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Noirvember Challenge (Official, November 2019)

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Re: Noirvember Challenge (Official, November 2019)

#161

Post by blueboybob » November 8th, 2019, 1:11 pm

67. Private Hell 36 (1956)
68. Riot in Cell Block 11 (1954)
69. The Chase (1946)
70. No Questions Asked (1951)
71. Shack Out on 101 (1955)
72. Port of New York (1949)
73. Her Kind of Man (1946)

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#162

Post by frbrown » November 8th, 2019, 2:39 pm

28. Never Let Go (1960)
29. The Houston Story (1956)
30. Avant le deluge (1954)
31. Diary of a Hitman (1991)
32. Lust for Gold (1949)

SpoilerShow
1. Southside 1-1000 (1950)
2. Chase a Crooked Shadow (1958)
3. Daybreak (1948)
4. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (1956)
5. Death of a Scoundrel (1956)
6. Street of Chance (1942)
7. Calling Homicide (1956)
8. The Bedroom Window (1987)
9. Cover Girl Killer (1959)
10. Heist (2001)
11a. Johnny Staccato: Murder in Hi-Fi (1959)
11b. Johnny Staccato: Fly Baby, Fly (1959)
11c. Johnny Staccato: Tempted (1959)
12. The Bonnie Parker Story (1958)
13. The Steel Jungle (1956)
14. I'll Get You for This (1951)
15. The Return of the Whistler (1948)
16. Iron Man (1951)
17. The Getaway (1994)
18. The Long Haul (1957)
19. Sealed Lips (1942)
20. The Lost Hours (1952)
21. Cry Wolf (1947)
22. Behind the High Wall (1956)
23. Chicago Syndicate (1955)
24. I, Jane Doe (1948)
25. Kiss of Death (1995)
26. I, the Jury (1982)
27. The Mysterious Mr. Valentine (1946)
28. Never Let Go (1960)
29. The Houston Story (1956)
30. Avant le deluge (1954)
31. Diary of a Hitman (1991)
32. Lust for Gold (1949)

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#163

Post by blocho » November 8th, 2019, 6:00 pm

1. Therese Raquin (1953)

2. Where Danger Lives (1950)
Surprisingly mediocre.

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#164

Post by blueboybob » November 8th, 2019, 7:38 pm

74. The Strange Door (1951)
75. Union Station (1950)
76. The Glass Web (1953)
77. Walk Softly, Stranger (1950)
78. Angels Over Broadway (1940)

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#165

Post by Coryn » November 8th, 2019, 10:28 pm

7. Jackie Brown (1997)
I saved Latin, what did you ever do ?

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#166

Post by blueboybob » November 9th, 2019, 1:44 am

79. The Man Who Cheated Himself (1950)
80. Trapped (1949)
81. On Dangerous Ground (1951)
82. Witness to Murder (1954)

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#167

Post by AB537 » November 9th, 2019, 3:02 am

8. I Confess (Alfred Hitchcock, 1953) 6.5/10 ... Some good stuff here, but definitely a lesser work from Hitchcock

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#168

Post by sol » November 9th, 2019, 3:35 am

Out of the PastShow
1. Marked Woman (1937)
2. Bullets or Ballots (1936)
3. The Price of Fear (1956)
4. Memories of Murder (2003)
5. City Across the River (1949)
6. Chinatown at Midnight (1949)
7. Footsteps in the Night (1957)

Pro-FBI Docudrama Double Feature (with similar names too):

8. Walk East on Beacon! (1952)

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Fashioned as a docudrama, this noir adulates the bravery of the FBI agents to such an extreme degree that it feels nothing short of pro-Bureau propaganda. The monotone narration also drains the story of the limited suspension and tension that it could have had. The film is almost interesting due to its showcasing of old school technology including early video surveillance equipment and Finlay Currie is always solid, but this is mostly a drag.

9. Walk a Crooked Mile (1948)

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Some of the technology used by the two agents here (one British; the other American) is pretty interesting as they find ways to discover coded messages embedded in paintings; the pair also interact well together with some slight but noticeable suggestions of the two become a little bit more than just good friends. The docudrama fashion of the film weighs against the film and the formulae are just McGuffins, but this works better than Beacon.
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#169

Post by mightysparks » November 9th, 2019, 4:09 am

7. Criss Cross (1949) 6/10
When an armoured truck driver is caught having an affair with his ex-wife by her new gangster husband, he offers to help him rob his own truck. This is a pretty well-paced, entertaining noir that looks pretty good, if not in any particularly noteworthy way. Its main downfall is how little 'meat' it has. The characters are all kind of slimy, but it relies too heavily on lengthy dialogue to get this point across rather than any deep characterization. Burt Lancaster's character is a lame dullard, and gives a wooden performance. Yvonne De Carlo gets the most to do and does it quite well, and though he only has a small-ish part, Dan Duryea is a decent bad guy. The 'affair' was pretty lackluster though and it didn't really build up tension at the beginning, it only really found its feet once they started on with the truck robbery. Similarly, all the betrayals weren't as powerful as they could've been if the characters were a bit more interesting and there had been a better build-up. The ending was pretty good, though.

