Welcome to the ICM Forum.
Check out our Magazine

If you notice any issues please post in the Q&A thread. Email issue should be fixed. If you encounter this issue, contact PeacefulAnarchy
Podcast: Talking Images (Episode 54 released July 1st: The Disappointment That is Leos Carax' Annette)
iCinema Magazine: WE ARE LIVE! (We just need more content)
ICMForum Film Festival 2022: Mon Nov 14 - Dec 12
Polls: 1990s (Results), Germany (May 30th), 2021 (Jun 30th), New Zealand (Jul 3rd), Swan Songs (Jun 30th), 1962 (Jul 30th), Performers (Jul 31st), Unofficial Checks (Jul 31st)
Challenges: Canadian, Unofficial Movies, Personal Toplists
About: Welcome All New Members, Terms of Use, Q&A

Run The Director Challenge (Official, June 2022)

morrison-dylan-fan
Posts: 1404
Joined: February 6th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#121

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

Image

Ernst Lubitsch.

Repeat viewing:8:I Don’t Want to Be a Man (1918)7.
Repeat viewing:9:The Oyster Princess (1919)8.
Repeat viewing:10:The Doll (1919)9.
Repeat viewing:11:Sumurun (1920)7.
Repeat viewing:12:The Wildcat (1921)9.

FTV:13:Deception (1920)7.

Image


Stomping round his kingdom, Emil Jannings (the very first actor to win Best Actor at the Oscars) gives an excellent turn as Henry VIII, a big baby who bounces with glee when he gets what he wants, which is brushed aside with a furious temper tantrum, when Henry wants to throw away people he regards as mere playthings.Contrasting Jannings performance, Henny Porten gives a delicate performance as Boleyn, sparkling with youthful enthusiasm when she meet cute with Henry, which Porten gradually dims, as Boleyn confronts the reality of her marriage, and life facing the axe.

Spanning aross a run time of over 2 hours, the screenplay by Hanns Kraly & Norbert Falk sadly struggles to build a real sense of the declining state of Henry and Boleyn's relationship, instead going for a stop/start approach, leading to awkward moments of lightness appearing straight after serious sequences of a marriage falling apart.Following from making Madame Dubarry a year earlier with another Costume Drama epic, direting auteur Ernst Lubitsch is joined by cinematographer Theodor Sparkuhl in bringing The Lubitsch Touch to the vast wide-shots of the glittering, richly detailed costumes and sets, expertly captured by Lubitsch with an inventive, stylish use of iris effects, emphasizing the physical, and psychologically imposing figure of Henry on Boleyn.
User avatar
flavo5000
Posts: 6011
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#122

Post by flavo5000 »

morrison-dylan-fan wrote: June 22nd, 2022, 11:39 pm

Hi Flavo,I've really enjoyed reading your write-ups, with it having been released on disc hyped as a title from the genre,did you find Chris Miller to have much of a Giallo vibe? I last month had the chance to see Bardem's Main Street in 35MM. About 30 minutes in, a scrambling sound could be heard, and the reel got jammed in the projection! Thankfully, after 15-20 minutes it restarted and everything was back to normal.
Thanks! and yes, Chris Miller definitely had a Spanish giallo vibes at times.
User avatar
flavo5000
Posts: 6011
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#123

Post by flavo5000 »

Barry Levinson

Image

Barry Levinson is a bit of a hard director to nail down. While some may not think him much of an auteur, there are certainly reoccurring themes that crop up throughout his career. In his early career, he see-sawed between his personal slice-of-life dramas set in his hometown of Baltimore (Diner, Tin Men, Avalon, Liberty Heights) and what feels like more prestige Oscar bait kind of films like Rain Man and Bugsy. As he progressed in his career, he developed much more of a satirical political agenda with films like Wag the Dog and Man of the Year, even injecting a political message into his found footage eco-horror film The Bay. His career definitetly has some bizarre sidesteps like Toys and Sphere, but in general, Levinson feels like a director that wants to make important films that get seen.

Image
126. The Humbling (2014)
Al Pacino stars as an aging actor who gets romantically involved with the volatile MUCH younger Greta Gerwig, who has been a fan of his since she was a little kid. The film definitely feels very Woody Allen-esque in both its basic plotting and in the writing (based on a book by Phillip Roth who I'm sure was an influence on Allen). While this is one of the better performances from Pacino since the '90s, that isn't really saying a whole lot when it's up against stuff like Jack & Jill. It's honestly kind of a mess of a movie with no one sympathetic to latch onto in a sea of screaming egos.

Image
127. Jimmy Hollywood (1994)
Joe Pesci plays a wannabe actor who, with the help of his empty-headed friend (Christian Slater) concocts an idea to basically become anonymous vigilantes as a way of gaining the attention he feels he so richly deserves. This is one of Levinson's earliest most overt social satires, railing against the ineffectiveness of the L. A. police and the breaking down of society, using the motor mouth ham Jimmy Alto as his mouthpiece. The tone is wildly uneven at times with Slater's character feeling a little superfluous (he's just kinda there, doesn't really seem to egg Jimmy on or try to stop him) but the movie definitely takes some interesting risks. And actually there are scenes in this that feature some of Pesci's best acting.

Image
128. The Wizard of Lies (2017)
Levinson directs this biopic takedown of notorious Ponzi Scheme maestro Bernie Madoff with De Niro really nailing Madoff's disaffected, sociopathic tendencies. The movie certainly takes a specific perspective on the whole affair that was sometimes at odds with how it was covered in the press. But in a way, by making the whole family completely ignorant of Madoff's shenanigans (which there has been a LOT of debate on whether they actually were), it creates for a more compelling film for the family as they struggle helplessly against the public backlash vortex they find themselves being sucked into.

