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GruesomeTwosome
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#2721

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

kongs_speech wrote: July 19th, 2022, 7:07 pm
GruesomeTwosome wrote: July 19th, 2022, 6:44 pm
kongs_speech wrote: July 19th, 2022, 1:14 pm Both Sides of the Blade is another lovely, melancholy Claire Denis experience. If it makes it to a theater near you, consider showing it some support. My roommate, our moms and myself were the only four people in my screening. Guess that's because there are no minions or superheroes in it. :(
That title is new to me, so I was thinking “Damn, Claire Denis has a THIRD film in 2022 besides Stars at Noon and Fire?”, but I see that Fire has just been re-titled as Both Sides of the Blade. Anyways, I thought you were in a somewhat rural/small-town part of Florida? How’d this film get screened there?! I just checked my larger metro area (Philly) and it doesn’t seem to be playing anywhere.
I moved to a larger urban area in May. B)
Aha! Nice. Much better cinema opportunities, I can dig it. :thumbsup:
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Good_Will_Harding
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#2722

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Saw the new Jordan Peele joint.

Image

Short review: Yup!

Now that I've gotten the joke that I'm confident everyone else that has/will see and like the film will make out of the way, here's some more detailed thoughts - I liked this about as much as I did Peele's previous two features, in that it's very, very good and juuuuust bordering on greatness for me, but probably needs another viewing before I shower it with the highest praise. Needless to say, this is among the better wide releases I've seen this summer, and see's Peele really doubling down in the realm of hard sci-fi. Whereas Get Out and Us had some sci-fi lite elements to them, particularly drawing inspiration from any number of "body snatcher" stories, this film is much less of a straight horror and leans more towards pure science fiction, of the UFO/extra-terrestrial variety.

Peele directs with increased confidence and a pretty solid eye for scale and spectacle, but along the way manages to maintain what made his first two so memorable, i.e. the focus on detailed, gradual tension building and an appreciable mix of humor to legitimate spooks. The guy is three for three in my book, and I'm glad he seems to steadily be working his way out of the horror/comedy comfort zone that brought him such success before, by also working in some surprising but welcome 'Western' elements here as well, albeit superficially - mostly regarding the setting, aesthetic, and Morricone-inspired musical score.
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#2723

Post by outdoorcats »

Good_Will_Harding wrote: July 24th, 2022, 1:38 am Saw the new Jordan Peele joint.

Image

Short review: Yup!

Now that I've gotten the joke that I'm confident everyone else that has/will see and like the film will make out of the way, here's some more detailed thoughts - I liked this about as much as I did Peele's previous two features, in that it's very, very good and juuuuust bordering on greatness for me, but probably needs another viewing before I shower it with the highest praise. Needless to say, this is among the better wide releases I've seen this summer, and see's Peele really doubling down in the realm of hard sci-fi. Whereas Get Out and Us had some sci-fi lite elements to them, particularly drawing inspiration from any number of "body snatcher" stories, this film is much less of a straight horror and leans more towards pure science fiction, of the UFO/extra-terrestrial variety.

Peele directs with increased confidence and a pretty solid eye for scale and spectacle, but along the way manages to maintain what made his first two so memorable, i.e. the focus on detailed, gradual tension building and an appreciable mix of humor to legitimate spooks. The guy is three for three in my book, and I'm glad he seems to steadily be working his way out of the horror/comedy comfort zone that brought him such success before, by also working in some surprising but welcome 'Western' elements here as well, albeit superficially - mostly regarding the setting, aesthetic, and Morricone-inspired musical score.
I'm still listening to the score of this one, especially the track "The Run" (as well as "Skin in the Game"). Hopefully they run a decent Oscar campaign for Michael Abels next year. He deserves some recognition.
music
spoilery thoughts
So did you find the "victorious" ending a bit ironic, in re, say, Whiplash? Like it's a bit of a hollow victory, since the theme of the film seems to be about exploiting trauma for entertainment and profit ("I will throw filth at you, degrade you, and make you a spectacle"). It felt like there was some self-critique in there as well, though I'd argue if so that it's unnecessary.

There's also some animal rights stuff in there as well; look at what happens to those who don't treat animals with respect and dignity (which becomes quite pertinent later on).

