Welcome to the ICM Forum.
Check out our Magazine

If you notice any issues please post in the Q&A thread. Email issue should be fixed. If you encounter this issue, contact PeacefulAnarchy
Podcast: Talking Images (Episode 64 released December 2nd: How Everything Everywhere All at Once Was Suddenly Eveything Everywhere All at Once)
iCinema Magazine: WE ARE LIVE! (We just need more content)
ICMForum Film Festival 2022 Nov 14 - Dec 12
World Cup - Season 5: Round 1 Schedule
Polls: 1924 (Results), Horror (Results), Canada (Results), 1941 (Dec 26th), Noir (Jan 2nd), Directors (Jan 2nd)
Challenges: Cult/Grindhouse, Documentary, Turkey and Caucasus
About: Welcome All New Members, Terms of Use, Q&A

the 2009 project

Post Reply
User avatar
cinewest
Posts: 2953
Joined: February 15th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#361

Post by cinewest »

My take is very similar to yours on this film, as well as Haneke’s intentions, St.

Haneke doesn’t pull any punches in any of his films, and though I find his investigations discomforting, they are at the same time astute and important commentaries about the dark side of human behaviour.
User avatar
cinewest
Posts: 2953
Joined: February 15th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#362

Post by cinewest »

matthewscott8 wrote: February 6th, 2022, 11:44 am
cinewest wrote: February 6th, 2022, 10:59 amI appreciate your thoughts, Mathew, as always, but I don't agree that Haneke's thesis is as specific as you claim, though "repression" (not just sexual) and its twisted result is clearly one facet of what Haneke is getting at, which also has a lot to do with perfection vs. sin, unforgiving judgment and harsh punishment, accusation and denial, and the kind of dissociation from oneself and one's own behavior that can be unified only by the adoption of the same duplicitous "tribal" beliefs and persecution of some "other." Donald Trump and his minions are a good example of a modern day version.
when asked if viewers would find thoughts of fascism unavoidable, Haneke laughed and said, "I hope so!". Of course Trump himself was and is a fascist, and also impacted by an abusive upbringing. I also don't claim that Haneke's intent is some sort of final word on the matter of interpretation. I would say that Reich's The Mass Psychology of Fascism was a touchstone for the film, it seems very strange to have focussed so heabily on the bed tying stuff otherwise. However, again we needn't be constrained by Haneke's intents or influences.

I am creating a presentation on the sustainability transition for an international conference soon. I had a slide at the end that had some quite stark statistics about climate change, soil erosion and pollinator loss. The marketing guy said to me, Matt if you bring people down you have go bring them back up again. Haneke takes the audience on a disquieting and unpleasant journey here, which he doesn't moor to any sense of the modern era, from which there's no ray of hope. To me, all too often, film directors press buttons like rape, violence, and animal slaughter, without taking much responsibility for the results or if they've traumatised their actors or audiences.

Whilst this sense of tribalness which allows one to dissociate from ones actions is important, I imagine everyone who watched this film and noticed that, already knew it. What I didn't get from The White Ribbon is any sense of revelation or responsibility. Tarantino does seem way more culpable as he's more didactic and has access to a much wider audience to influence. Many people walked away from his film fortified in their view that violence, according to conditions, is acceptable, cathartic and even fun.

My own responsibility is some sort of film historian for 2009 so I have to consider this film carefully, and I'll have to rewatch it at some point. Lucky I am not doing 2011 (yet!?) or I'd have to have keep on talking about The Turin Horse, that year's enigmatic black and white misery fest :lol:
It seems that Haneke pushed your buttons with certain depictions that might have disturbed not only your impressions but your reading of the film.

Should you come to 2011 (a year full of masterpieces in my eyes) we will also disagree on The Turin Horse, though I understand why you were put off by the film.

As for the weight of documentary versus fiction, I think that both can be powerful I different ways, though most people seem to take truth telling more to heart.

