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Unofficial Movies Challenge (Official, July 2022)

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sol
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#41

Post by sol »

Spoiler
1. See for Me (2021)
2. Wheat Soup (1987)
3. House of Luk (2001)
4. Homewrecker (2019)
5. Sensitive Parts (2017)
6. The Oak Room (2020)
7. Sunflower Hour (2011)

Image

Hoping to sabotage her partner's puppet show aimed at kids, a spiteful casting director selects the worst possible candidates as semi-finalists in this amusing mockumentary. The film goes 'behind the scenes' with each of the four finalists whose everyday business is anything but normal. The most entertaining moments though come from seeing their puppet shows in action, watched-on by confused children in a series of live auditions from hell.

8. Guido Superstar (2010)

Image

Sporting an over-the-top accent that makes him sound like Chico Marx, it is initially hard to warm to Silvio Pollio here, but as the film progresses he becomes quite a likeable lead with his endless energy, having to think on his feet as he goes undercover. Not all of the humour works (there is a bizarre part in which he threatens a gay couple with a toilet brush) but the majority of the jokes land, including a donkey running gag and mace-spraying madness.

9. Stegman is Dead (2017)

Image

Wittily narrated by Michael Eklund, cast as a career criminal with a young daughter who wants to turn straight while his wife wants him to rise up in the underworld, this Canadian comedy begins well. Linnea Moffat is well cast as his doting daughter and the pair share great repartee. Rather than focus on this unusual crime family though, the film instead spends the majority of its duration inside a murdered mogul's mansion, which is a lot less interesting.
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#42

Post by burneyfan »

Spoiler
01. Los sobrevivientes a.k.a. The Survivors -- Gutiérrez Alea, 1979 -- 6.5/10
02. Birth of the Blues -- Schertzinger, 1941 -- 4.5/10
03. L'attentat a.k.a. The Assassination -- Boisset, 1972 -- 6.5/10
04. Too Many Cooks -- Seiter, 1931 -- 4.5/10
05. Zabicie ciotki a.k.a. Killing Auntie -- Królikiewicz, 1985 -- 6.5/10
06. Levity -- Solomon, 2003 -- 2/10

This film made me so mad. It takes a decent cast (one extra star because most of them tried a little), and saddles it with a script that is the most trite, grandstanding Oscar bait I have come across in ages. The plot gets exponentially dumb and features a bevy of character decisions and actions that would only fly in a sci-fi universe where everyone is criminally stupid and behaves counter to rational human thought (unless I missed something really big, this film is not sci-fi and is set in contemporary Chicago). After the first 20 minutes, my brain was continually spluttering: "But why doesn't he...? How can he...? Who would ever...? How could she possibly...? HOW does he manage to...? How in the HELL do they...?" The whole thing was WTF overload. The film has a scene that is probably the source of its name, but the whole mess is so ponderous and takes itself soooooooo freaking seriously that its title is like naming a bald guy "Curly."
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#43

Post by magnusbernhardsen »

4. The Jackal Michael Caton-Jones, 1997
Spoiler
1. Project Grizzly Peter Lynch, 1996
2. Tully Jason Reitman, 2018
3. The Road to El Dorado Bergeron & Paul, 2000
4. The Jackal Michael Caton-Jones, 1997
Last edited by magnusbernhardsen on July 3rd, 2022, 9:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#44

Post by peeptoad »

1. Navajeros (1980) 7
2. The Fall of the House of Usher (1950) 5
3. The Doors (1991) 8+ (rewatch)
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#45

Post by frbrown »

2. Wyoming Outlaw (1939)

Three Mesquiteers western with John Wayne. Unusually dark for that type of film

Spoiler
1. Der Schatz im Silbersee (1962)
2. Wyoming Outlaw (1939)
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#46

Post by OldAle1 »

burneyfan wrote: July 3rd, 2022, 8:31 am
Spoiler
01. Los sobrevivientes a.k.a. The Survivors -- Gutiérrez Alea, 1979 -- 6.5/10
02. Birth of the Blues -- Schertzinger, 1941 -- 4.5/10
03. L'attentat a.k.a. The Assassination -- Boisset, 1972 -- 6.5/10
04. Too Many Cooks -- Seiter, 1931 -- 4.5/10
05. Zabicie ciotki a.k.a. Killing Auntie -- Królikiewicz, 1985 -- 6.5/10
06. Levity -- Solomon, 2003 -- 2/10

This film made me so mad. It takes a decent cast (one extra star because most of them tried a little), and saddles it with a script that is the most trite, grandstanding Oscar bait I have come across in ages. The plot gets exponentially dumb and features a bevy of character decisions and actions that would only fly in a sci-fi universe where everyone is criminally stupid and behaves counter to rational human thought (unless I missed something really big, this film is not sci-fi and is set in contemporary Chicago). After the first 20 minutes, my brain was continually spluttering: "But why doesn't he...? How can he...? Who would ever...? How could she possibly...? HOW does he manage to...? How in the HELL do they...?" The whole thing was WTF overload. The film has a scene that is probably the source of its name, but the whole mess is so ponderous and takes itself soooooooo freaking seriously that its title is like naming a bald guy "Curly."
Heh, reading that kind of makes me perversely want to see it. Never heard of it before, assumed it was some tiny indie thing but... top 4 cast members have 3 Oscars and 13 nominations between them (though not when this was made - still, all were stars at the time). So WTF happened? Writer/director was unfamiliar, looking him up...oh, nothing but comedy stuff before this. Maybe he has no idea how to make a serious film? Honestly, sounds intriguing for the moment when I want something that's a particular kind of terrible. Thanks for making me aware of it :lol:
It was the truth, vivid and monstrous, that all the while he had waited the wait was itself his portion..
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#47

Post by OldAle1 »

OK back in challenge mode, at least a bit this month.

