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Rank a musician

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Rank a musician

#1

Post by prodigalgodson »

Since we've all been enjoying ranking directors' filmographies, how bout a similar thread ranking musicians'/bands' discographies? Maybe this will help shed light on some hidden gems too.

Casting a wide net to start...

Abbey Road 10
The White Album
Revolver
Magical Mystery Tour
With the Beatles
Please Please Me 9
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 8
Rubber Soul 7
Let It Be 6

Haven't listened enough to Hard Day's Night, Beatles for Sale, or Help to know where I'd place them. You all?
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#2

Post by Lakigigar »

Abbey Road 6
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 4
Revolver 3
Rubber Soul 3

Sorry, not a fan. Good idea tho.
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#3

Post by prodigalgodson »

Hey Laki, thanks for the reply. I'm gonna give this another shot w/ America's troubadour, the self-proclaimed "last of the best":

Blood on the Tracks 10
Blonde on Blonde
Desire
Highway 61 Revisited
Nashville Skyline
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
Rough and Rowdy Ways 9/10
Time Out of Mind
Bringing It All Back Home
John Wesley Harding
New Morning 8/10
Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid
Infidels 7/10
Slow Train Coming 5/10

I'm a fan lol
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#4

Post by St. Gloede »

Way to go for the big guns fast. Bob Dylan my favourite artist of all time (granted, mainly held up by the first half of his career), while The Beatles is The Beatles, so let's do this.

The Beatles

9/10

White Album (1968)
Abbey Road (1969)

8/10

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)
Revolver (1966)
Magical Mystery Tour (1967)

7/10

Rubber Soul (1965)

6/10

Please Please Me (1963)

*For some reason I haven't rated Let It Be


Bob Dylan

10/10

Highway 61 Revisited (1965)
Blood on the Tracks (1975)

9/10

The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1963)
Blonde on Blonde (1966)
Infidels (1983)

8/10

Bringing It All Back Home (1965)
The Times They Are A-Changin' (1964)
Street-Legal (1978)
Another Side of Bob Dylan (1964)
Planet Waves (1974)

7/10

Desire (1976)
Slow Train Coming (1979)
Time Out of Mind (1997)
Modern Times (2006)
New Morning (1970)
Rough and Rowdy Ways (2020)
Oh Mercy (1969)

6/10

Empire Burlesque (1985) - Quite a miss-match but Tight Connection to My Heart is excellent!
The Basement Tapes (1975)
John Wesley Harding (1967)
Nashville Skyline (1969)
Dylan (1973)
Shot of Love (1981)
Self-Portrait (1970)
World Gone Wrong (1993)
Knocked Out Loaded (1986)

5/10

Bob Dylan (1962)
Saved (1980)

3/10

Christmas in the Heart (2009) - Why???
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#5

Post by kongs_speech »

The Beatles

01) Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (5/5)
02) Abbey Road

03) The Beatles [The White Album] (4.5/5)
04) Rubber Soul
05) Magical Mystery Tour
06) Revolver

07) A Hard Day's Night (4/5)
08) Help!
09) Please Please Me
10) With the Beatles

11) Let It Be (3.5/5)
12) Yellow Submarine
13) Beatles for Sale
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#6

Post by brokenface »

St. Gloede wrote: May 17th, 2022, 8:53 am 3/10

Christmas in the Heart (2009) - Why???
Honestly quite like his Must Be Santa, though not sure I could hack a whole Bob Christmas :lol:
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#7

Post by prodigalgodson »

St. Gloede wrote: May 17th, 2022, 8:53 am Way to go for the big guns fast. Bob Dylan my favourite artist of all time (granted, mainly held up by the first half of his career), while The Beatles is The Beatles, so let's do this.
Haha thanks Gloede. Dylan's definitely in the running for my favorite too.

Nice to see we share top 2 Beatles albums. I finally got into them with what I consider fresh ears this fall, and it was pretty revelatory.