Image
129. Young Sherlock Holmes (1985)
While this was directed by Levinson, it feels very much more indicative of its Amblin Entertainment production credit than of anything else in Levinson's filmography. In fact at times it seems to channel Indiana Jones pretty heavily (and in a way presages the Young Indiana Jones adventures we would see in the television series that would come several years later). It's a pretty fun adventure film that does a solid job of positing what it would've been like to see Holmes getting into rousing escapades as a teen, but it's not the sort of thing that proves to be very memorable in the long run in relation to other Amblin films from the same time period. One thing I did notice is that this apparently was one of (if not the first) theatrical film to feature the use of CGI, and it honestly doesn't look half bad.
Can't Stop, Won't Stop
1. Young Man with a Horn (1950)
2. This Is the Army (1943)
3. The Story of Will Rogers (1942)
4. Night and Day (1946)
5. The Hangman (1959)
6. Kid Galahad (1937)
7. Roughly Speaking (1945)
8. The Comancheros (1961)
9. Passage to Marseille (1944)
10. Gin gwai 10 a.k.a. The Eye 3 (2005) w/ Oxide Pang
11. Ah ma yau nan a.k.a. Leave Me Alone (2004)
12. Tung ngan a.k.a. The Child's Eye (2010) w/ Oxide Pang
13. My Voyage to Italy (1999)
14. Street Scenes (1970)
15. American Masters: No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)
16. The Hooked Generation (1968)
17. The Psychedelic Priest (1971/2001)
18. The Naked Zoo (1970)
19. Whiskey Mountain (1977)
20. Mako: The Jaws of Death (1976)
21. Jim, the World's Greatest (1976)
22. Kenny & Company (1976)
23. Survival Quest (1988)
24. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
25. Absolutely Anything (2015)
26. Erik the Viking (1989)
27. They Shall Not Grow Old (2018)
28. The Lovely Bones (2009)
29-31. The Beatles: Get Back (2021)
32. Death of a Salesman (1985)
33. Coup de grâce (1976)
34. Baal (1970)
35. Climbing High (1938)
36. The Running Man (1963)
37. The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965)
38. Bank Holiday (1938)
39. La mala ordina a.k.a. The Italian Connection (1972)
40. I padroni della città a.k.a. Rulers of the City (1976)
41. La città sconvolta: caccia spietata ai rapitori a.k.a. Kidnap Syndicate (1975)
42. Il poliziotto è marcio a.k.a. Shoot First, Die Later (1974)
43. La seduzione a.k.a. Seduction (1973)
44. La bestia uccide a sangue freddo a.k.a. Slaughter Hotel (1971)
45. Toni (1935)
46. Swamp Water (1941)
47. Le crime de Monsieur Lange (1936)
48. Blood Massacre (1991)
49. Fiend (1980)
50. Alien Factor 2: The Alien Rampage (2001)
51. Shooter (2007)
52. The Magnificent Seven (2016)
53. Southpaw (2015)
54. Zodiac Killer (2005)
55. Black Dahlia (2006)
56. Green River Killer (2005)
57. Zombie Nation (2004)
58. Nightstalker (2009)
59. Dungeon Girl (2008)
60. The Raven (2006)
61. Borderline Cult (2007)
62. Olivia (1983)
63. The Attic (2007)
64. Siesta (1987)
65. Strange Frequency (2001)
66. La corrupción de Chris Miller a.k.a. The Corruption of Chris Miller (1973)
67. La venganza (1958)
68. Esa pareja feliz a.k.a. The Happy Couple (1953)
69. Hana to Arisu a.k.a. Hana & Alice (2004)
70. Shigatsu monogatari a.k.a. April Story (1998)
71. Last Letter (2020)
72. Vampire (2011)
73. Let's Make Love (1960)
74. Keeper of the Flame (1943)
75. The Animal Kingdom (1932)
76. Travels with My Aunt (1972)
77. Pat and Mike (1952)
78. Tenshi no harawata: Akai memai a.k.a. Angel Guts 5: Red Vertigo (1988)
79. Yoru ga mata kuru a.k.a. Alone in the Night (1994)
80. Hana to hebi a.k.a. Flower and Snake (2004)
81. Stroker Ace (1983)
82. Rad (1986)
83. Bandit Goes Country (1994)
84. Bandit Bandit (1994)
85. Beauty and the Bandit (1994)
86. Bandit's Silver Angel (1994)
87. A doppia faccia a.k.a. Double Face (1969)
88. Murder Obsession (1981)
89. Estratto dagli archivi segreti della polizia di una capitale europea a.k.a. Tragic Ceremony (1972)
90. L'iguana dalla lingua di fuoco a.k.a. The Iguana with the Tongue of Fire (1971)
91. Napoli, Napoli, Napoli (2009)
92. 9 Lives of a Wet Pussy (1976)
93. Chelsea on the Rocks (2008)
94. Dangerous Game (1993)
95. Mulberry St. (2010)
96. Welcome to New York (2010)
97. Queen Kelly (1932)
98. The Merry Widow (1925)
99. The Great Gabbo (1929)
100. Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers (2022)
101. Michael Bolton's Big, Sexy Valentine's Day Special (2017)
102. The Watch (2012)
103. Let's Kill Uncle (1966)
104. The Americano (1955)
105. The Night Walker (1964)
106. Dreamgirls (2006)
107. Sister, Sister (1987)
108. Mr. Holmes (2015)
109. Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh (1995)
110. The Elusive Pimpernel (1949)
111. One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942)
112. Night Ambush (1957)
113. Our Man in Marrakesh a.k.a. Bang! Bang! You're Dead! (1966)
114. Hold the Dream (1986)
115. Dark Places (1974)
116. The Alphabet Killer (2008)
117. Saturn a.k.a. Speed of Life (1999)
118. The Boarder a.k.a. Room for Murder (2018)
119. Ninja Powerforce (1988)
120. Hei tai yang 731 si wang lie che a.k.a. Men Behind the Sun: A Narrow Escape (1994)
121. Manhattan Chase (2000)
122. Pearl Harbor (2001)
123. Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014)
124. 13 Hours (2016)
125. The Island (2005)
126. The Humbling (2014)
127. Jimmy Hollywood (1994)
128. The Wizard of Lies (2017)
129. Young Sherlock Holmes (1985)
blocho
Donator
Posts: 6152
Joined: July 20th, 2014, 6:00 am
Contact:

#124

Post by blocho »

flavo5000 wrote: June 23rd, 2022, 1:48 am While this is one of the better performances from Pacino since the '90s, that isn't really saying a whole lot when it's up against stuff like Jack & Jill.
Have you seen You Don't Know Jack, which was also directed by Levinson? I think it's one of Pacino's better performances this century.
User avatar
sol
Donator
Posts: 14384
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#125

Post by sol »

Spoiler
1. Strangers on a Train (1951) Alfred Hitchcock REVISION
2. North by Northwest (1959) Alfred Hitchcock REVISION
3. Rebecca (1940) Alfred Hitchcock REVISION
4. Laura (1944) Otto Preminger REVISION
5. Anatomy of a Murder (1959) Otto Preminger REVISION
6. Bunny Lake is Missing (1965) Otto Preminger REVISION
7. Kill Buljo (2007) Tommy Wirkola
8. The Trip (2021) Tommy Wirkola
9. Død Snø (2009) Tommy Wirkola REVISION
10. Død Snø 2 (2014) Tommy Wirkola REVISION
11. Involuntary (2008) Ruben Östlund
12. Play (2011) Ruben Östlund
13. The Square (2017) Ruben Östlund REVISION
14. Force Majeure (2014) Ruben Östlund REVISION
15. The Deep (2012) Baltasar Kormákur
16. Jar City (2006) Baltasar Kormákur
17. 101 Reykjavik (2000) Baltasar Kormákur
18. Men & Chicken (2015) Anders Thomas Jensen
19. Flickering Lights (2000) Anders Thomas Jensen
20. Riders of Justice (2020) Anders Thomas Jensen
21. The Green Butchers (2003) Anders Thomas Jensen

ImageImage
ImageImage

Anders Thomas Jensen

I have a broader taste than most when it comes to comedy: whether it be Aamir Khan goofiness, the films of Leonid Gaidai or silent slapstick, I seem to have higher tolerance for comedy than most others on this forum. It is therefore with utter dismay that I have to admit that Anders Thomas Jensen simply does not do it for me. All four of his films that I have seen this month have been labeled as comedies on IMDb, iCM and Letterboxd, but only one of them (Men & Chicken) really seems to be trying to be funny throughout its duration.

Jensen's films actually come off as closer to melodramas overall. They certainly have quirky premises, but calling his films comedies feels like a stretch. Flickering Lights was the most underwhelming in this regard. It begins as not only a comedy, but a suspense thriller involving criminals on the run, only for any fear of being caught to soon dry up as they keep getting lost in flashbacks to their childhood and discussions of turning their new abode into a restaurant. Then you get something like The Green Butchers, which should focus on two butchers finding success in selling human meat as chicken, only for the film to constantly get distracted with dead relative and estranged brother angles.

