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Which films Did You See Last Week? 01/09/19 - 08/09/19

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sol
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Which films Did You See Last Week? 01/09/19 - 08/09/19

#1

Post by sol » September 8th, 2019, 12:00 pm

Which Films Did You See Last Week?

Please share with us which films you saw last week. It would be great if you could include some comments on each film. It would be awesome if you could also take some time to comment on everyone else's viewings (if you're like me, "real life" sometimes gets in the way, so no need to feel obliged).

This is what I saw:

★★★★ = loved it /// ★★★ = liked it a lot; ~7/10 /// ★★ = has interesting elements; ~6/10 /// ★ = did very little for me; ~5/10 and lower

Dr. Jack (1922). Invited to give a second opinion on a bedridden young woman, a kindly doctor discovers that her personal physician as been exaggerating her illnesses and sets out to right things in this Harold Lloyd comedy. The film takes a while to get going as it keeps episodically darting between subplots, but several of these are very funny - a sabotaged poker game in particular. Whatever the case, from the moment that Lloyd begins treating the bedridden Mildred Davis, the film never once lets up, concluding with a near twenty minute chase scene inside a mansion in which Lloyd gets to truly strut his stuff, performing amazing gymnastic feats as he leaps and sprints through the house. His stunts are impressive though throughout (there is an early bit in which he jumps into a moving car) and this stands up overall as one of Lloyd's very finest films. (first viewing, online) ★★★★

Three Ages (1923). Three tales of love and romantic rivalry from different time periods are intertwined in this silent comedy starring Buster Keaton. The film is apparently a spoof of Intolerance and might be better appreciated with that iconic film in mind. Viewed on its own terms, Three Ages is as uneven ride with the constant (and often ostensibly random) cutting between tales making it hard to become emotionally invested. There are some great gags for sure - most notably, a friendly lion, a duel at dawn with clubs and an icy chariot race - but they are few and far between. Photographed mostly in long shot, Keaton does not really have a chance to flex his acting muscles either and his love interests in all three incarnations are utterly dull. The film is at least nice and short - though also further proof that Keaton's best work was his shorts. (first viewing, online) ★

Battling Butler (1926). Wanting to impress a lady, a young man pretends to be a prizefighter who has the same name as him, but keeping up the ruse proves challenging in this Buster Keaton comedy. The film is widely regarded as Keaton's weakest silent feature with good reason. Based on an established stage play, the gags and comedic routines do not quite play to Keaton's talents. The pacing is also off with almost twenty minutes elapsing before the deception begins and Keaton not even getting into the ring to train or box until well past the halfway mark. Keaton directs the movie quite competently with some cool armpit framing shots and a great bit in which Keaton and his valet sit in an empty arena following a fight, but the film is far less funny than Keaton par with the comedic potential of the ruse narrative never milked for all that it is worth. (first viewing, online) ★

Four Sons (1928). Having made a good life for himself after immigrating to America, a German-born delicatessen owner tries to convince his mother to come to America after his brothers go off to fight in World War I in this silent melodrama. The film is mostly notable for being directed by a young John Ford, who has more than a few interesting visual tricks up his sleeve, from a beautiful shot of lake reflection rippled by a pebble, to the foggy nighttime battlefields, to a poignant dissolve-over at an empty dinner table where the family matriarch remembers her sons sitting around the table. As a narrative though, the film is no great shakes. It is such an incredibly flag-waving and jingoistic tale (about how much better the US is than Germany) that emotion is pretty much zapped out of each scene. This is mostly just worthwhile as a curio for Ford followers. (first viewing, online) ★★

The Matinee Idol (1928). Indignant when fired from an amateur acting troupe that he joined for fun under a pseudonym, a Broadway star tricks the troupe's lead actress into taking her show to Broadway in this Frank Capra silent comedy. While it is uncomfortable watching Johnnie Walker parade around in blackface, he does well with what is essentially a dual role, trying to romance the lead actress under his pseudonym (without makeup) as well as under his stage name (with makeup). Of course, it is never credible that she does not instantly catch onto the ruse, but Bessie Love is so charming in the lead female role and Walker is so earnest that the whole thing still works. The film also has a welcome The Producers and Noises Off... vibe with troubles in live stage shows being centre focus - though this is not as funny as either of those classics. (first viewing, online) ★★★

