Welcome to the ICM Forum.
Check out our Magazine

If you notice any issues please post in the Q&A thread. Email issue should be fixed. If you encounter this issue, contact PeacefulAnarchy
Podcast: Talking Images (Episode 42 released December 1st: Remakes That Are Better Than the Original)
iCinema Magazine: WE ARE LIVE! (We just need more content)
ICMForum Film Festival: Mon Nov 15 - Dec 13
Polls: Sport (Results), USA (Results), 1985 (Dec 24th), UK (Dec 28th), Directors (Jan 3rd), Comedy (Jan 5th)
Challenges: Documentary, Oceania, Unofficial Checks
Managers Cup: QF Schedule, QFA: sacmersault vs filmbantha (Dec 12th)
About: Welcome All New Members, Terms of Use, Q&A

the 2009 project

Post Reply
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#241

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Lourdes (2009 - Jessica Hausner)

A film about a group of people visiting the holy site of Lourdes. They are part pilgrims part tourists in the tacky and often crass environment of Lourdes. Certainly though, everything is not what it seems and I had to watch the film twice to grasp its subtleties.

A lot of questions are posed, for which you can answer yourself, in what is an obviously consensual movie. If I may be so bold, it feels like profundity is sometimes hiding in plain sight.

There was some healing for me in this for sure.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#242

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

State of Play (2009 - Kevin Macdonald)

A story about an investigative reporter who is tasked with investigating his friend, a member of congress, whilst teaming up with a new partner. The movie is often glib, and there is some unintentional hilarity at the efforts to establish a Russell Crowe character as being Irish American. Indeed almost everyone seems miscast with Ben Affleck lacking the gravitas to play a politician. Deserves some brownie points for raising awareness of the use of contractors in more recent American wars. Twist is ok as twists go.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#243

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Ajami (2009 - Scandar Copti & Yaron Shani)

Ajami is a neighbourhood of Jaffa, in which Arabs, Christians and Jews all live together. This is a Crash style story where multiple strands come together. What unites the participants is a strange sense of patriarchal fealty, soft qualities like tenderness and charity, but also stubborn and violent defence of honour (stranger still these qualites appear to be two sides of the same coin). The participants in this drama exist on a substrate of injustice and mistrust, from which there seems to be little hope of escape. It's very well crafted, even handed (films from the region very rarely are) and hits great emotional notes, I found it surprisingly good, although it is often a little too cute.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on October 3rd, 2021, 7:01 pm, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#244

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Disorder (2009 - Weikai Huang)

Disorder is an experimental documentary set in Guangzhou, China. Director Huang assembles tense documents from different camerapeople, turns them black and white, adding some granularisation, to make them feel like they are all part of the same whole, which in a sense they are. Only a few scenes were actually shot by the director, the rest are assembled. The homogenization of the different sources, and the disjunct between the sound and picture editing (the sounds from one scene continue into the visuals of the next) are actually rather clever and well achieved. The director put in considerable effort here, boiling down a huge amount of footage to arrive at just under an hour of highly expressive material.

The people being filmed are often mad or selfish. The mad include a man who casts his net for fish, waist deep in an obscenely polluted river, the selfish include a man who holds up traffic on a arterial bridge, pretending to be thinking about jumping, but in reality wanting to draw attention to some compensation he has not received. One of the things Titicut Follies is famous for is the lack of awareness of the camera, people hadn't really learned to behave differently when a camera was around, there is some of that in this film as well, a policeman frankly admits that he is most worried about receiving blame if the man on the bridge jumps, a woman expresses her opinion that they, a group who have stumbled across an abandoned baby in a wasteland, should simply walk on. The film is intended as a critique of rapid urbanization, though will suit many proclivities, it felt to me like some sort of nocturne. The image that will probably stick with me the most is the "fisherman", but the blimp which has broken free of its mooring and is careening around the skyscape is good as a general emblem for the film. MUBI did a good article on the movie, so I include this below:

https://mubi.com/notebook/posts/city-on ... s-disorder

This movie was very well thought of in a poll I ran back in 2014, it received two 10s and a 9, but not enough votes to count to the final results. A warning that one scene contains a cat being cruel to a mouse, soon to be dinner.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#245

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Lumphini 2552 (2009 - Tomonari Nishikawa)

OK so this is really off the beaten track, a three minute film available here: https://vimeo.com/104211723.