In many ways, Riders of Justice is the best of this quartet since it never actually tries to be a comedy, give or take a few reactions when the action gets going near the very end. What we get instead though - true to Jense form - is trite melodrama: bonding with an estranged daughter and her boyfriend and much talk and discussion. Actually, if it was not for a reveal towards the end, this would be just as underwhelming as Green and Lights in my books. Which leaves Men & Chicken as the closest to a Jensen film that worked for me, simply because it is quirky the whole way through, even if it foreshadows everything to come a bit too much. But yeah, this guy and his films are not for me.
|iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | Gold Derby
Image
Long live the new flesh!
User avatar
flavo5000
Posts: 6011
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#126

Post by flavo5000 »

blocho wrote: June 23rd, 2022, 3:17 am
flavo5000 wrote: June 23rd, 2022, 1:48 am While this is one of the better performances from Pacino since the '90s, that isn't really saying a whole lot when it's up against stuff like Jack & Jill.
Have you seen You Don't Know Jack, which was also directed by Levinson? I think it's one of Pacino's better performances this century.
I have not. I'll keep a look out for it though. Pacino can give a great performance when he wants to.
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#127

Post by Silga »

Alfred Hitchcock TSPDT Top 250

25. Saboteur (1942) 8/10
26. Topaz (1969) 6/10
27. Family Plot (1976) 5/10

Saboteur is an exceptionally well-made film. It is innovative, daring and, no doubt, influential. Some parts of the storyline could have been fleshed-out better in the 3rd act, but it is, nevertheless, an impressive film. I see a lot of creative choices that Hitchcock displayed in this film replicated in contemporary action thrillers. Cinema owes a great deal to the master Alfred Hitchcock .
Spoiler
John Woo TSPDT Top 250
1. Face/Off (1997) 6/10 rewatch
2. Blackjack (1998) 2/10
3. Windtalkers (2002) 7/10

Martin Scorsese TSPDT Top 250
4. Street Scenes (1970) 6/10
5. Italianamerican (1974) 8/10
6. The Aviator (2004) 9/10 rewatch

Steven Soderbergh TSPDT Top 250
7. King of the Hill (Steven Soderbergh, 1993) 10/10
8. The Girlfriend Experience (Steven Soderbergh, 2009) 8/10
9. Unsane (Steven Soderbergh, 2018) 7/10

Phil Alden Robinson
10. Field of Dreams (1989) 5/10
11. The Sum of All Fears (2002) 8/10 rewatch
12. The Angriest Man in Brooklyn (2014) 4/10

Antoine Fuqua
13. Lightning in a Bottle (2004) 7/10
14. Shooter (2007) 6/10 rewatch
15. The Guilty (2021) 4/10

Sidney Lumet TSPDT Top 250
16. Bye Bye Braverman (1968) 6/10
17. Lovin’ Molly (1974) 7/10
18. Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007) 8/10

Clint Eastwood TSPDT Top 250
19. Bronco Billy (1980) 6/10
20. Firefox (1982) 6/10 rewatch
21. Space Cowboys (2000) 7/10 rewatch

Brian De Palma TSPDT Top 250
22. Greetings (1968) 3/10
23. Casualties of War (1989) 6/10
24. Mission to Mars (2000) 5/10 rewatch

Alfred Hitchcock TSPDT Top 250
25. Saboteur (1942) 8/10
26. Topaz (1969) 6/10
27. Family Plot (1976) 5/10
User avatar
DudeLanez
Posts: 838
Joined: August 25th, 2020, 12:22 am
Location: Germany
Contact:

#128

Post by DudeLanez »

Philippe Garrel
26. Liberty at Night (1984) 5,5/10
27. Emergency Kisses (1989) 5,5/10
28. The Birth of Love (1993) 7/10
29. Night Wind (1999) 6/10
Spoiler
Gustaf Molander
01. Intermezzo (1936) 5,5/10
02. A Woman's Face (1938) 6/10
03. Ordet (1943) 6/10
Jan Troell
04. Here Is Your Life (1966) 7,5/10
05. Who Saw Him Die? (1968) 7/10
06. As White as in Snow (2001) 7/10
Aleksey Balabanov
07. Brother (1997) 7/10
08. Brother 2 (2000) 6,5/10
09. Cargo 200 (2007) 6,5/10
10. The Castle (1994) 6,5/10
11. The River (2002) 7/10
12. Me Too (2012) 7,5/10
13. Blind Man's Bluff (2005) 6/10
14. It Doesn't Hurt Me (2006) 6/10
15. Morphine (2008) 7/10
16. The Stoker (2010) 6,5/10
William Friedkin
17. Sorcerer (1977) 7/10
18. Cruising (1980) 6/10
19. To Live and Die in L.A. (1985) 6,5/10
Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne
20. The Promise (1996) 7/10
21. The Son (2002) 6,5/10
22. The Unknown Girl (2016) 7,5/10
Tage Danielsson
23. The Apple War (1971) 3/10
24. Release the Prisoners to Spring (1975) 2,5/10
25. The Adventures of Picasso (1978) 4/10
Philippe Garrel
26. Liberty at Night (1984) 5,5/10
27. Emergency Kisses (1989) 5,5/10
28. The Birth of Love (1993) 7/10
29. Night Wind (1999) 6/10
:ICM: icm - :letbxd: letterboxd - :imdb: imdb

Challenges in July
Image -> 325/500
User avatar
flavo5000
Posts: 6011
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#129

Post by flavo5000 »

Nico Mastorakis

Image

When one thinks of masters of Greek cinema, Nico Mastorakis should be the at the top of the list. Well... Maybe not at the top... Really, probably closer to the bottom. But dammit, his movies are so fun! His films feel like cocaine-fueled frenzies of explosions, gunfights, freewheeling sexual deviance, with a anarchic mindset that resides unshackled from the limitations most filmmakers set for themselves in the realm of good taste and restraint. For that Nico, I salute you.

Image
130. In the Cold of the Night (1990)
Mastorakis does early '90s erotic thriller in the vein of Basic Instinct but with even more sex and sleaze than Verhoeven crammed into his film. It also is reminiscent of many an Italian giallo with its fashion photographer-focused plot. I got no complaints really.

Image
131. The Wind (1986)
This was a pretty solid flick about a woman being stalked by a crazy guy in a serious wind storm. It has a nice pace and while the acting is pretty preposterous, it's a lot of fun.

Image
132. Nightmare at Noon (1988)
While this one has a little bit of a sci-fi element to it, Mastorakis directs Nightmare at Noon as more of a straight up action movie (which frankly seems to be what he does best anyway so I guess he knows how to play to his strengths). We've got reliable B-actor Wings Hauser rubbing elbows with the likes of past-his-prime George Kennedy and Bo Hopkins to take down creepy albino Brion James. This is probably the closest you'll ever see Mastorakis to directing a western. It's a lot of fun actually.

Image
133. To koritsi vomva a.k.a. Death Has Blue Eyes (1976)
Here we've got another Mastorakis hodge podge that takes elements of a comedy, a giallo, an action chase film, throws in a psychic and puts it all in a blender on puree. Like most of Mastorakis' other films, he knows how to pace his schlock for maximum watchability even when it's stupid, offensive or ridiculous.