Cure (1997). Investigating a series of unrelated yet similar murders, all committed in trance-like states, a detective is drawn towards a student of hypnotic suggestion in this Japanese thriller. The film benefits from an offbeat premise and fascinating antagonist who likes playing mindgames with his victims and who is dangerous to talk to (think Hannibal Lector) as he constantly and cleverly turns the tables on others whenever questioned. The nonchalant, near emotionless murders are well filmed too. The overall movie though leaves far more questions than answers, especially regarding the antagonist's motives, and the abrupt ending is not exactly satisfying. Hypnotism is always a pretty cool subject though and Masato Hagiwara is perfectly mysterious. There is certainly enough to keep Cure chugging along even if it is not all that it could have been. (first viewing, online) ★★

My Neighbours the Yamadas (1999). Life has its ups and downs for a middle class Japanese family in this animated comedy from Isao Takahata. The film is based on a panel comic strip and it shows, consisting of series of loosely connected vignettes rather than a cohesive narrative. The most fascinating character in the clan - the precocious daughter who insists that her family got lost (rather than her being lost) - also oddly gets the least screen time. If flawed, this is a nevertheless thoroughly charming motion picture with a water colours animation style that allows images to seamlessly blend into each other, plus much amusing homespun wisdom - especially from the grandmother in the clan. The ending is nicely magical too, and while the film does not leave the same impact as Grave of the Fireflies or Only Yesterday, it is pleasing in its own way. (first viewing, DVD) ★★★

R100 (2013). His wife in a coma, a lonely salesman joins a S&M club that organises surprise dominatrix visits, only to find it hard to convince them that he really wants it to stop when their invasions of privacy go too far in this dark comedy from Japan. The film's title is a play on the R18+ rating classification in countries like Australia and Japan, with the idea that the content is so shocking that "no one under 100 will be admitted". As it turns out, the perversities on display are rather tame, and coupled against very limited graphic content, this aspect of the film disappoints. The vast majority of the movie works though with cool ripple special effects, intelligent fourth wall breaking and some commentary on the difficulties of maintaining boundaries and rules in any relationship. Things also grow more delightfully unpredictable as the film wears on. (first viewing, Blu-ray Disc) ★★★

The Heat (2013). Friction gradually turns into friendship when two polar opposite detectives are partnered together in this female take on the buddy cop comedy. Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy both offer energetic lead performances, though neither really gets a chance to flex their acting muscles as they are saddled with familiar character types that they have played multiple times before. Several of the jokes go on for way too long too (particularly McCarthy's initial arresting of a pimp) and the up and down love/hate relationship between the pair tires quite quickly. Everything nevertheless comes together fairly well in the final quarter with it reaching a point at which each protagonist knows the other one well enough to coordinate sabotages and attacks without talking to the other. An 'engagement ring' is especially well done in this regard. (first viewing, DVD) ★★

Big Hero 6 (2014). Intent on avenging his older brother's death, a teenager enlists the help of an inflatable healthcare robot in this Disney animated comedy. The film gets off to a good start with some solid laughs from the inflatable robot's clumsiness, slow speed and very literal interpretation of everything said. There is a particularly funny bit in which the robot acts drunk and disorderly when on low battery and in need of a recharge. The second half is not quite as good as the build-up to it though. The messy, chaotic action near the end feel like just that and most of the more emotional moments are easy to spot from a mile away. Some of the robotics (micro robots) at hand are certainly cool though and the Stay Puft style health robot is a pretty neat character, but one that may have been better suited to a more comedic, less action orientated film. (first viewing, Blu-ray Disc) ★★★

Daddy's Home (2015). Rivalry sparks between a stuffy stepfather and a macho biological father when the latter suddenly decides that he wants his kids back in this big budget comedy. Will Ferrell is never more than adequate here as his usual prissy self and has some groan-inducing emotional scenes. Mark Wahlberg on the other hand does well with his role, taunting and toying with Ferrell in often unpredictable ways. The one-upmanship between the pair quickly grows tiresome though and the film never really positions us to root for Wahlberg's character, whereas a stronger film may have made both characters equally likeable throughout. Scarlett Estevez and Owen Vaccaro are adorable as the kids though, and while not all the jokes work (especially the over-the-top stunts and comparing body parts bits) the film at least concludes on a decent laugh. (first viewing, DVD) ★★

