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Any interest in the Venice Film Festival?

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cinewest
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Any interest in the Venice Film Festival?

#1

Post by cinewest »

I've marked a bunch from this festival to keep an eye on, and so far Bardo (Inarritu's latest) has made the biggest cannonball, to a point it seems, that it has sunk from the weight of its own bombastic splash. Still want to see it though, and here's the best review I've read by someone whose take on the director's work I pretty much agree with:

"It can be quite a spectacle when critics smell blood in the water, particularly if the one doing the bleeding is one of those artists they (we) love to hate. And so it seems to be the case with Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu, the much-garlanded director of Birdman and The Revenant, who came to Venice with the Netflix-financed, much-hyped, and achingly sincere Bardo (or a False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths), only to receive something of a drubbing.

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Iñárritu makes for a particularly rich target for critics because he makes movies with grand intentions, where the greatness sometimes seems to announce itself long before the film starts. To some, that sense of greatness is unearned. And I get it. The Iñárritu Wars play out regularly in my own head: I loved Amores Perros and Birdman, but I detested 21 Grams and Babel. I liked Biutiful, but The Revenant felt to me like a movie filmed by a genius and edited by someone who was told a few too many times that he was a genius. (I still maintain that there’s a good film in there somewhere.)

Bardo is a surreal, semi-autobiographical fantasy-drama about Silverio (Daniel Giménez Cacho), a Mexican journalist and documentarian who left home years ago and has carved out a career for himself in California. He’s about to receive a prestigious prize from a U.S. journalism association, but he is filled with guilt. Guilt over accusations that he “kisses the gringos’ asses.” Guilt over criticisms that his work is self-centered, indulgent. Guilt over his bourgeois lifestyle, his out-of-touchness with the common people. Guilt over the fact that he’s never there for his family. Silverio’s crises also play out against news reports that the U.S. government is laying the groundwork for Amazon to buy the Mexican state of Baja California. Has he somehow been complicit in setting the stage for such a capitalist calamity?

A lot of critics aren’t buying all this introspection. “[T]he thing that most readily identifies Bardo as an Iñárritu movie is the virtuosic way it adopts greatness as a genre instead of earning it as a reward. Here is another magnum opus that’s eager to suffocate you with the same air of significance that Iñárritu has sewn into his previous work,” writes David Ehrlich at Indiewire. “Iñárritu has cooked up a personal epic of the most exhaustingly swaggery type, man-spread across three hours of screen time during which flashes of genuine, startling brilliance occasionally manage to push their way through the strenuously zany macho-visionary fug,” writes Robbie Collin at the Telegraph. “Bardo is a film high on its own supply yet low on any sense of actual intrigue or intuition. For the filmmaker, he’s breathing in his own narcissism. The audience? They’re breathing in his exhaust fumes,” writes Marshall Shaffer at Slashfilm. Those are the reviews; the on-the-ground buzz has in some cases been even more brutal.

Not everybody hated the 174-minute film, though. Carlos Aguilar at The Wrap declared Bardo a masterpiece, and was clearly moved by its labyrinthine self-interrogation and the way it explored Iñárritu’s thorny relationship with Mexico. “In Silverio’s complicated bond with his motherland, one can witness Iñárritu’s desire to acknowledge his own distance to it, geographically and emotionally,” Aguilar writes. “From afar, as many immigrants can attest to, our yearning to belong often manifests in patriotic sentiments. Nobody is prouder of being Mexican than a Mexican outside of Mexico, by choice or need.” It will indeed be interesting to see how Bardo is received as it is seen by more people, and in particular how it will be received in Mexico and among Mexican-Americans.

What’s interesting about Bardo is that, at least on the film’s surface, Iñárritu seems to have already taken many of the aforementioned criticisms to heart. The movie is filled with self-loathing, but it’s an arty kind of self-loathing, with extended scenes of Silverio’s shadow bouncing across the desert, Silverio drifting into surreal visions out of Mexican history and scenes from his own life. Honestly, on paper, it sounds like the kind of thing I would love. I have a soft spot for narratives of immigration and assimilation and the bizarre connection between alienation from, and adoration for, one’s homeland. But I must admit that I really did not care for Bardo. It has some of the same problems as The Revenant, in that Iñárritu can’t seem to let any idea go, and any interesting or exciting vision he presents us with has to be extended, and repeated, and shown from multiple angles, just in case we somehow missed its brilliance the first time. But it’s more than that. Without a central story, the film fails to breathe or move. Iñárritu has a flair for the cinematic, for bold and striking images, but he is not an experimental filmmaker. He doesn’t have that kind of deft touch, that willingness to throw ideas at the wall, see what sticks, and — most importantly — move on.