1. Romance on the High Seas (Michael Curtiz, 1948)

Image

Sparkling Technicolor Warner Brothers musical romantic comedy with Doris Day, in her first film role, and Jack Carson, Don DeFore and Oscar Levant as the three men competing for her - or (mistakenly) jealous of her. It's one of those mistaken-identity comedies, though in this case the mistakes are the deliberate creation of Day - a poor aspiring singer, Janis Paige - DeFore's jealous wife who wants to trap him in an indiscretion - and S.Z. Sakall, the bumbling uncle who's DeFore's boss but can't do anything without him. The three devise a plan for Day to go in Paige's place, taking her name, on a cruise to South America, so that Paige can stay secretly in NYC and spy on workaholic hubby DeFore; but DeFore thinks that Paige might be up to some extramarital carousing herself, and so sends hard-luck private dick Carson to spy on the cruise - only, of course, he's spying on Day, and of course they fall in love. And Levant is along as Day's every-faithful but ignored musical accompanist and would-be lover. This is lots of fun and a reminder to me that I ought to give up thinking of MGM as the go-to place for musicals; the WB stuff while not typically as grand or large-budgeted, and not having *quite* the talent level, tend to be shorter, funnier and just a different - but not necessarily lesser - kettle of fish. With Eric Blore in a tiny role, wasted alas, and Trinidadian singer Sir Lancelot. Really lovely, somewhat pastel-hued photography and design that to my eyes seems more characteristic of a slightly later era; the D.P., Elwood Bredell, made only a few color films after a career mastering the b/w stylings of noir, crime and some of the Universal horror pictures. Busby Berkeley directed the musical sequences, which are all pretty short and low-key; the most memorable song is surely "It's Magic" which Doris sings parts of twice earlier in the film and then in full at the end.

should this be official? - I think if we had a somewhat larger, more comprehensive musical list, it would be, and would deserve to be, yeah.

2. The Strange One (Jack Garfein, 1957)

TCM. Eddie Muller got into a bit of the backstory to this late-classic sorta-noir, with Ben Gazzara and a cast composed mostly of Actors Studio vets but film newcomers like himself, including Pat Hingle, George Peppard, and Peter Mark Richman. It's a story with continuing relevance today - and probably every day throughout history - of a charismatic sociopath (Gazzara) who runs roughshod over all of his fellow cadets at a prestigious southern military academy (modeled on the Citadel in SC, but filmed in Florida). The screenplay by Calder Willingham was based on his own novel and play titled "End as a Man", which had starred James Dean in the Gazzara role off-Broadway, and it's a pretty harsh indictment of machismo and also of the whole military ethos, with Gazzara's aggressive behavior only really punished when enough of his classmates have had enough at the very end. It's staginess is evident throughout, which is certainly a bit of a minus - the first sequence, which sets the scene for the whole narrative, in which Gazzara cajoles and threatens several of his buddies into taking revenge on a fellow cadet who pissed him off, goes on for 15 minutes or so, mostly in one room, and while it's fairly involving, overall the film feels just a mite static, and overlong to me, and the ending - which is more in keeping with the production code than Willingham's original, more cynical and dark vision, feels a little forced. Still a really solid film overall, with Gazzara's magnetism and the writing of his character being the highlights - one thing that's interesting is that we learn nothing of his background (while we do learn a bit about some of his classmates), and so we don't know if he's gotten away with his behavior so far because he's got connections, or for some other reason. I think this actually makes it more potent as an indictment of how we so often allow the worst among us to dictate the way we behave and live, but I can see some viewers wanting a bit more insight into why this guy is such an awful person.

should this be official? - eh, maybe. Solid film but does it stand out either as social statement or film noir? I'm not sure.
It was the truth, vivid and monstrous, that all the while he had waited the wait was itself his portion..
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#48

Post by maxwelldeux »

What happens when you murder a ref
1. From Russia, for Love (2000)
2. The Superfood Chain (2018)
3. Ice Guardians (2016)
4. Zombie Shark (2015)
5. Facebook Follies (2011) - 4/10
This is a TV movie about the dangers of social media. In 2011. The funniest part was the end scene when they rhetorically ask "What will be the next big platform in social media?" and then show the Google+ logo.
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#49

Post by flavo5000 »

1. In A Valley of Violence (Ti West, 2015)
2. X (Ti West, 2022)
Hey, a Ti West double feature! I wanted to do a Ti West director run for last month's challenge but ran out of time.