To me it depends more if the story and the teller of the tale, and interestingly enough, two of my favorite filmmakers (Kieslowski and Loznitsa) both started out as documentarians who turned to fiction because they felt they were limited by the documentary form….
lynchs
Posts: 527
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Portugal
Contact:

#363

Post by lynchs »

prodigalgodson wrote: February 6th, 2022, 8:39 am
cinewest wrote: February 6th, 2022, 12:21 am Oh Mathew, I know there is something that put you off about the brilliant White Ribbon, but lumping it together with trash like Inglorious Basterds, which I couldn’t even get half way into, makes me squirm ;-)
Both great films, you nitpicks! tehe
Both AWFUL, you mean :lol: :turned:
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#364

Post by matthewscott8 »

lynchs wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:33 pm
prodigalgodson wrote: February 6th, 2022, 8:39 am
cinewest wrote: February 6th, 2022, 12:21 am Oh Mathew, I know there is something that put you off about the brilliant White Ribbon, but lumping it together with trash like Inglorious Basterds, which I couldn’t even get half way into, makes me squirm ;-)
Both great films, you nitpicks! tehe
Both AWFUL, you mean :lol: :turned:
Muhaha, would you care to guess what rating you gave The White Ribbon back in my July 2014 poll? I can reveal you gave Inglourious a 4/10. You were not the person I was referring to when I said another cinephile gave both film bad ratings... hehe. Also this is just a bit of humour, I recognise people change their views and this is all good.
User avatar
OldAle1
Donator
Posts: 8038
Joined: February 9th, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Dairyland, USA
Contact:

#365

Post by OldAle1 »

matthewscott8 wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:41 pm I recognise people change their views and this is all good.
Speaking of which, how many films have you re-watched for this project? And what have been the most significant changes in your opinions?

As to The White Ribbon, I have it rated 10 and remember certainly being very impressed at the time, though it has largely faded from memory now. I thought I might have written something of minimal substance that would help me in discussing it here, but that alas doesn't seem the case, or it's lost in the memories of the IMDb forums. I did save a little scrap about it but it's really pretty useless. I have somewhat mixed feelings about Haneke overall, but I can't put him in the same category as QT - certainly not as regards intentions or seriousness of purpose. It may be that he fails here or elsewhere - and I think he failed pretty significantly in Funny Games - but there is no question that he sees himself as a filmmaker of moral purpose and moral questioning, and I think his work does bear out a relative seriousness of purpose most of the time. And I really don't think you can say that about QT, who - particularly from 2009 on - has been using very serious and tragic subjects to remake into Boys' Own adventures, 21st century style. He's basically doing what Disney did with Pocahontas and Hunchback of Notre Dame only for a slightly older (but no more mature) audience.
lynchs
Posts: 527
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Portugal
Contact:

#366

Post by lynchs »

matthewscott8 wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:41 pm
lynchs wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:33 pm
prodigalgodson wrote: February 6th, 2022, 8:39 am
Both great films, you nitpicks! tehe
Both AWFUL, you mean :lol: :turned:
Muhaha, would you care to guess what rating you gave The White Ribbon back in my July 2014 poll? I can reveal you gave Inglourious a 4/10. You were not the person I was referring to when I said another cinephile gave both film bad ratings... hehe. Also this is just a bit of humour, I recognise people change their views and this is all good.
Oh Oh I checked my IMDB ratings and and, it's a S7V7N!! :lol: :woot: still, way off from his best! Inglourious is just a total MESS!

'I recognise people change their views and this is all good'

VERY VERY VERY VERY VERY true!
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#367

Post by matthewscott8 »

OldAle1 wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:57 pm [It may be that he fails here or elsewhere - and I think he failed pretty significantly in Funny Games - but there is no question that he sees himself as a filmmaker of moral purpose and moral questioning, and I think his work does bear out a relative seriousness of purpose most of the time.
I watches Funny Games wheh I was about 20 I would say, and even with the introduction by Mark Kermode (I think it was), I just enjoyed it sttaught up as a horror movie, so with outcomes like that I would say he failed there!