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#2724

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

NOPE
The ending for sure had some shades of grey to it, but ultimately I think there's enough of a triumphant final note as to leave general audiences feeling satisfied with the way things turned out.

And yes, there was definitely a lot of themes about the equal (or at least humane) treatment of animals in the entertainment industry. That's where the whole Steven Yeun/Gordy sitcom subplot really fit in to the overarching narrative. And maybe I'm just desensitized from watching too many movies, but the Gordy stuff is probably the first time in quite a while that a film has genuinely unsettled me in such a way in years. It’s all truly great stuff, and I was disappointed when I realized that the entire subplot was wrapped up midway through the movie.
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#2725

Post by outdoorcats »

Good_Will_Harding wrote: July 25th, 2022, 1:07 pm
NOPE
The ending for sure had some shades of grey to it, but ultimately I think there's enough of a triumphant final note as to leave general audiences feeling satisfied with the way things turned out.

And yes, there was definitely a lot of themes about the equal (or at least humane) treatment of animals in the entertainment industry. That's where the whole Steven Yeun/Gordy sitcom subplot really fit in to the overarching narrative. And maybe I'm just desensitized from watching too many movies, but the Gordy stuff is probably the first time in quite a while that a film has genuinely unsettled me in such a way in years. It’s all truly great stuff, and I was disappointed when I realized that the entire subplot was wrapped up midway through the movie.
NOPE - more spoilers
The Gordy flashback was for sure about the treatment of animals, but it's also interesting how Jute deals with it; when he's asked about it directly, he ignores the question and starts talking about an SNL skit that parodied the event and how well it captured it. And ultimately the flashback is about understanding Jute, who although a minor role is arguably the most important character in the movie. He's not only the one who sets everything in motion (and when you think about it, is basically also responsible for the death of Otis Sr.), but his backstory and the fact that he's cannibalizing his own trauma for profit (while seemingly not actually having dealt with said trauma) provides a window into the film's main theme (OJ and Emerald trying to profit off the thing that killed their father, Otis Sr. trying to profit off the erasure of his ancestor).

edit - literally minutes after I posted this, I read this article and A.A. Dowd says a lot of the same things! (Also some interesting stuff comparing the being to a television camera, digesting traumas and spitting them back out) Validation? :shrug:

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#2726

Post by kongs_speech »

Seeing it tonight, then I can hop in whatever this discussion is. Thanks for using spoiler tags, guys. :cheers:
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#2727

Post by Onderhond »

Watched H4Z4RD this weekend. Only 10 people in the theater, and we were the only ones laughing. The coolest thing about the film is that it is entirely shot from within a single car, but I only realized that afterward. It's one of those "the day gets progressively worse" films, and it gets so insane and absurdist in places that it's hard to believe everything is happening from within one car.

Not sure how well this will translate outside Belgium though. It's extremely "Antwerp" and extremely 90s, I've watched the trailer and the subtitles are very much sanitized, which ruins quite a bit of the fun. It's like watching an old Ritchie film, or Trainspotting, without getting the slang and the type of characters they represent. Still, it's a film that does everything at 200%, so if you're in the mood for some very silly fun, it's an absolute hoot.
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#2728

Post by OldAle1 »

So yesterday I watched Summer of '42 (Robert Mulligan, 1971). There is nothing particularly remarkable about it to me - it's a gauzy (literally - the cinematography, by the great Robert Surtees, seems to have a nostalgic gloss and softness to it throughout that took some getting used to) look at a summer of first love, when a 15-year-old high school kid (Gary Grimes) spending the summer on Nantucket with his family and his two best friends becomes infatuated with the beautiful "older woman" (originally to be played by someone over 30, but eventually the part went to 23-year-old Jennifer O'Neill), who is waiting for her husband to come back from the war. Everything here is fairly predictable if you've seen a few of these kinds of films - and there seem to have been a lot of them in American cinema at this juncture - and there are several scenes (most notably the buying-condoms-in-the-drugstore one) that seemed to go on too long, and a very slight story ends up feeling a bit draggy, though at the end I was won over more-or-less through a really solid ending. Still, on the whole, nothing very memorable. It was a huge hit at the time and was nominated for several awards, winning an Oscar for Michel Legrand's slight, simple, repetitive score which is something of an earworm. And Brazilian-American actress O'Neill became a really big star for a while in the 70s, though her film career seems to be filled with bad choices - lots of big-budget flops and poorly-reviewed films over the next two decades, until she became a strident right-wing fundamentalist in the 90s and turned exclusively to Christian films this century.

