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Which films Did You See Last Week? 24/11/19 - 01/12/19

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sol
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Which films Did You See Last Week? 24/11/19 - 01/12/19

#1

Post by sol » December 1st, 2019, 12:00 pm

Which Films Did You See Last Week?

Please share with us which films you saw last week. It would be great if you could include some comments on each film. It would be awesome if you could also take some time to comment on everyone else's viewings (if you're like me, "real life" sometimes gets in the way, so no need to feel obliged).

This is what I saw:

★★★★ = loved it /// ★★★ = liked it a lot; ~7/10 /// ★★ = has interesting elements; ~6/10 /// ★ = did very little for me; ~5/10 and lower

Another week filled with mediocre noirs, but at least it is December now so I can ease off on the mediocre noirs for a while. :pinch:

Good-Time Girl (1948). Sympathetic to a teenager in trouble with police, a female magistrate tells the young woman of the downwards spiral of a similar juvenile offender in this British melodrama. The film is a little too obvious as a message movie to fully click with the framing device feeling both extraneous and distracting, though it is neat to see a young Diana Dors as the teen in the wraparound segment. As for the central tale, bits and pieces play out like a soap opera, however, Jean Kent's performance is generally down-to-earth and her brief experiences in a 1940s reform school are engaging. Some of the sexual harassment (of a minor) scenes are also pretty interesting to watch in this day and age; society has really changed. The film has some very cool shadowy shots too, though this is more of a noir stylistically than thematically or narrative-wise. (first viewing, online) ★★

Money Madness (1948). Desperate to make the bank loot that he stole seem legit, a daring criminal hatches a complex plan that involves marriage under false pretences, Munchausen by proxy and murder in this low budget noir. For a film clocking in at less than 75 minutes, the plot feels overly elaborate. The project is also heavily reliant on the female protagonist being too scared to say or do anything, which renders her a pretty lifeless character, having to rely on an alternate love interest to solve her problems for her, and Frances Rafferty is hardly compelling in the role. Fortunately, Hugh Beaumont is in excellent form as the cunning male protagonist, and with several memorable moments -- including one that may well have been the inspiration for the "little friend" scene in De Palma's Scarface -- the movie is encapsulating whenever he is on screen. (first viewing, online) ★★

Noose (1948). Also known as The Silk Noose, this odd motion picture from Britain focuses on a fast-talking female who journalist takes on a group of racketeers. The movie has been described as a film noir and with many memorable and atmospheric shots in low and limited lighting, the project certainly looks as sumptous as the best pictures of the American noir cycle. The overall film though is closer to a His Girl Friday style comedy with witty exchanges as Carole Landis talks her way in, out and around everyone. The comedy slant also brings a rather lighthearted tone though, which clashes very uncomfortably with the shady racketeers angle. Amidst all this, there are no especially intriguing characters beyond Landis despite a couple of fun supporting turns. In short, this is a real mess of a movie, if one with scattered interesting elements. (first viewing, online) ★

Hell's Island (1955). Hired to locate a precious ruby that may or may not be in possession of his former girlfriend, a Las Vegas bouncer is convinced to help his old flame's wrongfully imprisoned husband on the side in this complex colour noir. Despite an exotic Caribbean location, the film is mostly shot in studio and while intriguing at first, the ruby ends up being little more than a Hitchcockian MacGuffin. Some of the twists and turns involving the imprisoned husband are decent, yet this side of the film often feels at odds to the central ruby smuggling plot with a menacing Francis L. Sullivan rather randomly coming and going as the man who hires the protagonist. Paul Picerni also has some solid moments towards the end as said husband. Nobody else here offers anything of particular note and both the main character and femme fatale are a little dull. (first viewing, online) ★

Hit and Run (1957). Unhappily married to a much older man, a former showgirl is convinced by her extramarital lover to kill her husband in a hit-and-run crime, and then dissemble the car to hide the evidence in this low budget noir entry. The premise is undeniably intriguing with things only growing more interesting as a sly twin brother emerges upon learning of his brother's untimely death. It is almost halfway in though before the titular incident even occurs though and while writer-director Hugo Haas is excellent balancing a double role in which he becomes an increasingly taunting presence, it is only his scenes as the twin that are of any note. The film is also burdened by loud musical cues and extreme close-ups to spell out the most dramatic moments, plus the ending is oddly comical. It is a bit of a shame since the premise is so clever and unique. (first viewing, online) ★

The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave (1971). After an intriguing opening in which a wealthy man tortures and murders a prostitute who reminds him of his deceased wife, this luridly titled giallo becomes a dialogue-heavy affair with little of note happening until halfway in. The stuff that happens halfway in is interesting though with suggestions of something supernatural afoot as the man remarries but is then haunted by sounds and fleeting images of his dead wife that may or may not just be in his mind. Things become especially twisted in the final quarter of the movie with many memorably macabre moments. The film does not fully work since it encourages us to sympathise with the prostitute-killing protagonist and see him as a pure victim of circumstance, but this is a reasonably engaging look at longing, guilt, grief, greed and other human vices. (first viewing, online) ★★

The Woman of Fire '82 (1982). Bearing more in common with Fire Woman than The Housemaid, this third (!) version of the same tale from Ki-young Kim feels redundant as we are treated yet again to experiences of a housemaid made pregnant by her married employer. This version benefits from nifty ticking clock imagery - and the rape scene, depicted through a montage of cuckoo clocks and fetuses, needs to be seen to be believed. This is the most melodramatic version too though with the jilted wife's hysterics completely overdone. The housemaid actually bonds a bit with the kids this time, despite them calling her a "stray dog", but this renders their fear of her poisoning them nonsensical and silly. If nicely visualised in 2.35:1 widescreen, this offers little beyond the alternate spin that Fire Woman already placed on The Housemaid. (first viewing, online) ★★

Liebestraum (1991). Visiting his terminally ill mother in a small Illinois town, a successful writer becomes entangled with a controversial plan to demolish a murder site building in this neo-noir from Mike Figgis. With the Leaving Las Vegas director at the helm, Leibestraum expectedly looks and sounds great with lots of low lighting and some very effective semi-surreal nightmare scenes. To call the plot of the film a mess would, however, be an understatement. As the protagonist predicts or seems to foresee a near-fatal accident, things initially seem intriguing. This precognition angle soon dissolves into the background though with the film dawdling between a lackluster romance and slow walks of the building to be demolished. None of the characters are the least bit engaging either, though it is interesting to see Kim Novak in her last screen role. (first viewing, DVD) ★

