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¶ Short of the Day #10: Voda a práca

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¶ Short of the Day #10: Voda a práca

#1

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » February 22nd, 2017, 10:00 am

"Short of the Day" is the daily discussion of a short.

Tasks:
1) Watch.
2) Discuss.
3) Send me your suggestions for the next Short of the Day per PM, along with links to the shorts and comments, questions for the other users to think about, and/or info about the short.

Detailed project introduction: here


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Voda a práca / Water and Labor (Martin Slivka, 1964) :ICM: :imdb:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6E1vHwz_Azk
Length: 8 minutes 57 seconds[/color]

Suggested by: joachimt


I love shorts that show the beauty of man's inventions without any voiceover. If the images are strong enough, no commentary is necessary. For example, this applies to several works of Dutch filmmakers Joris Ivens and Bert Haanstra. Ivens had several shorts and features which combined the forces of water and wind and man's way of dealing with those forces. Some of those movies astonish me about the skills of mankind, especially with the technological advancements of the last few decades.

Voda a praca does exactly that. This Slovak documentary shows the skills of man to make use of the power of water. We see lots of technical solutions to convert the flowing water into useful movements. Especially in the second half of the short that really works well. By using detailed shots of mechanical tools and the fast editing, the movie itself takes over the power and the movement of the water. It never stops, it keeps flowing. In a way, this reminded me of Haanstra's "Glas".

The only annoying thing is the soundtrack. I don't really like the beeping sounds, although several other sound effects fit the movements well and add to the experience.

Comments by: joachimt
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#2

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » February 22nd, 2017, 10:11 am

joachimt already did a great job of explaining what 'Voda a práca' is about, and like him I also tend to like those type of films a lot. I think what's noteworthy with this one is how much the camera feels like it is right in there, always feeling very close to the action, making the camera, and hence the viewer, more than just the passive observer that one is used to being in documentary films from that time or earlier.

As for the music, while I certainly understand joachimt 's criticism, I kind of liked simply because it's unusual and I like the unusual, but also I think that this is a really early electronic soundtrack, so that deserves some credit. It actually does give the action a certain urgency, but yeah, it can also be slightly annoying, and a good soundtrack built out of the "natural" sounds of the things we see (which this film has too in some of the sections) often make those type of films better than any music could.

I also thought the ending was a nice final touch - spoilers tehe - where we learn that these pretty impressively elaborate wooden constructions that allow those folk to use the power of water in a variety of ways were already built in 1876.

I think this is a great one that would deserve as much exposure as the most popular films of Joris Ivens and Bert Haanstra.
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on February 22nd, 2017, 6:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#3

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » February 22nd, 2017, 10:27 am

PM me for a better-quality version.

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- http://dafilms.com/film/8784-voda-a-praca/
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on February 22nd, 2017, 9:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#4

Post by Mario Gaborović » February 22nd, 2017, 11:50 am

I think director's idea was to show how powerful water really is. Despite its lightness it carries away heavy trunks, crushes and grinds.

Pretty impressive shots. It holds attention all the time and no comment is necessary, as you said. I wonder to what extent (if at all) these sorts of mechanisms are used nowadays. The music was unusual which is good for a change.

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#5

Post by Cynical Cinephile » February 22nd, 2017, 1:17 pm

Human ingenuity at its finest, using a force of nature to one's own advantage. There were some impressive shots in it, I particularly liked the tracking shot of a log sliding down the hill. I dig the music, in some way, it reminded me of Phillip Glass, with its uptempo and repetitiveness, it fit the editing perfectly, imo. Editing is, btw, my favorite thing about this film.
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#6

Post by bal3x » February 22nd, 2017, 1:54 pm

Excellent stuff, really love these sort of shorts, good comparison with people like Ivens and Haanstra, most of those are among my favorites, this one also favorited.