Suicide Squad (2016). In what its director has described as a comic book take on The Dirty Dozen, this Academy Award winning movie focuses on a group of Gotham City villains recruited to defend the city from aliens that even Batman cannot stop. It is a premise with potential (only villains can be ruthless enough stop true evil) but intelligence is pushed aside for loud and chaotic action scenes here. That said, it is over 40 minutes in -- including 20 minutes of longwinded exposition -- before the squad even start working as a team. Some welcome characterisation pops up in the final half-hour or so, but it is mostly limited to the squad becoming a surrogate family (which feels odd given how little character bonding there is amid the high octane action). The songs here are excellent - especially 'Heathens' and 'Sucker for Pain' - but this leaves a lot to be desired. (first viewing, online) ★

Dogman (2018). Trying to run a legitimate dog grooming business proves challenging for a former drug dealer as a violent ex-customer refuses to leave him alone in this crime drama from Italy. Winner of the Best Actor award at Cannes, Marcello Fonte certainly does well as the conflicted protagonist, too scared to stand up to the violent customer but also too altruistic to do anything about it. Clocking in at close to two hours though, the film takes a very long time to make a rather simplistic point before arriving at an ending that feels needlessly drawn out. Having to put on many faces, Fonte keeps things chugging along though, Alida Baldari Calabria is adorable as his daughter, and the film is loaded with quite a bit of surprising humour from both the temperamental dogs he treats as well as from some of the dark turns that the tale takes towards the end. (first viewing, cinema) ★★★

The Hustle (2019). Considering that it is basically a scene-for-scene remake of Dirty Rotten Scroundrels with almost identical dialogue, this crime comedy makes for a surprisingly entertaining affair. The gender switching concept is nothing new, but given the swindling plot of the original, the change of genders allows the filmmakers here to create a female empowerment story with their victims only being the most shallow and despicable of men. Anne Hathaway also does very well channeling Michael Caine's upper class mannerisms. Rebel Wilson is less successful in the Steve Martin part with a little too much klutziness and vulgarity for good measure, but her character becomes more endearing as the movie progresses. The final twist does not work quite so well with the genders reversed, but the film is certainly highly watchable from start to finish. (first viewing, DVD) ★★★
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#2

Post by Onderhond » September 8th, 2019, 12:31 pm

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Pretty solid week, with some surprisingly fun classics. The bottom two films are 21st century features for a change, then again, so are the top 5 films.


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01. 4.0* - Call Boy [Shônen] (2018)
Frank and direct drama about a boy who becomes a call boy in order to get a grip on his emotional life. Well acted, beautifully shot and intruiging from start to finish. Miura has been making interesting films for a while now, he finally took the next step and made a small masterpiece. Probably a bit too direct for some, but definitely a worthwhile drama.

02. 3.5* - Tone-Deaf (2019)
Wacky and mean-spirited horror/comedy that features a nasty battle between a prissy millennial and a grumpy baby boomer. Bates' sense of humor is not for everyone, but there's plenty of laughs here, mixed with some devious horror and a healthy dose of general weirdness. The execution is a little flaky in places, but apart from that this is another solid effort from Bates.

03. 3.5* - In Fabric (2018)
Strange and mysterious film that mixes in horror and comedy influences, but is most of all absurd in a pretty artsy way. Strickland no doubt had a lot of fun bringing this strange tale of a murdering dress to life. The soundtrack stands out, but it doesn't quite have the visual chops to be a true masterpiece. Jolly good fun though, if you can appreciate the weirdness.

04. 3.5* - Seto & Utsumi [Setoutsumi] (2016)
A manzai-based comedy with a manga background. It's definitely not a film with big international appeal and fans of Tatsushi Ohmori should expect something completely different from his other work, but the mix with drama is surprisingly effective and well executed. Short, sweet and loveable, but very niche.

05. 3.5* - Rise Up (2009)
A sweet, genuine and slightly dramatized story about two boys and a girl starting a somewhat unlikely friendship. Nakajima is young director and uses this to his advantage, going for a more natural approach to bring some extra depth to the characters. While it lacks something to set it apart from its peers, it's a quality drama nonetheless.

06. 3.0* - Pastoral: To Die in the Country [Den-En ni Shisu] (1974)
My first Terayama and I have a feeling I'm going to like this guy. A unique take on cinema that has served as a clear inspiration for some of my own favorites. It's pretty weird, not very linear and at times quite absurd, but it's also very atmospheric and intruiging. A bit rough around the edges, but definitely worth a try if you're in the mood for something different.