Btw I think Tarantino thinks of himself as a very moral director too. Also rather than just throwing that out there, I'll say that he probably feels like Death Proof is a feminist movie and like Django Unchained is some sort of anti-racist movie, and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is a pretty political movie, majoring in a very blinkered "the system works" sort of daddy's capitalism. Simply put though, he is probably the most full of shit guy in Hollywood since John Wayne.
Last edited by matthewscott8 on February 7th, 2022, 4:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#368

Post by matthewscott8 »

OldAle1 wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:57 pmSpeaking of which, how many films have you re-watched for this project? And what have been the most significant changes in your opinions?
I haven't rewatched any with serious gaps. The ones I think would benefit most from rewatching are Wild Grass and Mr Nobody. I have seen long stretches of Inglourious several times and the chances of me one day liking that are close to nil, for all that I appreciate Waltz's casting and peformance, and the building of suspense, Tarantino treads on too many sacred bones here for my liking.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#369

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Father of My Children / Le père de mes enfants (2009 - Mia Hansen-Løve)

This is a film for film fans, because it largely concerns the stresses and pain of being a film producer, particularly of films with "artistic merit" and it's based on a true story. I always like Mia Hansen-Løve's movies although I never find them particularly ambitious.

The film is in some way, about hiding, we watch films to hide, make films to hide, what are we hiding from: le monde dégolace. The insipid, relentless, aggressive, stumbling world. The everyday mendacity, the agendas, the superficialities, the compromises. Grégoire, the film producer, has his standards, has a dignity threshold, and isn't able to stay above it.

Mia Hansen-Løve was directing a film with the real life subject, Hubert Balsam, during the events depicted. Von Trier was also making Manderlay with Balsam at the same time; in this movie, he is embodied by a director called Stig, a charismatic narcissist, the film is not flattering to him.

It doesn't particularly aid the film that it makes allusions to Fanny and Alexander, because, well that is just a bigger film.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#370

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Brüno (2009 - Larry Charles)

OK so the chances of me watching this without this quest were about nil, I've really been trying to avoid it for a long time, but it's on the low rated poll results so I decided to give it a go. Fundamentally I don't really agree with pranking strangers so this was one I knew for pretty much certain was not for me even before watching it. Turns out the actual film didn't change that view.

Brüno is a character of Sacha Baron-Cohen designed to trigger homophobia from people, and he causes a lot of mayhem on unsuspecting bigots, but not exclusively bigots. The one thing that stops it from being completely cheap and tawdry is that he does genuinely put himself in some very dangerous situations, his commitment levels are high.

I also felt queasy at points because it felt like when he interviewed Paula Abdul for example, she was quite vulnerable and suggestible, and also not a homophobe. I wouldn't prank homophobes either to be frank, but it felt less bad when Baron Cohen was doing that.

I am not going to be completely straight laced about this, I did genuinely guffaw at his sheer audacity at points. I will also remember the scenes where he has parents offering up their babies for modelling work and they simply agree to any conditions that he stipulates, they are absolutely heart stopping moments.
User avatar
peeptoad
Posts: 4253
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#371

Post by peeptoad »

Saw Wheatley's Down Terrace (2009) the other day and it was a strong debut effort imho. Some of the angst on display was fully heartfelt... and that ending. :(
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#372

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Kiskanmak / Envy (2009 - Zeki Demirkubuz)

Bitterness can build up as slowly and imperceptibly as the furring of arteries. This is the revelation of Kiskanmak, Zeki Demirkubuz' adaptation of Nahit Sirri Orik's novel. It's also epidemic as shown in a chilling scene where children are taught a cruel song in a schoolroom. There is not a single scene in the movie where a character is focussed on anyone other than themselves, it is a humbling spectacle.

Whilst focussed on class and gender roles in 30s Turkey, there is to some extent a timelessness and placelessness to the movie. If we are cold hearted to others, if we deny them agency and ignore their feelings, we reap the whirlwind. It is terrifyingly easy to ignore the suffering of others.

