bit surprising to see him move shop to Italy, but Venice is the perfect location for one of his slightly surreal, maximalist horror films. The premise and structure of the film are relatively simple and don't offer anything particularly new, but de la Iglesia's signature is definitely present. Five Spanish tourists have planned a trip to Venice. When they arrive, they find that the locals are tired of tourists destroying their city. They don't really care too much and go out in search of a party. They are invited to an exclusive club, but when they wake up the next morning, one of them is missing. The settings and costumes are superb, the performances are decent and the villains are pretty badass. The pacing is also on point, but there are few surprises here and even though the film is topical, it's not quite as original as I'd hoped. Veneciafrenia is a good horror flick and a fine addition to de la Iglesia's oeuvre, but not one of his best.

04. 3.5* - The Passenger [La Pasajera] by Raúl Cerezo, Fernando González Gómez (2021)
A fun, little horror/comedy, that delivers its punchlines with a pleasant smirk. The Passenger isn't doing anything new, but it is aware of its limitations and it exploits little details to make the film more distinct. It's a very smart solution to make a core genre film that doesn't immediately blend in with all the others. Blasco is a driver who takes people on joint trips. He owns a little minivan and loves a good chat, but the people making use of his services aren't too eager to join in. When Blasco discovers a crash site of a UFO one night, he and his passengers are in for a crazy ride, with a mad alien on the loose. The Spanish folk soundtrack, Blasco's bullfighter background, the slightly larger-than-life characters and the violent alien all add some spice to the mix. The effects can appear a little cheap and the comedy can't always mask that, but the pacing is solid, there's plenty of fun to be had and there are some pleasantly gory moments. Good fun.

05. 3.0* - Baby Assassins [Beibî Warukyûre] by Yugo Sakamoto (2021)
A fine premise, but the execution is a bit mediocre. I didn't have the highest expectations for this film, but I had hoped for something a tad more exciting. I understand the whole slacker/apathy angle, and the comedy that should come from it, but even that aspect wasn't entirely convincing. Chisato and Mahilo are two seemingly normal high school students. They also happen to be two very skilled assassins. They are both very good at their job, but when their boss orders them to live in the same apartment, things quickly go sour and their personal and professional relationship starts to suffer. The action scenes are merely decent, most of the film is spent on banter between the two girls, contrasted with their crazy "jobs". It's just not extreme or pure enough to make much of an impact. It's a bit too jolly for a true slacker comedy, a bit too tame from a crazy action flick. Still fun, but should've been better.

06. 3.0* - Shaolin Conquering Demons by Bo Zhang (2020)
The Chinese streamer films are slowly but surely getting longer, edging closer to the 90-minute mark. In a way that might give them a bit more validity, on the other hand, they are losing some of their biggest perks. What used to feel very trimmed and to the point, now gets padding that doesn't really add much to the overall quality of the film. The stories are still as basic as ever. Through some odd coincidence, a demon is awakened that will come to threaten the whole of humanity. A monk is sent out to fix the problem, looking for an arhat who holds the key to the protection of the human race. He takes his assignment very seriously but might be forgetting about some of the other important things in life, namely the love of an old friend. The extra comedy bits (mostly at the beginning of the film) are pretty terrible, the added drama isn't all that great either. The fantasy and action scenes on the other hand are on point. The CG too is pretty solid, especially considering the limited means these films are made with. I'm not a fan of the added runtime, but that was always going to be a matter of time. Other than that, amusing filler.

07. 3.0* - Muriel's Wedding by P.J. Hogan (1994)
A pretty solid Australian rom-com. There are some offkey dramatic moments that felt a little out of place, but for the most part, the film is pretty funny, without having to resort to overly simplistic gags and obvious plot twists. That's not to say the film is wildly original, but it's certainly above-average genre fare. Muriel is an outcast living in Porpoise Spit. None of her so-called friends like her, her family looks down on her and all she cares about is listening to ABBA and getting married. She turns her life around and elopes, moving to Sydney to start her life anew. But taking on a new identity doesn't change who she is on the inside. Toni Collette was surprisingly funny, the supporting cast is pretty solid too, the plot isn't too conventional and the pacing was on point. It's not an incredibly memorable film and I'm sure it'll feel like you've seen it all before, but as rom-coms go, it's one of the more palatable ones.