I was actually shocked at how cold Bardo left me. The film opens with a bizarre scene of childbirth, wherein the baby says the world is too fucked up and asks to be inserted back into his mother. It’s a bitter, funny little gag, but as the movie proceeds we realize that this story was how Silverio and his wife were able to come to terms with the death of a newborn. That’s a devastating idea. So why doesn’t it work? I think it might be because the film, even though it’s filled with people, has almost no characters. Everyone, including Silverio’s wife and his other two kids, seems to be there to reflect him. Silverio himself is a character, of course, but within the mad maze of his self-regard (of which his self-loathing is merely just an extension), nothing feels real or concrete. Not even his lost child.

Many have noted that Bardo consciously evokes Federico Fellini’s similarly surreal and semi-autobiographical masterpiece 8 ½. It also recalls Ingmar Bergman’s classic journey into memory, Wild Strawberries. One could go down the great names of film history and find any number of Capital-A Auteurs who made extended, allegedly indulgent tone poems about their lives: Theo Angelopoulos, Terrence Malick, Andrei Tarkovsky, Alfonso Cuarón, and so on. But the two pictures I kept thinking of were Dennis Hopper’s much-maligned, coke-fueled, career-ending acid-western The Last Movie (a film I personally love), and Iñárritu’s own Birdman, which is also an episodic and absurdist picture driven by self-doubt, but one that is a lot more compelling, perhaps partly because it’s more removed from the director’s own reality. (Birdman also has, like, characters, and a story.)

The scene in Bardo that most specifically reminds one of Birdman is one where a journalist pal of his lays into Silverio, telling him he couldn’t check his ego, that he turned everything into an objective correlative of his own life. (“You used historical figures to talk about yourself!”) A lot of critics saw the similar scene in Birdman as a declaration of war by Iñárritu, but it’s probably my favorite sequence from that movie, because it so accurately dissects the character of Michael Keaton’s Riggan Thompson and his whole theatrical project; it crystallizes his self-doubt. In Birdman, these criticisms are arguably refuted by the protagonist’s ultimate achievement, so that the scene becomes about the need to work through one’s doubts to achieve something meaningful. But Bardo’s critic doesn’t get such a touching comeuppance. One suspects that Iñárritu, for all the self-flagellation he’s doing in this movie, still kind of thinks the people who dare to criticize him are assholes. For some of those critics, the feeling appears to be mutual."
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#2

Post by Onderhond »

I'm just wondering who those people are who give minutes-long standing ovations. For a freaking film.
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#3

Post by OldAle1 »

Interesting review there on Bardo. My take on Iñárritu is I guess similar to many in the "mixed" camp - I've loved one film (Birdman), liked one with many reservations (The Revenant) and mostly disliked the other two I've seen (Amores perros and Babel). He certainly seems a blunt, self-indulgent filmmaker-in-the-making even in those films, so the reception for the new one doesn't feel surprising. And while there are plenty of self-indulgent pieces of cinematic onanism that I actually like, I'm not sure 3 hours of this director is something I'd go out of my way for.

Next!
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#4

Post by blocho »

Onderhond wrote: September 7th, 2022, 8:53 pm I'm just wondering who those people are who give minutes-long standing ovations. For a freaking film.
It's weird film festival behavior. I feel like I've read literally hundreds of reports of random movies getting a 11-minute standing ovation at Cannes. I wonder whether it's purposeful, in the sense that's it a PR stunt to build hype.