Surprised at your ranking of Infidels; that era's far from my favorite from a production standpoint, but definitely some incredible songs here. Encouraging to see high rankings for albums I haven't listened to (I have Times Are a Changin' on CD but need to listen to it more). Slow Train Coming I know has been reevaluated of late, but I thought it was pretty mediocre.
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#8

Post by prodigalgodson »

kongs_speech wrote: May 17th, 2022, 12:47 pm The Beatles

01) Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (5/5)
02) Abbey Road

03) The Beatles [The White Album] (4.5/5)
04) Rubber Soul
05) Magical Mystery Tour
06) Revolver

07) A Hard Day's Night (4/5)
08) Help!
09) Please Please Me
10) With the Beatles

11) Let It Be (3.5/5)
12) Yellow Submarine
13) Beatles for Sale
Hey kong, thanks for the reply. Sgt. Pepper's never hit me as hard as I feel like it should've. Incredible production and flow, but ultimately doesn't contain many of my favorite Beatles tracks or moments. A Day in the Life remains one of the best musical achievements ever though. Nice to see the love for Magical Mystery Tour; I feel like if people didn't know it wasn't conceived as a coherent album by the band it would be more acclaimed, sequencing is pretty seamless imo.
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#9

Post by prodigalgodson »

The Man with the Horn anyone?

In a Silent Way 10
Dark Magus
Bitches Brew
Jack Johnson
Kind of Blue
Agharta
Sketches of Spain
Miles in the Sky 9/10
Relaxin'
'Round About Midnight
Workin'
Pangaea
Someday My Prince Will Come 8/10
On the Corner
Steamin'
Filles de Kilimanjaro 7/10
Live-Evil
Miles Ahead
Cookin'
Bag's Groove

Need to spend more time with (5-7 range atm):
Milestones
Porgy and Bess
Seven Steps to Heaven
Quiet Nights
ESP
Miles Smiles
Sorcerer
Nefertiti
Big Fun
At Fillmore
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#10

Post by St. Gloede »

prodigalgodson wrote: May 19th, 2022, 10:32 pm
St. Gloede wrote: May 17th, 2022, 8:53 am Way to go for the big guns fast. Bob Dylan my favourite artist of all time (granted, mainly held up by the first half of his career), while The Beatles is The Beatles, so let's do this.
Haha thanks Gloede. Dylan's definitely in the running for my favorite too.

Nice to see we share top 2 Beatles albums. I finally got into them with what I consider fresh ears this fall, and it was pretty revelatory.

Surprised at your ranking of Infidels; that era's far from my favorite from a production standpoint, but definitely some incredible songs here. Encouraging to see high rankings for albums I haven't listened to (I have Times Are a Changin' on CD but need to listen to it more). Slow Train Coming I know has been reevaluated of late, but I thought it was pretty mediocre.
I might be overrating Infidels honesty. It is certainly below the other 9/10 albums, and may be enjoying a partial boost for being the last great album (IMO). Like you said, some incredible songs there, in particular Jokerman, but perhaps I should give it another listen today/soon.
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#11

Post by St. Gloede »

Re-listened to Infidels, and I'm still torn and leaning 8.5. I might bump it down simply because Jokerman is the only song on it I would place in the all-time Bob Dylan canon, but each song is great and feels like a proper return to form/style with some updated tools.

Even "Neighbourhood Bully" fits in very well with the lesser and tighter songs from Highway 61 Revisited and Bringing It All Back Home, though even this one is close to 5 minutes long, which all but one song on the album is. The album's longest, Man of Peace also fits into this sound too, faster, closer to rock, with harmonica in full riffing force, etc. The weakest is probably A Sweetheart Like You (also, what the hell are up with the lyrics "A Woman like you should be at home, that's where you belong" :D ). I think what pushed it up previously was liking License to Kill and I & I more. Both are excellent songs, but not quite top level. "Don't Fall Apart on Me Tonight" is a wonderful closer though.
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#12

Post by Lakigigar »

Not heard a single album, tbh, his discography is very overwhelming due to the vast amount of albums (similar to how i have never seen a Bergman or Kurosawa film), but the songs i've heard so far weren't my thing either, it's also a genre or music era that fits me the least. I have the most trouble with this music genre, and i have the most trouble with this era in particular.

I would try it out if there was less music, but there's so much music out that i want to hear and i just can't keep up and might never be able to.

EDIT:

Miles Davis

Kind of Blue (1959) - 8

Haven't listened a lot to jazz but so far what i've heard i liked.
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#13

Post by prodigalgodson »

St. Gloede wrote: May 20th, 2022, 12:37 pm Re-listened to Infidels, and I'm still torn and leaning 8.5. I might bump it down simply because Jokerman is the only song on it I would place in the all-time Bob Dylan canon, but each song is great and feels like a proper return to form/style with some updated tools.