08. 3.0* - The Assistant by Kitty Green (2019)
A rather dry and singular look at the entertainment industry. I hadn't really heard of the film before, but after seeing it, it was clear where The Assistant got its reputation from. In the wake of the first #metoo wave, and with the revelations of Harvey Weinstein fresh in people's minds, a film like this was always going to do well. It could've been better though. Jane is a young and aspiring producer, who lands her dream job as an assistant of a famous media mogul. Less than two months in, her idea of this world has changed completely. Her boss has no respect for her, her colleagues don't give her a second look and she suspects abuse of power from the top down. Only, there is no one she can turn to. The dry presentation is okay and works well for the most part, but it isn't quite as polished as it could've been. The performances are good and the pacing didn't bother me either, it's just that the message felt a bit simple and poorly presented. A slight disconnect with the main character left me pondering why she put up with the terrible working conditions. Solid, but somewhat forgettable.

09. 2.5* - Blue Ruin by Jeremy Saulnier (2013)
Decent, but somewhat tepid and simple revenge flick. Blue Ruin is very much a film of its time, bringing a slight indie/arthouse aesthetic to an otherwise straightforward genre premise. Sometimes this juxtaposition of styles can strengthen each other, most of the time they just cause unnecessary friction. The latter seems to be the case here. Dwight saw his parents brutally murdered. The killer was apprehended and sent to jail, but Dwight never really forgave him. When years later Dwight hears his parents' murderer is released before his sentence is completed, he plans a revenge mission. Dwight will not only have to become a killer himself, but he also has to accept that he'll be continuing the cycle of hate and violence. Conversation is slight and the film is more show than tell. That's usually a good thing, but the presentation felt a little too bland and sloppy to pull that off effectively. There are some decent twists and the performances aren't bad either, there just wasn't quite enough here to turn this into a riveting, gritty yet grounded revenge flick, which was clearly the goal.

10. 2.5* - True Fiction by Braden Croft (2019)
A basic thriller with minor horror elements. The biggest problem with True Fiction is that it fails to enthrall in any way. The premise is decent enough, but writer/director Croft never takes it anywhere interesting. The lead performances are pretty dim and the mystery is simply too predictable. Avery is a young, aspiring writer who lands her dream job. She is chosen to become the new assistant of her favorite writer. The job has some peculiarities though, as she is shipped to a remote house in the mountains where they'll write his latest masterpiece in complete isolation. And that's just the beginning. The mind games between the writer and Avery are a little simplistic, neither of the characters comes off very cunning, nor are they menacing when they need to be. And Croft's direction feels rather tepid and uninspired. It's decent enough filler, but it's a film that either lacks ambition or talent to make it stand out.

11. 2.5* - Good Time by Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie (2017)
One of the films that solidified the Safdie brothers' reputation. I'm not the biggest fan of their work, nor am I too impressed with the whole A24 hype, but their influence is hard to ignore, and they rarely make terrible films. Good Time fits in well with their catalogue in other words. Two brothers mess up a bank robbery. The police are on their tail, so they have no option but to flee. Connie manages to escape, Nick is apprehended by the cops. But Connie won't leave his brother behind. He goes by his girlfriend, hoping to convince her to help him gather the money to bail his brother out. My biggest problem with the Safdie brothers is that their sense of anxiety doesn't really translate for me. The cinematography is decent, the score not too bad, and the plot amusing (but predictable), it's just not enough to get me on the edge of my seat. Good Time is okay, but also pretty forgettable.