What is notable about it for me personally is that for some reason this film has been stuck in my mind for decades, as one of those films that seems to have resonance or meaning for me - though in reality it actually doesn't. I mean, I wondered if I'd ever seen it - I hadn't, or I'd forgotten it completely - and I felt like maybe it was a favorite of my mother's - but the year 1942 would have little relevance to her (she was 8 through most of it) and even the war didn't have much meaning - we only had one relative who served, and he was a desk clerk at Pearl Harbor who was slightly wounded in the attack and ended up spending the rest of the war in California. And my parents saw very, very few films in the cinema in the early 70s, and I don't remember it being on TV or my mom mentioning it in particular. The music was vaguely familiar but... not an A-HA THAT'S IT kind of familiar. I was thinking maybe that I've been getting the title mixed up with something else, but I have no idea what it could be - other "summer of" titles exist but they are much later, at least all the ones I've heard of or seen. I was hoping this would piece together one of those nagging little memory-mysteries in my life, but it didn't. SIgh.

Anyone else relate to my second paragraph (not in regards to this film in particular, necessarily).
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#2729

Post by St. Gloede »

Can't think of a film that I mistakenly thought I had a relationship to, but the first paragraph certainly resonates, could have been my own review.
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#2730

Post by cinewest »

Summer of '42 played well to me as a budding teenager when I first saw it, and has lodged in my memory as such. Am guessing that it probably wouldn't have nearly the same resonance today were I to revisit it.

My own choice to watch for the '71 poll last night was Straw Dogs, which I wrote about in a separate thread.
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#2731

Post by kongs_speech »

I loved Summer of '42. Found it very moving, and funny at times. Watched it last month because it was leaving HBO Max.
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#2732

Post by OldAle1 »

St. Gloede wrote: August 4th, 2022, 3:25 pm Can't think of a film that I mistakenly thought I had a relationship to, but the first paragraph certainly resonates, could have been my own review.
It's really rather confounding. WHAT have I actually been thinking about, all these years? I was thinking that I could be confusing the movie with a song or something, but I don't think that's it either, and though I vaguely knew the film music beforehand, it wasn't something that was stuck in my head.

Eh, this kind of thing happens to me a fair bit. Probably why memory is an important theme for me in film.
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#2733

Post by St. Gloede »

There are films I recreated in an entirely different way in my head. I remember thinking that Mirror changing cinematography/film techniques along with the timeline, with certain early memories shown in silent film style. This was due to my memory of the more throwaway backstory of one of the side characters, which was illustrated with rough archive footage. Rewatching it was quite a surprise (and while I still gave it 10 on that first rewatch, I was disappointed as it is a really cool idea).
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#2734

Post by OldAle1 »

St. Gloede wrote: August 4th, 2022, 5:24 pm There are films I recreated in an entirely different way in my head. I remember thinking that Mirror changing cinematography/film techniques along with the timeline, with certain early memories shown in silent film style. This was due to my memory of the more throwaway backstory of one of the side characters, which was illustrated with rough archive footage. Rewatching it was quite a surprise (and while I still gave it 10 on that first rewatch, I was disappointed as it is a really cool idea).
It was the truth, vivid and monstrous, that all the while he had waited the wait was itself his portion..
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#2735

Post by blocho »

St. Gloede wrote: August 4th, 2022, 3:25 pm the first paragraph certainly resonates, could have been my own review.
Ditto. I saw it a week ago and was similarly underwhelmed.
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#2736

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Here for another round of summertime catch-up, with a part three coming soon as well.

Bodies Bodies Bodies

It's a bit hard to categorize this one, beyond the very general "horror-comedy" classification - it fits more into the mold of a whodunit than a typical slasher, all the while aiming to satirize gen-Z/modern youth culture. I found this immensely entertaining, thanks in no small part to the troupe of talented young adult actresses, and it's one of the precious few films (along with The Fallout earlier this year) to utilize modern teen slang that didn't make me cringe in embarrassment - no small feat!