07. 3.0* - Roar (1981)
There's strange, there's absurd and then there's batshit crazy. The idea that Roar was filmed with untrained, untamed animals is completely insane, but there you have it. There's hardly a plot to speak off, but if you like watching a family of ill at ease, often downright scared people living amongst a bunch of big cats, this is a must-see.

08. 2.5* - Shanghai Fortress [Shanghai Bi Lei] (2019)
It's nice that China is getting into sci-fi, but they'll have to do better than this. While it looks like the budget was there, the talent clearly wasn't. Terrible editing, poor CG skills, lifeless designs and a bland story don't do this film any favors. Luckily the action is okay and the alien invasion setup is fun enough, but that's not enough to turn this into a good film.

09. 2.0* - The Axiom (2018)
Another well-meaning horror flick that can't escape its no-budget roots. Poor acting and sloppy camera work stand in the way of this ever becoming something truly worthwhile. There are some decent ideas in here (though few original ones), sadly the result is another mediocre attempt by a director who just doesn't have the talent for making films.

10. 2.0* - The Telephone Box [La Cabina] (1972)
While The Telephone Box has a solid concept and there are some nifty ideas here, there just isn't enough material to fill 30 minutes of film. The execution is also pretty poor, then again that's probably expected for a TV project. It's not a terrible way to pass 30 minutes and there are a couple of fun absurdities, but ultimately it just wasn't enough.

11. 1.5* - Jules and Jim [Jules et Jim] (1962)
Faltering classic that revolves around a love triangle that fails to engage. Poor acting and failed stylistic experiments make it very difficult to get into the film, what remains are some less than intruiging characters struggling with their relationship. I've seen some fine Nouvelle Vague films, but sadly this wasn't one of them.

12. 1.5* - Magellan (2017)
A very basic sci-fi genre flick that lacks the budget and talent to turn it into something worthwhile. The camerawork is terrible, the sets look awfully cheap and the actors are low grade. The mystery keeps the first half of the film alive, but once that is cleared up there really wasn't anything left to keep me interested.

13. 1.0* - Falling Inn Love (2019)
Noticed the pun? Well, that's about as good as it gets for this film. Terrible actors, a cheesy and extremely predictable plot and no effort at all to add anything unique. Kumble merely goes through the motions and hopes that some poor eco-babble and a nice setting will be enough for his audience. For me it clearly wasn't.

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#3

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » September 8th, 2019, 12:47 pm

L'inondation / The Flood (Louis Delluc, 1924) 6-/10

Les jeux de la Comtesse Dolingen de Gratz / The Games of Countess Dolingen (Catherine Binet, 1981) 6+/10

Wholly Communion (Peter Whitehead, 1966) 8-/10

The Benefit of the Doubt (Peter Whitehead, 1967) 6+/10

Tonite Let's All Make Love in London (Peter Whitehead, 1967) 5+/10

Seduced and Abandoned (James Toback, 2013) 6/10

Indonesia Calling (Joris Ivens, 1946) 5+/10

Wodaabe - Die Hirten der Sonne. Nomaden am Südrand der Sahara / Herdsmen of the Sun (English version) (Werner Herzog, 1989) 6+/10

Little Dieter Needs to Fly (Werner Herzog, 1997) 6/10

Woyzeck (Werner Herzog, 1979) (2nd viewing) 6/10

Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes (German version) (Werner Herzog, 1974 & 1972) (4th viewing) Ø

The Shanghai Gesture (Josef von Sternberg, 1941) (2nd viewing) 6/10

The Dark Knight (NOLAN, 2008) (10th viewing) -

The Dark Knight Rises (NOLAN, 2012) (6th viewing) 10/10

In the Mouth of Madness (The Carpenters again, 1995) (9th viewing) ∞/1


shorts

Markings 1-3 (Eva Kolcze, 2011) 7/10

By the Time We Got to Expo (Philip Hoffman & Eva Kolcze, 2015) 7/10

Low Tide (Eva Kolcze, 2019 6/10

Badlands (Eva Kolcze, 2013) 4/10

Sacris Pulso (Ana Vaz, 2008) 3/10

Alpsee (Matthias Müller, 1995) 8-/10

Free Fall (Arthur Lipsett, 1964) 7+/10

Fotel (Daniel Szczechura, 1964) 6/10

Thank You Mask Man (Lenny Bruce & John Magnuson, 1971) (2nd viewing) 7-/10

Primitive Technology: Adobe wall ("John Plant", 2019) +=


didn't finish

刺青 / Irezumi / The Spider Tattoo (Yasuzô Masumura, 1966) [46 min]
Hvorfor gør de det? / Why Do They Do It? (Italian dub) (Eberhard Kronhausen (as Eberhardt Kronhausen) & Phyllis Kronhausen, 1971) [23 min]
Sperling und das Loch in der Wand (Dominik Graf, 1996) [21 min]
Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, 2005) [21 min]
Glaube und Währung - Dr. Gene Scott, Fernsehprediger / God's Angry Man (Werner Herzog, 1981) [7 min]