Image
134. Darkroom (1989)
This one is basically a pretty decently made but extremely predictable slasher with a strong voyeurism angle to it. It's not bad, but it won't blow you away either.
Can't Stop, Won't Stop
1. Young Man with a Horn (1950)
2. This Is the Army (1943)
3. The Story of Will Rogers (1942)
4. Night and Day (1946)
5. The Hangman (1959)
6. Kid Galahad (1937)
7. Roughly Speaking (1945)
8. The Comancheros (1961)
9. Passage to Marseille (1944)
10. Gin gwai 10 a.k.a. The Eye 3 (2005) w/ Oxide Pang
11. Ah ma yau nan a.k.a. Leave Me Alone (2004)
12. Tung ngan a.k.a. The Child's Eye (2010) w/ Oxide Pang
13. My Voyage to Italy (1999)
14. Street Scenes (1970)
15. American Masters: No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)
16. The Hooked Generation (1968)
17. The Psychedelic Priest (1971/2001)
18. The Naked Zoo (1970)
19. Whiskey Mountain (1977)
20. Mako: The Jaws of Death (1976)
21. Jim, the World's Greatest (1976)
22. Kenny & Company (1976)
23. Survival Quest (1988)
24. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
25. Absolutely Anything (2015)
26. Erik the Viking (1989)
27. They Shall Not Grow Old (2018)
28. The Lovely Bones (2009)
29-31. The Beatles: Get Back (2021)
32. Death of a Salesman (1985)
33. Coup de grâce (1976)
34. Baal (1970)
35. Climbing High (1938)
36. The Running Man (1963)
37. The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965)
38. Bank Holiday (1938)
39. La mala ordina a.k.a. The Italian Connection (1972)
40. I padroni della città a.k.a. Rulers of the City (1976)
41. La città sconvolta: caccia spietata ai rapitori a.k.a. Kidnap Syndicate (1975)
42. Il poliziotto è marcio a.k.a. Shoot First, Die Later (1974)
43. La seduzione a.k.a. Seduction (1973)
44. La bestia uccide a sangue freddo a.k.a. Slaughter Hotel (1971)
45. Toni (1935)
46. Swamp Water (1941)
47. Le crime de Monsieur Lange (1936)
48. Blood Massacre (1991)
49. Fiend (1980)
50. Alien Factor 2: The Alien Rampage (2001)
51. Shooter (2007)
52. The Magnificent Seven (2016)
53. Southpaw (2015)
54. Zodiac Killer (2005)
55. Black Dahlia (2006)
56. Green River Killer (2005)
57. Zombie Nation (2004)
58. Nightstalker (2009)
59. Dungeon Girl (2008)
60. The Raven (2006)
61. Borderline Cult (2007)
62. Olivia (1983)
63. The Attic (2007)
64. Siesta (1987)
65. Strange Frequency (2001)
66. La corrupción de Chris Miller a.k.a. The Corruption of Chris Miller (1973)
67. La venganza (1958)
68. Esa pareja feliz a.k.a. The Happy Couple (1953)
69. Hana to Arisu a.k.a. Hana & Alice (2004)
70. Shigatsu monogatari a.k.a. April Story (1998)
71. Last Letter (2020)
72. Vampire (2011)
73. Let's Make Love (1960)
74. Keeper of the Flame (1943)
75. The Animal Kingdom (1932)
76. Travels with My Aunt (1972)
77. Pat and Mike (1952)
78. Tenshi no harawata: Akai memai a.k.a. Angel Guts 5: Red Vertigo (1988)
79. Yoru ga mata kuru a.k.a. Alone in the Night (1994)
80. Hana to hebi a.k.a. Flower and Snake (2004)
81. Stroker Ace (1983)
82. Rad (1986)
83. Bandit Goes Country (1994)
84. Bandit Bandit (1994)
85. Beauty and the Bandit (1994)
86. Bandit's Silver Angel (1994)
87. A doppia faccia a.k.a. Double Face (1969)
88. Murder Obsession (1981)
89. Estratto dagli archivi segreti della polizia di una capitale europea a.k.a. Tragic Ceremony (1972)
90. L'iguana dalla lingua di fuoco a.k.a. The Iguana with the Tongue of Fire (1971)
91. Napoli, Napoli, Napoli (2009)
92. 9 Lives of a Wet Pussy (1976)
93. Chelsea on the Rocks (2008)
94. Dangerous Game (1993)
95. Mulberry St. (2010)
96. Welcome to New York (2010)
97. Queen Kelly (1932)
98. The Merry Widow (1925)
99. The Great Gabbo (1929)
100. Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers (2022)
101. Michael Bolton's Big, Sexy Valentine's Day Special (2017)
102. The Watch (2012)
103. Let's Kill Uncle (1966)
104. The Americano (1955)
105. The Night Walker (1964)
106. Dreamgirls (2006)
107. Sister, Sister (1987)
108. Mr. Holmes (2015)
109. Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh (1995)
110. The Elusive Pimpernel (1949)
111. One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942)
112. Night Ambush (1957)
113. Our Man in Marrakesh a.k.a. Bang! Bang! You're Dead! (1966)
114. Hold the Dream (1986)
115. Dark Places (1974)
116. The Alphabet Killer (2008)
117. Saturn a.k.a. Speed of Life (1999)
118. The Boarder a.k.a. Room for Murder (2018)
119. Ninja Powerforce (1988)
120. Hei tai yang 731 si wang lie che a.k.a. Men Behind the Sun: A Narrow Escape (1994)
121. Manhattan Chase (2000)
122. Pearl Harbor (2001)
123. Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014)
124. 13 Hours (2016)
125. The Island (2005)
126. The Humbling (2014)
127. Jimmy Hollywood (1994)
128. The Wizard of Lies (2017)
129. Young Sherlock Holmes (1985)
130. In the Cold of the Night (1990)
131. The Wind (1986)
132. Nightmare at Noon (1988)
133. To koritsi vomva a.k.a. Death Has Blue Eyes (1976)
134. Darkroom (1989)
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#130

Post by Silga »

David Cronenberg TSPDT Top 250

28. Crimes of the Future (1970) 4/10
29. Fast Company (1979) 5/10
30. Crimes of the Future (2022) 3/10

I feel more positive about Fast Company than my rating suggests. It could have been more unorthodox in its approach to drag racing and behind the scenes drama, but it's still much better in the hands of Cronenberg who adds an ounce of sarcasm, when it might have been if directed by someone like Hal Needham.