Previously WatchedShow
1. Murder, My Sweet (1944) 6/10
2. The Hitch-Hiker (1953) 6/10
3. The Big Combo (1955) 6/10
4. Panic in the Streets (1950) 7/10
5. Crossfire (1947) 6/10
6. On Dangerous Ground (1951) 5/10
7. Criss Cross (1949) 6/10
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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#170

Post by 72aicm » November 9th, 2019, 9:47 am

13. No Man of Her Own (1950)
14. The Whistler (1944)
SpoilerShow

1. Too Late for Tears (1949)
2. The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)
3. You Only Live Once (1937)
4. The Devil Thumbs a Ride (1947)
5. The Hoodlum (1951)
6. Classe tous risques (1960)
7. Bodyguard (1948)
8. Experiment in Terror (1962)
9. Blood on the Moon (1948)
10. The Glass Wall (1953)
11. Whispering Footsteps (1943)
12. Fall Guy (1947)
13. No Man of Her Own (1950)
14. The Whistler (1944)

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#171

Post by blueboybob » November 9th, 2019, 12:48 pm

83. Canon City (1948)
84. Shield for Murder (1954)
85. Finger Man (1955)
86. Act of Violence (1949)

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#172

Post by flavo5000 » November 9th, 2019, 2:14 pm

Image
26. Dalkomhan insaeng a.k.a. A Bittersweet Life (2005) 7.5/10
List: CrimeReads' Korean Noir

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27. Smoking Tar (2017) 3/10
List: None
While this incredibly low budget crime flick isn't well known enough to show up on any lists, a cursory read of its IMDB description should give you enough info to put it squarely in noir territory: "Nathan Drake is driving to a dark past while shattered memories rise in his mind. Is he really doing the right thing?

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28. Farewell, My Lovely (1975) 7.5/10
List: TSPDT 1000 Noir #364

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29. Each Dawn I Die (1939) 6/10
List: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir: The Essential Reference Guide

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30. Sex Wish (1976) 4/10
List: Anthology Film Archives Porn Noir

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31. Double Cross (1941) 5/10
List: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Film Noir: The Essential Reference Guide
SpoilerShow
1. Appointment with Danger (1950)
2. Rope of Sand (1949)
3. The Tall Target (1951)
4. The Place Beyond the Pines (2012)
5. Take Aim at the Police Van (1960)
6. Storm Warning (1951)
7. Violent Cop (1989)
8. Le silence de la mer (1949)
9. The Burglar (1957)
10. A Double Life (1947)
11. Romeo Is Bleeding (1993)
12. Crashout (1955)
13. The Unsuspected (1947)
14. Edge of the City (1957)
15. One False Move (1992)
16. L'humanité (1999)
17. Bad Blonde (1953)
18. Alias Nick Beal (1949)
19. In the Bedroom (2001)
20. Panique (!946)
21. They Made Me a Fugitive (1947)
22. Nadie hablará de nosotras cuando hayamos muerto a.k.a. Nobody Will Speak of Us When We're Dead (1995)
23. Frantic (1988)
24. Johnny Stool Pigeon (1949)
25. Deception (1946)
26. Dalkomhan insaeng a.k.a. A Bittersweet Life (2005)
27. Smoking Tar (2017)
28. Farewell, My Lovely (1975)
29. Each Dawn I Die (1939)
30. Sex Wish (1976)
31. Double Cross (1941)

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#173

Post by frbrown » November 9th, 2019, 2:36 pm

33. Faces in the Dark (1960)
34. The Morning After (1986)

SpoilerShow
1. Southside 1-1000 (1950)
2. Chase a Crooked Shadow (1958)
3. Daybreak (1948)
4. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (1956)
5. Death of a Scoundrel (1956)
6. Street of Chance (1942)
7. Calling Homicide (1956)
8. The Bedroom Window (1987)
9. Cover Girl Killer (1959)
10. Heist (2001)
11a. Johnny Staccato: Murder in Hi-Fi (1959)
11b. Johnny Staccato: Fly Baby, Fly (1959)
11c. Johnny Staccato: Tempted (1959)
12. The Bonnie Parker Story (1958)
13. The Steel Jungle (1956)
14. I'll Get You for This (1951)
15. The Return of the Whistler (1948)
16. Iron Man (1951)
17. The Getaway (1994)
18. The Long Haul (1957)
19. Sealed Lips (1942)
20. The Lost Hours (1952)
21. Cry Wolf (1947)
22. Behind the High Wall (1956)
23. Chicago Syndicate (1955)
24. I, Jane Doe (1948)
25. Kiss of Death (1995)
26. I, the Jury (1982)
27. The Mysterious Mr. Valentine (1946)
28. Never Let Go (1960)
29. The Houston Story (1956)
30. Avant le deluge (1954)
31. Diary of a Hitman (1991)
32. Lust for Gold (1949)
33. Faces in the Dark (1960)
34. The Morning After (1986)

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#174

Post by ororama » November 9th, 2019, 8:55 pm

5. Stolen Face (1952) * 72 min.

SpoilerShow
1. The Crooked Way (1949) * 89 min.
2. Shield for Murder (1954) * 82 min.
3. The Narrow Margin (1952) * 71 min.
4. Hollow Triumph (1948) * 80 min.

*First time viewing.