12. 2.0* - Mr. Zhao [Zhao Xiansheng] by Yue Lü (1998)
An extremely simple relationship drama. I kind of get why this might have been considered an important film at the time, as it's a big shift from the cinema China was known for (the Sixth Generation). Then again, there are older, slicker, and more influential films much better fitted to stand the test of time. This one just doesn't have a whole lot going for it. Mr. Zhao is your typical male, middle-aged cliche. He has a wife and kid at home, but he also has a mistress who ends up pregnant. His wife finds out about his affair, but Zhao is unsure of what to do next. He doesn't want to leave the comfort of his old relationship but won't ditch the passion he finds with his new fling either. And so he strings the two women along. The cinematic qualities here are few and far between. Static and sloppy shots dictate the visual language, the soundtrack is completely absent, and the drama is just too primitive and dull to actively care about. The performances are decent though, which is something. Just not enough to give this film the dramatic impact it needed.

13. 1.5* - Pinocchio by Robert Zemeckis (2022)
A pointless "live-action" remake of Disney's Pinocchio. Most of the film is CG though, even when you have some human actors running across the screen from time to time. Zemeckis remained close to Disney's original cartoon, which means it's a very safe take on the story, with some familiar songs thrown in for good measure. The plot should be familiar to most, unless you're either very young or a complete fairy tale hater. Geppetto carves a wooden boy and wishes for it to become human. A fairy grants him his wish, but before Pinocchio can become a true human, he'll have to prove his worth. Together with Jiminy Cricket, he starts his big adventure. In the end, this felt like a very lazy remake. Zemeckis doesn't even make an effort to create something unique or special. The accents were horrible, the actors did poor jobs, the CG was lackluster and the music was bland. At least we have del Toro's take on Pinocchio to look forward to, no doubt it'll be at least twice as interesting as this one.

14. 1.5* - The Regeneration by Raoul Walsh (1915)
One of the earliest gangster films. I will say that genres had smaller impacts back in the days of silent cinema. It's more about the narratives and characters than it is about typical cinematic elements, which makes it less interesting. But Walsh's film has something to offer for fans of crime cinema. Owen Conway is orphaned at a young age and can't escape the world of crime. He finds a home with his neighbors for a short while, but ends up on the streets, and leads a street gang by the age of 25. But then he meets Marie, falls in love, and wants to leave his life of crime behind. There are some decent action scenes and the cinematography has its moments. The plot is very basic though and the characters are extremely one-dimensional. Luckily the film is pretty short and the pacing is solid, so it never gets too boring, but don't expect the world from this film.

15. 1.5* - Police Academy 5: Assignment: Miami Beach by Alan Myerson (1988)
The fifth in the series, and it's obvious that we've come to a point where it's just cranking out 90 minutes of cinema with familiar characters. The story is ever so slim, the new characters don't really add much to the whole, and the old characters are just repeating their little gimmicks. Lassard is set to retire, but before that moment he'll be honored by the academy. Everyone is invited to Miami, where the ceremony will take place. But Lassard finds himself in the middle of a kidnapping, without him realizing what is going on. The policemen will have to do their best to save their boss one last time. -The comedy is really childish (the crooks, in particular, are indefensible), the actors look a little bored and the plot is just plain terrible. The most surprising thing about part 5 is that they still managed to make two more films after this, meaning back then there was an audience eagerly looking out for new Police Academy films. Not good.

16. 1.0* - Licorice Pizza by Paul Thomas Anderson (2021)
So while most of the world is moving on from 80s to 90s nostalgia, Paul Thomas Anderson comes with his ode to the 70s. As someone with little interest in nostalgia, even less so in the 70s, I figured this wasn't really going to be a film for me. What I didn't expect was such a flat and lifeless film. When Gary first sees Alana, he's immediately smitten. Gary's a smooth talker, but Alana doesn't really trust him right away. Even so, they become good friends and spend most of their time together. Gary tries to make it as an actor, while Alana is more interested in politics and changing the world. The 70s vibe is on point, seeing as how I didn't like it all. I also didn't care much for the romance between Gary and Alana, and with that, it became painfully clear that this film has very little to offer. PTA's playfulness is completely absent, the cinematography and score are utterly boring, the plot meandering and stretched thin. One of his worst.