As for Crimes of the Future, the earlier one only suffers from a poor sound design and a miscast lead (should have been a much older man). Loved seeing all the gorgeous Brutalist architecture, both interiors and from the outside.
While the new one is rather vapid and uninspired. Also extremely amateurish for the most part. It still has some decent sequences, only they never merge into a more profound and meaningful storytelling.
Spoiler
John Woo TSPDT Top 250
1. Face/Off (1997) 6/10 rewatch
2. Blackjack (1998) 2/10
3. Windtalkers (2002) 7/10

Martin Scorsese TSPDT Top 250
4. Street Scenes (1970) 6/10
5. Italianamerican (1974) 8/10
6. The Aviator (2004) 9/10 rewatch

Steven Soderbergh TSPDT Top 250
7. King of the Hill (Steven Soderbergh, 1993) 10/10
8. The Girlfriend Experience (Steven Soderbergh, 2009) 8/10
9. Unsane (Steven Soderbergh, 2018) 7/10

Phil Alden Robinson
10. Field of Dreams (1989) 5/10
11. The Sum of All Fears (2002) 8/10 rewatch
12. The Angriest Man in Brooklyn (2014) 4/10

Antoine Fuqua
13. Lightning in a Bottle (2004) 7/10
14. Shooter (2007) 6/10 rewatch
15. The Guilty (2021) 4/10

Sidney Lumet TSPDT Top 250
16. Bye Bye Braverman (1968) 6/10
17. Lovin’ Molly (1974) 7/10
18. Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007) 8/10

Clint Eastwood TSPDT Top 250
19. Bronco Billy (1980) 6/10
20. Firefox (1982) 6/10 rewatch
21. Space Cowboys (2000) 7/10 rewatch

Brian De Palma TSPDT Top 250
22. Greetings (1968) 3/10
23. Casualties of War (1989) 6/10
24. Mission to Mars (2000) 5/10 rewatch

Alfred Hitchcock TSPDT Top 250
25. Saboteur (1942) 8/10
26. Topaz (1969) 6/10
27. Family Plot (1976) 5/10

David Cronenberg TSPDT Top 250
28. Crimes of the Future (1970) 4/10
29. Fast Company (1979) 5/10
30. Crimes of the Future (2022) 3/10
User avatar
Minkin
Posts: 868
Joined: January 13th, 2015, 7:00 am
Location: astarikar 4
Contact:

#131

Post by Minkin »

Alan Roberts

Roberts has two interesting claims to fame:

1) He designed and produced the Atari 2600 porn game: X-Man (link = hilariously nsfw)

2) He was the director behind the film Desert Warriors - which the producer turned into (without any of the cast's knowledge) the anti-Islam film Innocence of Muslims - which led to mass protests that resulted in the deaths of over 50 people and led to the 2012 Benghazi attack (which makes me wonder how history might've played out differently if not for this fucking film).

Image

01. Karate Cop (1991) - San Joaquin County - Rating: 4/10
One of the last cops on Earth must navigate through the postapocalyptic world of central California in order to get a crystal to teleport a bunch of orphans off to safety. This is mostly an excuse to throw terribly filmed fight scenes at us, to the point that you’d be forgiven for forgetting that the star was also a karate master in real life. I like that this karate cop just casually stops for “jackie rabbit stew” from David Carradine’s hellhole bar without expecting any trouble to ensue. At one point there’s some sort of religious group who worships another teleporter, and they’re never explained – like has he tried just asking to borrow it? What is the mythos behind their religion – is it embracing technology as the only way to escape the misery they find themselves in? I like the idea that they were so close to building a utopia for themselves, when out of nowhere, Karate Cop just shows up and ruins it. There isn’t ever any indication they’re evil anyway, unless you think wearing robes and chanting immediately equates bad, which I suppose is par for the course for the 90s. It doesn’t really seem like the orphans are anymore justified in using it – they all want to leave the hell they find themselves in, and drinking yourself to death in a crummy bar, or going wherever the dice of chance of the teleporter might take you – is seen as preferred to living in their present situation. For the kids have no idea where the teleporter leads – presumably into the plot of a 3rd, unmade movie in this series, although it could just lead to death – but the kids risk everything, just on the hope that somewhere, anywhere might be better than where they are now – and that feels true to the core of all escapism – that some mythical “better” exists out there, even if it’s just a dream – and if there’s the faintest chance it might be better, they will take it. Anyway, this is just a lot of super generic and instantly forgettable sometimes karate action (mostly, its guns), except for the villain Snaker – he brings a lot of heart to his role in this movie, and I for one truly felt the snake emanating from within him.
vaguely nsfw image
Image
02. Panorama Blue (1974) - Los Angeles County - Rating: 6/10
There have been many advances in the history of the adult movie, but now, Panorama Blue offers the first (and I believe only) 70mm softcore porn experience. This is a parody of This is Cinerama (/Cinerama in general) – which had been re-released in theaters the year prior. Panorama Blue recreates This is Cinerama’s opening narration (this time giving a history of porno films) + the roller coaster scene (only with a couple having greenscreen sex on their coaster) + the temple dance sequence (only its an exotic dance). The funniest recreation is where, instead of seeing breathtaking views of the world, we instead get to see the inside of an adult bookstore – which was quite amusing to see. Though, the best segment of Panorama Blue is the “Center-fold Girl” sequence – as that is the only element that seems like it wasn’t meant to be a parody; it’s fairly poetic (in a softcore adult film way), and it’s probably the only thing that qualifies as erotic – as this ode to lust and sensuality. My main problem though is that none of the sequences in Panorama Blue are all that entertaining from a filmic or prurient viewpoint – as they’re trying to parody something that only works if you can see it in a theater in all its glory. So the real main issue is that the only currently available copy is from a VHS source, and that negates all of the audio and visual splendor that this intended for audiences. As a result, it’s difficult to judge its particular technical merits, because you’re looking at a pan and scan mono VHS copy. It really deserves a blu-ray re-release, and I’m sure it will have one some day – 70mm restorations are expensive and time consuming (though this film might just be 35mm blown-up to 70mm); either case – I’d say to hold off watching it until a better quality copy surfaces. Unless of course this turns out to be the only surviving copy, to which I say, as a Cinerama parody – it manages to be fairly amusing. It perhaps is undone by its softcore trappings and some of the sequences work better when you know what the source of the parody was – but we still had quite a bit of fun, despite the limitations of the A/V quality – as somebody really needed to make a porn full of spectacle + knock down Cinerama a peg. I do think Panorama Blue is better than This is Cinerama – although they’re both held back by trying to wow you on a technical level, which doesn’t work as well at home.

Image

03. Young Lady Chatterley (1977) - England - Rating: 5/10
A woman, Cynthia, on the cusp of marriage inherits her aunt’s estate, where she learns a bit about lust and love from her servants in this softcore adult film. As Cynthia reads her aunt’s diary, which I assume are extracts from D.H. Lawrence’s novel, and learns about the aunt’s affairs with the gardener, so too does Cynthia find a similar interest in those working for her. It’s therefore a film that explore class identity – as Cynthia appears to be marrying into a wealthy family, and yet finds herself as heir to her own position of wealth, where she feels free to experience some dalliances before being tied down in marriage. Despite her noble intentions, she, along with her aunt, have both found themselves drawn towards someone who’s crude and masculine, but gentle enough to care for flowers – but it’s perhaps their commonness that attracts both Cynthia and her aunt to them. For they wish to experience life and lust as seen from the servant’s point of view, rather than being bogged down with the tedium of respectability. This distinction of class may have been too difficult to overcome for the aunt, but Cynthia decides to tear down those barriers – by throwing a party where her servant lovers come dressed as kings and noblemen – as being accepted as equals – who join together in a frenzy of passion. The issue is that these people are still on the paybook, and so one has to wonder how freely they give into the sex, and how much is just them wanting to keep their position – for the film is rather undecided on this matter. Another problem is that the fiancé, Philip, is heavily queer coded, but the film just toys with this notion and stops before showing him engaging in anything remotely gay – despite what is being hinted – and I find this disappointing, that they didn’t think they could show male on male sexuality. The film works best when its a celebration of polyamory, lust, and class identity, but its perhaps held back too much by trying to be a romance novel – though I do appreciate that it takes on a female gaze of desire.