Even "Neighbourhood Bully" fits in very well with the lesser and tighter songs from Highway 61 Revisited and Bringing It All Back Home, though even this one is close to 5 minutes long, which all but one song on the album is. The album's longest, Man of Peace also fits into this sound too, faster, closer to rock, with harmonica in full riffing force, etc. The weakest is probably A Sweetheart Like You (also, what the hell are up with the lyrics "A Woman like you should be at home, that's where you belong" :D ). I think what pushed it up previously was liking License to Kill and I & I more. Both are excellent songs, but not quite top level. "Don't Fall Apart on Me Tonight" is a wonderful closer though.
Sorry for the late reply gloede, nice to hear your take on re-listen. Makes me want to check it out again too; thinking about it, it certainly seems like it should rank above New Morning at least. I think what holds it back for me is I'm not a fan at all of the 80s studio aesthetic, with its gated drums, reverb, and hard-to-nail-down overall plastic-y sound I think attributable to the recording equipment and filters of the time, though within those parameters Dylan and his team make it as evocative as possible.

The songwriting is often top-tier. "Standing on the water, casting your breath / while the eyes of the idol with the iron head are glowing / distant ships sailing in through the mist / you were born with a snake in both of your fists while a hurricane was blowing" is the like ne plus ultra of transportive mythic imagery that most appealed to me in songwriting (and filmmaking, for that matter) as a teenager, and makes me wish I'd discovered it back then. Re: Neighborhood Bully, I'm not fan of Israel, but if ever there was a musical case for its sovereignty, this is it (unsettling as it is in the wake of his anti-Arab sentiments in his prior Christian albums); I should share it with my grandma on my Jewish side lol. I&I and Don't Fall Apart on Me Tonight are a great double-header to close out. And yeah, that line in A Sweetheart Like You is infamously cringeworthy; being charitable to Dylan, I interpret the sentiment behind it to mean something like "if you were mine I'd spoil you rotten," but no matter how you try to justify it it's a pretty shit take from someone whose best work stands for the opposite of that sort of trite retrograde puritanism. I think you mentioned every song except Union Sundown, which is actually one of the highlights of the album for me, a genuine subversive banger with as pointed and substantial a message as any of his protest period.
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#14

Post by prodigalgodson »

Lakigigar wrote: May 21st, 2022, 7:09 am Not heard a single album, tbh, his discography is very overwhelming due to the vast amount of albums (similar to how i have never seen a Bergman or Kurosawa film), but the songs i've heard so far weren't my thing either, it's also a genre or music era that fits me the least. I have the most trouble with this music genre, and i have the most trouble with this era in particular.

I would try it out if there was less music, but there's so much music out that i want to hear and i just can't keep up and might never be able to.

EDIT:

Miles Davis

Kind of Blue (1959) - 8

Haven't listened a lot to jazz but so far what i've heard i liked.
Is the first part in reference to Dylan laki? His golden age is both of a genre and era that most appeals to me personally, so it's hard to know what to recommend. You might actually like the sound of the above-mentioned Infidels from what little I know of your taste.

Nice, hard to go wrong with Davis, and Kind of Blue's definitely one of his dreamiest.
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#15

Post by prodigalgodson »

Dylan was the first musician that really got me excited about music, with Ballad of a Thin Man and Stuck Inside of Mobile especially blowing my pre-teen mind. After that I went through big periods with The Decembrists and Pink Floyd. But I think more than any other musicians Wu Tang Clan kicked off my fully-invested love of music when I first heard 36 Chambers in high school (a major local favorite in the time and place I grew up), and started branching out and discovering all their vast network of output. So, here's my ranking of all the group, solo, and affiliate albums I've spent enough time with to warrant inclusion. Still, as ODB put it, "the best."