17. 1.0* - The Big Clock by John Farrow (1948)
A somewhat lighter, jollier noir film. If that sounds a little nonsensical, it's because it is. The film seems a little unsure of what direction to take, and ends up a mess of two conflicting halves that never quite come together. In a way, it's a nice diversion on my journey of stereotypical noirs, but it doesn't really make for a better film. Earl is the CEO of a big publishing company. When he kills his girlfriend in a jealous fit, he panics. He calls on George, an editor of a crime magazine, and commands him to investigate the case. What George doesn't know is that Earl is planning to shift the blame to him, and make him the scapegoat. The plot and cinematography are typical noir elements, the soundtrack and performances give it a softer, almost comedic edge. It's still extremely dialogue-heavy though, and the simple plot and sluggish pacing don't do the film any favors. Noir fans probably won't mind, I just don't really care for it.

18. 1.0* - The Bridge [Die Brücke] by Bernhard Wicki (1959)
The atrocities of war. The Bridge is a German take on WWII, sadly it offers little beyond a rather static and predictable anti-war message, spread thin over the course of the film. Unless you're someone who somehow glorifies war, it's difficult to imagine this film being an eye-opener. And then it just comes down to the styling. Close to the end of WWII, few German troops remain. In a desperate attempt to turn the tables, teens are gathered to join the army and sent on pointless missions. One group is assigned to safeguard a bridge, in the hope to stop the invasion of Germany. A crazy mission with only one possible outcome. The stark black and white cinematography feels dead and empty, the performances are not very natural and the message of the film isn't exactly subtle. If you like minimalist classics with straightforward morality then this could very well be a film for you, I can't say it managed to grab me at any point.

19. 1.0* - I Know Where I'm Going! by Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger (1945)
Classic Powell & Pressburger. So far I haven't really cared for their films (even though they seem to be universally praised), I Know Where I'm Going didn't do much to change my mind. It's classic drama/romance cinema, meaning it's about as subtle as a sledgehammer. At least it was rather short. Joan Webster is about to marry the wealthy Robert Bellinger, who is quite a bit older than her. Their wedding will be on Kiloran, a little Scottish island. On her way there, she hits a patch of bad weather and ends up stranded on a different island. There, she meets Torquil MacNeil, a young and handsome man. The performances are overstated, the romance is predictable (and not exactly smoldering), and the British atmosphere is mostly just static and clunky. Towards the end, there were some decent shots, but otherwise, this was a dull and predictable classic, much like the other films I've seen from them.
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Torgo
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#2

Post by Torgo »

Onderhond wrote: September 11th, 2022, 8:06 am 11. 2.5* - Good Time by Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie (2017)
(...) My biggest problem with the Safdie brothers is that their sense of anxiety doesn't really translate for me. The cinematography is decent, the score not too bad,
Huh. What a bummer. I'm already a Oneohtrix fan in general, the fusion with the Safdies' hyper-nervous films is near-heaven for me and this was were I finally began to love Pattinson. Uncut Gems wouldn't go above 3 for you, huh? Both should actually have the prerequisites to make 3.5 in your book. Seems like me and the other A24 boys will have to push them in our polls then :shifty:


In the meantime, I haven't given up .. not yet.

Rudy (1993) (6,5/10)
Deewaar (1975) (6,5/10)
Guide (1965) (7/10)
Top Gun: Maverick (2022) (8/10)
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Onderhond
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#3

Post by Onderhond »

Torgo wrote: September 11th, 2022, 1:22 pm Huh. What a bummer. I'm already a Oneohtrix fan in general, the fusion with the Safdies' hyper-nervous films is near-heaven for me and this was were I finally began to love Pattinson. Uncut Gems wouldn't go above 3 for you, huh? Both should actually have the prerequisites to make 3.5 in your book. Seems like me and the other A24 boys will have to push them in our polls then :shifty:
I'm not familiar with Oneohtrix, but I found the score a pretty mixed bag. Some nice music, but not applied very well. And like I said, I don't really get hyper-nervous from their films, maybe because I'm conflating that too much with "frantic", which their films aren't imo.