Blades of Blood (2010). Their country on the brink of war, this historical action movie follows the experiences of a blind Korean swordsman and his protégé as they try to stop a corrupt and dishonorable man from seizing power. Or something like that. The plot and politics at hand here are murky, unclear and uninteresting with a lot of sentimentality and personal grudges thrown into the mix. The film sort of works though when the blind swordsman is given centre focus. The humour as he trains his underling generally clicks and it is of course great to watch him fight so deftly when purely relying on sound. He is absent from over half of the film though, and try as the young lead actor does to make something of his role, he is stuck with a formulaic character out to prove himself as a real man, ashamed of the fact that he is a concubine's son. (first viewing, Blu-ray Disc) ★

The Man from Nowhere (2010). Rescuing the kidnapped daughter of his next door neighbour, a young man with a violent past singlehandedly takes on a drug and organ smuggling ring in this Korean action film. With a precocious young girl and mysterious male protagonist, the parallels to Leon: The Professional are striking, yet this lacks the emotional oomph of the Luc Besson film since there are only a couple of brief scenes dedicated to the pair bonding before she is kidnapped - and she is mostly a supporting player thence onwards. The film stumbles a bit when trying to flesh out the title character's past too, never quite establishing why he wants a surrogate daughter so much. That said, this is a pretty gripping film either way, especially towards the end when the violence turns graphic and brutal. Some of the stunts are downright amazing too. (first viewing, online) ★★

Where in the World is Osama bin Laden? (2008). His first child on the way and nervous about how commonplace terrorism may be for his kid growing up, Morgan Spurlock goes on a futile quest to the Middle East to track down Osama bin Laden in this comic documentary. Spurlock is a fun personality, and much like his Super Size Me and Greatest Movie Ever Sold, this is an entertaining watch from start to finish and there some imaginative animated sequences and original songs in the mix. Spurlock does not, however, succeed in linking his search for Osama to his parenthood anxieties. He also spends far more time asking locals what they think of America rather than what they think of Osama and where he is. All of the interviews are pretty interesting though, especially those showing normal, peaceful Islamic families living their lives. (first viewing, DVD) ★★★

30 Minutes or Less (2011). Skilled at creating explosive devices but too nervous to rob a bank themselves, two aspiring criminals strap a bomb vest to a pizza delivery driver and threaten to detonate the device unless he robs the local bank in this comedy from Ruben Fleischer of Zombieland fame. The story is a little complex and the first twenty minutes do not flow well with the film constantly cutting between the pizza guy and bomb makers in a parallel plots. From the moment the plots converge though, the film rarely lets up with many laugh-out-loud moments at the expense of how everyone is such an amateur - including hitmen and policemen supporting characters. The premise is pretty interesting too, like a more twisted variation of blackmail, with ambiguity as to whether or not the bombers are unhinged enough to just explode the device anyway. (first viewing, online) ★★★

Doomsday Book (2012). Three short films about end of the world scenarios are linked together in this sci-fi anthology from Korea. The first tale is mediocre, involving a zombie apocalypse as the result of contaminated meat and introducing little that we have not seen time and time again. The second tale, directed by Jee-woon Kim (of I Saw the Devil fame) is excellent though with thoughtful ruminations on artificial intelligence and human perceptions as a group of Buddhist monks become divided about what to do with a robot who claims to have found enlightenment. Is it a malfunction or has he just embraced the teachings of Buddha? The third tale is less successful - but it is relatively fun in a darkly comic way as a young girl discovers that she might be responsible for a meteor heading towards Earth - and it offers a nice conclusion for the movie. (first viewing, online) ★★★

The Berlin File (2013). Spies for both North and South Korea try to work out what went wrong when an illegal arms sale results in an unexpected shootout in this action thriller. The film benefits from some superbly crafted action sequences, including bits in which the camera crashes through glass window roofs with plummeting actors, however, it is a lot less satisfying as an espionage narrative. It is over an hour in before the plot begins to make sense and while some of the betrayal and testing of loyalty stuff that emerges in the second half is interesting, it is also hard to care by such a late point in the story and with such enigmatic characters. For the action scenes, intense communication moments in a bugged apartment and violent final confrontation, this is sort of worth a spin, but it will probably appeal more to those well versed in North/South tensions. (first viewing, online) ★★

Okja (2017). Set in the near future, this Korean fable focuses on teenager who tries to save her genetically modified "super pig" pet from being slaughtered by the corporation that bred the pig for food production. As a message movie, Okja is far from subtle and the borderline comical caricature supporting characters lead to the tone of the project occasionally feeling off, but the central story is nevertheless powerful and told with flair. The visual effects used to create the creature are divine with super pig doing enough small things to convey its emotions while always seeming animalistic. Seo-hyun Ahn provides a strong turn too as the girl at the centre of the tale who finds herself pulled between animal activists and the evil corporation bigwigs, both factions of which may be more interested in using her as a pawn for their own causes than anything else. (first viewing, online) ★★★★
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Perception de Ambiguity
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#2

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » December 1st, 2019, 12:00 pm

Nora Helmer (RWF, 1974) 8/10
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Greenwich Village Story (Jack O'Connell, 1963-1982) 6/10

나쁜 영화 / Timeless Bottomless Bad Movie / Bad Movie (장선우/Jang Sun-woo, 1997) 7-/10

Casino Raiders II (Johnnie To, 1991) 4+/10

The Souvenir (Joanna Hogg, 2019) 6/10

Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese (see title, 2019) 7/10
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ユメノ銀河 / Labyrinth of Dreams (Sogo Ishii/石井岳龍/Gakuryu Ishii, 1997) 5+/10
CuM SWAP: viewtopic.php?p=613030

水の中の八月 / August in the Water (Sogo Ishii/石井岳龍/Gakuryu Ishii, 1995) 7/10
CuM SWAP: viewtopic.php?p=612837

(Impressions: A Journey Behind The Scenes of Twin Peaks:) Two Blue Balls (Jason S., 2017) (2nd viewing) 7-/10