Only Built 4 Cuban Linx -- Raekwon 10/10
Ironman -- Ghostface Killah
Supreme Clientele -- Ghostface Killah
Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) -- Wu-Tang Clan
The Pillage -- Cappadonna
Fear, Love & War -- Killarmy
The Pretty Toney Album -- Ghostface Killah 9/10
Fishscale -- Ghostface Killah
Wu-Tang Forever -- Wu-Tang Clan
Liquid Swords -- GZA
Silent Weapons for Quiet Wars -- Killarmy
Heavy Mental -- Killah Priest
Return to the 36 Chambers: The Dirty Version -- Ol' Dirty Bastard 8/10
The W -- Wu-Tang Clan
Only Built 4 Cuban Linx... Part II -- Raekwon
Pro Tools -- GZA
Dirty Weaponry -- Killarmy
The Last Shall Be First -- Sunz of Man
Apollo Kids -- Ghostface Killah
Bobby Digital in Stereo -- RZA
The Pilgrimage -- Cappadonna
The Yin and the Yang -- Cappadonna 7/10
N---a Please -- Ol' Dirty Bastard
No Said Date -- Masta Killa
Twelve Reasons to Die -- Ghostface Killah
36 Seasons -- Ghostface Killah
More Fish -- Ghostface Killah
Blackout -- Method Man and Redman 6/10
Tical -- Method Man
Sour Soul -- Ghostface Killah
Shaolin vs. Wu-Tang -- Raekwon
Bulletproof Wallets -- Ghostface Killah 5/10
Uncontrolled Substance -- Inspectah Deck
A Better Tomorrow -- Wu-Tang Clan
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#16

Post by prodigalgodson »

Let's throw the Coltranes in the mix...

World Galaxy -- Alice 10/10
Meditations -- John
Journey in Satchidananda -- Alice
Interstellar Space -- John
Ptah the El Daoud -- Alice
Blue Train -- John
Universal Consciousness -- Alice 9/10
Crescent -- John
My Favorite Things -- John
First Meditations -- John 8/10
A Love Supreme -- John 7/10
Lord of Lords -- Alice
Ascension -- John 6/10
Duke Ellington and John Coltrane -- John

Albums I need to sit with more, but all of which I would rate highly so far:

Giant Steps -- John
Olé Coltrane -- John
Africa/Brass -- John
Sun Ship -- John
Huntington Ashram Monastery -- Alice
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#17

Post by Lakigigar »

John Coltrane

8
A Love Supreme
Blue Train
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#18

Post by prodigalgodson »

Lakigigar wrote: June 12th, 2022, 5:47 am John Coltrane

8
A Love Supreme
Blue Train
I've been listening to Love Supreme again recently, my 7 seems like majorly underrating it in retrospect. It's pretty incredible stuff in a lot of ways, but I've always felt a bit at a distance from it, aside from the second track Resolution, which has always blown me away. Always tough to approach things with such a towering reputation, and Meditations, his subsequent take on similar themes and structure, has always hit me harder.

Seeing Robert Fulton's Kata, with a piano cover of A Moment's Notice, really brought the tune to life for me and got me listening to Blue Train again this fall. What a thrilling, moving, perfectly constructed album.
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#19

Post by prodigalgodson »

Joni Mitchell has become a major favorite of mine over the past six months. Still haven't heard enough to do justice in a ranking, but everything has been great so far. I'm pretty excited to spin through Hejira and Don Juan's Reckless Daughter.

EDIT:

The Hissing of Summer Lawns 10/10
Blue
Ladies of the Canyon 9/10
For the Roses
Court and Spark 8/10
Hejira 7/10
Last edited by prodigalgodson on June 29th, 2022, 4:02 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#20

Post by Lakigigar »

prodigalgodson wrote: June 17th, 2022, 6:38 pm
Lakigigar wrote: June 12th, 2022, 5:47 am John Coltrane

8
A Love Supreme
Blue Train
I've been listening to Love Supreme again recently, my 7 seems like majorly underrating it in retrospect. It's pretty incredible stuff in a lot of ways, but I've always felt a bit at a distance from it, aside from the second track Resolution, which has always blown me away. Always tough to approach things with such a towering reputation, and Meditations, his subsequent take on similar themes and structure, has always hit me harder.

Seeing Robert Fulton's Kata, with a piano cover of A Moment's Notice, really brought the tune to life for me and got me listening to Blue Train again this fall. What a thrilling, moving, perfectly constructed album.
I thought it was impressive, but I haven't listened to it more than once to be fair. Maybe a 8 would be exaggerated than, but obviously it's gonna be a masterpiece. So if i rate it lower because i've only listened to it once, that wouldn't be fair either. I still enjoyed it at least once, which i've never been able to do for a "beatles album" or even most of 60's and 70's album. I like "jazzy structures and rhythms too", it's a bit like psychedelic before psychedelic because it often feels so random which keeps me engaged. What I know is that it is also very spiritual.