I have Uncut Gems at 2.0*, so slightly worse than Good Times.
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Perception de Ambiguity
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#4

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

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헤어질 결심 / Decision to Leave (2022, 박찬욱/Chan-wook Park) 7+

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Shutter Island (2010, Martin Scorsese) (4th viewing) 8

The flow of images has a poetry to it while at the same time they are intentionally fragmented to create the frame of mind of its protagonist. The images from one cut to the next often don't quite join together, they are just a little bit off, like when in a jigsaw puzzle you can physically put two pieces together and they even look like they might belong together, so you get a little dopamine rush, but then you test the cohesion of the joined pieces a little bit and the construct just seems a little bit too wobbly to be the correct solution. How frustrating. Perhaps this fragmented nature of how the images fit together in this film is the very thing that does give the construct its poetry, but only if you don't get frustrated because you expect it to build a structure with a solid ground that you can walk on once when it's finished.

Under it's awfully obvious surface that deals with a detective, who is noticeably unhinged from the very beginning, trying to solve the case of a missing person at a mental hospital (can you guess the twist!!!?) 'Shutter Island' is something of a treatise on insanity in the elements it uses to tell its story, with all the tried and tested insights and truisms on the subject packed into one compact, stylish whole. But deeper down I think it's not so much about insanity or about any particular mental disorder than it is about how we all for a significant amount of time on any given day live in our own heads, and how those thinking patterns, as we become evermore self-obsessed, could easily be classified as insane by any observer who was privy to those thoughts, should he have an incentive to do so.

We keep questioning our environment and how we as an individual fit into it. We try to match one with the other, us with society. We know that society is a conglomerate of individuals but any one of those individuals will always be one thing and you will always be another thing. It's difficult to see them not as "They" and "The Other", or to see another I with the same eyes as the I of the self.
There is an ever-existing tension between maintaining an individualistic sense of self and succumbing to any whim of what society throws at you. A healthy human being - that is a human being who is an individual embracing their idiosyncrasies on one hand, and on the other hand a human being who is or at least has the appearance of being a valuable member to society - remains active in the struggle to keep a certain balance between those two poles. And so both the individual and their role in a functioning society are taken care of, and it might just mean that both are equally as fucked up, which seems to work well enough, at least in our modern times.

But what happens if one runs away with those thinking patterns that try to hold on to a rigid individualistic point of view of what is real? Everyone becomes a liar, an agent, an actor, and everything becomes a plot, the world against you. When in actuality you lie to yourself a little bit too much, and you create your own plot, and you fight against yourself. It's the thrilling world of "they are out to get us" conspiracies that we create out of our mundane reality to make that monotonous, boring and sad existence a livable one. If you are lucky enough you realize in time that you got stuck in a loop and that you need the proverbial "reality check" to break out of the insanity, in which case "reality" is defined as what society or particular authorities call truth at a particular point in time, because whether you like it or not, and for better or worse, we need each other, and we have to find ways to get along with each other, cuz, like, no man is an island.