I had a good time with this one. Lumphini is a reference to the birthplace of Buddha, and 2552 is the year 2009 in the Buddhist calendar. The film is an exuberance of images of plants, the images flicker incessantly. It's one of those films where the title helps a lot, it feels like the director is trying to capture this floribundance of lifeforce. It's a strange effect to have shot it in black and white but it works. Filmed in a park in Thailand called Lumphini.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#246

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

A Perfect Getaway (2009 - David Twohy)

Someone once described to me the process of watching Hollywood movies and looking for a good one, as being like trying to find a flower on a dungheap, that the production system puts the odds against anything good being made. Well lookie lookie, because we found ourselves a flower on the dungheap. A Perfect Getaway is smart, it's sexy, it's insightful, it's moving, it's meta. It's hardly hidden away, it's got 70,000 votes on the IMDb, but it's been hiding in plain sight, barely anyone noticed it!!

It's a movie about young couples gone hiking in Hawaii, only we know that one couple is likely to be a Mickey and Mallory pair, on a killing spree. It's a bonafide, pure-as-you-like goshdarned gem of a thriller. There's a good review here, but it's for reading after watching:

http://www.reverseshot.org/symposiums/e ... ct_getaway

Watched this for my birthday and pretty happy with the decision, thanks to Pedeamb for bringing to my attention.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#247

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

The Secret of Kells (2009 - Tomm Moore & Nora Twomey)

This was outrageously beautiful, evocative and entertaining. I can die happy after seeing this. It's a story about a boy from the abbey of Kells in the Middle Ages, and about what's important in life. Just go see it. Unbelievable. Birthday home run #2.
User avatar
Torgo
Posts: 4502
Joined: June 30th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Germany
Contact:

#248

Post by Torgo »

Aww! Glad you liked it, have a nice cake day! :party:
User avatar
kongs_speech
Posts: 2543
Joined: April 4th, 2020, 10:32 pm
Contact:

#249

Post by kongs_speech »

Happy birthday!!
🏳️‍⚧️
Honey Bunny wrote: Any of you fucking pricks move and I'll execute every motherfucking last one of ya!
Quartoxuma wrote: A deeply human, life-affirming disgusting check whore.
Image
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#250

Post by matthewscott8 »

Torgo wrote: October 9th, 2021, 1:43 am Aww! Glad you liked it, have a nice cake day! :party:
I got hold of the bluray because it was on your ballot in the poll :worship:
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#251

Post by matthewscott8 »

kongs_speech wrote: October 9th, 2021, 1:53 am Happy birthday!!
thanks :mrgreen:
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#252

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Georgic for a Forgotten Planet (2009 - Lynne Sachs)

A nice short for late nights here. I adored it. Loosely speaking a piece juxtaposing New York City in all its fabricated unnaturalness, with images of plant life from New York, the film achieves some sort of uncanny mood, aimed at reminding us how far removed we have become from our agricultural roots. The film seems very original in its editing and in its unmannered beauty. A mysterious embrace. Vimeo embed within the directors website below:

http://www.lynnesachs.com/2008/10/28/ge ... en-planet/
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#253

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Kosmos (2009 - Reha Erdem)

This is a movie about a stranger who enters a town in Winter and shakes things up. He has the supernatural capability to heal others and himself, and he has a strong line in gnostic utterances. I feel a sense of anger writing about this one, because in a way it had so much promise, some of the scenes are dazzling in their originality and electrifying in their intensity. However the film was overlong and became repetitive without managing to build on where it had come from.

The movie has some very interesting ideas around dismantling the conceptual divide between humans and adults, which were expounded in a gobsmackingly beautiful way (Battal/Kosmos/the dervish and his lover Neptün, do mating dances with animal calls that light up the soul). But this message about animals get completely obliterated when midway through the film there is a scene showing the destruction of some bullocks. I am simply bewildered that some filmmakers continue to see animal slaughter as some sort of lever to pull for their movies, as some sort of emotional register. Just stop it.