I'm just gonna say I appreciate it and I appreciate the musician. Most films i've also only seen once. Most music outside of shoegaze, dream pop and some pop i've also listened only once. Or at least much more to these genres. I mean i certainly believing in "learning to like an artist or learning a type/genre of music", because i didn't like Radiohead either the first few times i listened to it, although my music taste is more developed now or changed compared to 5-6 years ago. You might learn to enjoy it or more will be revealed after more listening times, but i'm not a robot that is gonna like every acclaimed album (or acclaimed film).

For example i tend to like "jazz rap or jazz hip hop" more than other hip hop music for some reason. I also tend to like jazz fusion or jazz inspired electronic music (hakushi hasegawa, leon vynehall) for example.

I also love the jazzy tracks on this japanese album

https://open.spotify.com/track/17EQgR65 ... d073ee4f13

Of course it's no real jazz.

I really liked that album of Cannonball Adderley (called Somethin' Else). I think that's my fav jazz album.

I also was a fan of the Taxi Driver score.
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#21

Post by prodigalgodson »

Lakigigar wrote: June 18th, 2022, 3:48 pm I thought it was impressive, but I haven't listened to it more than once to be fair. Maybe a 8 would be exaggerated than, but obviously it's gonna be a masterpiece. So if i rate it lower because i've only listened to it once, that wouldn't be fair either. I still enjoyed it at least once, which i've never been able to do for a "beatles album" or even most of 60's and 70's album. I like "jazzy structures and rhythms too", it's a bit like psychedelic before psychedelic because it often feels so random which keeps me engaged. What I know is that it is also very spiritual.

I'm just gonna say I appreciate it and I appreciate the musician. Most films i've also only seen once. Most music outside of shoegaze, dream pop and some pop i've also listened only once. Or at least much more to these genres. I mean i certainly believing in "learning to like an artist or learning a type/genre of music", because i didn't like Radiohead either the first few times i listened to it, although my music taste is more developed now or changed compared to 5-6 years ago. You might learn to enjoy it or more will be revealed after more listening times, but i'm not a robot that is gonna like every acclaimed album (or acclaimed film).

For example i tend to like "jazz rap or jazz hip hop" more than other hip hop music for some reason. I also tend to like jazz fusion or jazz inspired electronic music (hakushi hasegawa, leon vynehall) for example.

I also love the jazzy tracks on this japanese album

https://open.spotify.com/track/17EQgR65 ... d073ee4f13

Of course it's no real jazz.

I really liked that album of Cannonball Adderley (called Somethin' Else). I think that's my fav jazz album.

I also was a fan of the Taxi Driver score.
That "randomness," or sense of spontaneity and possibility, and what you could call the "psychedelic" or abstract appeal, is a big part of what attracts me to jazz too, and a big part of what draws me to modal jazz in particular (this and Kind of Blue probably being the flagship examples), where there's less of a prescribed sense of where the music is going.

By and large, I can't listen to an album just once and feel I've fully "got it" the way I can with movies and books. That's a big part of the appeal for music to me, the experience literally changes, like no part of me has consciously registered this or that aspect before. With my favorite artists I'll keep finding significant new nuances after 100 listens. Whereas oftentimes when I try to rewatch a movie, I just get bored, like "yeah I remember all this."

I definitely think you can learn to like things outside of your wheelhouse, but I also agree there's definitely limits to that, and ultimately aside from gradual changes to your own taste with time there are things that are just gonna "hit" you harder regardless of how much you try to intellectualize your appreciation (in my experience).

Thanks for the recommendations! I love the idea of jazz hip-hop, but I often find the lyrical side corny. Even cats who kept it fly like Tribe or Gangstarr I find hard to return to with much enthusiasm. I prefer artists who take the more abstract vibes and concepts of jazz and incorporate them into their own mode of expression, i.e. experimenting with a pocket, lyrical counterpoints, bending the meaning of a phrase the way someone like Trane would bend notes, etc. I think Roc Marci puts it best:

crash Beamers, get my slacks out the cleaners
my queen don't even speak English
watches on arms, rings on fingers
the notes we play is like Coltrane and Mingus

Fusion, especially the late 60s-early 70s variety, with electric keyboards and guitars and everything else conventional/acoustic, is probably my favorite period of jazz too. I'll check out some of those recommendations, thanks! I actually haven't heard an album with Cannonball Adderley as bandleader all the way through, so I look forward to checking that out; his tones certainly add a lot when he's working with someone like Davis.
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#22

Post by prodigalgodson »

I went through a Beach Boys phase earlier this year. Aside from Pet Sounds they'd never really vibed with me before, but the more I listen to them now the more I appreciate their chill creative beauty and find a melancholy resonance. There's a sense of sublime tragedy about their trajectory that I feel like says a lot about the 60s as an era.