The story uses the lighthouse as a symbol that shines a light, a beacon that tells what is important, what is to be deemed real. It's the place where in the case of failure to be socially functional a person is to be proverbially lobotomized in order for people to get along with each other. And so, like, Scorsese tells us that we must not get a shut-in to the island of the self, or something.


shorts

くず / Kuku / Junk (1962, 飯村隆彦/Takahiko Iimura) 7-

愛 / Ai / Love (1962, 飯村隆彦/Takahiko Iimura) 8-

視姦について / On Eye Rape (1962, 飯村隆彦/Takahiko Iimura) 6+

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石の歌 / The Song of Stone (1963, 松本俊夫/Toshio Matsumoto) (2nd viewing) 8+
Maybe the liveliest motion picture that is still contemplative that I have seen which is composed from still pictures/photographs, which is appropriate considering that it is all about stone that is carved so skillfully that it appears to be alive.


series

Begin Japanology - S03E01 - Sentou / Sentō (銭湯; Public Bath House) (2010) 7


music videos (only the good ones and the ones not on IMDb)

Lana Del Rey: Video Games (2011, Lana Del Rey) (2nd viewing) [from 6 >] 7+


other / podcasts

Dan Carlin: Hardcore History | Lex Fridman Podcast #136 woOt
«...it has to do with a story about the 1960's. In the vast scheme of things the 1960's looks like a revival of neo-romantic ideas, right? I had a buddy... [...] ..and we were talking about it and I was romanticizing it. And he said, "Don't romanticize it. Let me tell you, most of the people that went to those protests and did all those things. All they were there [for] was to meet girls and have a good time. You know, it wasn't...; BUT, it became en vogue..." In other words; let's talk about your "empathy and love"... You're never gonna - in my opinion - grab that great mass of people that are only in it if for the interest in whatever. But if meeting girls for a young teenage guy requires you to feign empathy, requires you to read deeper subjects because that's what people are into, you can almost, as a silly way to be trendy, you can make maybe empathy trendy, love trendy, solutions that are the opposite of that, the kind of things that people inherently will not put up with. In other words, the possibility exists to change the Zeitgeist and reorient it in a way that even if most of the people aren't serious about it, the results are the same.»
- Dan Carlin

KILL TONY #573 - JOE ROGAN

The Joe Rogan Experience - #1867 Eddie Bravo (2022) 6
The Joe Rogan Experience - #328 Dan Carlin (2013) 6
The Joe Rogan Experience - #436 Stefan Molyneux (2014) 6
«If you drug a ballerina, you get a weird show.»

The Joe Rogan Experience - #528 Michael Stevens, from VSause (2014) 8
The Joe Rogan Experience - #599 Shane Smith (2015) 7
«Life is like a shit sandwich, the more bread you have the less shit you eat.»
- Shane Smith's dad

The Video Archives Podcast with Quentin Tarantino and Roger Avery - After Show 04: Revisiting Dirty Hands (2022) 5


notable online media

next level:
What is Random? [by Vsauce]
What is NOT Random? [by Veritasium]
top:
Marlon Brando Interview with Connie Chung, Sept. 1989, Complete [rewatch]
RARE Marlon Brando Interview on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson - 05/11/1968
How do you know that you know what you know? [by Up and Atom]
Lana Del Rey's Best Live Vocals
Lana Del Rey - Old Money [by Mireia]
World's Highest Jumping Robot
Marc Maron - Brain Cancer - This Is Not Happening - Uncensored
rest:
Why Tarantino Will Only Make 10 Movies [by Nerdwriter1]
Elon Musk and Joe Rogan get a cartoon [rewatch]
Joe Rogan Interviews a Chimp
the dreams on television this week
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We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
LETTERBOXD | MUBI | IMDb | tumblr.
vortexsurfer
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#5

Post by vortexsurfer »

3022 (John Suits, 2019) - 5/10
Errementari: The Blacksmith and the Devil (Paul Urkijo, 2017) - 7.5/10
Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes (Junta Yamaguchi, 2020) - 9/10
Silent Night (Camille Griffin, 2021) - 8/10
Uncharted (Ruben Fleischer, 2022) - 4/10
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (Don Siegel, 1956) - 8/10
Seven Samurai (Akira Kurosawa, 1954) 7/10 (rewatch)
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Minkin
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#6

Post by Minkin »

Welcome back to the weekly corner, vortexsurfer, we're a lively but dedicated crew here.