The one time I saw it in person was when I saw The Wrestler (2008) premiere are the New York Film Festival. The level of self-admiration and self-congratulation on display went beyond conceited and landed somewhere in the realm of delusional. People acted like Aronofsky had just cured cancer or something.
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#5

Post by kongs_speech »

Blonde is polarizing but has plenty of critics labeling it a masterpiece. I know I'm going to be blown away by it. I read the Deadline review, and it sounds like Dominik and De Armas delivered everything I could want.
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#6

Post by Ivan0716 »

Just saw Blonde, Best Actress is locked in.
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#7

Post by cinewest »

blocho wrote: September 8th, 2022, 2:53 pm
Onderhond wrote: September 7th, 2022, 8:53 pm I'm just wondering who those people are who give minutes-long standing ovations. For a freaking film.
It's weird film festival behavior. I feel like I've read literally hundreds of reports of random movies getting a 11-minute standing ovation at Cannes. I wonder whether it's purposeful, in the sense that's it a PR stunt to build hype.

The one time I saw it in person was when I saw The Wrestler (2008) premiere are the New York Film Festival. The level of self-admiration and self-congratulation on display went beyond conceited and landed somewhere in the realm of delusional. People acted like Aronofsky had just cured cancer or something.
Film Festivals are special events that not only honor filmmakers with lifetime achievement awards, as well as spotlight various other people connected to the industry, in addition to particular films for some reason (I have seen several older films that have been remastered like Marketa Lazarova, for example), but more to your comment, they are events where new films are given their first public exposure, which makes their unveilings more like Broadway premiers or Art openings at a museum. Different films draw different crowds, who are often emotionally invested in a film for some reason at the outset, if only due to some kind of anticipation that is either satisfied , or not, by the film. Film Festivals are also events that encourage public response, and all of this can lead not only to cheers, but jeers at the end.

Personally, I enjoy seeing or being part of a passionate response to a film, even when I disagree with the overwhelming sentiment (I have been more disturbed by the jeers than the cheers, especially with films that dared to be different and simply upset people because expectations were confounded).

My favorite such memory was the standing ovation given to remastered screening of Days and Nights in the Forest by Satyajit Ray where I felt as enriched as everyone else by having the opportunity to witness such a great (previously lost) film in all its visual glory. This screening actually wasn't;t at a film festival, but special film events have a way of creating an aura or luster in advance that enlarges the film as much as the public response.
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#8

Post by Torgo »

blocho wrote: September 8th, 2022, 2:53 pm
Onderhond wrote: September 7th, 2022, 8:53 pm I'm just wondering who those people are who give minutes-long standing ovations. For a freaking film.
It's weird film festival behavior. I feel like I've read literally hundreds of reports of random movies getting a 11-minute standing ovation at Cannes. I wonder whether it's purposeful, in the sense that's it a PR stunt to build hype.
Hehe, just read a string of replies in this Reddit thread where users also wondered about people applauding for 10 minutes - for SO MANY films, according to (film) news outlets ..: https://www.reddit.com/r/entertainment/ ... t/inmz44e/

And then take a look at this if you want to have an idea what it's like - pure hell:




:satstunned:
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#9

Post by cinewest »

Torgo wrote: September 9th, 2022, 1:20 am
blocho wrote: September 8th, 2022, 2:53 pm
Onderhond wrote: September 7th, 2022, 8:53 pm I'm just wondering who those people are who give minutes-long standing ovations. For a freaking film.
It's weird film festival behavior. I feel like I've read literally hundreds of reports of random movies getting a 11-minute standing ovation at Cannes. I wonder whether it's purposeful, in the sense that's it a PR stunt to build hype.
Hehe, just read a string of replies in this Reddit thread where users also wondered about people applauding for 10 minutes - for SO MANY films, according to (film) news outlets ..: https://www.reddit.com/r/entertainment/ ... t/inmz44e/

And then take a look at this if you want to have an idea what it's like - pure hell:




:satstunned:
Maybe if I went to a few of these events my stance would change. I might even become "a hater." Just about every intolerance I have is the result of having to put up with the same Sh_t for far too long.
Last edited by cinewest on September 9th, 2022, 1:29 am, edited 2 times in total.
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#10

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Double Dutch
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#11

Post by blocho »

Torgo wrote: September 9th, 2022, 1:20 am Hehe, just read a string of replies in this Reddit thread where users also wondered about people applauding for 10 minutes - for SO MANY films, according to (film) news outlets ..: https://www.reddit.com/r/entertainment/ ... t/inmz44e/
Those comments are great. This is my favorite one:

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#12

Post by Ivan0716 »

Standing ovations are pretty common in most live events (performance arts, sports etc.), it can even be argued that these big festival premieres are a special case since almost everyone who attend them are involved in the film industry in one way or another. Not sure why anyone would have a problem with other people showing their appreciation for those involved in the project. It’s not like they bar the exits and force you to partake, if you don’t want to then just leave.
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#13

Post by Onderhond »

Ivan0716 wrote: September 9th, 2022, 11:44 am Not sure why anyone would have a problem with other people showing their appreciation for those involved in the project. It’s not like they bar the exits and force you to partake, if you don’t want to then just leave.
The thing is that these days, when one of the big three fests is going on, my FB/Twitter morphs into an endless stream of standing ovation post. A four-minute standing ovation means it's an okay film, but a little lackluster. Unless you're reaching the 10-minute mark, you probably didn't do that much of a good job.

Which is insane, who gives a 10-minute applause? It just feels fake at this point, something that is required rather than earned. It's not that I mind a standing ovation, but not as part of some etiquette/ad campaign.
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#14

Post by blocho »

Ivan0716 wrote: September 9th, 2022, 11:44 am Standing ovations are pretty common in most live events (performance arts, sports etc.), it can even be argued that these big festival premieres are a special case since almost everyone who attend them are involved in the film industry in one way or another. Not sure why anyone would have a problem with other people showing their appreciation for those involved in the project. It’s not like they bar the exits and force you to partake, if you don’t want to then just leave.
I don't have a problem with it. I just think it's stilted and unnatural in bizarre, humorous way. Just a bunch of people standing around robotically applauding, completely regardless of the extent to which they actually appreciated what they just saw.

Heck, my only real problem is they don't take it further. I think they should do multi-hour standing ovations.
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#15

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blocho wrote: September 9th, 2022, 6:22 pm
Ivan0716 wrote: September 9th, 2022, 11:44 am Standing ovations are pretty common in most live events (performance arts, sports etc.), it can even be argued that these big festival premieres are a special case since almost everyone who attend them are involved in the film industry in one way or another. Not sure why anyone would have a problem with other people showing their appreciation for those involved in the project. It’s not like they bar the exits and force you to partake, if you don’t want to then just leave.
I don't have a problem with it. I just think it's stilted and unnatural in bizarre, humorous way. Just a bunch of people standing around robotically applauding, completely regardless of the extent to which they actually appreciated what they just saw.

Heck, my only real problem is they don't take it further. I think they should do multi-hour standing ovations.
Make it a contest. The last person standing in the clap-a-thon gets a single VHS copy of the film, after which the film is destroyed, including the digital masters, and never seen again.
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The VENEZIA 79 Jury, chaired by Julianne Moore and comprised of Mariano Cohn, Leonardo Di Costanzo, Audrey Diwan, Leila Hatami, Kazuo Ishiguro and Rodrigo Sorogoyen, having viewed all 23 films in competition, has decided as follows:

GOLDEN LION for Best Film to:
ALL THE BEAUTY AND THE BLOODSHED
by Laura Poitras (USA)


SILVER LION – GRAND JURY PRIZE to:
SAINT OMER
by Alice Diop (France)

SILVER LION – AWARD FOR BEST DIRECTOR to:
Luca Guadagnino
for the film BONES AND ALL (USA, Italy)

COPPA VOLPI
for Best Actress:
Cate Blanchett
in the film TÁR by Todd Field (USA)

COPPA VOLPI
for Best Actor:
Colin Farrell
in the film THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN by Martin McDonagh (Ireland, UK, USA)

AWARD FOR BEST SCREENPLAY to:
Martin McDonagh
for the film THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN by Martin McDonagh (Ireland, UK, USA)

SPECIAL JURY PRIZE to:
KHERS NIST (NO BEARS)
by Jafar Panahi (Iran)

MARCELLO MASTROIANNI AWARD
for Best Young Actor or Actress to:
Taylor Russell
in the film BONES AND ALL by Luca Guadagnino (USA, Italy)
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#17

Post by Ivan0716 »

This whole drama surrounding Blonde is quite something, getting review bombed on Letterboxd before release, petition calling for Netflix to pull the film…like damn, this might well end up being one of the most controversial films of all time.
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#18

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Ivan0716 wrote: September 11th, 2022, 4:31 pm This whole drama surrounding Blonde is quite something, getting review bombed on Letterboxd before release, petition calling for Netflix to pull the film…like damn, this might well end up being one of the most controversial films of all time.
I've never been more interested!