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#7

Post by sortile9io » February 22nd, 2017, 8:06 pm

Simple yet effective in conveying the charm of those wooden machines that look nowadays taken from a fairy tale. As for the soundtrack, I tried several substitutes like Glass, Takemitsu, Piccioni and bossa nova and the best turned out to be Bach's English suites played on harpsichord.
Last edited by sortile9io on February 22nd, 2017, 8:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#8

Post by Coco LaBerge » February 22nd, 2017, 8:18 pm

As a lover of woodwork and engineering I loved it, thanks. Some very clever designs and quality craftsmanship there. Thought the music was cool too.
Last edited by Coco LaBerge on February 23rd, 2017, 12:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#9

Post by Carmel1379 » February 23rd, 2017, 12:25 am

It's one of the more focused and thought-through (editing, progression and pacing-wise) of those word-less documentaries attempting to depict the dynamics between humankind and nature, either commensalistic (as in the short - "Water and Work" - technology utilising nature without overly harming/exploiting it) or antagonistic (destruction, pollution, waste, predatoriness, natural disasters, etc.), such that in either case humankind is developing more "distinct" from it.

This shot doesn't just randomly cut from one thing that awakens awe to another interesting observation, during its short runtime I felt there was a clear distinction between several "chapters", that are obviously signalled by giving attention to different machines and processes, but also by the change of music (with cuts to a lack of one, back to some score again, change of instrument etc.). That's why I felt it was important to keep it on and not turn it off to put something of ones own on. I'd agree that in themselves the erratic beeps might be annoying, but it gives a nice alien touch to the short. And I surmise it's a common thing to have been done in Czechoslovakia - 'Krtek' for example also employs music of the very same type during the more distorting and surreal scenes (for the child's perception).

The logs flowing downstream was quite impressively depicted. Everything was, really. I should also mention that the runtime feels like passing very quickly.

The last minute or so, when the flute starts to play by itself, felt like a summary of all that has been seen before, a gathering of the aspects that the previous machines/ideas had in common, without really looking at its role. The revolutions now start to slow and seem to lack any purpose, since one doesn't see the full context anymore. Nice way to finish.

I have also been thinking about the short in terms of the daunting things I've read yesterday on thermodynamics and libidinal materialism, but I can't say anything about that.
Last edited by Carmel1379 on February 23rd, 2017, 7:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
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#10

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » February 23rd, 2017, 6:25 am

Agent1379 on Feb 22 2017, 05:25:13 PM wrote:I have also been thinking about the short in terms of the daunting things I've read yesterday on thermodynamics and libidinal materialism, but I can't say anything about that.
Reading top secret documents now, Agent 1379?


Well-said about the changes in music and pauses to mark some change in either subject, theme, location, perspective, etc. And the music actually is fairly varied, like the more chaotic bleeping for flowing water, while the music for the machines sounds more strained and rhythmic, I believe there is even an accordion in there, which fits right in with the electronic sounds? And the ending doesn't look at the water and the machines as separate from each other anymore, with the flute also indicating a harmonious unity. Coincidentally the next Short of the Day that we will have will also be about two distinctly different things gradually establishing an unlikely unity...
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on February 23rd, 2017, 6:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#11

Post by joachimt » February 23rd, 2017, 11:05 am

I'm glad people loved it! I nominated it for DtC. Don't forget to support it.
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#12

Post by Eve-Lang-El-Coup » February 23rd, 2017, 1:11 pm

The cinematography is great and informative. The soundtrack is definitely interesting and at the best of times is in unison with the shots.

At the end of the film, the credits show the year 1963.

Apparently this film has been an ICM forum favourite for a while as there are two lists related to it.

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#13

Post by joachimt » February 23rd, 2017, 3:32 pm

Eve-Lang-El-Coup on Feb 23 2017, 06:11:09 AM wrote:Apparently this film has been an ICM forum favourite for a while as there are two lists related to it.
No, not at all. It had only 6 checks before it became Short of the Day.
Those forum lists are lists will all movies with at least 1 vote in a poll. I was probably the only one every time who voted for it.
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#14

Post by Carmel1379 » February 23rd, 2017, 7:22 pm

Perception de Ambiguity on Feb 22 2017, 11:25:39 PM wrote:
Agent1379 on Feb 22 2017, 05:25:13 PM wrote:I have also been thinking about the short in terms of the daunting things I've read yesterday on thermodynamics and libidinal materialism, but I can't say anything about that.
Reading top secret documents now, Agent 1379?