3. Hai Phuong a.k.a. Furie (Le-Van Kiet, 2019)
4. King & Country (Joseph Losey, 1964)
5. Fort Apache the Bronx (Daniel Petrie, 1981)
6. The Man from Colorado (Henry Levin, 1948)
Spoiler
1. In A Valley of Violence (Ti West, 2015)
2. X (Ti West, 2022)
3. Hai Phuong a.k.a. Furie (Le-Van Kiet, 2019)
4. King & Country (Joseph Losey, 1964)
5. Fort Apache the Bronx (Daniel Petrie, 1981)
6. The Man from Colorado (Henry Levin, 1948)
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#50

Post by burneyfan »

Spoiler
01. Los sobrevivientes a.k.a. The Survivors -- Gutiérrez Alea, 1979 -- 6.5/10
02. Birth of the Blues -- Schertzinger, 1941 -- 4.5/10
03. L'attentat a.k.a. The Assassination -- Boisset, 1972 -- 6.5/10
04. Too Many Cooks -- Seiter, 1931 -- 4.5/10
05. Zabicie ciotki a.k.a. Killing Auntie -- Królikiewicz, 1985 -- 6.5/10
06. Levity -- Solomon, 2003 -- 2/10
07. The Iceman Cometh -- Frankenheimer, 1973 -- 7.5/10

This is probably my least favorite Eugene O'Neill play, it's four hours long, and I'm not convinced that Frankenheimer used the cinematic medium to elevate the production beyond a taped stage production. That said, the cast and their performances are fantastic, so much that the film almost made my Favorites list. Lee Marvin is very good as Hickey, but I can imagine how Jason Robards might have OWNED that role. Brilliant acting from the ensemble.
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#51

Post by magnusbernhardsen »

5. The Girl in the Spider’s Web Fede Álvarez, 2018
Spoiler
1. Project Grizzly Peter Lynch, 1996
2. Tully Jason Reitman, 2018
3. The Road to El Dorado Bergeron & Paul, 2000
4. The Jackal Michael Caton-Jones, 1997
5. The Girl in the Spider’s Web Fede Álvarez, 2018
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#52

Post by burneyfan »

OldAle1 wrote: July 3rd, 2022, 4:43 pm
burneyfan wrote: July 3rd, 2022, 8:31 am
Spoiler
01. Los sobrevivientes a.k.a. The Survivors -- Gutiérrez Alea, 1979 -- 6.5/10
02. Birth of the Blues -- Schertzinger, 1941 -- 4.5/10
03. L'attentat a.k.a. The Assassination -- Boisset, 1972 -- 6.5/10
04. Too Many Cooks -- Seiter, 1931 -- 4.5/10
05. Zabicie ciotki a.k.a. Killing Auntie -- Królikiewicz, 1985 -- 6.5/10
06. Levity -- Solomon, 2003 -- 2/10

This film made me so mad. It takes a decent cast (one extra star because most of them tried a little), and saddles it with a script that is the most trite, grandstanding Oscar bait I have come across in ages. The plot gets exponentially dumb and features a bevy of character decisions and actions that would only fly in a sci-fi universe where everyone is criminally stupid and behaves counter to rational human thought (unless I missed something really big, this film is not sci-fi and is set in contemporary Chicago). After the first 20 minutes, my brain was continually spluttering: "But why doesn't he...? How can he...? Who would ever...? How could she possibly...? HOW does he manage to...? How in the HELL do they...?" The whole thing was WTF overload. The film has a scene that is probably the source of its name, but the whole mess is so ponderous and takes itself soooooooo freaking seriously that its title is like naming a bald guy "Curly."
Heh, reading that kind of makes me perversely want to see it. Never heard of it before, assumed it was some tiny indie thing but... top 4 cast members have 3 Oscars and 13 nominations between them (though not when this was made - still, all were stars at the time). So WTF happened? Writer/director was unfamiliar, looking him up...oh, nothing but comedy stuff before this. Maybe he has no idea how to make a serious film? Honestly, sounds intriguing for the moment when I want something that's a particular kind of terrible. Thanks for making me aware of it :lol:
Yeah, it's a production full of people who've demonstrated capability in other roles: Billy Bob Thornton, Morgan Freeman, Holly Hunter, and Kirsten Dunst. It's just...there are so many coincidences and explain-aways, and so many times when NO ALLEGEDLY SANE HUMAN would act or make the choices that these characters make. I have a litany of "why/how in the hell...?" questions for the screenwriter/director (who should definitely stick to comedies/adventures like Men in Black and Now You See Me), but they all involve spoilers.
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#53

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

1. The Bubble (2022, Judd Apatow): 4.0 - The self-mocking satire is an amusing idea, but never really delivers. It also offers a fun time capsule on how live was during the pandemic (which only a half year later already feels ages ago), but that wears thin quickly. There is way too little material in this to sustain a 2h movie, making the movie feel repetitive and a complete drag.