This film was a minor sensation on the SCFZ forum back in the day, their poll for the year 2009 from 2014 has recently become a much relied upon resource for me.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#373

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Slovenka / Slovenian Girl (2009 - Damjan Kozole)

This is the story of a Slovenian girl who is studying at university and selling her sexual services. Slovenia have the EU presidency for the year and so there are lots of foreign diplomats with plenty of euros in town. It's an incredibly upsetting movie at points, so gruelling I had to have multiple pauses. It felt like it was meant to be a social issue movie, what are we doing to our young women? It was not entirely successful at that. Nina Ivanisin does an exceptional job as Aleksandra. My friend referred to young women from that part of the world that he met in the UK as iron butterflies, you can tell they have been through some shit and survived. When I was a night shift manager at a supermarket, a lady who was on shift, Monika once fixed the toilet for me when she saw I was phoning for a plumber. I asked her how she knew how to do that, she said when it's winter and you have three kids to look after, your husband has run off and you have no money, you learn how to do things fast.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#374

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Le streghe, femmes entre elles (2009 - Jean-Marie Straub)

I don't know why it's so easy for Straub. He makes a film that uplifted and enlivened me, with basically no money spent. This is simply him in a forest filming two local actresses reading some (astonishingly wondrous) lines from Pavese's Dialogues with Leuco, concerning Circe's encounter with Odysseus, but also the nature of life and fate, and what it is to be a God. If you didn't know better you would be thinking wtf at the start of this one. Hardly anything happens with the camera, its positioning for most of the movie seems almost random, but all of a sudden the genius of its positioning and the phenomenon it's been positioned to capture is revealed. The lines from Pavese are very beautiful, and bring to life the final two images after the dialogue has been finished, an earthern valley wall standing in for death, and the forest river as the chain of fate. I just do not understand how it is so easy for him and how much clarity he must have. I'm green with envy.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#375

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

The Loved Ones (2009 - Sean Byrne)

Australian high school horror movie. Mostly a deranged horror nonsense but with some very effective scenes on the subject of teenage angst. The cutting and dangerous climbing chimes with people I knew growing up. If there had been no horror elements at all I would have been much more interested. Has a lot of completely unnecessary sadism.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#376

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Podwórka (2009 - Sharon Lockhart)

Podwórka reminds us what it is to be children again, to play, to experiment, cack-handedly, to co-operate, to enjoy the arcing of balls, the bracing for impact as a jump hits the ground, getting dirty. It is a small handful of static shots of concrete public spaces and the children that inhabit them. It is a slow and peaceful half an hour.
User avatar
Perception de Ambiguity
Posts: 4319
Joined: July 9th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: in space the stars are no nearer
Contact:

#377

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

In case you don't know yet, the SCFZ forum is currently doing a new 2009 poll:
http://scfzforum.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=874
We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
LETTERBOXD | MUBI | IMDb | tumblr.
User avatar
cinewest
Posts: 2953
Joined: February 15th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#378

Post by cinewest »

matthewscott8 wrote: February 7th, 2022, 3:53 pm
OldAle1 wrote: February 6th, 2022, 1:57 pm [It may be that he fails here or elsewhere - and I think he failed pretty significantly in Funny Games - but there is no question that he sees himself as a filmmaker of moral purpose and moral questioning, and I think his work does bear out a relative seriousness of purpose most of the time.
I watches Funny Games wheh I was about 20 I would say, and even with the introduction by Mark Kermode (I think it was), I just enjoyed it sttaught up as a horror movie, so with outcomes like that I would say he failed there!