Alright Mr. Inquisitive, these long-winded trivialities are meant for your ears (well, sight) only:

As I have said, the logs flowing downstream was an image that impressed me and directly reminded me of stuff I've read (just a few hours before I saw the short) from Nick Land's 'The Thirst for Annihilation', in particular his further brooding and conceptualisation of libidinal materialism and it's relation to thermodynamics. At first I wanted to write something about it with respect to the short, but I gave up since ultimately I don't think the short really goes on a high enough philosophical level, i.e. it wasn't (fortunately) necessarily of the filmmaker's concern to question the things that happened on screen or add any such redundancy and possible obfuscation. I mean, the short will obviously inspire thoughts about things like tendency of energetic matter and the arrow of time, but so does just looking out of the window and observing how the wind moves the branches on a tree or someone lighting a cigarette. 'Water and Work''s structuring definitely has meaning, but it isn't meant to aspire to musings about The Universe as a whole. One thing that could inspire discussion is the "twist" you mentioned at the end - that the machinery that's used and (seems) functioning (very) well, actually originates from 1876 --- what does that say (if anything?) about society and people and development etc.?

But here then, are the thoughts I was meant to attempt to write down, and the passages from the book:


So the water flows downwards attracted by gravity, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics (and principle of minimum energy). Humans can utilise that observed feature of the world to transport logs to a lower spot on earth, perhaps even replicate the shapes of a river for an even steeper gradient and faster flow. But the logs aren't meant to disintegrate or dissipate, they're in themselves stable solids that will survive being carried by river from one level to another. They're transmitted in the first place, because humanity associates potential with it, the possibility that they may be used for construction and manufacturing. In the long run if left untouched, the logs would corrode at the bottom of the river and progressively disintegrate into finer particles that converge to immanent nullity.

Humans deviate from that; at the cost of work and sweat --- which is also aided and often substituted by a cascade of machines initially started by (again) the flow of water --- the species attempts to sustain organisational and "excessive" (compared to a random spot in space) facets of life, to optimistically continue engaging in convulsive aberrance of civilisation. But what most don't realise is that everything under the sun also evolves in accordance to the second law of thermodynamics and that eventually everything will return to zero, the thermospasm, undiluted chaos.
Life and machines will not escape the Trieb - it obviously flows through them.

In Bataille's view:

"The primordial task of life is not to produce or survive, but to consume the clogging floods of riches - of energy - pouring down upon it. (...) 'The world is sick with wealth'. Expenditure, or sacrificial consumption, is not an appeal, an exchange, or a negotiation, but an uninhibited wastage that returns energy to its solar trajectory, releasing it back into the movement of dissipation that the terrestrial system - culminating in restricted human economies - momentarily arrests. (...)"

"The thermospasm is reality as undilute chaos. It is where we all came from. The death- drive is the longing to return there (‘it’ itself), just as salmon would return upstream to perish at the origin. Thermospasm is howl, annihilating intensity, a peak of improbability. Energetic matter has a tendency, a Todestrieb. The current scientific sense of this movement is a perpetual degradation of energy or dissipation of difference. Upstream is the reservoir of negentropy, uneven distribution, thermic disequilibrium. Downstream is Tohu Bohu, statistical disorder, indifference, Wärmetod. The second law of thermodynamics tells us that disorder must increase, that regional increases in negentropy still imply an aggregate increase in entropy. Life is able to deviate from death only because it also propagates it, and the propagation of disorder is always more successful than the deviation. Degradation ‘profits’ out of life. Any process of organization is necessarily aberrational within the general economy, a mere complexity or detour in the inexorable death-flow, a current in the informational motor, energy cascading downstream, dissipation. There are no closed systems, no stable codes, no recuperable origins. There is only the thermospasmic shock wave, tendential energy flux, degradation of energy. A receipt of information—of intensity—carried downstream."