Mysteries of the Unseen World 3D (Louie Schwartzberg, 2013) (in 3D) (2nd viewing) 8/10

Drive (NicWinRef, 2011) (17th viewing)

ZOOI: 4 2P4C3 0DDY53Y (the Cube Man, MCMLXVIII) (7th viewing) by Jupiter(!)


shorts

Is This What You Were Born For? (Abigail Child)

Part 1: Prefaces (1981) 8/10

Part 2: Mutiny (1982) 7/10

Part 3: Both (1988) 6/10

Part 4: Perils (1986) 7/10

Part 5: Covert Action (1984) 7/10

Part 7: Mercy (1989) 7-/10

After the Circus (Larry Jordan, 2013) 7/10

Variations (Nathaniel Dorsky, 1998) 5/10

RELIGEOZOON (Xiong Zaixia, 2019) 3/10


music videos

Karen O & Danger Mouse: Woman (Spike Jonze)

Marilyn Manson: Disposable Teens (Samuel Bayer, 2000) (umpteenth viewing) 6/10

Everlast: Ends (Samuel Bayer, 1999) (rewatch) 4/10

Everlast: What It's Like (1998) (rewatch) 5/10

Everlast: Black Jesus (Jonas Åkerlund, 2000) (rewatch) 4/10

Garbage: Stupid Girl (1996) (rewatch) 3/10

Drowning Pool: Bodies (2001) (rewatch) 3/10


series

Rick and Morty - S04E03 - "One Crew Over the Crewcoo's Morty" (2019) 8/10

South Park - S23E08 - "Turd Burglars" (2019) 6+/10

Batman: The Animated Series: What Is Reality? (1992) (highly likely rewatch) 2/10

Monty Python's Flying Circus - S03E08 - "The Cycling Tour" (1972) 7/10

Monty Python's Flying Circus - S03E09 - "The Nude Man" (1972) 8-/10

Monty Python's Flying Circus - S03E10 - "E. Henry Thripshaw's Disease" (1972) (2nd viewing) 8-/10


other

George Carlin - I Kinda Like It When A Lotta People Die (released 2016, recorded 2001) [audio only] 8/10

Untitled Goose Game (2019) - couple o' hours...*honk*


didn't finish

Themroc (Claude Faraldo, 1973) [50+ min]

The Irishman (Martin Scorsese, 2019)[50 min]

The Daughter (Simon Stone, 2015) [21 min]

Homebodies (Larry Yust, 1974) [5 min]

Rambo: Last Blood (Adrian Grunberg, 2019) [4 min]


notable online media

top:
Led Zeppelin - Communication Breakdown/ Cover by Yoyoka Soma, 8 year old
B’z "ギリギリchop"を叩いてみた 8year old drummer "Yoyoka" Cover / Detective Conan /名偵探柯南
rest:
Bob Dylan - Love Sick (with "Soy Bomb" included)
Guerrilla Radio - Rage Against the Machine / Cover by Yoyoka, 10 year old
【RSR2018】よよかの部屋 Good Times Bad Times - Live (LED ZEPPELIN Cover)
Deutsche Meme´s #3 REUPLOAD | Irgendwas
M E M E S #1 [by golden muffin]
George Lucas Reacts to Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Final Trailer - Salty Celebrity Deepfake
Bob Dylan meets some gypsy fans – Dont Look Back (1967) – Criterion Collection

screenshots of the week:

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Onderhond
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#3

Post by Onderhond » December 1st, 2019, 12:07 pm

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Some alone time meant I was able catch up with some longer films this week. Also had the chance to get rid of a bunch of filler. Luckily there were some pleasant surprises too. Ramsay's latest was pretty great, so were the latest films by Takeuchi, Yaguchi and Pinkaew. Also saw one of the most terrible Bollywood films ever, thanks to ICM. The official lists never fail to disappoint.


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01. 4.0* - WXIII: Patlabor the Movie 3 by Takuji Endo, Fumihiko Takayama [2002]
A very peculiar sequel that in some ways echoes Oshii's work, but is something completely different. The Patlabor crew are mere visitors in their own franchise, instead the film focuses on detective Hata and introduces some unexpected Kaiju action. It feels more like a spin-off than a real Patlabor film, but the quality is still there.

02. 3.5* - Fly Me to the Saitama [Tonde Saitama] by Hideki Takeuchi [2019]
Quirky and goofy comedy, set in a universe that offers an unparalleled mix of modern, historic, realistic and fantastic elements. The film looks rich and there are some solid laughs, but somehow the direction itself felt a little too timid. This film deserved a full-on Tetsuya Nakashima treatment, even so there's plenty of fun to be had here.

03. 3.5* - You Were Never Really Here by Lynne Ramsay [2017]
Dark and chilling character portrait that felt like the film Joker should've been. Ramsay's direction is impressive but cold and menacing, Phoenix is subdued and introverted, the way I like him. Some beautiful, stark cinematography and a very nice and effective score further elevate the film, only the ending is somewhat of a letdown.

04. 3.5* - Survival Family [Sabaibaru Famirî] by Shinobu Yaguchi [2016]
Amusing and light-hearted adventure that follows a family's attempt to survive a long-lasting power outage. With no electricity, society quickly collapses, though Japan seems to take on the looming apocalypse relatively dignified. Nothing truly exceptional, but the trip though the country is quite quirky and entertaining.

05. 3.5* - Sisters by Prachya Pinkaew [2019]
Pinkaew is back ... with a horror film. The intro feels a little rushed and at times I wondered if this was part of an existing franchise, but once things start to fall into place this became a fun and entertaining little film. The monster designs and cheap CG keep it from reaching a higher score though. Whether it was intentional or not, the cheesiness felt out of place.

06. 3.5* - Stay Out Stay Alive by Dean Yurke [2017]
Visual effects man Dean Yurke directs his very own feature. No surprise then that it looks pretty awesome, especially for a film where the inexperience of its director is almost tangible. It's a relatively original and well-made horror film, with a couple of stand-out moments and a pretty intriguing premise, well worth a try for genre fans.