[edit]Going to save a snapshot of when LB became reverse IMDb ..:
https://imgur.com/a/Dc0W80V

Also keep in the mind when reading those 1/2-* reviews that Blonde was the very movie that spawned the absurdly long standing ovation debate:
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#19

Post by hurluberlu »

Too early to say but at least Venice Jury was quite daring with the two biggest awards going to female directors with two (almost) documentaries on women… and completely ignoring the Netflix glow (Blonde, Bardo, White Noise, Athena).
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#20

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Torgo wrote: September 11th, 2022, 4:40 pm
Ivan0716 wrote: September 11th, 2022, 4:31 pm This whole drama surrounding Blonde is quite something, getting review bombed on Letterboxd before release, petition calling for Netflix to pull the film…like damn, this might well end up being one of the most controversial films of all time.
I've never been more interested!

[edit]Going to save a snapshot of when LB became reverse IMDb ..:


Also keep in the mind when reading those 1/2-* reviews that Blonde was the very movie that spawned the absurdly long standing ovation debate:
I take it this kind of shit hasn't happened on LB that much before?

Pathetic shit if you ask me.
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#21

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Correct. Letterboxd isn't perfect, neither in terms of its functionality or core community of users, but this sort of IMDB/Rotten Tomatoes level of tanking a movie's user rating before the general public has even had the chance to watch it (nor the majority of the people spamming its user score) is very new. I really can't imagine why this of all films is the one to finally break the dam in that regard.

Just doing a quick look at some of the most recent reviews, the majority of the newly published negative ones all amount to something along the lines of "How dare they make a film about this woman when her life was full of suffering and hardships!?" - to which there might be the beginnings of a constructive discussion somewhere, but this sort of reactionary white-knighting just isn't the way to go about it. Another victory for black and white / all or nothing thinking! Huzzah...? :down:

And that petition to have Netflix not even release it? Absolutely psychotic shit :finger:
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#22

Post by kongs_speech »

This is fucking disgusting. These woke kids aren't progressives, they're unhinged authoritarian whack jobs. Joyce Carol Oates has more genuine feminism in her toenail clippings than any of these unenlightened twats will ever know. These people are anti-art and quite possibly anti-humanity. The idea that they label themselves "leftists" is a travesty. They are not the true left. They do not represent us. Speaking as a trans woman, they sure as hell don't represent me. I despise them.
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#23

Post by blocho »

Would someone clue in those of us who don't follow these things? What's the objection to this movie? And how much of that objecting is being done by people who have actually seen it?
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#24

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blocho wrote: September 12th, 2022, 3:21 am Would someone clue in those of us who don't follow these things? What's the objection to this movie? And how much of that objecting is being done by people who have actually seen it?
That men are continuing to objectify and profit from a feminist icon over half a century later.

Most if not all of the half star “reviews”/ratings on Letterboxd were submitted by people who have never seen the film. It’s hard to tell how much of it is genuine outrage and how much is just people hopping on the bandwagon to score easy internet points by calling out “men”, letterboxd is a social media platform afterall.

I can definitely see why some of those who have seen it would be repulsed by it (I mean, that’s kind of the point). But to call it “pornographic” is a joke unless you consider all forms of sex and nudity to be pornographic. There is nothing gratuitous or sexy about any of what we see in Blonde.
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#25

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Me when I hear that the new Ana de Armas led film contains "pornographic" amounts of sex and nudity.

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#26

Post by matthewscott8 »

Onderhond wrote: September 7th, 2022, 8:53 pm I'm just wondering who those people are who give minutes-long standing ovations. For a freaking film.
probably people like me. I'm often the last person clapping at a film festival, although I've never been to a big competition festival. I usually stop clapping because it feels awkward to be clapping on my own. But if there were lots of people like me, hell yeah. Films are incredible.
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