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#175

Post by klaus78 » November 9th, 2019, 9:26 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Fatal Attraction (1987) 7/10
2. Whirlpool (1949) 6/10
3. No Way Out (1950) 8/10
4. House of Strangers (1949) 6/10

5. A Kiss Before Dying (1956) 6/10
6. Viele kamen vorbei (1956) 7/10
7. Nightfall (1956) 7/10
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#176

Post by blueboybob » November 9th, 2019, 10:33 pm

87. I Wake Up Screaming (1941)
88. World for Ransom (1954)
89. Cry Vengeance (1954)
90. Framed (1947)
91. Side Street (1950)

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#177

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » November 9th, 2019, 10:36 pm

FTV:7:The Girl in the Picture (1957) 6

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Despite the audio on Simply Media’s transfer sounding like it was recorded in a tin can, the first screenplay by Paul Ryder grabs some snappy headlines in a mad-dash Noir mystery for cop George Keefe (a fittingly frantic Tom Chatto) being desperate to find the name of a woman in a photo taken the day his brother was killed. Matching Ryder’s printing, director Don Chaffey & cinematographer Ian D. Struthers joining Keefe chasing the killer in rapid whip-pans, which whilst sadly not closing in for headline grabbing close-ups, do catch the girl in the picture.
Last edited by morrison-dylan-fan on November 10th, 2019, 3:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#178

Post by 72aicm » November 9th, 2019, 11:22 pm

15. La belle équipe (1936)
16. The Mark of the Whistler (1944)
SpoilerShow
1. Too Late for Tears (1949)
2. The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)
3. You Only Live Once (1937)
4. The Devil Thumbs a Ride (1947)
5. The Hoodlum (1951)
6. Classe tous risques (1960)
7. Bodyguard (1948)
8. Experiment in Terror (1962)
9. Blood on the Moon (1948)
10. The Glass Wall (1953)
11. Whispering Footsteps (1943)
12. Fall Guy (1947)
13. No Man of Her Own (1950)
14. The Whistler (1944)
15. La belle équipe (1936)
16. The Mark of the Whistler (1944)

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#179

Post by mightysparks » November 10th, 2019, 4:16 am

8. D.O.A. (1949) 5/10
A poisoned accountant discovers he has less than a week to live and tries to find the person who wants him dead. Whilst the premise is interesting and the opening scene is a great hook, the mystery is quite convoluted and gets less interesting as it goes on. The film is also extremely sexist and gross; the main character is a slimy guy with an overly clingy and emotionally girlfriend who he strings along for no real reason, and on his trip away perves on every woman with an accompanying comical whistle sound. Lucky it does away with this once he realises he's dying, but he's still gross and it's hard to be invested with him or his upcoming death. Props to the film to sticking to its hook with a good ending, though.

Previously WatchedShow
1. Murder, My Sweet (1944) 6/10
2. The Hitch-Hiker (1953) 6/10
3. The Big Combo (1955) 6/10
4. Panic in the Streets (1950) 7/10
5. Crossfire (1947) 6/10
6. On Dangerous Ground (1951) 5/10
7. Criss Cross (1949) 6/10
8. D.O.A. (1949) 5/10
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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#180

Post by jeroeno » November 10th, 2019, 5:53 am

18. Chicago Confidential (1957)
19. I Love Trouble (1948)
20. The Maltese Falcon (1931)
21. State of Grace (1990)
22. Flaxy Martin (1949)

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#181

Post by vortexsurfer » November 10th, 2019, 10:51 am

4. Blonde Ice (Jack Bernhard, 1948)
5. Dishonored Lady (Robert Stevenson, 1947)
6. Fear in the Night (Maxwell Shane, 1947)

SpoilerShow
1. The Strange Woman (Edgar G. Ulmer, 1946)
2. The Glass Key (Stuart Heisler, 1942)
3. The Stranger (Orson Welles, 1946)
4. Blonde Ice (Jack Bernhard, 1948)
5. Dishonored Lady (Robert Stevenson, 1947)
6. Fear in the Night (Maxwell Shane, 1947)

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#182

Post by sol » November 10th, 2019, 11:47 am

Out of the PastShow
1. Marked Woman (1937)
2. Bullets or Ballots (1936)
3. The Price of Fear (1956)
4. Memories of Murder (2003)
5. City Across the River (1949)
6. Chinatown at Midnight (1949)
7. Footsteps in the Night (1957)
8. Walk East on Beacon! (1952)
9. Walk a Crooked Mile (1948)

10. Take One False Step (1949)

Image

William Powell is as solid as ever here and the film has some lovely low lighting photography from Oscar nominee Franz Planer, most notably when Powell searches an apartment in the dark (see above) and Powell's reflection in a photo frame while on the phone. The whole thing feels a little daft though with Powell's fear of being accused of murder always seeming irrational; much of the film is also derailed by a false rabies radio report subplot.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#183

Post by blueboybob » November 10th, 2019, 12:27 pm

92. The Sellout (1952)
93. The Lawless (1950)
94. The Come On (1956)
95. Drive a Crooked Road (1954)

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#184

Post by ororama » November 10th, 2019, 1:21 pm

6. The House on Telegraph Hill (1951) 93 min.

SpoilerShow
1. The Crooked Way (1949) * 89 min.
2. Shield for Murder (1954) * 82 min.
3. The Narrow Margin (1952) * 71 min.
4. Hollow Triumph (1948) * 80 min.
5. Stolen Face (1952) * 72 min.

*First time viewing.

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#185

Post by clemmetarey » November 10th, 2019, 2:20 pm

peeptoad wrote:
November 7th, 2019, 7:51 pm
clemmetarey wrote:
October 31st, 2019, 12:34 pm
'peedtoad' ?
:lol:
:whistling:

morrison-dylan-fan wrote:
November 9th, 2019, 10:36 pm
FTV:7:The Girl in the Picture (1957) 6
That's your 8th film Morrison. :)
SpoilerShow
1: Think of a Number (1969)
2: Cash on Demand (1962)
3:The Silent Partner (1978)
4:Le faux pas (1965)
5: The Glass Cage (1955)
6: Section des disparus (1956)
7:Five Days (1954)
8:The Girl in the Picture (1957)

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#186

Post by blocho » November 10th, 2019, 3:32 pm

3. Across the Bridge (1957)

There are noirs that feature suave leading men and beautiful women, sharp dialogue and witty one-liners, elegant suits and slinky dresses. I love these movies. And then there are noirs that are focused moral turpitude, low motives, the degrading and humiliating aspects of human nature and human actions. This tradition owes a lot to pulp, and I love these movies too.