"Life is ejected from the energy-blank and smeared as a crust upon chaotic zero, a mould upon death. This crust is also a maze—a complex exit back to the energy base-line—and the complexity of the maze is life trying to escape from out of itself, being nothing but escape from itself, from which it tries to escape: maze-wanderer. That is to say, life is itself the maze of its route to death; a tangle of mazings [Umwege] which trace a unilateral deviation from blank. What is the source of the ‘decisive external influences’ that propel the mazings of life, if not the sun?"

"Bataille interprets all natural and cultural development upon the earth to be side-effects of the evolution of death, because it is only in death that life becomes an echo of the sun, realizing its inevitable destiny, which is pure loss."


Alright, enough of that I didn't mean to make this thread so seemingly depressing. There is of course a lot more discussion about other stuff, in particular art (Nietzsche).
IMDb, letterboxd, tumblr
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#15

Post by jvv » February 23rd, 2017, 7:53 pm

If there's one thing that these shorts discussions have shown me (even though I kind of knew that already), it's that you guys fundamentally look way more/deeper into movies than I do. Usually my response to a movie is mostly emotional. Either I like it or I don't. I might notice references to ancient mythology or social critique or an interesting idea or subtext, but I'm not actively looking for them.

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#16

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » February 23rd, 2017, 8:05 pm

Carmel on Feb 23 2017, 12:22:05 PM wrote:
Perception de Ambiguity on Feb 22 2017, 11:25:39 PM wrote:
Agent1379 on Feb 22 2017, 05:25:13 PM wrote:I have also been thinking about the short in terms of the daunting things I've read yesterday on thermodynamics and libidinal materialism, but I can't say anything about that.
Reading top secret documents now, Agent 1379?


Alright Mr. Inquisitive, these long-winded trivialities are meant for your ears (well, sight) only:

As I have said, the logs flowing downstream was an image that impressed me and directly reminded me of stuff I've read (just a few hours before I saw the short) from Nick Land's 'The Thirst for Annihilation', in particular his further brooding and conceptualisation of libidinal materialism and it's relation to thermodynamics. At first I wanted to write something about it with respect to the short, but I gave up since ultimately I don't think the short really goes on a high enough philosophical level, i.e. it wasn't (fortunately) necessarily of the filmmaker's concern to question the things that happened on screen or add any such redundancy and possible obfuscation. I mean, the short will obviously inspire thoughts about things like tendency of energetic matter and the arrow of time, but so does just looking out of the window and observing how the wind moves the branches on a tree or someone lighting a cigarette. 'Water and Work''s structuring definitely has meaning, but it isn't meant to aspire to musings about The Universe as a whole. One thing that could inspire discussion is the "twist" you mentioned at the end - that the machinery that's used and (seems) functioning (very) well, actually originates from 1876 --- what does that say (if anything?) about society and people and development etc.?

But here then, are the thoughts I was meant to attempt to write down, and the passages from the book:


So the water flows downwards attracted by gravity, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics (and principle of minimum energy). Humans can utilise that observed feature of the world to transport logs to a lower spot on earth, perhaps even replicate the shapes of a river for an even steeper gradient and faster flow. But the logs aren't meant to disintegrate or dissipate, they're in themselves stable solids that will survive being carried by river from one level to another. They're transmitted in the first place, because humanity associates potential with it, the possibility that they may be used for construction and manufacturing. In the long run if left untouched, the logs would corrode at the bottom of the river and progressively disintegrate into finer particles that converge to immanent nullity.

Humans deviate from that; at the cost of work and sweat --- which is also aided and often substituted by a cascade of machines initially started by (again) the flow of water --- the species attempts to sustain organisational and "excessive" (compared to a random spot in space) facets of life, to optimistically continue engaging in convulsive aberrance of civilisation. But what most don't realise is that everything under the sun also evolves in accordance to the second law of thermodynamics and that eventually everything will return to zero, the thermospasm, undiluted chaos.
Life and machines will not escape the Trieb - it obviously flows through them.

In Bataille's view:

"The primordial task of life is not to produce or survive, but to consume the clogging floods of riches - of energy - pouring down upon it. (...) 'The world is sick with wealth'. Expenditure, or sacrificial consumption, is not an appeal, an exchange, or a negotiation, but an uninhibited wastage that returns energy to its solar trajectory, releasing it back into the movement of dissipation that the terrestrial system - culminating in restricted human economies - momentarily arrests. (...)"