2. The King of Staten Island (2020, Judd Apatow): 8.0 - This was way better, cause it's based on co-writer and protagonist Pete Davidson on life, and this shows in the understanding of the characters and the Staten Island environment the movie is set in.
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#54

Post by Lammetje »

OldAle1 wrote: July 3rd, 2022, 5:29 pm 1. Romance on the High Seas (Michael Curtiz, 1948)

Sparkling Technicolor Warner Brothers musical romantic comedy with Doris Day, in her first film role, and Jack Carson, Don DeFore and Oscar Levant as the three men competing for her - or (mistakenly) jealous of her. It's one of those mistaken-identity comedies, though in this case the mistakes are the deliberate creation of Day - a poor aspiring singer, Janis Paige - DeFore's jealous wife who wants to trap him in an indiscretion - and S.Z. Sakall, the bumbling uncle who's DeFore's boss but can't do anything without him. The three devise a plan for Day to go in Paige's place, taking her name, on a cruise to South America, so that Paige can stay secretly in NYC and spy on workaholic hubby DeFore; but DeFore thinks that Paige might be up to some extramarital carousing herself, and so sends hard-luck private dick Carson to spy on the cruise - only, of course, he's spying on Day, and of course they fall in love. And Levant is along as Day's every-faithful but ignored musical accompanist and would-be lover. This is lots of fun and a reminder to me that I ought to give up thinking of MGM as the go-to place for musicals; the WB stuff while not typically as grand or large-budgeted, and not having *quite* the talent level, tend to be shorter, funnier and just a different - but not necessarily lesser - kettle of fish. With Eric Blore in a tiny role, wasted alas, and Trinidadian singer Sir Lancelot. Really lovely, somewhat pastel-hued photography and design that to my eyes seems more characteristic of a slightly later era; the D.P., Elwood Bredell, made only a few color films after a career mastering the b/w stylings of noir, crime and some of the Universal horror pictures. Busby Berkeley directed the musical sequences, which are all pretty short and low-key; the most memorable song is surely "It's Magic" which Doris sings parts of twice earlier in the film and then in full at the end.

should this be official? - I think if we had a somewhat larger, more comprehensive musical list, it would be, and would deserve to be, yeah.
Always nice to see some love for Doris. :wub:
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OldAle1 wrote:I think four Aamir Khan films is enough for me. Unless I'm down to one film left on the IMDb Top 250 at some point and he's in that last film, at which point I'll watch it and then shoot myself having become the official-check-whoring person I hate.
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#55

Post by PUNQ »

13. Bud pripraven [Be Prepared!] (1924, Svatopluk Innemann) - 3/10
--- More a sightseeing and boy scout documentary than a narrative feature. Odd one for sure. Not sure what to make of it.


14. Tkies khaf [The Rabbi's Power] (1924, Zygmunt Turkow) - 6/10
--- Pretty much the same as The Dybbuk (1937), and pretty much as good, even if silent. It's haunting, but perhaps a little easier to digest than the heavier dramatization of the sound adaptation.


15. Waking Up the Town (1925, James Cruze) - 4/10
--- Saw the 41-min version that's out there. Will watch the 60-min one if I can get my hands on it. This is a Jack Pickford picture, but it's really Norma Shearer wheeled me it. It's a silly mid-range filler, but it seemed alright for what it was there to do. And that was put you in a good mood.


16. Soft Shoes (1925, Lloyd Ingraham) - 5/10
--- Some kind of adorable gangster western hybrid written and starring Harry Carey. It was a weird mix, but I can't deny I was enjoying it. Didn't take itself serious at all, and that way it was playful.


17. Schatten der Weltstadt (1925, Willi Wolff) - 6/10
--- Didn't need to be as long as it was, but everything silently screamed quality. Recently restored by the Murnau Foundation, and is the first film I've seen directed by Willi Wolff. Felt just like you'd expect from mid-1920s German film, with all the dark tones that the expressive silent cinema was known for. Perhaps a little melodramatic and slow at times, but the acting felt believable.

Spoiler
1. Rags (1915, James Kirkwood) - 5/10
2. The Intrigue (1916, Frank Lloyd) - 4/10
3. Dornröschen [Sleeping Beauty] (1917, Paul Leni) - 3/10
4. The Broken Butterfly (1919, Maurice Tourneur) - 5/10
5. The Restless Sex (1920, Leon D'Usseau & Robert Z. Leonard) - 4/10
6. Vallfarten till Kevlaar [The Pilgrimage to Kevlaar] (1921, Ivan Hedqvist) - 4/10
7. The Bride's Play (1922, George Terwilliger) - 4/10
8. Cocaine (1922, Graham Cutts) - 5/10
9. A Chapter in Her Life (1923, Lois Weber) - 4/10
10. Drifting (1923, Tod Browning) - 6/10
11. The Hunt (II) (2020, Craig Zobel) - 6/10
12. Lasse Månsson fra Skaane [Struggling Hearts] (1923, A.W. Sandberg) - 5/10
13. Bud pripraven [Be Prepared!] (1924, Svatopluk Innemann) - 3/10
14. Tkies khaf [The Rabbi's Power] (1924, Zygmunt Turkow) - 6/10
15. Waking Up the Town (1925, James Cruze) - 4/10
16. Soft Shoes (1925, Lloyd Ingraham) - 5/10
17. Schatten der Weltstadt (1925, Willi Wolff) - 6/10
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#56