notable online media

[top:]
LENNY BRUCE ON THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW APRIL 5, 1959
JACK KEROUAC on THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW with Steve Allen 1959
Jim Carrey on David Letterman Show 2014 Full HD [rewatch?]
top surreal video:
Joaquin Phoenix, Joker, taking, the joker, home, crying, laughing.
rest:
Navy pilot escaped from Vietnam prison camp (IGaS 1/30/67, 1 of 3)
Werner Herzog career interview: "You have to brace yourself for the bozos"
Werner Herzog Was ich bin, sind meine Filme
Jeff Ross Plays Who’s Getting Roasted?
Wu-Tang’s RZA Breaks Down 10 Kung Fu Films He’s Sampled | Vanity Fair
Frank Zappa Late Night with David Letterman June 16, 1983
New Leonardo DiCaprio´s comercial for JIM BEAM ASIAN Market.
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#4

Post by mightysparks » September 8th, 2019, 1:21 pm

Onderhond wrote:
September 8th, 2019, 12:31 pm
02. 3.5* - Tone-Deaf (2019)
Wacky and mean-spirited horror/comedy that features a nasty battle between a prissy millennial and a grumpy baby boomer. Bates' sense of humor is not for everyone, but there's plenty of laughs here, mixed with some devious horror and a healthy dose of general weirdness. The execution is a little flaky in places, but apart from that this is another solid effort from Bates.

03. 3.5* - In Fabric (2018)
Strange and mysterious film that mixes in horror and comedy influences, but is most of all absurd in a pretty artsy way. Strickland no doubt had a lot of fun bringing this strange tale of a murdering dress to life. The soundtrack stands out, but it doesn't quite have the visual chops to be a true masterpiece. Jolly good fun though, if you can appreciate the weirdness.
Didn't realise these two were available, been waiting for them for a while! Might have to save them for the horror challenge though :think: :circle:
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#5

Post by viktor-vaudevillain » September 8th, 2019, 3:30 pm

Pretty good week:

Voyage d'une maine / Voyage of a Hand (Raúl Ruiz, 1984) - 6

Parasite (Bong Joon-Ho, 2019) - 6

Fish Tank (Andrea Arnold, 2009) - 7+

The Seventh Victim (Mark Robson, 1943) - 6

La belle noiseuse (Jacques Rivette, 1991) - 9+

Jeanne la Pucelle I: Les batailles (Jacques Rivette, 1994) - 8

Jeanne la Pucelle II: Les prisons (Jacques Rivette, 1994) - 8

+ The first two episodes of Mindhunter B) I'm hooked.

People:

@sol:
Cure - 8 - I really liked this, and of the 3 Kiyoshi's I've seen it's the best.

@onderhond:
In Fabric - 7 - I don't know if I were too generous with the rating, but I had a blast while watching. One of the dumbest films from recent years.
Jules et Jim - (l)

@PdA:
Les jeux de la Comtesse Dolingen de Gratz - really interested in this!
Little Dieter Needs to Fly - never gotten around to this... My Herzog craze also ended some years ago, but maybe I should start to roll up the Herzog joint once again.
Woyzeck - 7
Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes - well, you know it.
The Shanghai Gesture - probably watching it soon
The Dark Knight - 8
The Dark Knight Rises - 6
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#6

Post by joachimt » September 8th, 2019, 7:31 pm

Had a really busy week. I watched only 5 features and 1 short. I can't remember the last time that happened.