Bullet Train

You could pretty much copy and paste everything I said about The Gray Man in my last 'catch up' post here - overstuffed with action/thriller/espionage tropes and containing some rather shoddy, cartoonish CGI effects, and yet the very likable and charismatic ensemble cast and generally lightweight tone help turn this into something I don't regret watching.

Prey

A refreshingly lean and straightforward take on the Predator series, which brings it back to the basics which made the original stand out so well. The structure isn't anything brand new, but the period, vaguely Western setting and commanding lead performance from Amber Midthunder (which is a great name for an actress playing an action heroine) definitely add some credibility and gravitas to this. Would pair great with Nope for a 'non-white siblings face off against extra-terrestrial invaders' double feature,

Thirteen Lives

Surprisingly decent, and much better than Ron Howard's previous streaming original work, that hillbilly POS. This feels like Howard trying to make lightning strike in the same place as Apollo 13 did before, and this does make very good use of some lovely Thai locales for the setting, but is also a bit overlong and eventually leans hard into sentimentality. For a much better (and shorter) take on the exact same subject matter, check out last year's documentary The Rescue.

Vengeance

A very pleasant surprise. Went into this with only the most basic awareness of the premise, but this wound up being a pretty enjoyable bit of southern fried neo-noir with some pretty sharp commentary and a good sense of humor to keep it afloat. This also marks the first time I've seen Ashton Kutcher in anything brand new in at least a decade, if not more, so it was good to see him back, even if it was for a supporting role.

As things are starting to slow down film-wise, looking back it's actually been a pretty good summer at the movies, at least here in the US. While most of the major franchise hopefuls have all fallen pretty flat (the lone exception being Top Gun: Maverick, which exceeded just about everyone's expectations), the majority of the mid to lower budget fare I've seen has been consistently satisfying.
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#2737

Post by kongs_speech »

Vengeance reminded me of Under the Silver Lake and I hope it finds a cult following like that film has.

Bullet Train is one of my favorites of the year, but the action / vulgar auteurism stuff is right in my wheelhouse. I'm so impressed by David Leitch as a filmmaker thus far.
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#2738

Post by Torgo »

kongs_speech wrote: August 13th, 2022, 3:10 pm I'm so impressed by David Leitch as a filmmaker thus far.
"so impressed"? Atomic Blonde, Deadpool 2, Hobbs & Shaw. Hm. :mellow:
Not bad, but not on the level of, say, Matthew Vaughn during his first decade as a director, I'd say. But then it's not completely my wheelhouse :sweat:

Can't say anything on recent 2022 releases at all, catch up with you guys in December :turned:
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#2739

Post by OldAle1 »

Torgo wrote: August 13th, 2022, 5:37 pm
"so impressed"? Atomic Blonde, Deadpool 2, Hobbs & Shaw. Hm. :mellow:
Not bad, but not on the level of, say, Matthew Vaughn during his first decade as a director, I'd say. But then it's not completely my wheelhouse :sweat:
Somehow you manage to make a comparison that makes both filmmakers look bad :lol: - not that either is particularly good to begin with IMO. Am sort of looking forward to Leitch's film simply because, oh, it looks better than the other schlock I've been avoiding. But I didn't much like Atomic Blonde or Hobbes & Shaw so my expectations will be very low.
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#2740

Post by kongs_speech »

Torgo wrote: August 13th, 2022, 5:37 pm
kongs_speech wrote: August 13th, 2022, 3:10 pm I'm so impressed by David Leitch as a filmmaker thus far.
"so impressed"? Atomic Blonde, Deadpool 2, Hobbs & Shaw. Hm. :mellow:
Not bad, but not on the level of, say, Matthew Vaughn during his first decade as a director, I'd say. But then it's not completely my wheelhouse :sweat:

Can't say anything on recent 2022 releases at all, catch up with you guys in December :turned:
I think Atomic Blonde is fantastic. So is John Wick, for which he wasn't credited but apparently directed a significant amount of the film. I didn't see Hobbs and Shaw yet, because I've only seen the first two Fast flicks. But yeah, Atomic Blonde, Bullet Train and John Wick are where it's at, with Deadpool 2 also being solidly good despite having a very annoying kid villain.
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#2741