Pet Sounds 10
Smiley Smile 9
Surf's Up
Sunflower
The Smile Sessions 8
Summer Days (And Summer Nights!!)
Today! 7
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#23

Post by Lakigigar »

Pet Sounds 6

But maybe it should be a 7. I don't listen it too often. It's similar to the Beatles, but I think I like it slightly more than The Beatles? Anyways, it is still my opinion that bands like these cannot survive today. It's a product of their age.

Also, feels like we're only discussing 60s and 70s music.
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#24

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Lakigigar wrote: July 5th, 2022, 1:59 pm Pet Sounds 6

But maybe it should be a 7. I don't listen it too often. It's similar to the Beatles, but I think I like it slightly more than The Beatles? Anyways, it is still my opinion that bands like these cannot survive today. It's a product of their age.

Also, feels like we're only discussing 60s and 70s music.
Aside from some sectors of underground hip-hop I don't know much at all about modern music, but I'm sure many of the more acclaimed contemporary-ish groups like Vampire Weekend, Arcade Fire, or Animal Collective would acknowledge their roots can be traced very directly to the harmonic and structural innovations of these two. In that sense, as much as some of the trappings are different, the production techniques have changed, and decades of subsequent influences have been synthesized, I think bands like these still very much thrive in the 21st century. Of course, everything's a product of its age to some extent, but the flip side of that is that nothing will every sound quite like them or capture quite the same vibes or expeditious energy again, any more than we can ever return to that dusty, analog trademark sound of early RZA and Premier as production equipment has continued to evolve, for better or worse, which is a big part of what keeps drawing me back to pioneering eras across various media. Along with which, I think the production of the mature period of The Beatles and The Beach Boys, setting aside some shortcomings -- the tinnier recording of guitars for example -- has aged drastically more seamlessly than the overproduced, reverb-heavy, gated sound that developed through the 70s and became absolutely ubiquitous in the 80s and beyond until grunge reared up. And as much as it's been repeated, the 6-year progression of The Beatles from Please Please Me to Abbey Road continues to blow my mind and strikes me as one of the most miraculously accelerated artistic transformations in human history. Likewise, tracing the development of some suburban So-Cal kids -- or kid, really, since it basically all came down to Brian -- from Surfin' USA to Smile is a remarkable journey to follow itself.

I'm a little surprised you don't like The Beach Boys more, since I believe they're considered the progenitors of dream pop, which is in its incipient form in Pet Sounds. You might enjoy Sunflower, that one has a lovely dreamy aura.

When I made the thread I had the idea that folks would contribute their own musicians, a la the rank a director thread, with the idea of maybe finding some underappreciated artists hidden gems in major discographies. So please, feel free to introduce rankings for whoever you like! The number of artists whose discographies I've explored in depth is very limited, and yeah, mostly to late-60s/early-70s jazz/folk artists and maybe more obscure 90s/10s rappers.
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#25

Post by Onderhond »

The only artist I could add that might find some minor overlap on this forum is Aphex Twin, and even that looks somewhat of a long shot. Let's give it a go though:

Albums:
4.5* - Aphex Twin - Richard D. James Album (1996)
4.5* - Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92 (1992)
4.0* - Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works Volume II (1994)
3.5* - Polygon Window - Surfing on Sine Waves (1993)
3.5* - Aphex Twin - ... I Care Because You Do (1995)
3.5* - The Tuss - Rushup Edge (2007)
2.0* - Aphex Twin - Drukqs (2001)