Khostovanank AKA The Confession (1990, 1 official list, 28 checks) ?/10
Watched because it's on the Rosenbaum-list.
Rating is pointless with this one. This movie was never finished. Just a few minutes material was shot and not soon after that Parajanov got ill and died. I watched everything that could be found, which is roughly 7 minutes of the probably 8 minutes that was shot. It even includes three different versions of the same scene, the carrying down of a coffin out of a house. Weird to call this essential cinema, Mr. Rosenbaum. It's a shame Parajanov didn't finish it, especially if you consider the fact that the plot was ready 20 years earlier. He should have started shooting then......
La décade prodigieuse AKA Ten Days Wonder (1971, 0 official lists, 55 checks) 7/10
Watched because it used to be on TSPDT.
Checkcounts can be rather surprising now and then. This is directed by Claude Chabrol and starring Anthony Perkins, Orson Welles (!) and Michel Piccoli, so not very unknown names. Yet I was only the 54th check. It had an interesting plot between a married couple, of which the man was a lot older (Welles), and their adopted son (Perkins), who had a not very common relationship with his adoption-mother. The pace was a bit too slow in the first half, so I didn't really get into it (despite the very good opening scene of Perkins waking up covered with blood), but the tension went up in the second half.
Bad Lieutenant (1992, 5 official lists, 3472 checks) 6/10
Watched because it used to be on TSPDT.
Good performance by Keitel. A shame there's not a lot more to the story than the title of the movie.
Barnvagnen AKA Pram (1963, 1 official list, 67 checks) 6/10
Watched because it used to be on TSPDT.
Bo Widerberg's debut certainly has some interesting moments where he explores his cinematic style, but overall it's too uneven to impress me. Story is pretty standard, so that won't last very long in my memory.
El Cid (1961, 1 official list, 791 checks) 6/10
Watched because it used to be on TSPDT.
Waaaaay too long. The Cid himself was a rather weird character. He was presented at first as a mercyful man, but at other times he killed men without trying to solve it differently. Therefor the love-hate-love relationship of him and the woman was a bit unbelievable. Yet, there was still a lot to enjoy in set design and battles. Just a regular classic epic.
Where Eagles Dare (1968, 5 official lists, 3486 checks) 6/10
Watched because it's a random official check available on Netflix.
Just okay movie about a rescue mission in WW2. Oh right, it wasn't just a rescue mission. But that part of the plot was brought in a pretty lame way, so that couldn't put this one into a more memorable category.
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#7

Post by sol » September 8th, 2019, 11:42 pm

Onderhond:

The way that Roar was made (and some of the horror stories about injuries on set) interested me a lot more than the film itself, which I got very little out of, novelty factor aside. La Cabina was very cool on the other hand; I totally get the 30 minutes feeling too long thing, but I recall liking how much it dragged out towards the end as it added to whole gloom and doom of the tale with no easy end in sight. I also wasn't too impressed by Jules et Jim at the time, but it has been ages, and even as a disappointment, I expectedly rated it higher than you.

PdA:

Haven't seen any YouTube promotional videos for Joker myself, but I am very interested after the win at Venice. Plus, Phoenix has been doing nothing except great things this decade.

viktor:

Cure had an interesting premise and reminded me a little of Danny Boyle's Trance as well as Blumhouse's Truth or Dare. I wish that I had more idea of what the hypnotist's motives were though beyond creating general havoc and chaos. Cure is the only Kiyoshi Kurosawa film that I have seen so far. Would be curious to see more, and I guess now is the month to do so.

Yours:

Absolutely loved Parasite myself - just my sort of black comedy with some commentary about social class divides. It's been longer since I have seen The Seventh Victim, but I recall thinking that it was one of Val Lewton's stronger films. Didn't think too much of Fish Tank myself, but I liked Arnold's Red Road quite a bit when I watched it for this year's Female Directors Challenge.

joachimt:

Ten Days' Wonder was the first Chabrol film that I ever saw on ex-rental pan-and-scan VHS. Not the best experience that I have ever had by a long shot. It probably deserves a rewatch on DVD. Must have been at least 15 years ago that I saw it; probably longer.

Don't recall much of Bad Lieutenant or Where Eagles Dare other than what you mention.
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#8

Post by Eve-Lang-El-Coup » September 9th, 2019, 11:49 am

Shouldn't it be 02/09 - 08/09?