"The thermospasm is reality as undilute chaos. It is where we all came from. The death- drive is the longing to return there (‘it’ itself), just as salmon would return upstream to perish at the origin. Thermospasm is howl, annihilating intensity, a peak of improbability. Energetic matter has a tendency, a Todestrieb. The current scientific sense of this movement is a perpetual degradation of energy or dissipation of difference. Upstream is the reservoir of negentropy, uneven distribution, thermic disequilibrium. Downstream is Tohu Bohu, statistical disorder, indifference, Wärmetod. The second law of thermodynamics tells us that disorder must increase, that regional increases in negentropy still imply an aggregate increase in entropy. Life is able to deviate from death only because it also propagates it, and the propagation of disorder is always more successful than the deviation. Degradation ‘profits’ out of life. Any process of organization is necessarily aberrational within the general economy, a mere complexity or detour in the inexorable death-flow, a current in the informational motor, energy cascading downstream, dissipation. There are no closed systems, no stable codes, no recuperable origins. There is only the thermospasmic shock wave, tendential energy flux, degradation of energy. A receipt of information—of intensity—carried downstream."

"Life is ejected from the energy-blank and smeared as a crust upon chaotic zero, a mould upon death. This crust is also a maze—a complex exit back to the energy base-line—and the complexity of the maze is life trying to escape from out of itself, being nothing but escape from itself, from which it tries to escape: maze-wanderer. That is to say, life is itself the maze of its route to death; a tangle of mazings [Umwege] which trace a unilateral deviation from blank. What is the source of the ‘decisive external influences’ that propel the mazings of life, if not the sun?"

"Bataille interprets all natural and cultural development upon the earth to be side-effects of the evolution of death, because it is only in death that life becomes an echo of the sun, realizing its inevitable destiny, which is pure loss."


Alright, enough of that I didn't mean to make this thread so seemingly depressing. There is of course a lot more discussion about other stuff, in particular art (Nietzsche).
Anyway, how's your libidinal life?

What do you mean by "seemingly depressing"? :rip:
Reducing life and death just to energy I think is a bit overly reductive even for my tastes. But incidentally Martin Slivka's great 'Odchádza clovek' goes much deeper than this short and I think I'll touch upon this thermodynamics issue to some (less nihilistic) extent in my little write-up about it in the next weekly thread.
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on February 23rd, 2017, 8:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#17

Post by Carmel1379 » February 23rd, 2017, 8:28 pm

Perception de Ambiguity on Feb 23 2017, 01:05:49 PM wrote:
Carmel on Feb 23 2017, 12:22:05 PM wrote:
Perception de Ambiguity on Feb 22 2017, 11:25:39 PM wrote:Reading top secret documents now, Agent 1379?


Alright Mr. Inquisitive, these long-winded trivialities are meant for your ears (well, sight) only:

As I have said, the logs flowing downstream was an image that impressed me and directly reminded me of stuff I've read (just a few hours before I saw the short) from Nick Land's 'The Thirst for Annihilation', in particular his further brooding and conceptualisation of libidinal materialism and it's relation to thermodynamics. At first I wanted to write something about it with respect to the short, but I gave up since ultimately I don't think the short really goes on a high enough philosophical level, i.e. it wasn't (fortunately) necessarily of the filmmaker's concern to question the things that happened on screen or add any such redundancy and possible obfuscation. I mean, the short will obviously inspire thoughts about things like tendency of energetic matter and the arrow of time, but so does just looking out of the window and observing how the wind moves the branches on a tree or someone lighting a cigarette. 'Water and Work''s structuring definitely has meaning, but it isn't meant to aspire to musings about The Universe as a whole. One thing that could inspire discussion is the "twist" you mentioned at the end - that the machinery that's used and (seems) functioning (very) well, actually originates from 1876 --- what does that say (if anything?) about society and people and development etc.?