The categories sometimes overlap, but Across the Bridge definitely belongs to the latter. It feels almost like a Jim Thompson novel, although it's based on a story by Graham Greene. There may be only one positive character in the whole movie, and she's a minor figure. Everyone else is venal. Rod Steiger, full of tics and fury, carries the movie.

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#187

Post by maxwelldeux » November 10th, 2019, 3:51 pm

Once you go noir, you'll never go farShow
1. Brute Force (1947)
2. 5 Against the House (1955)
3. Shock Corridor (1963)
4. Pickup on South Street (1953)
5. Little Caesar (1931)
6. The Long Goodbye (1973)
7. Whispering Footsteps (1943)
8. Lady in the Death House (1944)
9. Strangers in the Night (1944)
I was inspired by BBB to sort by length on the long official noir list, so here I am. The first two weren't memorable, but Strangers in the Night was quite enjoyable - very atmospheric, good shadow work, and creepy as hell.

10. The Whistler (1944)
11. The Mark of the Whistler (1944)
And then I found the Whistler films. Kinda cool to see a series like this. The films aren't great (the first is better than the second), but entertaining enough to watch.

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#188

Post by frbrown » November 10th, 2019, 3:54 pm

35. The Story of Molly X (1949)
36. The Nickel Ride (1974)
37. Voici le temps des assassins... (1956)

38. The Judge (1949)

Bizarre little movie

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SpoilerShow
1. Southside 1-1000 (1950)
2. Chase a Crooked Shadow (1958)
3. Daybreak (1948)
4. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (1956)
5. Death of a Scoundrel (1956)
6. Street of Chance (1942)
7. Calling Homicide (1956)
8. The Bedroom Window (1987)
9. Cover Girl Killer (1959)
10. Heist (2001)
11a. Johnny Staccato: Murder in Hi-Fi (1959)
11b. Johnny Staccato: Fly Baby, Fly (1959)
11c. Johnny Staccato: Tempted (1959)
12. The Bonnie Parker Story (1958)
13. The Steel Jungle (1956)
14. I'll Get You for This (1951)
15. The Return of the Whistler (1948)
16. Iron Man (1951)
17. The Getaway (1994)
18. The Long Haul (1957)
19. Sealed Lips (1942)
20. The Lost Hours (1952)
21. Cry Wolf (1947)
22. Behind the High Wall (1956)
23. Chicago Syndicate (1955)
24. I, Jane Doe (1948)
25. Kiss of Death (1995)
26. I, the Jury (1982)
27. The Mysterious Mr. Valentine (1946)
28. Never Let Go (1960)
29. The Houston Story (1956)
30. Avant le deluge (1954)
31. Diary of a Hitman (1991)
32. Lust for Gold (1949)
33. Faces in the Dark (1960)
34. The Morning After (1986)
35. The Story of Molly X (1949)
36. The Nickel Ride (1974)
37. Voici le temps des assassins... (1956)
38. The Judge (1949)

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#189

Post by AB537 » November 10th, 2019, 4:35 pm

9. The Big Clock (John Farrow, 1948) 7.5/10
10. Le deuxième souffle - Second Breath (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1966) 8.5/10
11. The Big Knife (Robert Aldrich, 1955) 7/10
12. Mr. Arkadin (Orson Welles, 1955) 8/10

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#190

Post by OldAle1 » November 10th, 2019, 5:10 pm

Noir is the New BlackShow

Day 1 - Whistle in the Night

1. The Whistler (William Castle, 1944)
2. The Mark of the Whistler (William Castle, 1944)
3. The Power of the Whistler (Lew Landers, 1945)
4. Voice of the Whistler (William Castle, 1945)

Day 2 - More Whistling in the Night

5. Mysterious Intruder (William Castle, 1946)
6. The Secret of the Whistler (George Sherman, 1946)
7. The Thirteenth Hour (William Clemens, 1947)
8. The Return of the Whistler (D. Ross Lederman, 1948)
Day 3 - The Low Rent World of Hugo Haas Pt 1

9. The Girl on the Bridge (Hugo Haas, 1951)

My only exposure to Czech actor/producer/screenwriter/director up to this point had been seeing him in a few of the small Hollywood parts he got in the years immediately after fleeing the Nazis - things like King Solomon's Mines - but he didn't make an impression on me. He certainly does now after getting a start on these cheap independent productions that he made in the 50s, mostly noir-tinged at the least, some certainly full-blooded entries in the cycle. Looks like this was the second in his cycle, but for whatever reason I got mixed up and watched this one first. This is certainly moody and downbeat, with the director starring as a watch repairman who makes a minimal living, working and living in a squalid district right next to the title bridge (here's a case where the title actually describes the setup for the film, a rarity). He rescues a young woman (Beverly Michaels) from throwing herself off, and gradually they develop a relationship, despite a huge age difference - one thing I really like about Haas is that he is totally conscious that his characters are older, not so attractive, and that there's something unhealthy or at least odd about the situations they find themselves in with young women - he's never pretending that it's just normal for a chunky 50+ guy who is often rather hopeless to end up with a beautiful young blonde. Here the situation is complicated by a shadow out of the woman's past, an ex-husband and baby, and the possibilities of blackmail. This is all quite deftly handled and nicely acted, and Haas mostly makes good use of his minimalist sets; it's a bit too familiar perhaps, which keeps it out of the top echelon, but still an impressive start to this series for me.