I'm not done watching Alan Roberts movies - and I hope to see two more from him, as I guess I'm focusing on him for this entire challenge... but now that I have a run started, I suppose I can just post any new watches at my leisure? :unsure:
Cinema Safari (Currently working on Inyo County, CA + Zimbabwe upgrade) Help recommend me movies to watch) Letterboxd
blocho
Donator
Posts: 6152
Joined: July 20th, 2014, 6:00 am
Contact:

#132

Post by blocho »

Steve McQueen

9. Mangrove (2020)
10. Lovers Rock (2020)
11. Red, White and Blue (2020)
12. Alex Wheatle (2020)
13. Education (2020)

Five movies, all of them set among the British-Caribbean community in London from the 1960s to the 1980s. These movies have personal resonance for director and co-writer McQueen, perhaps more than any of his other projects, because this is the community he grew up in, the child of Grenadian and Trinidadian immigrants. Every story is fascinating, often gripping, and I’m glad I watched them. And yet, the filmmaking is never better than average and occasionally subpar. One example: a movie cuts from one scene featuring non-diegetic music (an Al Green song) to another scene featuring diegetic music (a Marvin Gaye song). There’s no pause in this abrupt transition. And then there are some really random scenes. Why do we get thirty seconds of a person listening to a radio interview of Roald Dahl? Why do we spend two minutes watching someone lying motionless in a bathtub? Finally, too many of these movies are too short. Only the first is feature-length, and the others suffer to varying levels from sudden endings and a lack of depth. Given the monumental cinematic achievements in McQueen’s past, this is a bit disappointing.

Mangrove
This is a story from British history I was unfamiliar with. A restaurant in London becomes a center of community for British-Caribbean immigrants, so the police respond with violent oppression. Continuing brutality culminates in a protest in which the police predictably riot. Cops gonna be cops, right? The rest of the movie is devoted to the legal struggle that ensues. What sets this apart from the many other movies about police oppression, and the battles for redress and justice that inevitably follow in its wake, is its focus, as the title suggests, on a specific place (the Mangrove restaurant) as both product and stimulant of an incipient community. The movie suggests, furthermore, a praxis of revolution — a community begets a social center which begets collective action. It is not accidental that this is the first movie in the series, for the development and travails of this community is the overarching narrative thread.

Lovers Rock
A man and a woman form a romantic connection at a dance party. A couple of other things happen, but that’s basically the whole plot. The focus is on the dance party, and most of the runtime is spent amid the dancers, providing a you-are-there feeling. I’ll admit that this looks like a really good dance party. Still, it’s really not much to build a movie around on its own. The movie does serve a larger function in comparison to the four others because it’s the only one that doesn’t focus on the oppression of state institutions. It is devoted instead entirely to the British-Caribbean community on its own terms.

Red, White and Blue
The son of Jamaican immigrants joins the police in 1980s London. He hopes to create change within the system. Entirely predictably, he is beset by the racism of his fellow cops, and his course becomes a contest between achieving change and becoming co-opted. It’s well-acted, and I appreciate any story that says fuck the police, but this feels like the least of the movies so far. There isn’t a surprising note in it. And there’s some amateurish filmmaking here. For example, a racist cop tells the protagonist that if he doesn’t conform, other cops won’t back him up. A few minutes later, the protagonist is chasing a suspect and calls for backup. We already know what will happen. But rather than trusting the audience to connect the dots, we get to see the lead call for backup twice more. Finally, the movie ends rather suddenly and far too early, depriving the story of an outcome.

Alex Wheatle
The adolescent years of a child brought up and brutalized by the foster system, his gradual acculturation to the West Indies culture in London, his turn to music and crime, and an eventual term in prison, from whence he emerges with a more positive outlook. It’s a nice story with a great lead performance, but once again far too brief at just 66 minutes. McQueen isn’t giving this story enough room to develop.

Education
A pre-teen boy in 1970s London has dyslexia and struggles in school. He is moved to a special needs school where he experiences what educators in the United States refer to as “warehousing.” The traditional argument against this sort of tracking is that it creates a self-fulfilling prophecy, what someone once called the soft bigotry of low expectations. So it is in this story. Eventually, only the intervention of some activists help steer the boy onto a more hopeful path. From what I’ve read, this story is based on McQueen’s own childhood.
blocho
Donator
Posts: 6152
Joined: July 20th, 2014, 6:00 am
Contact:

#133

Post by blocho »

Paul Schrader

14. The Card Counter (2021)
15. Hardcore (1979)
16. Auto Focus (2002)

I'm going to re-post below what I wrote about Schrader in the Rank a Director thread and what I wrote about The Card Counter in TSPDT challenge.

I remember about a decade ago, a friend of mine suggested that I meet a friend of his. He said, "You should meet this guy. He's a film nerd. You two can hang out and talk about Paul Schrader or something." I never ended up meeting that guy, but I was amused by the role Schrader's name played in that conversation -- prominent enough that a casual moviegoer knew his name but offbeat enough that he was proffered as some sort of cult object for real film nerds.

Schrader may be fated to always be known to a wider audience as a sort of junior partner to Martin Scorsese, but if his supposed recent resurgence accomplishes anything, I hope it will make more people appreciate him as a filmmaker on his own terms. Whether as a writer, a director, or a writer/director, Schrader has had an astonishingly successful career. The two chief influences on his work have been his strict religious upbringing and the European arthouse movies of the 1960s, especially the work of Robert Bresson. (So important is Bresson to Schrader that he has copied the closing scene of Pickpocket no less than three times). The result of these influences has been a consistent focus on lead characters, nearly always men, who suffer under extreme tension, often driven from an internal anguish as much as any external force.

The Card Counter
A peculiar amalgam of a war crimes movie and a gambling movie (despite the title, the focus is mainly on poker rather than blackjack). The reason it works is because neither of those two elements are all that important in themselves. They only function as the means of placing the title character in torment. The movie, as per usual from writer/director Paul Schrader, is a character study, one that brims with deeply felt dread and remorse. There are a lot of similarities here with Schrader's previous Light Sleeper. Both are mood pieces about lone men in disreputable professions that end with a moment of great violence. Both men keep a notebook diary. And the score for The Card Counter was done by the son of the person who composed Light Sleeper's score. Do I hold it against Schrader that he repeats so many themes and narrative tropes in his movies? I might as well ask whether I hold it against Hitchcock that he made so many movies that centered on the theme of the "wrong man"? I don't. I'm willing to journey through Hitchcock's obsessions, so I'm happy to do the same for Schrader, especially because his finished work is so engaging. That being said, this is the third time he's concluded one of his movies by copying the final scene of Bresson's Pickpocket, and it does feel like a bit much.

Hardcore
The daughter of a successful businessman from Grand Rapids, Michigan, goes missing during a religious retreat in Los Angeles. He eventually learns that she has become involved in pornography, and sets off to find and "rescue" her. This movie is most interested in depicting the descent of the protagonist, a devout man who belongs to a Calvinist church, into an exceptionally seedy part of society. The highlight of the movie is some philosophical conversations he has with a stripper/prostitute who helps him in his search. This is unsurprising given that Schrader's background is the same as that of the lead (Grand Rapids, Calvinist). But the movie as a whole is not compelling, and Schrader's direction is uneven.