But here then, are the thoughts I was meant to attempt to write down, and the passages from the book:


So the water flows downwards attracted by gravity, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics (and principle of minimum energy). Humans can utilise that observed feature of the world to transport logs to a lower spot on earth, perhaps even replicate the shapes of a river for an even steeper gradient and faster flow. But the logs aren't meant to disintegrate or dissipate, they're in themselves stable solids that will survive being carried by river from one level to another. They're transmitted in the first place, because humanity associates potential with it, the possibility that they may be used for construction and manufacturing. In the long run if left untouched, the logs would corrode at the bottom of the river and progressively disintegrate into finer particles that converge to immanent nullity.

Humans deviate from that; at the cost of work and sweat --- which is also aided and often substituted by a cascade of machines initially started by (again) the flow of water --- the species attempts to sustain organisational and "excessive" (compared to a random spot in space) facets of life, to optimistically continue engaging in convulsive aberrance of civilisation. But what most don't realise is that everything under the sun also evolves in accordance to the second law of thermodynamics and that eventually everything will return to zero, the thermospasm, undiluted chaos.
Life and machines will not escape the Trieb - it obviously flows through them.

In Bataille's view:

"The primordial task of life is not to produce or survive, but to consume the clogging floods of riches - of energy - pouring down upon it. (...) 'The world is sick with wealth'. Expenditure, or sacrificial consumption, is not an appeal, an exchange, or a negotiation, but an uninhibited wastage that returns energy to its solar trajectory, releasing it back into the movement of dissipation that the terrestrial system - culminating in restricted human economies - momentarily arrests. (...)"

"The thermospasm is reality as undilute chaos. It is where we all came from. The death- drive is the longing to return there (‘it’ itself), just as salmon would return upstream to perish at the origin. Thermospasm is howl, annihilating intensity, a peak of improbability. Energetic matter has a tendency, a Todestrieb. The current scientific sense of this movement is a perpetual degradation of energy or dissipation of difference. Upstream is the reservoir of negentropy, uneven distribution, thermic disequilibrium. Downstream is Tohu Bohu, statistical disorder, indifference, Wärmetod. The second law of thermodynamics tells us that disorder must increase, that regional increases in negentropy still imply an aggregate increase in entropy. Life is able to deviate from death only because it also propagates it, and the propagation of disorder is always more successful than the deviation. Degradation ‘profits’ out of life. Any process of organization is necessarily aberrational within the general economy, a mere complexity or detour in the inexorable death-flow, a current in the informational motor, energy cascading downstream, dissipation. There are no closed systems, no stable codes, no recuperable origins. There is only the thermospasmic shock wave, tendential energy flux, degradation of energy. A receipt of information—of intensity—carried downstream."

"Life is ejected from the energy-blank and smeared as a crust upon chaotic zero, a mould upon death. This crust is also a maze—a complex exit back to the energy base-line—and the complexity of the maze is life trying to escape from out of itself, being nothing but escape from itself, from which it tries to escape: maze-wanderer. That is to say, life is itself the maze of its route to death; a tangle of mazings [Umwege] which trace a unilateral deviation from blank. What is the source of the ‘decisive external influences’ that propel the mazings of life, if not the sun?"

"Bataille interprets all natural and cultural development upon the earth to be side-effects of the evolution of death, because it is only in death that life becomes an echo of the sun, realizing its inevitable destiny, which is pure loss."


Alright, enough of that I didn't mean to make this thread so seemingly depressing. There is of course a lot more discussion about other stuff, in particular art (Nietzsche).
Anyway, how's your libidinal life?

What do you mean by "seemingly depressing"? :rip:
Reducing life and death just to energy I think is a bit overly reductive even for my tastes. But incidentally Martin Slivka's great 'Odchádza clovek' goes much deeper than this short and I think I'll touch upon this thermodynamics issue to some (less nihilistic) extent in my little write-up about it in the next weekly thread.
Oh, you know, strikes and gutters, ups and downs...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FqHYstooBQ

I'm looking forward to seeing 'Odchádza clovek', I noticed it's complete on youtube, so I should get around it this week.
Last edited by Carmel1379 on February 23rd, 2017, 8:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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