There is a good teardown of it here from the Guardian, although they don't even mention the animal cruelty:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/j ... mos-review

It did feel like Erdem was trying to make a Bela Tarr movie.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#254

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Atlantiques (2009 - Mati Diop)

A short film documentary showing Senegalese men talking about travelling to Spain via pirogue (wonky ship) around a campfire. The men face harsh economic realities, the hustle is real, and they wonder if in Europe they will fare better. They recount trauma, and serenade death. Cinematically the film is not very accomplished, but the participants have stories that deserve to be heard.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#255

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Jao nok krajok / Mundane History (2009 - Anocha Suwichakornpong)

This is very special. I need to give it another watch to absorb it. It's a film about a nurse who comes to care for a young man from a wealthy family who has recently become disabled. It is intangible in the way that only the sublime can be; it is very intimate and empathic. :wub:
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#256

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Kimssi pyoryugi / Castaway on the Moon / Kim's Island (2009 - Hae-jun Lee)

This was one of the real crowd pleasers of 2009, a romantic drama full of quirkiness, redemption, hope and humour. A down in the dumps man who can't swim is trapped on an island in the middle of a river, but gradually learns to enjoy the change; a recluse in a skyscraper follows his travails via a telephoto lens. What it did, it did very well, I especially like the metaphorical change the guy goes through when he starts transmitting HELLO instead of HELP to the world. It's very original and lovable, I guess it reminded me a bit of Amelie in that sense. It's very honest, open and human when it showcases despair and alienation, and the indifference of the world, and how hard it is to carry on in the knowledge of that. I did somehow feel empty at the end, maybe because the film was too quirky for me, also it used grossing out as a technique a few times, then maybe because they're both really good looking, and that's the true seed of romantic hope for them. Maybe it was too theatrical for me, it felt a bit Beckettian. Everyone likes this but me I think, but it was instructive to me for sure.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#257

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Gamer (2009 - Mark Neveldine & Brian Taylor)

Voyeuristic, self-aware, clumsily scripted action movie, which is all about the concept. The concept is a future of gaming where wealthy players control actual humans. It came across to me as some sort of parody of Ex Machina avant la lettre. Did make me feel queasy about social media usage afterwards so not entirely ineffectual.
User avatar
viktor-vaudevillain
Posts: 630
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#258

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

matthewscott8 wrote: October 13th, 2021, 12:26 am
Jao nok krajok / Mundane History (2009 - Anocha Suwichakornpong)

This is very special. I need to give it another watch to absorb it. It's a film about a nurse who comes to care for a young man from a wealthy family who has recently become disabled. It is intangible in the way that only the sublime can be; it is very intimate and empathic. :wub:
Yeah. One of my favorites of 2009. You should seek out her other films as well.
intimate and empathic are really the right words for it. Though cosmic and local, might also be applicable.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#259

Post by matthewscott8 »

viktor-vaudevillain wrote: October 20th, 2021, 3:54 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: October 13th, 2021, 12:26 am
Jao nok krajok / Mundane History (2009 - Anocha Suwichakornpong)

This is very special. I need to give it another watch to absorb it. It's a film about a nurse who comes to care for a young man from a wealthy family who has recently become disabled. It is intangible in the way that only the sublime can be; it is very intimate and empathic. :wub:
Yeah. One of my favorites of 2009. You should seek out her other films as well.
intimate and empathic are really the right words for it. Though cosmic and local, might also be applicable.
I've been cautious about using the word cosmic without a rewatch. Obviously there are images that relate to the cosmos, the museum exhibit image I used for example, but also the supernova imagery and the birth imagery. I wasn't 100% decided on how much the film is about Ake and Pun and how much it is a generality about life, or both. The supernova imagery could be simply metaphorical. Long story short I didn't get there on 1 watch but it was very clearly brilliant and empathic and now deffo interested in looking for the director's other works. Re: local, yes place comes out very clearly in the dialogue, the staff discuss it directly, this was refreshing.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#260

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Breath of the Compassionate (2009 - Bill Alves)

Oh wow, speechless at the magnificence and gentleness of this one, 10 minutes of bringing to life patterns from Arabic art. This is really something. In the words of one of my favourite IMDb lists, "I found a treasure"

https://vimeo.com/30696881

EDIT: higher def here with an intro:

https://vimeo.com/623829023
Last edited by matthewscott8 on October 22nd, 2021, 7:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
pitchorneirda
Posts: 1374
Joined: February 11th, 2019, 12:07 pm
Location: France
Contact:

#261

Post by pitchorneirda »

I'm not that convinced by the imagery but the music is absolutely wonderful
"Art is like a fire, it is born from the very thing it burns" - Jean-Luc Godard
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#262

Post by matthewscott8 »

pitchorneirda wrote: October 20th, 2021, 7:51 pm I'm not that convinced by the imagery but the music is absolutely wonderful
He's primarily known as a composer, did the music and visuals here. He released a bunch of records.
User avatar
viktor-vaudevillain
Posts: 630
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#263