10. Pickup (Hugo Haas, 1951)

Released a few months before The Girl on the Bridge, this was Haas' first film as d/w/p in America, and his first film as director in a dozen years. As in the other film from 1951, he plays something of a loser or at the least, a man of small ambition and achievement, a railroad dispatcher who lives fairly contentedly on the outskirts of town next to the tracks, with a "Professor" (Howland Chamberlain, who nearly steals the show) as his main friend - until he's seduced by a gorgeous young blonde on the make, who then conspires with a younger man to get his money and do away with him. If this sounds familiar it's because you've seen the basic story in one of the innumerable adaptations or rip-offs of The Postman Always Rings Twice, and I suppose this qualifies though it's got enough that's original to it - especially including the dispatcher's deafness, which plays heavily into the plot, and the rather surprising
SpoilerShow
mostly happy, and murder-free
ending. Michaels makes a truly great femme fatale in a part completely different from the one she plays in The Girl on the Bridge, in fact it was hard for me to recognize her as the same actress. Wonder why she didn't have a better career. Anyway, this is on a par with TGOTB and it will certainly be fun to go through the rest of Haas' work.

Day 4 - The Low Rent World of Hugo Hass Pt 2 + Interlude, with Bowling

11. Strange Fascination (Hugo Haas, 1952)

This one's a little different, in that the Haas character isn't down and out - well, at least not during the bulk of the picture, though the "prologue" as you might call it, before the long flashback that is the bulk of the film, suggests otherwise. He's a famous European pianist, convinced to come to America and try his luck in a less dangerous part of the world, largely through the sponsorship of a rich widow (Mona Barrie) who is probably about his age and who seems to have other interests in him. Alas, he quickly finds himself falling for a younger and more attractive woman (Cleo Moore) and, no surprise, things start to go downhill from there, as his powerful jealousy is aroused whenever she's out in public, working as a model or actress - and yet his drinking and other problems keep him from making the kind of money he needs to keep them both in style. Same old story...again this is nothing out of the ordinary, story-wise, but Haas, Moore, Barrie and the other actors are all pretty solid, and I feel that there's a certain realism in Haas' depiction of the sacrifices we make for love, lust, or money that goes beyond what I see in most low-rent noir, and even in some of the better-known A pictures in the style.

12. The Big Lebowski (JoelEthan Coen, 1998) (re-watch)

Probably somewhere between my 6th and 8th viewing. I suppose it's morbid, but I was inspired to watch this again by remembering the final scene while talking with the funeral home director about my mom's cremation. No, I didn't put her ashes in a Ralph's can - we don't have Ralph's around here. Not sure what I can say about this one that hasn't been said a million times; I do think in some ways it's much ado about nothing, it's a film that is pretty largely predicated on jokey over-the-top characters, an incomprehensible plot, and a certain light surrealism, and when you start looking for more serious elements of the noir universe - in particular any kind of critique of capitalism or the justice system - it's not there. But so what? This is a rare case where a jumble of silly ideas and outrageous characters thrown all together just works and it's one of those rare films I could probably watch every 6 months and never get bored of. If I had to pick a favorite character it's certainly Walter (John Goodman), but I do wish more time was there for Ben Gazzara and Jon Polito, and I think for whatever reason the line that makes me laugh the loudest - really it's all in the delivery - is "Older Cop" (Richard Gant) saying "Or the Creedence" after the Dude has reported his car theft. Supposedly most influenced by Chandler, but I'd say the more sleazy elements (porn) and the innumerable times that the Dude gets hit on the head recall Mickey Spillane just as much.

Day 5 - The Don't Make Them Like They Used To

13. Against All Odds (Taylor Hackford, 1984)

What better film to follow up Lebowski with than another film starring the Dude himself, also predicated on earlier noir - in this case a remake, more-or-less, of Out of the Past. I got nothing against remakes - obviously in the noir world we have the 1941 Maltese Falcon, a far better film than the 2 previous versions, and we also have some pretty credible modern takes on the style like the 1975 Farewell, My Lovely, IMO every bit as good as Murder My Sweet. But this sadly is an example of leave-it-the-hell-alone if you don't have anything interesting to bring to the story, and it fails on almost every level except perhaps in James Woods' take on the Kirk Douglas part, which is reasonably credible if not a patch on the original. Woods was on a roll in the 80s and his other film for this year was Once Upon a Time in America, in my opinion the greatest crime film ever made; Bridges on the other hand had a spottier decade, and while his other 1984 film Starman is at least better than this, it also points to a problem in his acting - he's good at the dopey, maybe drugged-out, kind of weird guys, not so hot as the straight, ordinary, man in trouble which he plays here. He's just awful here, coming off as totally fake and just reading lines much of the time, and Rachel Ward while not bad just doesn't have a character a tenth as juicy as Jane Greer (who is also in this in a small role) did in the original. And Out of the Past is just full of some of the best lines in movie history, like "it was the bottom of the barrel, and I was scraping it" and "Joe couldn't find a prayer in the Bible". Even RIchard Widmark can't save this extended, dull mess, and the wussy ending is the worst.