Btw I think Tarantino thinks of himself as a very moral director too. Also rather than just throwing that out there, I'll say that he probably feels like Death Proof is a feminist movie and like Django Unchained is some sort of anti-racist movie, and Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is a pretty political movie, majoring in a very blinkered "the system works" sort of daddy's capitalism. Simply put though, he is probably the most full of shit guy in Hollywood since John Wayne.
I would love to see (or perhaps write) a comparison of Tarantino and Haneke, especially in terms of the moral questions / themes in their films. I happen to believe that haneke is all about making films that wrestle with moral issues, whereas Tarantino's movies are at best witty riffs on genre schlock without any thematic depth.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#379

Post by matthewscott8 »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: March 22nd, 2022, 11:22 pm In case you don't know yet, the SCFZ forum is currently doing a new 2009 poll:
http://scfzforum.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=874
Thank you, no I didn't know, a good reason to see some more 2009 films!
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#380

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Série noire (2009 - Jean-Claude Rousseau)

The title refers to the series of hardboiled detective stories published in France by Editions Gallimard under the label Série noire, with black covers, or it could literally refer to the series of black frames that occur during the movie. Throughout the 19 minutes of the film, Rousseau mostly shows us fixed framed backstreet, and we have to work out what is going on. Plaintive voice messages could be real, or could be an actress, music could be chosen, or could just be the radio, bangs could be shots or exhaust backfires or doors slamming. There is a certain hostility to the images, we see windows mostly closed or barred, ugly metal barriers fencing off an empty lot, weeds. A passerby with a stiff walk makes you wonder about their life's woes. Two teenagers in sombre garb stroll by, what disillusionments have they suffered.

What is actually happening? It's unclear - is it a documentary or a fiction, are there crimes, is there a mourning? Some people seem certain that they watched a film with a contract killing, I have no such certainty. What does the film say about the viewer, do you the viewer need a solution, can you not rest without one? Are the black and white windows a visual pun on the black and white film medium, where noir originated? When the view suddenly becomes mobile, are we seeing redefinitions or ironic takes on concepts like suspense and thriller.

The programmer at the Viennale described this as a take on Rear Window, which is a clever thing to say for sure.

Whatever the take is, the film seems pregnant and the sounds and image somehow just.

You can watch it here if you care to:

User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 14575
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#381

Post by St. Gloede »

Did you watch Melody for a Street Organ by Kira Muratova during this quest, Matthew?

Image

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1482194
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#382

Post by matthewscott8 »

St. Gloede wrote: March 25th, 2022, 10:30 am Did you watch Melody for a Street Organ by Kira Muratova during this quest, Matthew?

Image

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1482194
yes, beautiful film (l) #26 out of 268 watches. Saw it a very long time ago so don't have a lot of insight left. However I'm going to do write ups of all the films in the top 40, have done most of them already.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#383

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Petition (2009 - Liang Zhao)

This is a film about ordinary Chinese people attempting to petition the Chinese government. This never really turns out well. By petition I mean that some wrong occurred at some point, and all local avenues of redress were completed, so the folk head to Beijing, to a hostile, under-resourced bureaucratic machine to ask the federal government to overrule the local decisions. There are tales of corruption and punishment beatings for petitioners who have refused to go away. Because the federal government takes notice of strength in numbers of petitioners, for example if 20 farmers from a region are saying they've been conned by the local government, it's likely true, local government pays for "retrievers", basically payrolled thugs who hang around the petitioner slums in Beijing and kidnap people back to their districts.

Liang Zhao is a talented documentarist who captures pertinent footage over more than a decade, including relating to the slum clearing that happened prior to the Beijing Olympics, part of the Potemkinisation for western eyes. The subjects have often been there for over a decade themselves and have gone half mad with grief and anger over injustice.