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

I'm generally indifferent towards David Leitch as a filmmaker, but I've liked pretty much everything I've seen from him so far, or at least enjoyed them to varying degrees (though rubbery, fake looking CGI is also a problem with his previous works as well and not just Bullet Train apparently). Atomic Blonde does stick out a little from his solo efforts, since it's much more serious from what I remember, and the rest of his works have far more tongue-in-cheek sensibilities. Not a director who I've given much thought to overall, but I haven't disliked anything I've seen from him so far, so there's that. :turned:
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#2742

Post by prodigalgodson »

So have I missed any talk about RRR on here or has it not caught on? An anti-colonial buddy-movie epic from a neglected area of production with gonzo action scenes whose choreography is only matched by an insane dance sequence seems like it would check so many boxes for the forum.
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#2743

Post by Torgo »

Hey prod,
I don't think we have many avid followers of Indian cinema in the Forum, it seems to be widely ignored. Users of ICM (the site) got increasingly suspicious and weary of Bollywood hits to enter several IMDb charts which didn't live up to their expectation, or, said more friendly: didn't match their tastes.
Now a few years have passed since that, the sujet of the American blockbuster is close to collapsing under its creative emptiness, so it might be the right time to look somewhere else. The funny thing is, I finally saw Netflix' The Gray Man on Sunday (which I enjoyed!) which stars Dhanush. I read a review afterwards that described how the production team decidedly wanted to feature one of India's (super?)stars, not only for marketing reasons (well, who knows), but because they were in praise of their current / recent action philosophy and that it influenced the Russos. I don't remember the exact words, it was something along the lines of "fresh" or even visionary.
Having said that, your comment might be just the final push needed for me to put RRR on my watchlist. I mean, it gets compared to Sholay so I'm basically already sold; it's from Tollywood (big difference!), ranks #226 in the Letterboxd Top 250 AND did not get in IMDb's Top 250 concurrently - that might be a good sign!

All aboard the RRR train!
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#2744

Post by Onderhond »

RRR has been a big hit on my film Twitter/Facebook. But yeah, very different crowd :)
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#2745

Post by hurluberlu »

I have been disappointed too often by modern Indian flicks that have "gonzo action scenes whose choreography is only matched by an insane dance sequence" to invest 3h+ again but Metascore looks good for this one.
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#2746

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

I missed it while it was in theaters, but caught up with it once it hit Netflix and really enjoyed it!
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#2747

Post by kongs_speech »

Orphan was surprisingly enjoyable and well-made. The prequel, which has arrived at least a decade too late, owes an apology to the brain cells it slaughtered as I watched it. Jesus Christ, that's a bad movie. Bad, bad, bad, bad, bad.
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#2748

Post by hurluberlu »

Just saw Memories / Memorîzu (1995) for the first time, restored and in theater: what a great anime ! From space opera and Kubrickian sci-fi to steam-punk, it is an anthology with three segments that are deep enough in themes and visuals they would have easily deserved a full length film each. One recognizes Satoshi Kon's influence from the other movies he directed himself and esthetically the segments have a lot in common with other animes from the era (Ghost in the Shell, Akira) but also some inspiration from European graphic novels (from Moebius, Schuiten & Peeters). The soundtrack is also covering a lot of ground from opera to 90s techno very sensibly making it a whole immersive experience.

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#2749

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I went to see Three Thousand Years of Longing yesterday, and had the whole theater to myself, apart from two elderly ladies who were apparently playing some porno cell-phone game and talking loudly about how one guy reminded them of an ex-husband of one of them, who she saw Jaws with when it came out. I could almost get most of their conversation, it was kind of entertaining, but I worried they'd keep it up once the film started - thankfully, they didn't.