07. 3.5* - I'll Give It My All ... Tomorrow [Ore Wa Mada Honki Dashite Nai Dake] by Yuichi Fukuda [2013]
Goofy and understated comedy about a 40 y/o guy who quits his job and vows to become a manga artist. Fukuda is a skilled comedy director and Tsutsumi hasn't lost much of his flair. It's not a real stand-out film, but there are some good laughs and the film never drags or gets boring. Very good filler indeed.

08. 3.0* - Gemini Man by Ang Lee [2019]
Plot, sci-fi elements and drama all are kind of mediocre, but the film has a handful of truly outstanding action scenes that make it very watchable indeed. The CG to create Smith's younger self isn't flawless, but isn't really distracting either. A pretty decent blockbuster, especially with Lee directing, but nothing truly great.

09. 3.0* - Tucker: The Man and His Dream by Francis Ford Coppola [1988]
A surprisingly fun and playful biopic that leans heavily on the performance of Bridges, but is aided by some solid direction of Coppola too. I don't care much for the US car industry, nor for all the practical and legal issues Tucker had to face, but his flamboyant character was infectious and the film does justice to the man's legacy.

10. 3.0* - Xiangxi Legend by Liu Hendi [2019]
Another tomb raiding fantasy from Mainland China. The genre is incredibly popular right now and supply can't seem to meet demand. That means there's a lot of cheap shlock around, but this was a pretty decent film. Of course, it suffers from some subpar CG and it's not very original, but it's a decent genre film that offers 90 minutes of solid entertainment.

11. 2.5* - The Climbers [Pan Deng Zhe] by Daniel Lee [2019]
At times a decent blockbuster, but some scenes are so sentimental and over the top that it's closer to a genre parody than an actual bona fide adventure flick. Daniel Lee has the skills, but he needs to show a little more restraint if he wants to get back on top. This was borderline entertaining, but much more than that.

12. 2.5* - 3022 by John Suits [2019]
A basic genre flick that recycles a lot of familiar sci-fi ideas and doesn't add much of its own. People are stuck in space, their life support is running out and communications with Earth are cut. It's not a horrible film, but chances are that you've seen this before, executed more skillfully. If you're starving for some space sci-fi though, it's not a bad choice.

13. 2.5* - Destroy All Monsters [Kaijû Sôshingeki] by Ishirô Honda [1968]
Feels like a classic Godzilla best-of film. All the monsters are here, there's a bunch of weird sci-fi stuff and some random extraterrestrial interference. Some Godzilla entries can be a little slow and tepid in between the fighting, there's simply so much happening here that they didn't have the time or money to waste film on any serious conversation. Good fun, but very, very cheesy.

14. 2.5* - Godzilla vs. Monster Zero [Kaijû Daisensô] by Ishirô Honda [1965]
This was pretty fun. You get a kaiju film and a space exploration film rolled into one. It's all very cheesy and cardboard-like of course, but there's hardly a dull moment and some there are some truly stand-out scenes. Apart from the original Godzilla film, this is one of the best Honda films I've seen so far.

15. 2.0* - Maze Runner: The Death Cure by Wes Ball [2018]
Third and (hopefully) final part in this franchise. I didn't dislike the first two films, this one isn't terrible either, but it's clear that it gets progressively worse as the saga continues. The action feels too derivative and the characters are boring, which makes some of the more sentimental moments a drag. This is the worst one of the three.

16. 2.0* - The Gate by Tibor Takács [1987]
80s horror flick that takes a really long time to get going and turns out to be a little too kiddy-proof once the shit hits the fan. The effects are rather poor, the characters are cheesy and the actors are unqualified, but there's a certain charm that peeks during the final 30 minutes, which saves the film from being a complete failure.

17. 2.0* - The Burning by Tony Maylam [1981]
It's the 80s, a group of teens is attending summer camp and someone is looking for revenge. This is core genre fare, a bit more serious than some of its contemporaries, but still quite lazy and derivative. The murders and the killer are too lame to make a real impression, the gore is minimal and the rest is just filler. It's not terrible, for extremely forgettable.

18. 2.0* - People's Hero [Yan Man Ying Hung] by Tung-Shing Yee [1987]
A pretty tepid and basic heist/hostage movie. With Yee in the director's chair and the two Tony Leungs in front of the camera, expectations were slightly higher, but this is just a run-of-the-mill genre film. It's not terrible and the limited runtime definitely helps, but it's far from memorable and lacks any stand-out moments.

19. 1.5* - Napoleon [Napoléon Vu par Abel Gance] by Abel Gance [1927]
Some fancy camera work and experimental editing making this an interesting classic, but the excessive runtime and the excruciating orchestral score really take away from the experience. The score isn't really Gance's fault, but the length of the film betrays his lack of restraint. I'm quite glad the sequels were never made.

20. 1.5* - McCabe & Mrs. Miller by Robert Altman [1971]
Altman is a better storyteller than most Western directors and Beatty's performance was commendable, but the dreary 70s visuals and the ill-fitting score are a pain to sit through. My quest to find something worthwhile in the western genre continues. McCabe and Mrs Miller didn't really help me forward, but at least it was different enough from the usual genre fare.

21. 1.5* - All Monsters Attack [Gojira-Minira-Gabara: Oru Kaijû Daishingeki] by Ishirô Honda [1969]
A nonsensical Godzilla film that slaps two unrelated plot lines together and still manages to get some additional Godzilla action in there. There's a lot of different monsters present, but they only appear in a kid's dream, and they're just battling it out on their own territory. It feels pretty cheap, but at least it's short and the scenes on Monster Island are decent.

22. 1.5* - The Angry Guest [E Ke] by Cheh Chang [1972]
I sometimes complain that many of the Shaw Bros films are too much alike, the problem is that when they try to do something else, it often ends up worse than their core offerings. This contemporary brawler is pretty dull and lifeless. Without all the typical martial arts drama and the historic settings, Chang's films just aren't that good.

23. 1.5* - Bikram: Yogi, Guru, Predator by Eva Orner [2019]
ike many of its contemporaries, this is a documentary with a mission. A more honest approach and a hint of objectivity would've been appreciated, but clearly that wasn't in the cards. I was clueless about the man before though and there are some moments where it's fairly informative, but overall this was pretty bad.