The film shows a Dickensian zone which is a graveyard for hopes, it is bleak but fascinating. I watched the 2 hour version, but there is also a 6 hour version (which I've only seen on the director's website, which is password protected, with no indication of how to get the password).
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#384

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

J. (2009 - Alexandre Larose & Solomon Nagler)

A wonderful little gem unearthed on the current 2009 poll thread on SCFZ. Old decaying film stock salvaged from a bin is reprinted and we see ghosts, we see intimacy.

https://vimeo.com/40793084
Last edited by matthewscott8 on April 20th, 2022, 1:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 14575
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#385

Post by St. Gloede »

matthewscott8 wrote: March 25th, 2022, 5:35 pm
St. Gloede wrote: March 25th, 2022, 10:30 am Did you watch Melody for a Street Organ by Kira Muratova during this quest, Matthew?
yes, beautiful film (l) #26 out of 268 watches. Saw it a very long time ago so don't have a lot of insight left. However I'm going to do write ups of all the films in the top 40, have done most of them already.
:cheers:

Looking forward to reading them!
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#386

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Welcome (2009 - Philippe Lioret)

A melancholy film about a young Kurdish teenager trying to cross the English Channel / La Manche to be with his sweetheart in London. Due to some PTSD he cannot do it by the easiest illegal route of stowing away in a lorry. He meets an ex swimming champion and they start training to see if they can get him to attempt a channel swim. Welcome to the world of stupidity, where some people are illegal, and helping some people is illegal.
longsilence
Posts: 14
Joined: August 4th, 2018, 10:25 am
Contact:

#387

Post by longsilence »

hi matt, coming in from the other thread. in two tiers solely based on how often they sneak up on me

Agrarian Utopia (Uruphong Raksasad)
Beetles (Eun-Hee Kim)
Bernadette (Duncan Campbell)
Craneway Event (Tacita Dean)
Dahlia (Shiho Kano)
Four Seasons (Keren Cytter)
Hanging Upside Down in the Branches (Ute Aurand)
Let Each One Go Where He May (Ben Russell)
Material (Thomas Heise)
Nebula Rising (Lee Hangjun)
Petition (Zhao Liang)
Sense of Architecture (Heinz Emigholz)
Totò (Peter Schreiner)
Wednesday Morning Two A.M. (Lewis Klahr)
Weekend in the Pines (Karl Lemieux, Hyena Hive)

1958 (Ghassan Salhab)
Ascension (Pavel Medvedev)
Bouquets 11-20 (Rose Lowder)
Compline (Nathaniel Dorsky)
Dazzle (Cyrus Frisch)
Disorder (Huang Weikai)
Il finish delle figure (Paolo Gioli)
Irene (Alain Cavalier)
Island Belarus (Victor Asliuk)
Lowlands (Peter Thompson)
Materia Obscura (Jürgen Reble)
Olga e il tempo - Parte seconda: Equinozio del pomeriggio (Manuele Cecconello)
Oxhide II (Liu Jiayin)
Sphinx on the Seine (Paul Clipson)
Still in Cosmos (Takashi Makino)
Terrorism Considered as One of the Fine Arts (Peter Whitehead)
The Old School of Capitalism (Želimir Žilnik)
The Other Song (Saba Dewan)
They All Lie (Matías Piñeiro)
Train of Thought (Jim Jennings)
Windows onto Montebello Road (Paul Turano)
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#388

Post by matthewscott8 »

longsilence wrote: September 21st, 2022, 12:59 pm hi matt, coming in from the other thread. in two tiers solely based on how often they sneak up on me
(l) thanks, lots of leads for me there
Last edited by matthewscott8 on November 25th, 2022, 10:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#389

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Luftslottet som sprängdes / The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest (2009 - Daniel Alfredson)

I watched #1 in the series back in 2009 and was disgusted by the rape scene, and the rape revenge scene. #2 and #3 were released in successive months and I chose not to watch them due to those scenes. However this is the 2009 thread, and I'm watching everything! #2 was in my view a set up / prologue for #3, and had still some elements of exploitation. However, I found myself surprised tonight watching #3. Surprised by just how majestic and restrained Lizabeth Salander is in the court room scenes (pictured). I really felt I was watching something quite special, and indeed that Noomi Rapace is a hell of an actress. I felt that where was a lot of catharsis and respect for the character. So I would probably give segment #3 a 9/10. #2 a 7/10 and #1 a 3/10. Pretty different marks for a single storyline but I did get very different feelings from each. In general I thought the writing was bad, the plot was at points completely ludicrous. However the character was more important and by the end she had regained some dignity, and it felt like the film-makers were taking her character more seriously. As someone with autism I was really happy to recognize autistic character traits without them being overplayed, related to savantism, or made farcical. I can't think of a film where an autistic character was better portrayed.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#390