It's disappointing to see this film faring poorly at the box office; perhaps not surprising though. These days anything that doesn't fall into one of just a few distinct and explainable-in-ten-words categories isn't an easy sell, and while this is "fantasy" (which is popular), it's not fantasy of the battles-with-dragons kind, it's not "epic". It's a callback to the worlds of the Arabian Nights, specifically to some of the early Cinemascope fantasies of the 50s, and it's about the nature of storytelling itself - none of that is going to bring in the kiddies. And neither is the romantic element, something else that's largely missing in box-office successes in America these days. And while Tilda Swinton and Idris Elba and director George Miller are all pretty big names, it's clear that in 2022 you pretty much have to be Tom Cruise to bring people in just on the strength of a name. But it's too bad, because it's a pretty good film - in fact for the first half to two-thirds, I thought it had the potential to be a great one. British narratologist (not a term I've heard before - let's say Professor of myths) Tilda Swinton is in Istanbul for a conference, and while shopping in the Grand Bazaar she's drawn to a particular little glass vessel, which upon cleaning in her hotel suite pops open to reveal a room-filling Djinn (Elba). Over most of the rest of the film, he tells her stories about how he was trapped, freed, and re-trapped over the past three millennia; she, being wise to the ways of words and mythical creatures, is loathe to present him with a wish, let alone three, because she knows how they tend to turn out, and our self-reflective and somewhat depressive Djinn only adds to her negativity on this point. But something changes in both of them as the Djinn's story comes to the present, and they are off to London to live together at the end, until the Djinn's place in the modern world is disrupted by forces too powerful even for him. Choices are made, wishes have to be considered, and a happy ending seems necessary - and deserved. I think the last was a bit wonky and muddled - though I like where the story ends up, I'm not sure the way it got there once the scene shifts it's place was the best way to do it. But the Djinn's tales are marvelous, the use of color and production design are excellent, and most of all, given that this is basically a 2-person film, the two stars are just wonderful together. I would love to see these two in something simpler and non-fantastic, actually, like a semi-comedic Mike Leigh film, perhaps as a long-married, loving but eternally squabbling couple. In any case, they made the film absolutely worth watching, and I think for anybody interested in the origins of myths and in the film's early antecedents - Scheherazade being only the most obvious of many - it's worth it.

A side note for those who tend to complain about language - one thing I really liked is that, while Elba narrates his stories in English (with an unplaceable "foreign" accent which I think is appropriate), much of the film is in original languages - he starts out in Greek when the bottle is opened but quickly learns Swinton's language, and then we proceed through the ages hearing the language of Solomon and Sheba (?? early Hebrew, I dunno) and Turkish, and bits of other languages I think. I really liked the way this was done, it certainly gives it more of a feel of "authenticity", if that's a meaningful term in a story about a 3000-year-old djinn.
It was the truth, vivid and monstrous, that all the while he had waited the wait was itself his portion..
Arkantos
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#2750

Post by Arkantos »

I saw Three Thousand Years at the cinema about a week ago, and amusingly I had a similar experience of being alone aside from an elderly couple. I agree with your take about the flashbacks, I could have watched the two of them tell tales all day long. It's interesting how the muddled and unearned nature of the London segment mirrors the narrative, in that
Spoiler
the love between Alithea and the Djinn is itself also muddled and unearned, given it is the result of her wish and not an organic development.
Though I suspect that angle wasn't really what Miller was going for :lol:
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Good_Will_Harding
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#2751

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

I saw the new Goerge Miller joint last night as well, and would have to agree largely with Ale's take on it - very good overall, but just a bit shy of greatness. I went yesterday for the $3 "National Cinema Day" discounted price at all the major chains, and even with that in mind, my theater wasn't very full. Just me, and two other couples in the entire room.

Anyhow, the biggest strengths here would be the two central performances, and the spectacular visuals, not only in terms of the effects, but the production value as a whole. The budget for this was reportedly around $60 million, and it's all up there on the screen, but I guess that also makes its status as a flop even more disappointing. But one of the main things that took a while for me to warm up to with this is that I didn't find Tilda Swinton's protagonist very well defined, at least not at first, and while Swinton's acting is reliably strong, she isn't really doing anything all that new or surprising here. On the other hand, Idris Elba as the Djinn definitely livens up the proceedings once he enters the story, and I'm glad he stepped away from blockbusters to really let his acting chops shine here. As I'm sure is the case with most others who have seen this, I need to sit on how I feel about the final third of the story. I certainly appreciated the different direction it took and went along with it fine, but it didn't feel like enough time was spent on that portion of the film to make as big of an impact as was intended. If anything, it comes across a more of an extended epilogue rather than the emotional climax of the story.