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

matthewscott8 wrote: October 20th, 2021, 5:36 pm
viktor-vaudevillain wrote: October 20th, 2021, 3:54 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: October 13th, 2021, 12:26 am
Jao nok krajok / Mundane History (2009 - Anocha Suwichakornpong)

This is very special. I need to give it another watch to absorb it. It's a film about a nurse who comes to care for a young man from a wealthy family who has recently become disabled. It is intangible in the way that only the sublime can be; it is very intimate and empathic. :wub:
Yeah. One of my favorites of 2009. You should seek out her other films as well.
intimate and empathic are really the right words for it. Though cosmic and local, might also be applicable.
I've been cautious about using the word cosmic without a rewatch. Obviously there are images that relate to the cosmos, the museum exhibit image I used for example, but also the supernova imagery and the birth imagery. I wasn't 100% decided on how much the film is about Ake and Pun and how much it is a generality about life, or both. The supernova imagery could be simply metaphorical. Long story short I didn't get there on 1 watch but it was very clearly brilliant and empathic and now deffo interested in looking for the director's other works. Re: local, yes place comes out very clearly in the dialogue, the staff discuss it directly, this was refreshing.
A second viewing of the film was also more of an eye opener to me. The film can definitely be read allegorical, but I'm not much for allegorical readings, so I'd rather like to see these two destinies as simply two complex singularities in a universe of trillions of unlike singularities.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#264

Post by matthewscott8 »

I will try and watch as many of these as possible by the time the 2009 poll ends, shout if there is anything not on here that you think I should prioritise:

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls041227238/
User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 3398
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#265

Post by peeptoad »

Have you seen Królik po berlinsku ('Rabbit ala Berlin')? If not I recommend it. It's a short running time with some beautiful photography and a subject matter that I found engaging, though smaller in scope.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#266

Post by matthewscott8 »

peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 11:10 am Have you seen Królik po berlinsku ('Rabbit ala Berlin')? If not I recommend it. It's a short running time with some beautiful photography and a subject matter that I found engaging, though smaller in scope.
Yup I saw it, reviewed on page 4 of this sprawling thread! I really liked it
User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 3398
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#267

Post by peeptoad »

matthewscott8 wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 3:13 pm
peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 11:10 am Have you seen Królik po berlinsku ('Rabbit ala Berlin')? If not I recommend it. It's a short running time with some beautiful photography and a subject matter that I found engaging, though smaller in scope.
Yup I saw it, reviewed on page 4 of this sprawling thread! I really liked it
:thumbsup:
User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 3398
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#268

Post by peeptoad »

matthewscott8 wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 3:13 pm
peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 11:10 am Have you seen Królik po berlinsku ('Rabbit ala Berlin')? If not I recommend it. It's a short running time with some beautiful photography and a subject matter that I found engaging, though smaller in scope.
Yup I saw it, reviewed on page 4 of this sprawling thread! I really liked it
How about Heartless? It's a horror movie, so you might not be interested, but I did a word search on this thread and I didn't see it . That one and Rabbit ala Berlin are my favorites for this year.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#269

Post by matthewscott8 »

peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 4:45 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 3:13 pm
peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 11:10 am Have you seen Królik po berlinsku ('Rabbit ala Berlin')? If not I recommend it. It's a short running time with some beautiful photography and a subject matter that I found engaging, though smaller in scope.
Yup I saw it, reviewed on page 4 of this sprawling thread! I really liked it
How about Heartless? It's a horror movie, so you might not be interested, but I did a word search on this thread and I didn't see it . That one and Rabbit ala Berlin are my favorites for this year.
yup, I have seen that one, back in the day in the cinema. I am a big fan of Philip Ridley, and was super excited when he came back to directing movies. It's a movie I think about a lot, the speech in it by the main character's dad (played by Timothy Spall) has always given me a lot of comfort. It talks about the difference between being happy and popular, and an outcast, that the former is like living during the day, but when you look up there's just the sun, whereas the latter is like living in the night, which is not so great, but when you look up you see so many stars. I think about that a lot. My main issue was that the character wasn't actually unattractive, putting a birthmark on a really good looking person doesn't stop them being good looking.
Spoiler
There was a murder involving wrapping a guy in plastic that really unnerved me as well
The highest unseen on your ballot for me is Macabre
User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 3398
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#270