24. 1.0* - Kiss Me Deadly by Robert Aldrich [1955]
I'm afraid I'm just not enough of a noir fan to recognize how this film differs from its peers. I only noticed the same elements that annoyed me in other noirs. Uninteresting characters, a tepid plot, poor acting and dull dialogues and a complete lack of visual bravura. It's really not my genre I guess, I found it quite a chore to sit through.

25. 0.5* - Lamhe by Yash Chopra [1991]
Terrible 90s Bollywood film, full of terrible dance routines, horrible music and atrocious cinematography. I appreciate its attempts to be colorful, but it's just an eyesore. Why this has to last for 3+ hours is also completely beyond me, as the characters are completely cardboard and forgettable. No, this wasn't worth it.

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sol
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#4

Post by sol » December 1st, 2019, 12:26 pm

PdA:

That's what I am worried about with The Irishman. Of course, you give up on 50% of the films that you view each week, so maybe it won't be the same for me, but gee that massive runtime is certainly somewhat daunting.

Onderhond:

Seen a bunch of yours this week:

You Were Never Really Here - definitely with you on Phoenix's performance and the music; agree about the ending too
Tucker: The Man and His Dream - I recall liking this quite a bit at the time, though it is middle of the road for Coppola
Maze Runner: Death Cure - I actually really enjoyed the first film but by the time this one ended I had definitely had enough
The Gate - loved this one as a kid; not so much as an adult, but still pretty cool as far as 80s horror films go
The Burning - agreed re: "forgettable"; only seen a few months ago myself and already it is a blurred memory
McCabe & Mrs. Miller - I pretty much hated this, so glad to find someone else with a similar opinion
Kiss Me Deadly - quite possibly my favourite of your viewings this week and I am guessing that you missed the opening of the film since the visual bravura on hand there is incredible
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#5

Post by Carmel1379 » December 1st, 2019, 1:45 pm

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Side/Walk/Shuttle (1991, Ernie Gehr) 4/10

Presents (1981, Michael Snow) 7/10

千禧曼波 Millennium Mambo (2001, Hou Hsiao-Hsien) 5/10

ユメノ銀河 / Labyrinth of Dreams (1997, Sōgo->Gakuryū Ishii) 6/10
viewtopic.php?p=613030

水の中の八月 / August in the Water (1995, Sōgo->Gakuryū Ishii) 9/10
viewtopic.php?p=612837

Hanna (2011, Joe Wright) 7/10

Freaks (2018, Zach Lipovsky & Adam B. Stein) 6/10

Ocean’sEleven (2001, Steven Soderbergh) 6/10

Rick and Morty: One Crew Over The Crewcoo’s Morty (2019) (thrice)

Star Wars: The Mandalorian Chapter 4 (2019)

South Park: Turd Burglars (2019, Trey Parker)


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Last edited by Carmel1379 on December 1st, 2019, 2:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#6

Post by Carmel1379 » December 1st, 2019, 1:49 pm

dp
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#7

Post by peeptoad » December 1st, 2019, 2:34 pm

hi sol-
The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave (1971) 7
Okja (2017) seen it and not rated it; 7/10 from memory

PdA-
나쁜 영화 / Timeless Bottomless Bad Movie / Bad Movie (장선우/Jang Sun-woo, 1997) 8 saw this ~20 years ago and it made a big impact on me at the time; glad you found something decent in there...
Drive (NicWinRef, 2011) 6

Onderhond-
Destroy All Monsters [Kaijû Sôshingeki] by Ishirô Honda [1968] 8
Godzilla vs. Monster Zero [Kaijû Daisensô] by Ishirô Honda [1965] 7
The Gate by Tibor Takács [1987] 5
The Burning by Tony Maylam [1981] 7
All Monsters Attack [Gojira-Minira-Gabara: Oru Kaijû Daishingeki] by Ishirô Honda [1969] need to reatch to rate, but recall its cheesiness being front and center, and prob agree with your rating
Kiss Me Deadly by Robert Aldrich [1955] 8 one of the better noirs I saw last month... though the pool was small.

Carmel-
Ocean’sEleven (2001, Steven Soderbergh) 7

mine-
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018) 7
Outcast (2010) 6
Lady Bird (2017) 6
Sully (2016) 7

:cheers:

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#8

Post by joachimt » December 1st, 2019, 3:15 pm

La belle équipe AKA They Were Five (1936, 3 official lists, 138 checks) 8/10
Watched because it's on 500<400.
Good looking 30's pic with interesting characters and strong Jean Gabin.
The Pumpkin Eater (1964, 3 official lists, 254 checks) 8/10
Watched because it's on 500<400.
Strong character piece.
Ant-Man and the Wasp (2018, 1 official list, 5759 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
Fun.
Captain Marvel (2019, 2 official lists, 5127 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
Fun.
Ching se AKA Green Snake (1993, 3 official lists, 205 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's on 500<400.
This was weird. A combination of martial arts and fantasy combined with cheesy romance with terrible music. I often thought it was turning into softcore porn.
Free Solo (2018, 1 official list, 1621 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
I wouldn't vote for this in a documentary-poll, but I even might in a suspense-poll, because the main sequence in the end is just barely watchable. Part of me was glued to the screen, but another part wanted to turn it off. As a documentary, I didn't find it insightful enough. It didn't really get into the question everyone is wondering about: why the hell would anyone do a thing like that? He says he's not an adrenaline-junky, but what then? I really don't understand such people and I also have problems with people getting paid for stuff like this. I also have problems with the health care people need because of doing dangerous sports (unless they pay for it themselves, but I don't think that's the case very often). Anyway, this is just a rant related to the topic, not about the movie. Last thing I was wondering about the movie was
SpoilerShow
Would they have aired this if he had fallen to his death?
Maleficent (2014, 1 official list, 12379 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
This looks pretty. It's also nice to have such a movie for a change without the clear good character vs bad character.
Remember the Titans (2000, 1 official list, 23369 checks) 7/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
No matter how often I see a movie about racism, I get angry every time. It's even more so with a movie that's set in modern times (post WW2) than movies with stuff like slavery. When you see "civilized" people in the 70's like in this movie, who don't even want to shake hands with coloured people, it just makes my stomache turn. Every time again, I just can't believe people are like that, but every time I realized this is really how things happened and unfortunately often still do. The movie is fine, btw. Denzel is doing a good job. I did think the change of all the football player during camp was a bit too hasty and therefor felt unnatural.
Blood on the Moon (1948, 2 official lists, 253 checks) 6/10
Watched because it was FotW.
Decent western with a forgettable story.
Kyônetsu no kisetsu AKA The Warped Ones (1960, 3 official lists, 266 checks) 6/10
Watched because it's on 500<400.
Lot of great scenes. A shame the story felt rather messy and random to me.
The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg (1927, 3 official lists, 328 checks) 6/10
Watched because it's on 500<400.
Quite a standard love story.
Jack (1996, 1 official list, 5708 checks) 5/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
Maybe I should put Coppola lower on my directors list now. Robin Williams couldn't save this predictable plot.
Old Yeller (1957, 1 official list, 1811 checks) 5/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
Dull story. Felt very dated as well.
Return to Oz (1985, 1 official list, 4490 checks) 5/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Disney+.
Pointless sequel if you ask me. Pretty dull story and the characters are missing the charm of the original.
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#9