So on the whole, pretty good and definitely worth seeing. Certainly one of the most original and ambitious wide releases I've seen all year, and the fact that it's able to pull together all of its weaving narrative threads into a satisfying package overall is quite the accomplishment.
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Good_Will_Harding
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#2752

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Barbarian

Had very little interest in seeing this latest horror film when I first heard about it or initially saw the trailer. But some pretty encouraging advanced buzz and word of mouth caught my attention, and at the very least I wouldn't mind supporting an original horror film at the box office these days, and wound up quite pleasantly surprised by it. Sure, there's nothing superlative or genre defining going on here, but it's a very slick, nasty, and surprising bit of pulp that held my attention for a refreshingly breezy runtime. Another notch in one of the stronger years for the horror genre in recent memory.
Horror/horror adjacent films of '22, arbitrarily ranked
Top tier
Nope

Pretty good
Bodies Bodies Bodies
Prey
Men
Scream

Solid, worth seeing
The Black Phone
Crimes of the Future
Barbarian
X
Master

Meh
Jurassic World: Dominion, emphasis on "ass"
Morbius aka More BS
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kongs_speech
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#2753

Post by kongs_speech »

Good_Will_Harding wrote: September 11th, 2022, 11:05 pm Barbarian

Had very little interest in seeing this latest horror film when I first heard about it or initially saw the trailer. But some pretty encouraging advanced buzz and word of mouth caught my attention, and at the very least I wouldn't mind supporting an original horror film at the box office these days, and wound up quite pleasantly surprised by it. Sure, there's nothing superlative or genre defining going on here, but it's a very slick, nasty, and surprising bit of pulp that held my attention for a refreshingly breezy runtime. Another notch in one of the stronger years for the horror genre in recent memory.
Horror/horror adjacent films of '22, arbitrarily ranked
Top tier
Nope

Pretty good
Bodies Bodies Bodies
Prey
Men
Scream

Solid, worth seeing
The Black Phone
Crimes of the Future
Barbarian
X
Master

Meh
Jurassic World: Dominion, emphasis on "ass"
Morbius aka More BS
Just saw Barbarian, had an absolute blast. I found it to be hilarious, terrifying, smart and depraved. Can't wait to see how Zach Cregger follows up such a strong first horror film.
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JLG wrote: Photography is truth ... and cinema is truth 24 times a second.
First to check CODA (2021)
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matthewscott8
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#2754

Post by matthewscott8 »

Cronenberg's new movie Crimes of the Future is astonishingly poor, incoherent, has too much awkwardly delivered expository dialogue, has an actor who struggles to speak English, really bad special effects. The biggest failure is that it just ends suddenly, when it feels like the story is still being established. Mortensen is atrocious, Seydoux and Stewart must have thought working with Cronenberg would be legacy material, but they've been trapped in a film maudit. Annoyingly it also has some interesting ideas. Feels like one of those that will be talked about a lot by scholars when his career is summed up (like some of the crap Argento and Ruiz turned out towards the end also will end up in their textbooks).
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Silga
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#2755

Post by Silga »

matthewscott8 wrote: September 17th, 2022, 7:37 pm Cronenberg's new movie Crimes of the Future is astonishingly poor, incoherent, has too much awkwardly delivered expository dialogue, has an actor who struggles to speak English, really bad special effects. The biggest failure is that it just ends suddenly, when it feels like the story is still being established. Mortensen is atrocious, Seydoux and Stewart must have thought working with Cronenberg would be legacy material, but they've been trapped in a film maudit. Annoyingly it also has some interesting ideas. Feels like one of those that will be talked about a lot by scholars when his career is summed up (like some of the crap Argento and Ruiz turned out towards the end also will end up in their textbooks).
Exactly my thoughts. Completely agree. I'm a fan of Cronenberg's work, but Crimes of the Future was a major disappointment.
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1SO
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#2756

Post by 1SO »