The Pearl (1947) - Greedy Greedy people.
Hungarian Rhapsody (1979) - As seems to be customary, a sprawling epic with great choreography and little narrative.
Nazaré (1952) - Similar to La Terra Trema (1948).
The Paper Man (1963) - Greedy Greedy people.
The Kneeling Goddess (1947) - A watchable melodrama.
Wheels on Meals (1984) - The three musketeers of China working a food van in Spain, the set up is odd but the action is good fun.
Police Story 1 (1985)
Police Story 2 (1988) - Both of the police films were good with my favourite moments being in the early parts of the second film.
Crime Story (1993) - A more serious film which I didn't care for too much other than the ending.
Il tempo dell'inizio (1974) - Pretty cool flick about a guy in an asylum trying to make sense of his world. It's for lack of a better term 'Kafka-ish'.
Happy End (1999) - A pretty drab film. i didn't expect the ending, I still don't get the ending.
Smoke on the Potato Fields (1977) - I liked This review of the film due to its emphasis on context.

Then I watched 4 movies in the cinema on the same day (Saturday the 7th).
Midsommar (2019) - The beginning was damned intense, I mean it had my stomach churning and those wails, oh damn those wails, then it became it's own odd version of The Stepford Wives.
Parasite (2019) - The first 3 quarters were my favourite of the whole week, then the ending came.
SpoilerShow
Why did the dad (Kim Ki-taek) kill rich husband (Park Dong-ik)? Frustration? Just to put dad in the bunker? It felt really forced. And then the letters that never see the light of day. Yeah, the film was colourful, but this was too much for me.
The Farewell (2019) - Sweet family movie. The Wǒ zhīdào joke went on too long.
The Nightingale (2018) - Another very intense opening which transforms into an odd couple road movie.

Tanna (2015) - Nice enough Rome and Juliet like story with origins in reality.
Voyage to the Beginning of the World (1997) - A road trip through aging memories.
The Executioner (1963) - Good fun. I think the best bits come toward the end on their executive vacation.
Estranho Encontro (1958) - A bang bang beginning which ultimately has a plodding last quarter without tension.
The Red Lanterns (1963) - A celebration of love, life and music.

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Onderhond
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#9

Post by Onderhond » September 9th, 2019, 11:58 am

sol wrote:
September 8th, 2019, 11:42 pm
Onderhond:

The way that Roar was made (and some of the horror stories about injuries on set) interested me a lot more than the film itself, which I got very little out of, novelty factor aside. La Cabina was very cool on the other hand; I totally get the 30 minutes feeling too long thing, but I recall liking how much it dragged out towards the end as it added to whole gloom and doom of the tale with no easy end in sight. I also wasn't too impressed by Jules et Jim at the time, but it has been ages, and even as a disappointment, I expectedly rated it higher than you.
I completely agree with your take on Roar, but for me that was more than enough to enjoy the film. One of the few films were a little info up front is detrimental to the enjoyment :)
As for La Cabina, that one was too simple and too conceptual for me. The potential was there, but then the execution was just poor.
mightysparks wrote:
September 8th, 2019, 1:21 pm
Didn't realise these two were available, been waiting for them for a while! Might have to save them for the horror challenge though :think: :circle:
They are "out there", though not quite sure in which form. Both aren't too heavy on the horror I guess, but interesting in their own right. Should do well for an October challenge :)

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sol
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#10

Post by sol » September 9th, 2019, 12:29 pm

Eve-Lang-El-Coup wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 11:49 am
Shouldn't it be 02/09 - 08/09?
Nope. Ideally, participants here should list all their viewings during the 168 hours between the different weekly threads being released. If you saw something on Sunday before the weekly thread was released, then include it that week. If you saw it after the weekly thread was released, then include it the following the week and so on. Of course, you are welcome to post your viewings however you see fit.

Agreed about the ending of Parasite being a little weak for the reasons you've stated, but it's still a 9/10 in my books for everything else about it. I might comment on the rest of yours later. We'll see. I have been spending most of my forum time over the past few days dealing with Challenge Schedule stuff, so not much chance for film discussion here.
Onderhond wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 11:58 am
As for La Cabina, that one was too simple and too conceptual for me. The potential was there, but then the execution was just poor.
Fortunately for me, I loved the poor execution. ;)
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#11

Post by Onderhond » September 9th, 2019, 12:39 pm

sol wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 12:29 pm
Fortunately for me, I loved the poor execution. ;)
Myeah, I guess that's the most puzzling thing for me in general re:classics.

With La Cabina it was extra bad since it was clearly TV-material. To me it looks like all the director cared about was getting the script on film/tape, with as little effort/budget as possible. But clearly others are seeing something completely different from what I'm seeing. I've been doing this film/discussion thing for almost 20 years now and that's a schism I can't seem to bridge :)

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#12

Post by peeptoad » September 9th, 2019, 12:40 pm

Hi sol. I hope you had a good week. Wish I could say mine was fantastic, but it wasn't due to a family medical emergency. Being an only child is hard sometimes, esp when it involves caring for/assisting aging parents.