Didn't end up watching very much this week - just one film, but I ended up having a rather good week. This is despite everyone thinking the roof would fall down because I went back to half my one medication, despite having lived like this for two years already - which started off rocky, but has so far been ok, and much better than dealing with side effects, which again - fuck akathisia. Probably won't watch too much more next/this week either, but we'll see.
Highlights of the Past Week in my meager existence
-Go swimming for the first time this summer. Pool was 92 degrees just via how hot it had gotten here, and that was at like 9 at night
-Got to like 112 degrees here, but stayed in cooled comfort rather than brave the weather
-Partner's still reading Fried Green Tomatoes and was in a Fried Green Tomatoes style dinner mood, so we have a happy Labor Day fried chicken dinner
-I think my mom is addicted to peach milkshakes now... what have I wrought
-Had my first experience with a benzo, which I'm prescribed for akathisia... and it did nothing for that, sigh - didn't even help with mania
-See a pulmonologist - thinks my exercise induced throat spasms are a vocal cord thing, so Im being passed along to another Dr, but am prescribed an inhaler to see if that does anything.
-It rains for the first time in like 6 months thanks to a hurricane off of Mexico
-Had a wild night where we organized my partner's closet for 6 hours, then made gnocchi, then got our favorite donuts at our favorite donut place at 3AM, then tried Del Taco for the first time in years, then drove by a converted mental hospital (now a university), and made friends with a family of Raccoons living in a sewer drain at 6AM. It was fantastic.
Star Trek: First Contact (1996) - Montana / Arizona - Rating: 5/10
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The Star Trek The Next Generation crew are back (including Worf on loan from DS9), and they’re fighting the Borg again, this time in the Earth’s past – on the precipice of human’s first contact with the Vulcans. This is largely a story about the characters pursuing their humanness. Data is of course still chasing after whatever brings him closer to being a human. The Borg Queen is pursuing essentially the same – striving for perfection but just wanting to have a human partner to compliment the sum of her experiences – which in the end just makes it sound like she wants someone to find her pretty. Then there’s the warp drive inventor – afraid of his own celebrity, and just wanting to be left alone with his flaws rather than deified into an ideal of perfection. Finally there’s Picard – endangering everyone by letting revenge cloud his judgement, which feels off for his character here, but he’s compared to Ahab even, so he’s letting his emotions get in the way of his duties. The sum total of these four character’s experiences is that they all cherish and struggle with their flaws and what makes them unique. They see what they’re missing and realize it’s ultimately this pursuit for humanness – for the chase towards betterment whilst acknowledging that they’ll never be perfect, except for in legends. Whilst they’re all striving for something that’s unattainable, perhaps that yearning and pursuit is what brings out their quintessential humanity. Anyway, once again this suffers the same problems that all the Trek films have – they’re all several magnitudes more actiony than any of the episodes ever are – which just makes me think they’re only trying to appeal to non-Star-Trek-fans, and that’s incredibly disappointing. Still though, it manages at least some hints here and there of what makes the series quite what it is, though quite low on technobabble this round.
Cinema Safari (Currently working on Inyo County, CA + Zimbabwe upgrade) Help recommend me movies to watch) Letterboxd
She has an illusion, and you have reality. May you find your way as pleasant.
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Silga
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Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
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#7

Post by Silga »

My last week:

The Little Hours (Jeff Baena, 2017) 8/10 (re-watch)
22 Bullets (Richard Berry, 2010) 6/10
Everything Must Go (Dan Rush, 2010) 6/10
Dead Man's Folly (Clive Donner, 1986) 5/10
The Losers (Sylvain White, 2010) 4/10

What a joyful re-watch of The Little Hours. A small gem of a comedy!

Plus re-watched the first episode of Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey on TV. Still great.
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Torgo
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Joined: June 30th, 2011, 6:00 am
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#8

Post by Torgo »

Such a pleasure to see so many new (and yet known) faces.
This thread is ALIVE, our tradition UNKILLABLE!
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