14. Mirage (Paul Williams, 1995)

Then again, you can do worse than Against All Odds. You can do this film, an uncredited Vertigo rip-off, with Edward James Olmos as the down-and-out cop (an alcoholic in this case) in a sleepy desert town (probably chosen because it was much cheaper than shooting this kind of story in a city, and cheap is certainly in evidence throughout) picked by a husband (the director, Paul Williams) to follow his wife (Sean Young), because he's got a psychological problem (not the alcoholism, interestingly) that will prevent him from acting at the crucial moment. This is just awful through and through, with again a lame-ass ending that proves that even during the Production Code era films could often be tougher than they are today - I guess during and after WWII people actually understood that life wasn't always a bed of roses, and sometimes a happy ending just wasn't going to work, and now we're too soft to tolerate gloom and doom anymore? Anyway it sure seems like the people behind these two films felt that way. I rather like Sean Young and Olmos is a really terrific actor, and both had decent careers in the 80s, with Olmos having a resurgence more recently with Battlestar Galactica, but I guess at the time this was made they must have both been pretty desperate for work, because this is really rock bottom crap.

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#191

Post by 72aicm » November 10th, 2019, 10:39 pm

17. The Power of the Whistler (1945)
18. Fury (1936)
19. Akai satsui (1964)
SpoilerShow
1. Too Late for Tears (1949)
2. The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973)
3. You Only Live Once (1937)
4. The Devil Thumbs a Ride (1947)
5. The Hoodlum (1951)
6. Classe tous risques (1960)
7. Bodyguard (1948)
8. Experiment in Terror (1962)
9. Blood on the Moon (1948)
10. The Glass Wall (1953)
11. Whispering Footsteps (1943)
12. Fall Guy (1947)
13. No Man of Her Own (1950)
14. The Whistler (1944)
15. La belle équipe (1936)
16. The Mark of the Whistler (1944)
17. The Power of the Whistler (1945)
18. Fury (1936)
19. Akai satsui (1964)

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#192

Post by blueboybob » November 10th, 2019, 10:46 pm

96. Calcutta (1947)
97. Highway 301 (1950)
98. Crossroads (1942)
99. Red Light (1949)

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#193

Post by Nopros » November 10th, 2019, 11:28 pm

7. The Dark Corner (1946)
8. The Dark Mirror (1946)
9. Lady in the Lake (1946)
10. Desperate (1947)
11. The Stranger (1946)
12. Border Incident (1949)
SpoilerShow
1. Stranger on the Third Floor (1940)
2. I Wake Up Screaming (1941)
3. The Glass Key (1942)
4. The Human Jungle (1954)
5. Fallen Angel (1945)
6. Black Angel (1946)
7. The Dark Corner (1946)
8. The Dark Mirror (1946)
9. Lady in the Lake (1946)
10. Desperate (1947)
11. The Stranger (1946)
12. Border Incident (1949)

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#194

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » November 10th, 2019, 11:54 pm

FTV:9: Ôsen chitai (1960) 9.

Image


“The Yellow line laid bare.”

The first and only entry in the “ Chitai” series to be shot in colour,writer/director Teruo Ishii & cinematographer Hiroshi Suzuki enter the murky side-streets assassin Amachi stays in hiding, with startling blemishes, via the crimson red and brown walls of the gangsters seedy apartment being broken by Ozuki’s ruby red shoes marking her kidnapping, picked up on by her journalist boyfriend Mayama, who enters the underworld like a homing beacon in his pristine white trench coat. Unrolling a unique long zoom-in shot between the legs of a woman (!) Ishii superbly reels in a documentary rawness, spinning on the stylisation of Film Noir, where sawn-off tracking shots curl on Mayama just missing from catching the Gangster and Emi in his sights.

Greasing palms so no questions are asked in the flat the Gangster holds Emi in, Ishii presents the Casbah as a maze of corruption built on a intense Film Noir atmosphere, weaving the camera in tightly held tracking shots dipping into each drug den/ brothel Mayama enters in the hope of reuniting Emi with her shoe. Left to fend for himself after the backers leave him high and dry once the target is killed, the screenplay by Ishii brilliantly taps into the high-wire anxiety just under the surface of the Gangster/hit-man brute confidence, whose simmering gun-point phone call hold-up with Ami, leads to IshII freeing Ami to come up with invented note write in a attempt to leave a paper trail.

Keeping Ami on his knife edge over threats if his orders are not followed, Shigeru Amachi gives a mesmerising turn as the Gangster/ hit-man, whose to-the-point dialogue is delivered with a brittle relish by Amachi. Entering the Casbah as a outsider, Teruo Yoshida gives a terrific performance as Mayama, with Yoshida bending Mayama’s fearfulness when confronted with the laid bare underworld, with a rush of blood to the head desire to free Ami from this Casbah. Taken at gun point to join the Gangster, the alluring Yoko Mihara gives a outstanding turn as Emi, via Mihara balancing Emi’s burnt-edge raw nerves with a sharp slyness to fold the Gangster plans on him.
Last edited by morrison-dylan-fan on November 11th, 2019, 11:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#195

Post by OldAle1 » November 11th, 2019, 1:34 am

Noir is the New BlackShow

Day 1 - Whistle in the Night

1. The Whistler (William Castle, 1944)
2. The Mark of the Whistler (William Castle, 1944)
3. The Power of the Whistler (Lew Landers, 1945)
4. Voice of the Whistler (William Castle, 1945)