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Go Get Some Rosemary / Daddy Longlegs (2009 - Benny Safdie & Josh Safdie)

So back before they hit the bigtime with films like Uncut Gems and Good Time, the Safdie Brothers made this charming autobiographically-inspired slice-of-life feature based on their upbringing by a divorced dad who is just a big kid himself. Lenny's got both parts of being a kid still going on, child-ish and child-like. It does stand out from the crowd of indie features, and I can see why Criterion got them a disc for it this year. I actually preferred it to their famous films. Whilst they won some mid-profile awards at the time, it was a while before the Safdies really made it, few went to see the movie.

It reminded me a lot of Inside Llewyn Davis because it's really good at showing mindfulness lapses. What I was originally watching as quirky rough and ready parenting soon became apparent to be seriously irresponsible. Lenny never quite stops being a lovable screw up though. He's unusual for the struggling dad character in that he genuinely does seem to love his kids, albeit he wants to be best friends more than he wants to be a dad. His winsome good looks seem to be his best asset at fending off a world that would otherwise hammer him like a nail. It's got some understanding of life that a lot of privileged filmmakers don't have, it understands deadbeat culture, flakiness and the spasmodic desperation and compromises that punctuate unprepared life (alongside moments of surprise elation). The Safdies are also very good at recalling what being children is like, clever moments like putting urine in a water pistol spring to mind.

Ronald Bronstein, director of cult movie Frownland is the dad, Lenny, it's an inspired pick, and it feels like very few if any other actors could have pulled this off like he did. Whilst a 90s film at heart it's shot about 10 years after the events, and on a low budget, so has a minor feeling of anachronicity, 2008 New York Cabs, but not much evidence of 2008 digital culture. You just have to go with it as a 90s flim I think, it's helps that it's shot on some gorgeous filmstock (in verité style).

A note on the titles, "Go Get Some Rosemary" is a reference to a scene where Lenny asks the kids to go do the food shopping for him (another irresponsible move to send young kids out into a rough neighbourhood). Sometimes if a film is less successful than filmmakers hope the title gets changed (speculation on my part). They certainly upgraded the title here, Lenny is fun like a spider with googly eyes is fun. Another fun touch is to have a couple named Lenny and Leni.

Health warning about viewing mode. The Safdies have noted that most people have viewed this movie in a strange unintended way. The way most people have seen it online is with a military sounds overlaid soundtrack. So when Lenny is falling over himself whilst carrying his hot dogs (which feels like it lends the movie iconicity), there's machine gun and mortar fire sounds. Some people have assumed this was artistic choice, but it's not. The movie was unavailable for so long that people think this manipulated version is the real one.

Whilst this was meant to be a chore watch I actually couldn't resist it creeping up on me, and may watch again at some point.
User avatar
matthewscott8
Donator
Posts: 3294
Joined: May 13th, 2015, 6:00 am
Contact:

#391

Post by matthewscott8 »

Image

Zombieland (2009 - Ruben Fleischer)

So who knew Jesse Eisenberg would be in two movies featuring adventure parks in 2009? Zombieland is popcorn-chomping fun, bringing together a quirky group of people in a challenging situation. There's a lot of Zombies but the film is about cobbling together a makeshift family, and is some sort of late coming of age story for Eisenberg's character Columbus who gets his first kiss and learns to go from being an army of one to part of an army of four. It's funny and relateable, and I can see why people liked it, it's hard to use terms like "masterpiece" to describe it though. I think I will watch the sequel (Double Tap) when I next need to tune out. Edit: I watched Zombieland 2, it was very much a direct sequel that stuck to established territory, but was better.
Post Reply