Post by peeptoad »

matthewscott8 wrote: October 23rd, 2021, 12:37 pm
peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 4:45 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 3:13 pm Yup I saw it, reviewed on page 4 of this sprawling thread! I really liked it
How about Heartless? It's a horror movie, so you might not be interested, but I did a word search on this thread and I didn't see it . That one and Rabbit ala Berlin are my favorites for this year.
yup, I have seen that one, back in the day in the cinema. I am a big fan of Philip Ridley, and was super excited when he came back to directing movies. It's a movie I think about a lot, the speech in it by the main character's dad (played by Timothy Spall) has always given me a lot of comfort. It talks about the difference between being happy and popular, and an outcast, that the former is like living during the day, but when you look up there's just the sun, whereas the latter is like living in the night, which is not so great, but when you look up you see so many stars. I think about that a lot. My main issue was that the character wasn't actually unattractive, putting a birthmark on a really good looking person doesn't stop them being good looking.
Spoiler
There was a murder involving wrapping a guy in plastic that really unnerved me as well
The highest unseen on your ballot for me is Macabre
Agree totally on the speech in Heartless. That film was one that almost mesmerized me to the point that I stared at the screen after the credits ran for an extra 15 minutes or so. I don't have as much a problem with the lead being not wholly unattractive since the perception/subjective judgement is the real killer there, but I understand your point about it maybe detracting slightly. It's easily my favorite Ridley film, though I like everything he's done.

Macabre is more a straight-up cannibal affair, though done very well imo and the lead actress was absolutely perfect. This one was initially a short film that was reworked and expanded to a feature and I think a significant part of that was the strong lead (she was also the focal point in the short).
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#271

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

The Messenger (2009 - Oren Moverman)

This film follows two soldiers whose work it is to inform families of the death of their soldier kinfolk. There is some interesting procedural detail at the beginning, after that it becomes a lot more involving as both men work through their own emotional difficulties and try to start forming connections again. The acting is superb, particularly from Samantha Morton.

I read a book recently, The Reluctant Fundamentalist, one of the characters is a woman called Erica, a play on America without the Am. This film is loaded with that feeling, of social fabric worn thin, of people acting roles or going through the motions without any sense of a national meaning. For these soldiers their meaning can only be found in a brotherhood of shared trauma. I wondered what Iraqis would think watching this one.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#272

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

ابن بابل‎ / Syn Babilonu / Son of Babylon (2009 - Mohamed Al Daradji)

A very special film. Son of Babylon follows a grandmother and her grandson as they travel over Iraq on a forlorn hope quest, to find the father, in the aftermath of Saddam's downfall. It's much more about the trauma of an entire nation, and the filmmaker uses the plight of this pair to skilfully and gradually draw the viewer in and build up an effect. There is a blur between fiction and documentary here because the fires and smoke that can be seen are from real bombings, as terrorist attacks were happening constantly during filming. When a character is crying sometimes it's acting, sometimes it's reality as the cast get overwhelmed. This is deeply authentic filmmaking using non-professional actors. Son of Babylon is as much of a monument as it is a film.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#273

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Sweetgrass (2009 - Ilisa Barbash & Lucien Castaing-Taylor)

This one was released way after it was shot, shooting finished in 2003. It's a documentary about sheep herding, filmed in Montana; the name of the film comes from the county of Sweetgrass in Montana. The first part documents quite a lot of animal cruelty, sheep being shorn then put out in the cold, lambs being tossed around. To a farmer none of this is sadistic, it's just part and parcel of farming, although it made me wonder of course, if it's ethical to farm animals at all. Much of the rest is more of a pastoral piece as the sheep are herded to summer pasture. The piece grasped my interest from time to time, for example when one of the two cowboys that are driving the sheep out in the open country is having such a bad time of it that he cries down the phone to his mother.

The film is both a piece about animal cruelty, and an elegy to a passing way of life (the filmmakers filmed the last sheep drive, an event that had been occurring in those parts for over one hundred years). These felt like slightly dissonant aims, although apparently this is very much intentional. It is a very interesting experiment, though I can't pretend that it wasn't a chore to watch.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#274

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Ville Marie - A (2009 - Alexander Larose)

This is Alexander Larose's effort for 2009 (of ICM forum fame for his short Brouillard: Passage #14). This short is inspired by dreams he had of falling off skyscrapers, it has the super bright colours of the abstract dreams I used to have when I was a very young child. It also reminded me of the moments after waking where you are still upset by a dream and replaying fragments (I don't remember dreams anymore, but can recall this state). It's very beautiful and self tender in the end.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on October 24th, 2021, 9:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#275