Day 2 - More Whistling in the Night

5. Mysterious Intruder (William Castle, 1946)
6. The Secret of the Whistler (George Sherman, 1946)
7. The Thirteenth Hour (William Clemens, 1947)
8. The Return of the Whistler (D. Ross Lederman, 1948)

Day 3 - The Low Rent World of Hugo Haas Pt 1

9. The Girl on the Bridge (Hugo Haas, 1951)
10. Pickup (Hugo Haas, 1951)

Day 4 - The Low Rent World of Hugo Hass Pt 2 + Interlude, with Bowling

11. Strange Fascination (Hugo Haas, 1952)
12. The Big Lebowski (JoelEthan Coen, 1998) (re-watch)

Day 5 - The Don't Make Them Like They Used To

13. Against All Odds (Taylor Hackford, 1984)
14. Mirage (Paul Williams, 1995)
Day 6 - Old Guys Still Got It

15. Twilight (Robert Benton, 1998)

I've had this film in my head since it came out - not out of any love at the time for the director or any of the stars, though I've since grown into something of a Newman and Hackman fan, but because Rosenbaum pared it with The Big Lebowski in a review; at the time he liked this more but in his header he mentions that he might feel differently now. He's not generally a Coens fan so I dunno about what his take on that film would be, but giving *** in his ratings system to this film sure seems generous to me. Oh it does have some fine older and middle-aged actors (also including Susan Sarandon, James Garner and a tiny bit from M. Emmett Walsh) as well as an early performance by Reese Witherspoon, and it's reasonably well shot, nicely paced, etc, but it's just all so familiar, and really adds very little to the tale of noir or even of any of these experienced actors' careers. And while I wouldn't say that any of them are just going through the motions here, I also wouldn't say I feel much juice here - the tale (washed-up cop, now PI Newman on the trail of an old murder involving married couple Hackman and Sarandon, with whom he's living) is as tired as the actors and the ending and reveal of the bad guy can be seen a mile away. An enjoyable film still but I'm already forgetting it.

Day 7 - Money and Murder in a Modern Way

16. Croupier (Mike Hodges, 1998)

Clive Owen is Jack, an aspiring novelist, narrating the film in the voice of the author as he describes the character of himself and his approach to the world of the croupier at a mid-level London casino. Not a whole lot is done with the conceit - I'd hoped there would be some real conflict between what we see on the screen and what's going on in Jack's head, maybe a touch of the surreal or at least something like an unreliable narrator, but there really isn't - at least not so much that the film can't be taken and won't be taken by most as something quite straightforward. Jack has issues with his girlfriend, who wants him to stick to writing, gets involved in the lives of a couple of other women, and eventually there is a crime element that sort of floats in, but on the whole this isn't terribly "noir" in feel though it is rather stylish and reasonably compelling, up to what I thought was a rather stupid and pointless ending. I kind of feel like I'm missing something here, but I kind of don't care.

17. Freeway (Matthew Bright, 1996)

It didn't register to me that this was a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood until I read it in the description; I guess I'm a long ways from the fairy tale, and the film certainly isn't a straightforward reworking of it. Reese Witherspoon is the antithesis of innocent here - at least on the outside - a foulmouthed teen with a hooker mother, drug addict father-in-law who has the hots for her, etc, and when she gets pissed off at the cops for taking away her parents, she decides to head out on the freeway north to see her grandmother in Stockton, CA - the freeway in question is California's I-5. Unfortunately her car breaks down and who should come along but smooth-talking Kieffer Sutherland, apparently a therapist of some sort, who ends up a lot darker (think Big Bad Wolf) than he appears. The long, long conversation the two have as he drives her north is really great, easily the highlight of the film, but when the film starts to go pretty heavily into that dark and violent territory it kind of lost me; I guess it all felt very nihilistic and for much of the film it felt to me like Witherspoon and her "low life" friends and family were portrayed as pretty disgusting though it's clear that the film wants us to think otherwise; it just seemed very confused in it's messaging to me, with the weird cop played by Wolfgang Bodson in particular a character that didn't make sense. At the same time it was consistently involving, so I dunno - a mixed, mixed feeling at this point is the only way to describe it.

Day 8 - More Gambling, the Modern Way

18. The Cooler (Wayne Kramer, 2003)

Another casino-themed film, this one American and starring William H. Macy in the William H. Macy role - the bitter but mostly passive loser, with Alec Baldwin as the owner with whom he has a fraught relationship, and Maria Bello as the woman sent to make him happy, who he ends up falling for. Lots of style and flash here, decent performances by the principals and a nice supporting cast including Paul Sorvino, but the story of the unluckiest man in the world suddenly becoming lucky just didn't ring true to me either as wish-fulfillment or as an ironic twist on casino capitalism. OK, but that's about it.

Day 9 - Back to the Classics, With Cages and Spies

19. Caged (John Cromwell, 1950)

If there's a typical noir trope, or sub-category that I'm not particularly fond of - or at least don't seek out - it's the prison film. Not sure why this is - I'm not claustrophobic, and there are plenty of films set in a few locations or shot all on obvious sets that I love, but for some reason films set entirely in prisons are just something I tend to shy away from, though I must admit there are plenty of great examples. Seeing Eleanor Parker's frightened face, as the young naive Marie Allen, going away for her first time at 19, I had the feeling this was going to be one of the great ones, but it didn't hold. It's not bad certainly, well acted by Parker and fellow Oscar nominee Hope Emerson as the vicious matron in charge of the ward, and Agnes Moorhead as the sympathetic warden, but the characters of the warden and matron and many of the others are just too black-and-white, too much types rather than real people, and Parker's character arc really doesn't ring true - it just felt like more of a social issues tract than a screenplay at times. Sill worth seeing but something of a disappointment given the high reputation.