Post by Lammetje »

1. Hustle (2022): 7/10

Fun basketball movie with Adam Sandler. Fairly straightforward, except that many peeps who appear as basketball players are actually pros in real life, which makes the basketball scenes impressive to watch.
Seen
1. Hustle (2022)
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maxwelldeux wrote:If you asked me to kill my wife and pets OR watch Minions, I'd check the runtime and inquire about sobriety requirements before providing an answer.
More memorable quotes
OldAle1 wrote:I think four Aamir Khan films is enough for me. Unless I'm down to one film left on the IMDb Top 250 at some point and he's in that last film, at which point I'll watch it and then shoot myself having become the official-check-whoring person I hate.
PeacefulAnarchy wrote:Active topics is the devil. Please use the forums and subforums as intended and peruse all the topics nicely sorted by topic, not just the currently popular ones displayed in a jumbled mess.
Torgo wrote:Lammetje is some kind of hybrid Anna-Kendrick-lamb-entity to me and I find that very cool.
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mightysparks wrote:ARGH. RARGH. RARGH. DIE.
Kowry wrote:Thanks, Art Garfunky.
Rich wrote:*runs*
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#57

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

1. Temptation (1948)
2. Shozo (1948)
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#58

Post by AB537 »

1. National Lampoon's European Vacation (Amy Heckerling, 1985) 5.5/10
2-4. One Team, One Dream - This is Chelsea (DAZN original, 2022, 6 episodes) 7.5/10
ICM Forum Challenge winner: 2020 Crime, 2021 UK/Ireland
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#59

Post by kongs_speech »

08) Huesera (2022, Michelle Garza Cervera) - 3.5/5
09) Official Competition (2021, Mariano Cohn & Gaston Duprat) - 4/5
Spoiler
01) Way Out Ahead of Us (2022, Rob Rice) - 4/5
02) Keep It for Yourself (1991, Claire Denis) - 4/5
03) The Severing (2022, Mark Pellington) - 1.5/5
04) Hollywood Ending (2002, Woody Allen) - 4/5
05) Ingrid Goes West (2017, Matt Spicer) - 4/5

06) Totally Fucked Up (1993, Gregg Araki) - 4/5 (rewatch)
07) Images of Liberation (1982, Lars Von Trier) - 2.5/5
08) Huesera (2022, Michelle Garza Cervera) - 3.5/5
09) Official Competition (2021, Mariano Cohn & Gaston Duprat) - 4/5
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#60

Post by DudeLanez »

02. Armourless Knight (1966, Sharaliev) 6,5/10
03. Deception (2021, Desplechin) 7,5/10
Spoiler
01. Goto, Island of Love (1969, Borowczyk) 7/10
02. Armourless Knight (1966, Sharaliev) 6,5/10
03. Deception (2021, Desplechin) 7,5/10 :ICM:
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#61

Post by ororama »

1. Fast Company (1938) * 75 min.
Light, fast mystery comedy about rare book forgeries and thefts leading to murder.

2. Lawman (1971) * 99 min.
Thanks to blocho for recommending this in May's Western Challenge. Burt Lancaster's grim, determined performance fits the film's theme and mood perfectly.

3. The Case of the Lucky Legs (1935) * 77 min.
The third Perry Mason movie falls short of its predecessors, making the mistake of having him make his first appearance passed out on the floor of his office and wasting time joking about his efforts to avoid his doctor's orders to stop drinking and improve his diet. Warren William's charm salvages the movie, but just barely.

*First time viewing
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#62

Post by sol »

Spoiler
1. See for Me (2021)
2. Wheat Soup (1987)
3. House of Luk (2001)
4. Homewrecker (2019)
5. Sensitive Parts (2017)
6. The Oak Room (2020)
7. Sunflower Hour (2011)
8. Guido Superstar (2010)
9. Stegman is Dead (2017)
10. Incredible Violence (2018)

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An inexperienced actress agrees to be locked inside a house for the entire duration of a movie shoot in this horror film. It is not until nearly halfway in that it becomes clear that something is wrong with the movie shoot though, and although there is something fun in the actress being told not to worry with her fears chalked up to her inexperience, not enough of the project is dedicated to this. And the entire second half is just mindless violence, true to the title.

11. Trans-Canada Summer (1958)

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Spanning more than 7000km, the east-to-west running Trans-Canada Highway is one of the longest roads in the world, and this NFB documentary looks at its construction and the provinces that the highway runs through. With the documentary released before the route was finished, we get first-hand construction footage; most notably, we are shown the difficulties in creating the Canso Causeway that now connects Cape Breton to the rest of Nova Scotia.
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#63

Post by gunnar »

12 - Plymouth Adventure (1952) - 7/10 - Spencer Tracy is the captain of the Mayflower with Lloyd Bridges as his first mate. They carry the Puritans over to New England in 1620 with a difficult journey along the way. Van Johnson, Gene Tierney, and others also star. It's a decent historical film.