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » December 2nd, 2019, 8:35 am

Not that much last week:

Wagon Master (John Ford, 1950) - 8

How Green Was My Valley (John Ford, 1941) - 10

Le doux amour des hommes / Men's Gentle Love (Jean-Paul Civeyrac, 2002) - 7+
A less sprawling and more perverted version of Joachim Trier's 'Reprise'. Pretty good, pretty pretty good.

Some shorts:

Nightfall (Anocha Suwichakornpong, 2016) - 6

Ah, Liberty! (Ben Rivers, 2008) - 7

Low Tide (Lukas Marxt, 2013) - 6

+

Season 4 of Curb Your Enthusiasm. Don't know what I think about that last 1 hour episode, but the rest was great.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere

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#10

Post by GruesomeTwosome » December 2nd, 2019, 2:23 pm

Hi sol. From yours, I've seen 30 Minutes or Less and Okja. The former I recall being an OK comedy that does indeed have an interesting concept (apparently inspired in part by a real-life incident that was very similar to the one depicted in the film, which is pretty crazy) but ultimately not too memorable really. I liked Okja well enough, but Bong Joon-ho has done better and for a director not really known for subtlety, this one was a bit too on-the-nose at times for me. Gyllenhaal's performance is pretty insane, mostly in a good way.


My viewings last week:

Image

J'ai perdu mon corps / I Lost My Body (2019, Jérémy Clapin) - 7.5/10


Image

The Irishman (2019, Martin Scorsese) - 8/10


Image

Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018, Ron Howard) - 6/10


Shorts:

Do pivnice (1983, Jan Svankmajer) - 9/10

The Fourth Dimension (1988, Zbigniew Rybczynski) - 6/10

Maska (2010, Quay brothers) - 6/10

Dwaj ludzie z szafa / Two Men and a Wardrobe (1958, Roman Polanski) - 6/10


TV stuff:

South Park: "Turd Burglars" (2019) - 8/10
Last edited by GruesomeTwosome on December 2nd, 2019, 2:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#11

Post by Onderhond » December 2nd, 2019, 2:54 pm

sol wrote:
December 1st, 2019, 12:26 pm
Tucker: The Man and His Dream - I recall liking this quite a bit at the time, though it is middle of the road for Coppola
Myeah, for me that's almost top tier Coppola. I kinda like his 80s work I've seen so far, much better than his 70s films.
sol wrote:
December 1st, 2019, 12:26 pm
Maze Runner: Death Cure - I actually really enjoyed the first film but by the time this one ended I had definitely had enough
Same here. The first film was surprisingly good for a young adult adaptation (though not as good as Attack on Titan, which is pretty similar). It went downhill after the first film for me, mostly because it became more about narrative and characters than the actual maze, which is where these young adult things get pretty flat and cheesy.
sol wrote:
December 1st, 2019, 12:26 pm
McCabe & Mrs. Miller - I pretty much hated this, so glad to find someone else with a similar opinion
Well, it's still an above-average Western for me. I really don't like the genre.
sol wrote:
December 1st, 2019, 12:26 pm
Kiss Me Deadly - quite possibly my favourite of your viewings this week and I am guessing that you missed the opening of the film since the visual bravura on hand there is incredible
I know noirs are generally considered very "visual" films, but I just don't see it. It's not that I dislike b&w cinematography, it's just that I prefer grainy/high-contrast b&w, not the muddy version that most noirs offer. The Third Man is one of the exceptions there.

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#12

Post by sol » December 2nd, 2019, 2:54 pm

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 2:23 pm
I liked Okja well enough, but Bong Joon-ho has done better and for a director not really known for subtlety, this one was a bit too on-the-nose at times for me. Gyllenhaal's performance is pretty insane, mostly in a good way.
Maybe I just wasn't paying enough attention, but I didn't even realise that it was him until the end credits. Gyllenhaal is certainly capable of some quite kooky stuff as this year's Velvet Buzzsaw once again proved.

@ Everyone Else - probably no replies from me this week. Things are banking up at work, my health hasn't been the best and I am generally feeling quite irritable and exhausted. I would like to say that I'll be more conversative next week, but that probably won't happen. Feel free to chat among yourselves. I'll be a better host in a few weeks when school is over for the year.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#13

Post by Carmel1379 » December 2nd, 2019, 4:43 pm

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 2:23 pm
Image
Best moment in Solo :thumbsup:

Looking forward to seeing Clapin's first feature, based on the title alone it sounds like there are similar themes to 'Skhizein' in it. It's not on Netflix here though, so I'm going to have to wait a while longer

Do you think I should watch 'The Irishman'?