Good_Will_Harding wrote: September 11th, 2022, 11:05 pm Another notch in one of the stronger years for the horror genre in recent memory.
Horror/horror adjacent films of '22, arbitrarily ranked
Top tier
Nope

Pretty good
Bodies Bodies Bodies
Prey
Men
Scream

Solid, worth seeing
The Black Phone
Crimes of the Future
Barbarian
X
Master

Meh
Jurassic World: Dominion, emphasis on "ass"
Morbius aka More BS
To strengthen your opinion I recommend...
Fresh
Hatching
Hypochondriac
Watcher
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Ebbywebby
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#2757

Post by Ebbywebby »

Silga wrote: September 17th, 2022, 7:49 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: September 17th, 2022, 7:37 pm Cronenberg's new movie Crimes of the Future is astonishingly poor, incoherent, has too much awkwardly delivered expository dialogue, has an actor who struggles to speak English, really bad special effects. The biggest failure is that it just ends suddenly, when it feels like the story is still being established. Mortensen is atrocious, Seydoux and Stewart must have thought working with Cronenberg would be legacy material, but they've been trapped in a film maudit. Annoyingly it also has some interesting ideas. Feels like one of those that will be talked about a lot by scholars when his career is summed up (like some of the crap Argento and Ruiz turned out towards the end also will end up in their textbooks).
Exactly my thoughts. Completely agree. I'm a fan of Cronenberg's work, but Crimes of the Future was a major disappointment.
Yup.
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Ivan0716
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#2758

Post by Ivan0716 »

Decision to Leave (Park Chan-wook)

Been waiting desperately for this one as soon as I had heard that Park will be directing Tang Wei after his last outing with Miss Flo (another one of my favourite actresses atm), so when it popped up online I just couldn't help myself.

I don't think I've ever liked a film this much and still feel so disappointed by it. The first half is up there with the best work Park has ever done, there is no one out there who can jump between playfulness and morbidity as effortlessly as he does, and here we have some of the finest examples of that. It kept me on the edge of my seat even when I knew how it's all gonna go down, the tension just builds and builds. The problem is it all comes to a head in a scene at the midpoint of the film...after which it quite literally just hits the reset button and never reaches the same heights again, most of the intensity that was so brilliantly sustained in the first half is lost and it starts to border on the contrived. By the end I couldn't shake the feeling that the entire second half was written simply to justify that ending, it's certainly an ending that will be remembered, but I think I would have happily settled for a lesser one in exchange for a tighter narrative.

Still the best film I've seen this year so far, and a directorial masterclass as you would expect, but a disappointment for sure. It had all the ingredients for it to be an all time great, then went on to miss the mark quite dramatically. Will probably see it again in the cinema when it releases next month.
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#2759

Post by kongs_speech »

matthewscott8 wrote: September 17th, 2022, 7:37 pm Cronenberg's new movie Crimes of the Future is astonishingly poor, incoherent, has too much awkwardly delivered expository dialogue, has an actor who struggles to speak English, really bad special effects. The biggest failure is that it just ends suddenly, when it feels like the story is still being established. Mortensen is atrocious, Seydoux and Stewart must have thought working with Cronenberg would be legacy material, but they've been trapped in a film maudit. Annoyingly it also has some interesting ideas. Feels like one of those that will be talked about a lot by scholars when his career is summed up (like some of the crap Argento and Ruiz turned out towards the end also will end up in their textbooks).
Don't agree with any of that except "some interesting ideas." It's a welcome return to Cronenberg's body horror roots.
🏳️‍⚧️ (she/her)
JLG wrote: Photography is truth ... and cinema is truth 24 times a second.
First to check CODA (2021)
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Ivan0716
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#2760

Post by Ivan0716 »

Before, Now & Then (2022, Kamila Andini)

Here’s one for all the WKW fans. Comparisons to In the Mood for Love will be made by everyone who has seen both films, and rightfully so. The atmosphere and composition of the film owes so much to the 2000 film. On one hand, good job for invoking and dare I say, replicating, WKW’s style so well. On the other hand, it’s so full on that it pretty much overshadows everything else about the film and makes it hard to take it seriously on its own merits. I spent way too much of its runtime wondering if this shot was taken straight from In the Mood for Love.
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