13 - A Hole in the Head (1959) - 8/10 - Frank Sinatra is a widower who owns a hotel in Miami, but his high living and love of women leads him to miss a few payments and he could lose the hotel. He has a great relationship with his young son (Eddie Hodge) and refuses to be separated from him. He hopes to get some money from his successful older brother (Edward G. Robinson). Sinatra and Hodge are each pretty good here as are the rest of the supporting cast, which includes Eleanor Parker, Thelma Ritter, and Carolyn Jones.

14 - A Mighty Wind (2003) - 8/10 - I normally dislike mockumentaries, but I enjoyed this one quite a bit. It features the reunion of several folk groups from the 1960s for a tribute concert. Eugene Levy in particular is very funny, but Catherine O'Hara, Fred Willard, and others are good, too.

15 - Hitchcock (2012) - 6.5/10 - This film focuses on the making of Psycho and the relationship at the time between Hitchcock and his wife Alma. I found Anthony Hopkins in his Hitchcock makeup to be distracting and not very convincing, though I get used to it more as the film went along. I enjoyed the ending (the last 20 minutes or so) and there were good parts along the way, but much of the rest of the film seemed a bit dull.

16 - Unstoppable (2010) - 8/10 - A runaway train with a load of hazardous chemicals as part of its cargo threatens other trains and a city in Pennsylvania. A rookie train conductor (Chris Pine) and a veteran engineer (Denzel Washington) make a risky attempt to stop the train. It's got a fair amount of action and tension and is entertaining throughout.

17 - Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) - 6/10 - I liked some of the songs and a few of the choreographed numbers in the film, but I thought much of it was mediocre.

Spoiler
1 - The Captain's Paradise (1953) - 6.5/10
2 - Defiance (2008) - 7/10
3 - The Duchess (2008) - 7/10
4 - A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966) - 6/10
5 - Anna Karenina (2012) - 6/10
6 - Here Comes the Groom (1951) - 6.5/10
7 - The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956) - 7.5/10
8 - State Fair (1945) - 7.5/10
9 - You Light Up My LIfe (1977) - 6.5/10
10 - The Great Gatsby (1974) - 5/10
11 - The Hindenburg (1975) - 7/10
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#64

Post by blocho »

5. Operation Avalanche (2016)
6. Blood Quantum (2019)

Comments in the Canadian challenge.

7. The Killing Floor (1984)
We all know Bill Duke from performances in movies like American Gigolo, Predator, Payback, and Mandy. He’s not as well known as a director, but perhaps he should be. He directed Deep Cover, which besides being a stylish crime thriller was also one of the smarter movies made about the drug war. And he directed three movies for a PBS series called American Playhouse, of which The Killing Floor was the first. The titular location is in the Chicago stockyards, where our protagonist gets a job after leaving the South in 1917 during the Great Migration. The story follows him as he becomes involved in the labor movement leading up to the fateful summer of 1919, which has been lost somewhat in popular memory but was one of the most violent eras in American history, a few bloody months when American businesses and American governments wiped out the forces of social change for a generation.

There are some familiar faces here, including Alfre Woodard, Moses Gunn, and Dennis Farina (who was still a Chicago police officer at the time). John Mahoney and Ted Levine have cameos. The filmmaking is no great shakes. Although Duke does fine as director, the script is a bit didactic and dominated by voiceover narration. That’s perhaps fitting given the movie’s docudrama quality, which includes regular use of historical footage.

The great value of this movie is its subject matter. How many non-documentary, American movies have been made about the labor movement in the past 75 years? Maybe 30 or 40, I suppose. How many have been made about the Great Migration? A handful at best. How many have been made about how business interests used race and ethnicity to divide unions? Just one other that I can think of (Matewan). So, in the end, The Killing Floor is invaluable. It faithfully dramatizes a true but hidden episode in the American historical record. And it ably elucidates the complexities of labor organization. The American movie industry has pumped out thousands of movies about World War II. It has almost entirely ignored the labor conflict, a less intense battle but a longer-lasting one that still affects the lives of American workers every day. There’s a reason for that. One last thing: When this movie was first broadcast, about 19% of American workers were unionized, down from a peak of 35% in the 1950s. Today, the number is about 10%. The conflict is ongoing.

The Killing Floor is streaming on Criterion if anyone is interested.
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#65

Post by vortexsurfer »

1. Miami Connection (Y.K. Kim & Woo-sang Park, 1987) - 7/10
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#66

Post by peeptoad »

4. Un couteau dans le Coeur/Knife + Heart (2018) 8
the zero club
1. Navajeros (1980) 7
2. The Fall of the House of Usher (1950) 5
3. The Doors (1991) 8+ (rewatch)
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#67

Post by maxwelldeux »

What happens when you murder a ref
1. From Russia, for Love (2000)
2. The Superfood Chain (2018)
3. Ice Guardians (2016)
4. Zombie Shark (2015)
5. Facebook Follies (2011)
6. Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day (2009) 6/10
TPB for the win!

7. Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile (2019) 5/10
This was a really underwhelming miss for me - supposedly it's from the girlfriend's perspective, but it didn't focus enough on her to really sell that point. But it didn't focus enough on Ted Bundy to really be about him, either. It just felt long and kinda boring.
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#68

Post by OldAle1 »

Unofficial you say? How can a movie be unofficial? What the hell do you mean?