Auto Focus
Bob Crane, the star of Hogan's Heroes, was also a sex addict and a pioneer in home sex videos. This movie offers a depiction of his descent from TV stardom to personal and professional desperation. Unfortunately, though the story is mildly interesting, I found nothing here particularly notable aside from Willem Dafoe's typically excellent performance as Crane's swinger pal.
User avatar
RolandKirkSunglasses
Posts: 492
Joined: January 15th, 2021, 12:54 pm
Contact:

#134

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

Anthony Asquith

29. The Way to the Stars (1945)
30. The Woman in Question (1950)
31. The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)
32. The Winslow Boy (1948)
33. Libel (1959)
34. The Browning Version (1951)
Spoiler
1. Nobuko (1940)
2. Introspection Tower (1941)
3. Children of the Beehive (1948)
4. Tokyo Profile (1953)
5. The Black Tulip (1964)
6. The Bellman (1945)
7. Adorable Creatures (1952)
8. L'Enfer des Anges (1941)
9. Boule de Suif (1945)
10. Voyage sans Espoir (1943)
11. Charterhouse of Parma (1948)
12. Jean de Florette (1986)
13. Manon des Sources (1986)
14. Germinal (1993)
15. Golgotha (1935)
16. Tales of Manhattan (1942)
17. The Burning Court (1962)
18. Le Golem (1936)
19. The Great Waltz (1938)
20. Marianne of my Youth (1955)
21. While the Door was Locked (1946)
22. The Banquet (1948)
23. The Girl from the Third Row (1949)
24. Manji (1964)
25. Irezumi (1966)
26. Lullaby of the Earth (1976)
27. Black Test Car (1962)
28. Wife of Seishu Hanaoka (1967)
29. The Way to the Stars (1945)
30. The Woman in Question (1950)
31. The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)
32. The Winslow Boy (1948)
33. Libel (1959)
34. The Browning Version (1951)
ororama
Posts: 2898
Joined: June 19th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#135

Post by ororama »

Lee Grant

(continued)


16. Down and Out in America (1986) * 58 min.
17. Battered (1989) * 58 min.

Down and Out in America looks at homelessness in America in the Reagan era through mid-western farmers fighting to keep their farms, residents of a Los Angeles homeless encampment and residents of New York City shelters. It destroys the myth that the poor create their own problems; most of these people are victims of corporate predation, inhuman bureaucracies and just bad luck. Battered begins with a woman with a face covered with bruises talking about being beaten by her husband, then tells you that she was murdered, and goes on from there. The relatively new Minnesota program requiring police to arrest when there are physical signs of assault and the spouse appears to be the culprit regardless of whether the victim wishes to press charges and interviews with men who assaulted their wives and entered therapy offer hope, but it's over 30 years later and things haven't changes nearly as much as they should have. Grant is a skillful interviewer and an extremely effective muckraker.

These are my last Lee Grant movies this month, but I plan to watch one or two more that she directed and at least one in which she acted next month.
Spoiler
Orson Welles
1. The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice (1951) * 93 min.
2. Filming 'Othello' (1978) * 83 min.
3. The Immortal Story (1968) * 57 min.
Lee Grant
4. The Willmar 8 (1981) * 51 min.
5. When Women Kill (1983) * 54 min.
6. What Sex Am I? (1985) * 58 min.
William A. Wellman
7. Robin Hood of El Dorado (1936) * 85 min.
8. Safe in Hell (1931) * 73 min.
9. Stingaree (1934) * 76 min.
Mani Kaul
10. Uski Roti (1970) * 105 min.
11. One Day Before the Rainy Season (1971) * 119 min.
12. Duvidha (1973) * 81 min.
Robert Bresson
13. A Man Escaped (1956) * 101 min.
14. Pickpocket (1959) * 76 min.
15. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962) * 64 min. 
*First time viewing
User avatar
DudeLanez
Posts: 838
Joined: August 25th, 2020, 12:22 am
Location: Germany
Contact:

#136

Post by DudeLanez »

Chang-dong Lee
30. Green Fish (1997) 6,5/10
31. Oasis (2002) 7/10
32. Poetry (2010) 6,5/10
Spoiler
Gustaf Molander
01. Intermezzo (1936) 5,5/10
02. A Woman's Face (1938) 6/10
03. Ordet (1943) 6/10
Jan Troell
04. Here Is Your Life (1966) 7,5/10
05. Who Saw Him Die? (1968) 7/10
06. As White as in Snow (2001) 7/10
Aleksey Balabanov
07. Brother (1997) 7/10
08. Brother 2 (2000) 6,5/10
09. Cargo 200 (2007) 6,5/10
10. The Castle (1994) 6,5/10
11. The River (2002) 7/10
12. Me Too (2012) 7,5/10
13. Blind Man's Bluff (2005) 6/10
14. It Doesn't Hurt Me (2006) 6/10
15. Morphine (2008) 7/10
16. The Stoker (2010) 6,5/10
William Friedkin
17. Sorcerer (1977) 7/10
18. Cruising (1980) 6/10
19. To Live and Die in L.A. (1985) 6,5/10
Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne
20. The Promise (1996) 7/10
21. The Son (2002) 6,5/10
22. The Unknown Girl (2016) 7,5/10
Tage Danielsson
23. The Apple War (1971) 3/10
24. Release the Prisoners to Spring (1975) 2,5/10
25. The Adventures of Picasso (1978) 4/10
Philippe Garrel
26. Liberty at Night (1984) 5,5/10
27. Emergency Kisses (1989) 5,5/10
28. The Birth of Love (1993) 7/10
29. Night Wind (1999) 6/10
Chang-dong Lee
30. Green Fish (1997) 6,5/10
31. Oasis (2002) 7/10
32. Poetry (2010) 6,5/10
:ICM: icm - :letbxd: letterboxd - :imdb: imdb

Challenges in July
Image -> 325/500
User avatar
shugs
Donator
Posts: 961
Joined: November 15th, 2014, 7:00 am
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Contact:

#137

Post by shugs »

--- Walter Hill ---
14. 48 Hrs. (Walter Hill, 1982, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
15. Hard Times (Walter Hill, 1975, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
16. Another 48 Hrs. (Walter Hill, 1990, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
17. Brewster’s Millions (Walter Hill, 1985, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
18. Southern Comfort (Walter Hill, 1981, 🇺🇸) - 9/10
19. The Long Riders (Walter Hill, 1980, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
20. Geronimo: An American Legend (Walter Hill, 1993, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
21. Extreme Prejudice (Walter Hill, 1987, 🇺🇸) - 8/10
22. Supernova (Walter Hill, Jack Sholder, 2000, 🇺🇸) - 4/10
23. Wild Bill (Walter Hill, 1995, 🇺🇸) - 7/10

Went on a Hill marathon and I absolutely love his style. Would recommend all of the above, except maybe for Brester's Millions (which in Hill's own words was made strictly "to improve his bank account and success quotient") and Supernova (which was a production mess, with Francis Ford Coppola coming in to edit the movie and Jack Sholder for reshoots after Hill dropped out of it).
Spoiler
--- Joachim Trier ---
1. Reprise (Joachim Trier, 2006, 🇳🇴) - 8/10
2. Oslo, August 31st (Joachim Trier, 2011, 🇳🇴) - 6/10
3. Thelma (Joachim Trier, 2017, 🇳🇴) - 6/10
4. The Worst Person in the World (Joachim Trier, 2021, 🇳🇴) - 7/10

--- Peter Hyams ---
5. Capricorn One (Peter Hyams, 1977, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
6. Narrow Margin (Peter Hyams, 1990, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
7. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (Peter Hyams, 2009, 🇺🇸) - 6/10

--- Robert Zemeckis ---
8. What Lies Beneath (Robert Zemeckis, 2000, 🇺🇸) - 4/10
9. The Walk (Robert Zemeckis, 2015, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
10. Death Becomes Her (Robert Zemeckis, 1992, 🇺🇸) - 7/10

--- Radu Muntean ---
11. One Floor Below (Radu Muntean, 2015, 🇷🇴) - 7/10
12. Alice T. (Radu Muntean, 2018, 🇷🇴) - 8/10
13. Visiting Room (Alexandru Baciu, Radu Muntean, 2011, 🇷🇴) - 7/10
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#138

Post by Silga »

Agree, Shugs! Walter Hill is a great director. I did a similar run of his films two years ago and still fondly remember Hill marathon as a time I watched a bunch of great films. Love Southern Comfort too!
User avatar
RogerTheMovieManiac88
Posts: 2417
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Westmeath, Ireland
Contact:

#139

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

Apologies, I've been so caught up in following rugby league over the last couple of weeks that I've rather let my challenge involvement slide.