EPs:
4.5* - Aphex Twin - Girl / Boy EP (1996)
4.0* - Aphex Twin - Come to Daddy (1997)
4.0* - Aphex Twin - On EP (1993)
4.0* - Aphex Twin - Xylem Tube EP (1992)
4.0* - AFX - Analogue Bubblebath Vol. 3.1 (1997)
4.0* - Caustic Window - Joyrex J5 EP (1993)
4.0* - AFX - Analogue Bubblebath Vol. 2 (1991)
3.5* - AFX - Hangable Auto Bulb EP (1995)
3.5* - AFX - Analogue Bubblebath (1991)
3.0* - Aphex Twin - Windowlicker (1999)
3.0* - AFX - Hangable Auto Bulb EP.2 (1995)
3.0* - AFX - Analogue Bubblebath 4 (1994)
3.0* - Aphex Twin - Analord 10 (2005)
3.0* - AFX - Analord 04 (2005)
3.0* - AFX - Analord 01 (2005)
2.5* - AFX - Smojphace EP (2003)
2.5* - AFX - Analord 11 (2005)
2.5* - AFX - Analord 02 (2005)
2.0* - AFX - Analord 03 (2005)

Clearly had his best period in the 90s, not too surprising since that's when IDM was still developing. Once he went back to making acid-like techno, I kinda lost interest.
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#26

Post by Lakigigar »

I should listen more to Aphex Twin, but so far what i've listened from the other albums, i wasn't exactly a fan off. The only songs i've liked so far were all on Selected Ambient Works 85-92. But it's possible i'm missing out on something. His work is a bit overwhelming to get into at times.

4.0* - Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92 (1992)
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#27

Post by Lakigigar »

prodigalgodson wrote: July 11th, 2022, 6:23 pm
Lakigigar wrote: July 5th, 2022, 1:59 pm Pet Sounds 6

But maybe it should be a 7. I don't listen it too often. It's similar to the Beatles, but I think I like it slightly more than The Beatles? Anyways, it is still my opinion that bands like these cannot survive today. It's a product of their age.

Also, feels like we're only discussing 60s and 70s music.
Aside from some sectors of underground hip-hop I don't know much at all about modern music, but I'm sure many of the more acclaimed contemporary-ish groups like Vampire Weekend, Arcade Fire, or Animal Collective would acknowledge their roots can be traced very directly to the harmonic and structural innovations of these two. In that sense, as much as some of the trappings are different, the production techniques have changed, and decades of subsequent influences have been synthesized, I think bands like these still very much thrive in the 21st century. Of course, everything's a product of its age to some extent, but the flip side of that is that nothing will every sound quite like them or capture quite the same vibes or expeditious energy again, any more than we can ever return to that dusty, analog trademark sound of early RZA and Premier as production equipment has continued to evolve, for better or worse, which is a big part of what keeps drawing me back to pioneering eras across various media. Along with which, I think the production of the mature period of The Beatles and The Beach Boys, setting aside some shortcomings -- the tinnier recording of guitars for example -- has aged drastically more seamlessly than the overproduced, reverb-heavy, gated sound that developed through the 70s and became absolutely ubiquitous in the 80s and beyond until grunge reared up. And as much as it's been repeated, the 6-year progression of The Beatles from Please Please Me to Abbey Road continues to blow my mind and strikes me as one of the most miraculously accelerated artistic transformations in human history. Likewise, tracing the development of some suburban So-Cal kids -- or kid, really, since it basically all came down to Brian -- from Surfin' USA to Smile is a remarkable journey to follow itself.

I'm a little surprised you don't like The Beach Boys more, since I believe they're considered the progenitors of dream pop, which is in its incipient form in Pet Sounds. You might enjoy Sunflower, that one has a lovely dreamy aura.

When I made the thread I had the idea that folks would contribute their own musicians, a la the rank a director thread, with the idea of maybe finding some underappreciated artists hidden gems in major discographies. So please, feel free to introduce rankings for whoever you like! The number of artists whose discographies I've explored in depth is very limited, and yeah, mostly to late-60s/early-70s jazz/folk artists and maybe more obscure 90s/10s rappers.
Not a fan of Arcade Fire or Vampire Weekend, although the latter has a few nicer songs.

On the other hand I like Animal Collective, and while I see the references to the psychedelic pop era, they're very different from AF and Vampire Weekend. In the same way, Candy Claws can somehow also be dated back to these psychedelic pop/sunshine pop/baroque pop era. Maybe i need to give The Beach Boys more of a shot, and maybe i'll give Sunflower a try.

https://open.spotify.com/album/5KkGAZra ... _z_tXc568Q

This definitely has a lot of 60's psychdelic pop references.
When I made the thread I had the idea that folks would contribute their own musicians, a la the rank a director thread, with the idea of maybe finding some underappreciated artists hidden gems in major discographies. So please, feel free to introduce rankings for whoever you like! The number of artists whose discographies I've explored in depth is very limited, and yeah, mostly to late-60s/early-70s jazz/folk artists and maybe more obscure 90s/10s rappers.
I'll do so. :) I have plenty of ideas.
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#28

Post by Lakigigar »

I see this thread hasn't seen much activity as of late, so i'll bring some new life by naming a new artist with one of the most influential artists active in the 1990's and 2000s, and who is still active.