1. Romance on the High Seas (Michael Curtiz, 1948)
2. The Strange One (Jack Garfein, 1957)
3. Johnny Tremain (Robert Stevenson, 1957)

Disney live-action film based on an award-winning children's book about the titular hero, a fictional young man who gets involved in early Revolutionary activities, meeting most of the prominent names (Sam Adams, Paul Revere, etc) and participating in the Boston Tea Party of 1773 and the first couple of battles of the war, in 1775. Tremain is an apprentice silversmith (which is how he knows Revere) who injures himself through impetuousness and has to leave his apprenticeship temporarily, giving him the time and impetus to get involved with the nascent rebellion. This is typical 50s Disney stuff, very family-friendly of course, cheaply shot on back lots, but not bad looking (color, 1.33 aspect ratio as it was originally intended for TV), and with a decent enough cast of old pros - Sebastian Cabot, Whit Bissell and Lumsden Hare were the names and faces I recognized - as the soon-to-be-famous revolutionaries and other adults. Hal Stalmaster as the titular character and Luana Patten as his would-be-girlfriend are both bland but not terrible or anything, as is Richard Beymer - later of Twin Peaks fame - as Johnny's slightly older buddy who helps incite his revolutionary fervor. I have known this title forever, and wondered if I might have seen it on "The Wonderful World of Disney" back in the 70s; even after watching it today I can't be sure, but the story was quite familiar, so either I saw the film or read the book, or both, probably around the time when it would have had the strongest impression on me at age 9-10 or so.

should this be official? Nah. It's all right for family entertainment - if the kids can deal with older films and like American history - but it's pretty disposable.
It was the truth, vivid and monstrous, that all the while he had waited the wait was itself his portion..
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#69

Post by kongs_speech »

10) Will-o’-the-Wisp (2022, Joao Pedro Rodrigues) - 3.5/5
Spoiler
01) Way Out Ahead of Us (2022, Rob Rice) - 4/5
02) Keep It for Yourself (1991, Claire Denis) - 4/5
03) The Severing (2022, Mark Pellington) - 1.5/5
04) Hollywood Ending (2002, Woody Allen) - 4/5
05) Ingrid Goes West (2017, Matt Spicer) - 4/5

06) Totally Fucked Up (1993, Gregg Araki) - 4/5 (rewatch)
07) Images of Liberation (1982, Lars Von Trier) - 2.5/5
08) Huesera (2022, Michelle Garza Cervera) - 3.5/5
09) Official Competition (2021, Mariano Cohn & Gaston Duprat) - 4/5
10) Will-o’-the-Wisp (2022, Joao Pedro Rodrigues) - 3.5/5
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#70

Post by magnusbernhardsen »

6. For Love of the Game Sam Raimi, 1999
Spoiler
1. Project Grizzly Peter Lynch, 1996
2. Tully Jason Reitman, 2018
3. The Road to El Dorado Bergeron & Paul, 2000
4. The Jackal Michael Caton-Jones, 1997
5. The Girl in the Spider’s Web Fede Álvarez, 2018
6. For Love of the Game Sam Raimi, 1999
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#71

Post by ororama »

4. Bodyguard Kiba (1993) * 94 min.
A karate bodyguard is hired by a yakuza just released from prison to accompany him to Naha, Okinawa to recover money that he stole from the gang and escort him safely back to Tokyo. A relatively restrained early movie from Takashi Miike.

5. Delphine's Prayers (2021) * 95 min.
A documentary in which a Cameroonian immigrant to Belgium talks about her life in both countries.

6. Bandit Ranger (1942) * 56 min.
Solid B western. Tim Holt is becoming a favorite, in part because he doesn't sing (that's the job of his goofy sidekicks, here Cliff Edwards, the voice of Jiminy Cricket) and because he plays uncomplicated good guys very well. This movie has the added bonus of not getting him romantically involved with the obligatory girl, who actually is relevant to the plot (although she really has nothing to do but be threatened) for a change.
Spoiler
1. Fast Company (1938) * 75 min.
2. Lawman (1971) * 99 min.
3. The Case of the Lucky Legs (1935) * 77 min.
*First time viewing
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#72

Post by burneyfan »

Spoiler
01. Los sobrevivientes a.k.a. The Survivors -- Gutiérrez Alea, 1979 -- 6.5/10
02. Birth of the Blues -- Schertzinger, 1941 -- 4.5/10
03. L'attentat a.k.a. The Assassination -- Boisset, 1972 -- 6.5/10
04. Too Many Cooks -- Seiter, 1931 -- 4.5/10
05. Zabicie ciotki a.k.a. Killing Auntie -- Królikiewicz, 1985 -- 6.5/10
06. Levity -- Solomon, 2003 -- 2/10
07. The Iceman Cometh -- Frankenheimer, 1973 -- 7.5/10
08. Shin kanashiki hittoman a.k.a. Another Lonely Hitman -- Mochizuki, 1995 -- 6/10

Adequate Kitano-esque gangster tale, but lacking Kitano's nice quirkiness or finesse.
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#73

Post by AB537 »

5. Tricheurs - Cheaters (Barbet Schroeder, 1984) 6.5/10
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#74

Post by 3eyes »

1. I see a dark stranger (UK 46)

WW II spy comedy in which neutral Ireland looms large. Great fun.
:run: STILL the Gaffer!
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#75

Post by gunnar »

18 - The Good German (2006) - 5/10 - George Clooney is an American journalist who arrives in Berlin during the Potsdam Conference and gets involved in a murder mystery and his pre-war girlfriend. Clooney isn't bad here, but I didn't like Tobey Maguire's acting and while they did a decent enough job trying to get the look of 1940s noir films, the story itself and much of the acting from the rest of the cast was not so good.