Do pivnice - I happened to catch this one in the cinema! Excellent complementary viewing to 'Valerie and Her Week of Wonders':)

Turd Burglars - Probably my favourite from this season so far as well, even though I had no prior knowledge of Tom Brady's existence :$ The Spice melange...
IMDb, letterboxd, tumblr
Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#14

Post by Lonewolf2003 » December 2nd, 2019, 5:01 pm

My entry this week:

Geuk jang jeon [Tale of Cinema] (2005, Sang-soo Hong): 7.8 - Hong being Hong, that adds an extra layer by contrasting the movie-in-the-movie with the movie and thereby showing the influence of art on life.
Goyangileul butaghae [Take Care of My Cat] (2001, Jae-eun Jeong): 8.0 - Sweet and charming coming-of-age movie that shows very well how a group of friends drifts apart after high school.
Palwolui Keuriseumaseu [Christmas in August] (1998, Jin-ho Hur) (rewatch): 9.0 > 8.0 - Very serene film about terminal ill man that tries to keep living his life as usual, has to come to grip with the fact he's dying, while simultaneous falling in love in his last month. Han Suk-kyu and Shim Eun-ha both do a tremendous job in showing with little details, f.e. small quick smiles, that they are in love with each other. Meanwhile Han Suk-kyu also succeeds in showing in flashes the anger and sadness between his calm and friendly mask.
Kimssi pyoryugi [Castaway on the Moon] (2009, Hae-jun Lee): 8.0 - A sweet and quirky movie about the redeeming power of love for lost lonely souls. Surprising how quickly this succeeded in suspending my disbelief about a guy being stranded in a deserted island in the middle of Seoul.
Angae [Mist /The Foggy Town] (1967, Soo-yong Kim): 8.0 - A business man has to return to his hometown, of which he wasn't very fond of, because his rich wife demands it of him. In that town he remembers his history and thinks about his life after meeting a young woman. The movie does a great job in integrating his memories in the movie. F.e. When he visit his mothers grave, his envisions his mother burial parade. The whole movie has a great existential mood.
Sampoganeun kil [Road to Sampo ] (1975, Man-hui Lee): 6.2 - Tho well made, this didn't captivate me, cause neither of the three characters did interest me.
Pieta (2012, Ki-duk Kim): 6.5 - I ended this feeling this story could been told and the themes about motherhood, sacrifice and guilt could have conveyed without the extremeness and violence in this. At best it's unnecessary, at worst it's only there for shock value.
The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946, Lewis Milestone): 6.5 - While the title and introduction are about Martha Ivers, it makes the poor decision to switch the POV to the Heflin character in the main part of the movie. Therefor wasting time on the less interesting love story with Lizabeth Scott and we aren't as left in the dark about what happened on that fatal night decades ago as the Heflin himself is, making Martha less mysterious for us than for him. The whole cast is strong. But Douglas is miscast, he would been better in the Heflin part, but hey it was his first role so can't blame for not knowing how to use him properly yet.
They Drive by Night (1940, Raoul Walsh): 7.5- The first part is more a hangout movie about the truck driving brothers than a noir, which moves along on a leisurely pace but nothing really suspenseful happen. The second part shifts to a noir about a jealous woman with a show stealing Ida Lupino. Unfortunate Bogey takes a backseat in the second part.
Dead Reckoning (1947, John Cromwell): 6.8 - Overal well made, Bogey does his thing well, and enjoyable, but the murder mystery isn't substantial enough to sustain the movie and the banter just not good and the love story not interesting enough to make up for it.
Ggobangdongne saramdeul [ People of the Slum/People of Ko-bang Neighborhood] (1982, Chang-ho Bae): 7.5
Byeoldeului gohyang [Heavenly Homecoming to Stars/The Stars Heavenly Home] (1974, Jang-ho Lee): 6.2 - A "fallen woman" story that gets more touching as it moves along. The more experimental film making techniques seemingly inspired by European arthouse of the time doesn't fit the movie.
Oasiseu [Oasis] (2002, Chang-dong Lee) (rewatch): 8.5 > 8.0
Desperate (1947, Anthony Mann): 6.8 - another okay enjoyable noir. But Steve Brodie doesn't have enough charisma to carry the picture and the pacing is off with the plot skipping months ahead at times.
Crossfire (1947, Edward Dmytryk): 7.8 - The murder mystery is intriguing, it gives an good depiction of the post-war mindset of soldiers and has a good, although unsubtle, message about the dangers of xenophobia. Gloria Grahame steals the few scenes she’s in as a sassy "showgirl" (well for the smart viewer it's clear what her job really is).
Ddongpari [Breathless] (2009, Ik-joon Yang): (rewatch): 8.5 > 8.0
Hanyo [The Housemaid] (1960, Ki-young Kim): 7.8 - Pure coincidentally this just happened to play at the cinema the last day of the Korean challenge :)
The Meaning of Life (1983, Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones) (rewatch): 8.5 > 7.5 - It has two great songs and some lesser one, and one that's so gross I skipped it this time. It also misses the narrative trust of the better Python movies, Life of Brain and the Holy Grail.
Demonlover (2002, Olivier Assayas): 7.0 - This starts of very promising as a well directed corporate spionage thriller about two companies fighting for control over a 3d porn animation studio. But the second half can be best described as an interesting mess. A mess cause the story derails and becomes less coherent. Also the characters motives are harder to understand and harder to care for. But still interesting cause the theme about desensitization by extreme violence and porn and corporate selfish greed is still there. So one could argue that I didn’t care about the characters fits the theme of dehumanization. One could also argue that it makes the second half a rather boring watch. It does remain very well directed all through nonetheless. .
Mimong [Sweet Dream] (1936, Ju-nam Yang): 5.0 - like others remarked before it's an interesting curiosity but a poor movie. The morals are completely outdated so it hasn't stand the test of time in that regard. Besides that it's just a very stiff acted and horribly edited movie; most of the scenes do not flow well on from each other (as sol said earlier).
You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (2010, Woody Allen): 5.5 - A subpar Allen with an miscast Josh Brolin and Anthony Hopkins and a Noami Watts that's totally calling it in. It's all very cliched and doesn't even finish most storylines properly.
Les roseaux sauvages [Wild Reeds] (1994, André Téchiné): 7.2 - Nice subdued natural coming of age movie.

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#15

Post by Onderhond » December 2nd, 2019, 5:13 pm

Lonewolf2003 wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 5:01 pm

Pieta (2012, Ki-duk Kim): 6.5 - I ended this feeling this story could been told and the themes about motherhood, sacrifice and guilt could have conveyed without the extremeness and violence in this. At best it's unnecessary, at worst it's only there for shock value.
Necessary in the sense that it really wouldn't be the same film without it. If you don't care for shock value/elements (ie Ki-duk's harshness), it's normal that it adds nothing, but I wouldn't have liked the films as much without it. At the very least because tepid dramas are the norm.