Björk

5.0* Vespertine (2001)
4.5* Homogenic (1997)
3.5* Post (1995)
3.5* Debut (1993)
3.0* Medúlla (2004)
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#29

Post by brokenface »

Love Bjork,

1. Homogenic
2. Debut
3. Vespertine
4. Post
5. Volta
6. Medulla
7. Biophilia

Sugarcubes - Life's Too Good also deserves a shout out though hard to compare to her solo stuff.

don't really know the last couple well enough to rank - so this serves as a welcome reminder I need to give them a bit more of a spin :cheers:
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#30

Post by Lakigigar »

prodigalgodson wrote: July 11th, 2022, 6:23 pm
Lakigigar wrote: July 5th, 2022, 1:59 pm Pet Sounds 6

But maybe it should be a 7. I don't listen it too often. It's similar to the Beatles, but I think I like it slightly more than The Beatles? Anyways, it is still my opinion that bands like these cannot survive today. It's a product of their age.

Also, feels like we're only discussing 60s and 70s music.
Aside from some sectors of underground hip-hop I don't know much at all about modern music, but I'm sure many of the more acclaimed contemporary-ish groups like Vampire Weekend, Arcade Fire, or Animal Collective would acknowledge their roots can be traced very directly to the harmonic and structural innovations of these two. In that sense, as much as some of the trappings are different, the production techniques have changed, and decades of subsequent influences have been synthesized, I think bands like these still very much thrive in the 21st century. Of course, everything's a product of its age to some extent, but the flip side of that is that nothing will every sound quite like them or capture quite the same vibes or expeditious energy again, any more than we can ever return to that dusty, analog trademark sound of early RZA and Premier as production equipment has continued to evolve, for better or worse, which is a big part of what keeps drawing me back to pioneering eras across various media. Along with which, I think the production of the mature period of The Beatles and The Beach Boys, setting aside some shortcomings -- the tinnier recording of guitars for example -- has aged drastically more seamlessly than the overproduced, reverb-heavy, gated sound that developed through the 70s and became absolutely ubiquitous in the 80s and beyond until grunge reared up. And as much as it's been repeated, the 6-year progression of The Beatles from Please Please Me to Abbey Road continues to blow my mind and strikes me as one of the most miraculously accelerated artistic transformations in human history. Likewise, tracing the development of some suburban So-Cal kids -- or kid, really, since it basically all came down to Brian -- from Surfin' USA to Smile is a remarkable journey to follow itself.

I'm a little surprised you don't like The Beach Boys more, since I believe they're considered the progenitors of dream pop, which is in its incipient form in Pet Sounds. You might enjoy Sunflower, that one has a lovely dreamy aura.
I've done what you recommended to me. I've listened to Sunflower for the first time and relistened Pet Sounds. To be honest, i still don't make the click, but I can see some of the references you made. I just feel like the peaks are just very occassional and that the large majority of both albums is just mediocre at best.

The best song i've heard by far is All I Wanna Do



It sounded quite familiar to me



Maybe this one and especially the Panda Bear part.



But that song of Beach Boys in particular is the one that stood the test of time. The others, less so or not so much.

The best tracks i've heard are:
- All I Wanna Do
For the reasons i stated before
- Cool, Cool Water
Kinda experimental and also dreamier vibe
- Caroline, No
Probably best track on Pet Sounds

There were some others that were okay (like probably the better known ones and the second one on Pet Sounds for example or the opening of Sunflower), but also a lot that didn't do it for me.

For albums

Pet Pounds - 6
Sunflower - 6

Pet Pounds was a 6, and after relistening carefully, it stays at 6/10. Sunflower also gets a 6. Pet Pounds is slightly better in its entirety, but Sunflower has the higher peaks.

50 scrobbles now, 32 of them being today (i relistened a few songs as well after listening Sunflower and also tried a few other songs outside of those 2 albums).

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like, this feels off and weird
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