19 - Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (2013) - 7/10 - This biopic of Nelson Mandela is a bit slow at times, but gets better as it goes along. Good performances from Idris Elba and Naomie Harris help.

20 - What's New Pussycat? (1965) - 6/10 - Peter O'Toole plays Michael, who wants to be faithful to his fiance, but he has a history of being a womanizer and every woman he meets seems to fall for him. He goes to see a psychoanalyst (Peter Sellers) who has his own issues. The last 10 minutes or so were pretty funny and the parts with Woody Allen tended to be more entertaining than the rest.
Spoiler
1 - The Captain's Paradise (1953) - 6.5/10
2 - Defiance (2008) - 7/10
3 - The Duchess (2008) - 7/10
4 - A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966) - 6/10
5 - Anna Karenina (2012) - 6/10
6 - Here Comes the Groom (1951) - 6.5/10
7 - The Solid Gold Cadillac (1956) - 7.5/10
8 - State Fair (1945) - 7.5/10
9 - You Light Up My LIfe (1977) - 6.5/10
10 - The Great Gatsby (1974) - 5/10
11 - The Hindenburg (1975) - 7/10
12 - Plymouth Adventure (1952) - 7/10
13 - A Hole in the Head (1959) - 8/10
14 - A Mighty Wind (2003) - 8/10
15 - Hitchcock (2012) - 6.5/10
16 - Unstoppable (2010) - 8/10
17 - Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) - 6/10
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#76

Post by jdidaco »

Thank you for hosting, Lammetje!

(Screenshots from 'Nihonbashi'),

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1. Nihonbashi (Bridge of Japan, Kon Ichikawa, 1956) 9.5/10
2. Arashi o yobu otoko (Man Who Causes a Storm, Umetsugu Inoue, 1957) 8/10
3. Kaidan chibusa enoki (The Mother Tree, Gorô Kadono, 1958) 7.5/10
4. Jasei no in (The Lust of the White Serpent, Morihei Magatani, 1960) 8/10
5. Sen-hime to Hideyori (Lady Sen and Hideyori, Masahiro Makino, 1962) 9.5/10
6. Chi to suna no kettô (Duel of Blood and Sand, Sadatsugu Matsuda, 1963) 8/10
7. Genji monogatari (The Tale of Genji, Tetsuji Takechi, 1966) 8.5/10
8. Ukiyoe zankoku monogatari (Ukiyo-e Cruel Story, Tetsuji Takechi, 1968) 9/10
9. Yadonashi (The Homeless, Kôichi Saitô, 1974) 7.5/10
10. Aoi numa no onna (Blue Lake Woman, Akio Jissôji, 1986) 8/10
11. Teito monogatari (Tokyo: The Last Megalopolis, Akio Jissôji, 1988) 7/10
12. Saint-Narcisse (Bruce La Bruce, 2020) 7.5/10
13. Ultraviolette et le gang des cracheuses de sang (Ultraviolette and the Blood-Spitters Gang, Robin Hunzinger, 2021) 7/10
14. Crimes of the Future (David Cronenberg, 2022) 8.5/10

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#77

Post by VincentPrice »

3. The Spoilers-1942: 6/10
Spoiler
1. Northern Pursuit-1943: 8/10
2. You Said a Mouthful-1932: 6/10
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#78

Post by Lammetje »

2. Malang - Unleash the Madness (2020): 5/10

There's a cop killer on the loose and two policemen with seemingly very different approaches must try to stop him. About five years prior to that, two young people meet during a party in Goa and fall in love. As the film progresses, more and more is revealed about how the events that took place during that time are connected to the present.

Sarah, the female lead who wants to overcome her fears such as jumping out of an airplane and "drinking cheap beer", focuses mainly on being pretty and doesn't seem very natural. I found the movie rather unrealistic, but not in a fun way (like some other Bollywood action flicks).
Seen
1. Hustle (2022)
2. Malang - Unleash the Madness (2020)
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#79

Post by Silga »

1. The Tracker (John Guillermin, 1988) 5/10
2. Follow Me (Carol Reed, 1972) 7/10
3. Brewster's Millions (Walter Hill, 1985) 6/10 rewatch

Carol Reed's final film Follow Me has a gentle, melancholic mood. Topol shines in another great performance and London is beautifully portrayed with many locations I miss from the time I lived there.
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#80

Post by sol »

The Tracker is interesting as a very different take on the older man/younger girl angle to Rapture. I tried to bring this up the Mary Guillermin interview, but she didn't recall the film vividly enough to comment on it. Certainly I imagine they would be interesting back-to-back watches.
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