Anyway, here is a rough approximation of what I saw last week (rough 'cause I'm doing this remotely without my actual list)-
a bunch of shorts and a couple of features for silents, plus three for 2000 and beyond


The Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots (1895) 8 I loved this. It was "on point". ;)
Le manoir du diable (1896) The House of the Devil 6
Le voyage dans la lune (1902) A Trip to the Moon 7*
Le chaudron infernal (1903)The Infernal Boiling Pot 6
Le voyage à travers l'impossible (1904)The Voyage Across the Impossible 6
Les quatre cents farces du diable (1906)The 400 Tricks of the Devil 6
Faust and Marguerite (1900) 4
Le diable géant ou Le miracle de la madonne (1901) The Gigantic Devil 7
Le diable noir (1905) The Black Imp 6
The Haunted Hotel (1907) 7
Le château hanté (1908)The Haunted Castle 7
Une excursion incohérente (1909) A Panicky Picnic 7
Pikovaya dama (1910) 6
Mest kinematograficheskogo operatora (1912) The Cameraman's Revenge 7
Figures de cire (1914) The Man with Wax Faces 6
Trolldrycken (1915) Demon Drink 8 another good one. Love the gremlin in the guy's cranium.
The Haunted House (1921) 6
The Skeleton Dance (1929) 7
The Fall of the House of Usher (1928, Watson) 8 trippy and cool visuals, love some of the distorted/experimental stuff
Paris qui dort (1924) At 3:25 5
Die Augen der Mumie Ma (1918) The Eyes of the Mummy 5
Warning Shadows (1923) 7
Black Death (2010) 7 (maybe a weaker 8- I forgot how good this one is)*
The Hobbit (2012) 7
Gothika (2003) 5 if I had seen closer to its release I might have liked it slightly more; pretty old hat at this point

*rewatch
Last edited by peeptoad on September 9th, 2019, 12:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#13

Post by sol » September 9th, 2019, 12:49 pm

peeptoad wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 12:40 pm
Hi sol. I hope you had a good week. Wish I could say mine was fantastic, but it wasn't due to a family medical emergency. Being an only child is hard sometimes, esp when it involves caring for/assisting aging parents.

Anyway, here is a rough approximation of what I saw last week (rough 'cause I'm doing this remotely without my actual list)-
a bunch of shorts and a couple of features for silents, plus three for 2000 and beyond

...

The Haunted House (1921) 6
Sorry to hear about your parents. Hopefully they are doing better now.

I've seen a few of yours this week, but The Haunted House is the only one that I have vivid memories of since I have seen it three or four times. I consider it to be one of Buster's better shorts. As a haunted house comedy, it takes a while to get going with around half the film's duration spent in the bank, but those bank scenes are great - especially the glue, that irate moustached guy and those three guys moving synchronously while trying to get the money off their hands. Also, the house design was pretty cool to me - that collapsing staircase in particular. Could have done without the white sheet ghosts though.
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#14

Post by peeptoad » September 9th, 2019, 12:52 pm

sol wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 12:49 pm
peeptoad wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 12:40 pm
Hi sol. I hope you had a good week. Wish I could say mine was fantastic, but it wasn't due to a family medical emergency. Being an only child is hard sometimes, esp when it involves caring for/assisting aging parents.

Anyway, here is a rough approximation of what I saw last week (rough 'cause I'm doing this remotely without my actual list)-
a bunch of shorts and a couple of features for silents, plus three for 2000 and beyond

...

The Haunted House (1921) 6
Sorry to hear about your parents. Hopefully they are doing better now.

I've seen a few of yours this week, but The Haunted House is the only one that I have vivid memories of since I have seen it three or four times. I consider it to be one of Buster's better shorts. As a haunted house comedy, it takes a while to get going with around half the film's duration spent in the bank, but those bank scenes are great - especially the glue, that irate moustached guy and those three guys moving synchronously while trying to get the money off their hands. Also, the house design was pretty cool to me - that collapsing staircase in particular. Could have done without the white sheet ghosts though.
Thanks. My mom is doing better. These are just stressful times we are living in.
I forgot yours- the only film I've seen of yours is Big Hero 6 though, which I watched on a cruise ship a few years ago, ha ha. Think I have that one down as a 7.

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