20. 5 Fingers (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1952)

James Mason is a gentleman's gentleman, serving the British ambassador in Ankara, and Danielle Darrieux is the French noblewoman who has lost her money who forms an alliance with Mason when he suddenly comes into great wealth - gotten through very ignoble means in this WWII spy story based apparently on real life. This is a really well done, suspenseful espionage story and Mason is typically great in a role that, though he could have played it in his sleep, suits him better than anyone else. Michael Rennie doesn't really have enough screen time as the British agent on the trail of the spy, and Darrieux's part isn't all that interesting, unfortunately, but Mason is a joy enough to watch that he makes this a pretty solid affair all around, the the chase sequences are some of the best from this era I've seen.

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#196

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » November 11th, 2019, 1:53 am

clemmetarey wrote:
November 10th, 2019, 2:20 pm
peeptoad wrote:
November 7th, 2019, 7:51 pm
clemmetarey wrote:
October 31st, 2019, 12:34 pm
'peedtoad' ?
:lol:
:whistling:

morrison-dylan-fan wrote:
November 9th, 2019, 10:36 pm
FTV:7:The Girl in the Picture (1957) 6
That's your 8th film Morrison. :)
SpoilerShow
1: Think of a Number (1969)
2: Cash on Demand (1962)
3:The Silent Partner (1978)
4:Le faux pas (1965)
5: The Glass Cage (1955)
6: Section des disparus (1956)
7:Five Days (1954)
8:The Girl in the Picture (1957)
Thanks for the correction clemmetarey.

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#197

Post by Nathan Treadway » November 11th, 2019, 2:42 am

11. Raw Deal
12. Act of Violence
13. The Blue Dahlia
14. The Street With No Name
15. Human Desire
16. Clash By Night
17. Odds Against Tomorrow
18. Desperate
19. Black Angel
20. I Wake Up Screaming
21. Dead Reckoning
22. Dark Corner
23. Dark Mirror
24. Born to Kill
25. Lady in the Lake
26. Road House
SpoilerShow
1. Brighton Rock
2. The Human Jungle
3. Kiss of Death
4. The Hitch-Hiker
5. Pitfall
6. Hollow Triumph
7. The Glass Key
8. The C-Man
9. The G-Men
10. The T Men
11. Raw Deal
12. Act of Violence
13. The Blue Dahlia
14. The Street With No Name
15. Human Desire
16. Clash By Night
17. Odds Against Tomorrow
18. Desperate
19. Black Angel
20. I Wake Up Screaming
21. Dead Reckoning
22. Dark Corner
23. Dark Mirror
24. Born to Kill
25. Lady in the Lake
26. Road House

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#198

Post by RBG » November 11th, 2019, 3:06 am

SpoilerShow
1. the threat (felix feist 1949)
2. desperate (anthony mann 1947)
3. scandal sheet (phil karlson 1951)

based on a novel by sam fuller!! :thumbsup:

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icm + ltbxd

NO GODS NO MASTERS

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#199

Post by maxwelldeux » November 11th, 2019, 3:47 am

OldAle1 wrote:
November 11th, 2019, 1:34 am
15. Twilight (Robert Benton, 1998)
At first, I was like "WHOA WHOA WHOA - WHAT?!?" then I saw the date/director... :lol:

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#200

Post by frbrown » November 11th, 2019, 4:05 am

39. A Rage in Harlem (1991)
40. Joe MacBeth (1955)
41. F.B.I. Girl (1951)
42. Smile Jenny, You're Dead (1974)

SpoilerShow
1. Southside 1-1000 (1950)
2. Chase a Crooked Shadow (1958)
3. Daybreak (1948)
4. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (1956)
5. Death of a Scoundrel (1956)
6. Street of Chance (1942)
7. Calling Homicide (1956)
8. The Bedroom Window (1987)
9. Cover Girl Killer (1959)
10. Heist (2001)
11a. Johnny Staccato: Murder in Hi-Fi (1959)
11b. Johnny Staccato: Fly Baby, Fly (1959)
11c. Johnny Staccato: Tempted (1959)
12. The Bonnie Parker Story (1958)
13. The Steel Jungle (1956)
14. I'll Get You for This (1951)
15. The Return of the Whistler (1948)
16. Iron Man (1951)
17. The Getaway (1994)
18. The Long Haul (1957)
19. Sealed Lips (1942)
20. The Lost Hours (1952)
21. Cry Wolf (1947)
22. Behind the High Wall (1956)
23. Chicago Syndicate (1955)
24. I, Jane Doe (1948)
25. Kiss of Death (1995)
26. I, the Jury (1982)
27. The Mysterious Mr. Valentine (1946)
28. Never Let Go (1960)
29. The Houston Story (1956)
30. Avant le deluge (1954)
31. Diary of a Hitman (1991)
32. Lust for Gold (1949)
33. Faces in the Dark (1960)
34. The Morning After (1986)
35. The Story of Molly X (1949)
36. The Nickel Ride (1974)
37. Voici le temps des assassins... (1956)
38. The Judge (1949)
39. A Rage in Harlem (1991)
40. Joe MacBeth (1955)
41. F.B.I. Girl (1951)
42. Smile Jenny, You're Dead (1974)

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