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Trees of Syntax, Leaves of Axis (2009 - Daïchi Saïto)

I tried to watch this years ago online but couldn't get on with it. It turns out it really needs to be an immersive experience. I just watched it via a DVD on my big screen. This is a kind of stop motion film of trees, with a huge amount of post filming magic gone into it.
User avatar
kongs_speech
Posts: 2543
Joined: April 4th, 2020, 10:32 pm
Contact:

#276

Post by kongs_speech »

matthewscott8 wrote: October 24th, 2021, 7:41 pm Image

Ville Marie - A (2009 - Alexander Larose)

This is Alexander Larose's effort for 2009 (of ICM forum fame for his short Brouillard: Passage #14). This short is inspired by dreams he had of falling off skyscrapers, it has the super bright colours of the abstract dreams I used to have when I was a very young child. It also reminded me of the moments after waking where you are still upset by a dream and replaying fragments (I don't remember dreams anymore, but can recall this state). It's very beautiful and self tender in the end.
Ebby suggested this one to me recently. I was very impressed with it as well.
🏳️‍⚧️
Honey Bunny wrote: Any of you fucking pricks move and I'll execute every motherfucking last one of ya!
Quartoxuma wrote: A deeply human, life-affirming disgusting check whore.
Image
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#277

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

A Woman, a Gun, and a Noodle Shop (2009 - Yimou Zhang)

A low budget wacky Chinese remake of Blood Simple set in Imperial China, in a lonely mountain inn. I saw this as Prod has mentioned it to me for some time now, he has a keen eye. It can be easy to dismiss as foolish or outlandish in its clownish tampering with the Coens' much respected original. In fact I think it is audacious and brilliant. I don't feel worthy to criticize this work, because I think Yimou Zhang knew exactly what he was doing here. Whilst many aspects of the movie are fabulous and leave me with great and beautiful memories, I found some of the sexually sadistic elements not to my taste, which means I can't call it a new favourite. It is definitely an improvement on Blood Simple, although I feel a horde of fans mobbing towards my doors with flaming torches as I write this. Whilst it's only 5.6 rated on IMDb, I did read the reviews section, and some other lonely souls definitely "got it".
User avatar
cinewest
Posts: 2488
Joined: February 15th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#278

Post by cinewest »

Zhang Yimou does a nice job with crime dramas, and Ju Dou is one of my favorites of the early 90’s.
User avatar
cinewest
Posts: 2488
Joined: February 15th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#279

Post by cinewest »

Double post
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 2515
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#280

Post by matthewscott8 »

peeptoad wrote: October 23rd, 2021, 12:49 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: October 23rd, 2021, 12:37 pm
peeptoad wrote: October 22nd, 2021, 4:45 pm

How about Heartless? It's a horror movie, so you might not be interested, but I did a word search on this thread and I didn't see it . That one and Rabbit ala Berlin are my favorites for this year.
yup, I have seen that one, back in the day in the cinema. I am a big fan of Philip Ridley, and was super excited when he came back to directing movies. It's a movie I think about a lot, the speech in it by the main character's dad (played by Timothy Spall) has always given me a lot of comfort. It talks about the difference between being happy and popular, and an outcast, that the former is like living during the day, but when you look up there's just the sun, whereas the latter is like living in the night, which is not so great, but when you look up you see so many stars. I think about that a lot. My main issue was that the character wasn't actually unattractive, putting a birthmark on a really good looking person doesn't stop them being good looking.
Spoiler
There was a murder involving wrapping a guy in plastic that really unnerved me as well
The highest unseen on your ballot for me is Macabre
Agree totally on the speech in Heartless. That film was one that almost mesmerized me to the point that I stared at the screen after the credits ran for an extra 15 minutes or so. I don't have as much a problem with the lead being not wholly unattractive since the perception/subjective judgement is the real killer there, but I understand your point about it maybe detracting slightly. It's easily my favorite Ridley film, though I like everything he's done.

Macabre is more a straight-up cannibal affair, though done very well imo and the lead actress was absolutely perfect. This one was initially a short film that was reworked and expanded to a feature and I think a significant part of that was the strong lead (she was also the focal point in the short).
Found this quote today, thought you might like it: "If you cry because the sun has gone out of your life, your tears will prevent you from seeing the stars." Rabindranath Tagore
Post Reply