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#16

Post by GruesomeTwosome » December 3rd, 2019, 12:23 am

Carmel1379 wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 4:43 pm
GruesomeTwosome wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 2:23 pm
Image
Best moment in Solo :thumbsup:

Looking forward to seeing Clapin's first feature, based on the title alone it sounds like there are similar themes to 'Skhizein' in it. It's not on Netflix here though, so I'm going to have to wait a while longer

Do you think I should watch 'The Irishman'?

Do pivnice - I happened to catch this one in the cinema! Excellent complementary viewing to 'Valerie and Her Week of Wonders':)

Turd Burglars - Probably my favourite from this season so far as well, even though I had no prior knowledge of Tom Brady's existence :$ The Spice melange...
Yeah I wish there was more cool stuff in Solo like that Lovecraftian creature, but alas...

Thanks again for the heads-up on Clapin, and you’re right, definitely some similarities between Skhizein and I Lost My Body in regards to the body/magical realism. That sucks that it’s not on your local Netflix. But I think there’s a good shot you’d like it once you get around to it.

As for The Irishman...my guess is that this might not be your kinda thing really? Not sure if you’re big on Scorsese in general, particularly his gangster films, but this one seems like a natural coda to the likes of Goodfellas and Casino. A decidedly much less romanticized, de-glamorized take on the genre compared to those prior Scorsese films. I’m actually not too big on Goodfellas myself, and slightly prefer Casino if only for the vibrant Las Vegas setting, but I might like The Irishman over either of them, as it ends up being more humanist and showing the regrets/damage of living that kind of life as Scorsese seems to be reflecting on the genre as a whole, from a more matured perspective and sort of closing the book on it (with his favorite old fart actors in tow, De Niro and Pesci). But I certainly prefer Marty in non-mobster mode.

Do pivnice - You’re lucky! Did you see it in the cinema as part of a screening of a bunch of other Svankmajer shorts or something? This one knocked me out, had me on edge more than most horror films and the sound design (as always with Svankmajer) is superb. Yes I can see the Valerie comparison.

Hehe, probably the funniest South Park episode of the season for me, yep. The running Dune references had me dying. :lol: Makes me wanna watch Lynch’s film again, I only saw it as a kid.
Last edited by GruesomeTwosome on December 4th, 2019, 3:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#17

Post by RedHawk10 » December 3rd, 2019, 5:07 am

The Irishman (2019) - posted my thoughts in the last movie you saw thread, basically found it a great and deeply upsetting film that had quite a lot to say.

From What is Before (2014) - absolutely haunting. Has grown in my mind the more I've thought about it.

Horse Money (2014) - unfortunately this one did very little for me. I don't think I'm on Costa's wavelength at all. I kinda appreciate what he was going for with the elevator scene though.

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#18

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » December 3rd, 2019, 8:06 am

Carmel1379 wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 4:43 pm
GruesomeTwosome wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 2:23 pm
Image
Best moment in Solo :thumbsup:
You're just stimulated by long organic stuff entering or exiting vibrant holes as a means of connecting to the Other.
Also by "Star Wars". And on that note, here's the newest indispensable chapter in the saga:

dream realityImage
LETTERBOXD | MUBI | IMDb | tumblr.

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#19

Post by Carmel1379 » December 4th, 2019, 12:24 am

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
December 3rd, 2019, 12:23 am
Yeah I wish there was more cool stuff in Solo like that Lovecraftian creature, but alas...

Thanks again for the heads-up on Clapin, and you’re right, definitely some similarities between Shkizein and I Lost My Body in regards to the body/magical realism. That sucks that it’s not on your local Netflix. But I think there’s a good shot you’d like it once you get around to it.

As for The Irishman...my guess is that this might not be your kinda thing really? Not sure if you’re big on Scorsese in general, particularly his gangster films, but this one seems like a natural coda to the likes of Goodfellas and Casino. A decidedly much less romanticized, de-glamorized take on the genre compared to those prior Scorsese films. I’m actually not too big on Goodfellas myself, and slightly prefer Casino if only for the vibrant Las Vegas setting, but I might like The Irishman over either of them, as it ends up being more humanist and showing the regrets/damage of living that kind of life as Scorsese seems to be reflecting on the genre as a whole, from a more matured perspective and sort of closing the book on it (with his favorite old fart actors in tow, De Niro and Pesci). But I certainly prefer Marty in non-mobster mode.

Do pivnice - You’re lucky! Did you see it in the cinema as part of a screening of a bunch of other Svankmajer shorts or something? This one knocked me out, had me on edge more than most horror films and the sound design (as always with Svankmajer) is superb. Yes I can see the Valerie comparison.

Hehe, probably the funniest South Park episode of the season for me, yep. The running Dune references had me dying. :lol: Makes me wanna watch Lynch’s film again, I only saw it as a kid.
Thanks for the comments. I've decided to save the more gritty Goodfellas Casino Spice mélange for a rainy day when I'm so sick I can't move out of my bed, to then watch it on my phone, just as Scorsese intended! B) No, but you're right, I'm currently not too drawn to the mobster lifestyle movies, and if anything will sway my decision to see this one faster, it'll probably be my desire to see a high budget period piece more than anything else, but there's no rush for that.

It was screened -- along with Svankmajer's 1968 'Byt' -- before "Valerie". :P I remember not knowing they were on the program, and hence being pleasantly surprised, especially by 'Do pivnice', my only first viewing on that night, which as we said ties with "Valerie" quite well, while the large screen and room acoustics also really made its word- and music-less spooky atmosphere more pronounced. 'Stoker' beats both when it comes to pure cellar explorations though ;)
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Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#20

Post by Carmel1379 » December 4th, 2019, 12:42 am

Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
December 3rd, 2019, 8:06 am
Carmel1379 wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 4:43 pm
GruesomeTwosome wrote:
December 2nd, 2019, 2:23 pm
Image
Best moment in Solo :thumbsup:
You're just stimulated by long organic stuff entering or exiting vibrant holes as a means of connecting to the Other.
Also by "Star Wars". And on that note, here's the newest indispensable chapter in the saga:

Ha ha ha, what a story Mark

Image
Image
Image


Thanks a lot, bye!
IMDb, letterboxd, tumblr
Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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