(Screenshots from 'Fräulein' and 'The Naked Kiss')

Image

Henry Koster
10. Das häßliche Mädchen / The Ugly Girl (1933) - 7/10
11. De Kribbebijter / The Cross-Patch (1935) - 9/10
12. Fräulein (1958) - 8.5/10

Gordon Douglas
13. The Black Arrow (1948) - 7/10
14. Come Fill the Cup (1951) - 7/10
15. Chuka (1967) - 7.5/10

Lewis Gilbert
16. Johnny on the Run (1953) - 7.5 or 8/10
17. The Greengage Summer (1961) - 8/10
18. Operation: Daybreak (1975) - 6.5 or 7/10

Samuel Fuller
19. Hell and High Water (1954) - 7/10
20. House of Bamboo (1955) - 7.5 or 8/10
21. The Naked Kiss (1964) - 8.5/10

Image
That's all, folks!
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#140

Post by Silga »

I love The Naked Kiss. What an eerie and tense film. And that scene where children sing "Mommy Dear" - chilling.
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#141

Post by Silga »

Woody Allen TSPDT Top 250

31. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) 9/10
32. Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) 7/10 rewatch
33. Everyone Says I Love You (1996) 7/10

Woody Allen is my favorite writer/director and throughout the years I 'saved' some of his films to always have something new and unseen from Woody. After this run I only have 3 remaining (Interiors, Shadows & Fog, Husbands & Wifes).

Crimes and Misdemeanors is one of his great achievements. Another re-watch is a must to fully appreciate all the intricate character development and nuanced performances. Martin Landau is in his usual magnificent form, a true master of his craft. Alan Alda is a joy to watch on screen. Coincidentally, all three Allen films in this run feature Alda's performances.
Spoiler
John Woo TSPDT Top 250
1. Face/Off (1997) 6/10 rewatch
2. Blackjack (1998) 2/10
3. Windtalkers (2002) 7/10

Martin Scorsese TSPDT Top 250
4. Street Scenes (1970) 6/10
5. Italianamerican (1974) 8/10
6. The Aviator (2004) 9/10 rewatch

Steven Soderbergh TSPDT Top 250
7. King of the Hill (Steven Soderbergh, 1993) 10/10
8. The Girlfriend Experience (Steven Soderbergh, 2009) 8/10
9. Unsane (Steven Soderbergh, 2018) 7/10

Phil Alden Robinson
10. Field of Dreams (1989) 5/10
11. The Sum of All Fears (2002) 8/10 rewatch
12. The Angriest Man in Brooklyn (2014) 4/10

Antoine Fuqua
13. Lightning in a Bottle (2004) 7/10
14. Shooter (2007) 6/10 rewatch
15. The Guilty (2021) 4/10

Sidney Lumet TSPDT Top 250
16. Bye Bye Braverman (1968) 6/10
17. Lovin’ Molly (1974) 7/10
18. Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007) 8/10

Clint Eastwood TSPDT Top 250
19. Bronco Billy (1980) 6/10
20. Firefox (1982) 6/10 rewatch
21. Space Cowboys (2000) 7/10 rewatch

Brian De Palma TSPDT Top 250
22. Greetings (1968) 3/10
23. Casualties of War (1989) 6/10
24. Mission to Mars (2000) 5/10 rewatch

Alfred Hitchcock TSPDT Top 250
25. Saboteur (1942) 8/10
26. Topaz (1969) 6/10
27. Family Plot (1976) 5/10

David Cronenberg TSPDT Top 250
28. Crimes of the Future (1970) 4/10
29. Fast Company (1979) 5/10
30. Crimes of the Future (2022) 3/10

Woody Allen TSPDT Top 250
31. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) 9/10
32. Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) 7/10 rewatch
33. Everyone Says I Love You (1996) 7/10
User avatar
RogerTheMovieManiac88
Posts: 2417
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Westmeath, Ireland
Contact:

#142

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

Silga wrote: June 26th, 2022, 9:08 pm I love The Naked Kiss. What an eerie and tense film. And that scene where children sing "Mommy Dear" - chilling.
Chilling indeed. Fuller's film in some ways perhaps shouldn't work. There are so many strange, intersecting elements that verge on the inappropriate and exploitational and elicit unease. And yet his critique of social standing and hypocrisies possesses a starkness that proves utterly compelling. That POV title sequence is such a striking opening to a remarkable film.
That's all, folks!
blocho
Donator
Posts: 6152
Joined: July 20th, 2014, 6:00 am
Contact:

#143

Post by blocho »

Werner Herzog

17. Wings of Hope (2000)
18. Bells from the Deep: Faith and Superstition in Russia (1993)
19. The Wild Blue Yonder (2005)

Not much I can write about Herzog that I haven't written before in this forum. I'm willing to see pretty much anything he makes. I watched Herzog in last year's Run the Director, and if this challenge recurs next year (and I hope it does), I'll watch him again.

Wings of Hope
In 1997, Werner Herzog made an astonishingly successful documentary called Little Dieter Needs to Fly about the title character, a US Navy pilot who was shot down during the Vietnam War, captured, and suffered a brutal imprisonment. A few years later, Herzog made this movie, also about the aftermath of an aviation disaster. This is the story of Juliane Koepcke, the only survivor of LANSA Flight 508, which suffered a mid-air break-up in 1971. Only 17 years old, Koepcke became one of the very few people ever to survive a fall from a plane at high altitude. Even after surviving the fall, though, she had to wander the Peruvian jungle for 11 days before being rescued. For Herzog, the story has particular relevance because he was originally scheduled to fly on LANSA 508, but his ticket was canceled at the last moment. As with Dieter, Herzog structures the documentary as a return, many years later, to the scene of the protagonist’s trauma, providing a survival narrative that also serves as foreground for psychological exploration. This movie doesn’t succeed quite as much as Little Dieter because Koepcke, as Herzog explicitly notes, has built up an emotional shell regarding her disaster (in which her mother perished). Still, it’s a fascinating movie.

Bells from the Deep: Faith and Superstition in Russia
The first image in this movie shows a man crawling across a frozen lake. We don’t know why. It is only when the movie is nearly over that we learn the lake crawling is a pilgrimage of sorts, to a holy city that according to legend was flooded and now lies at the bottom of a bottomless lake. The men crawling across that frozen lake do so in the hopes of coming as close as they can to the holy city. Moments like these are the saving grace of this rather aimless documentary, an exploration of religious movements in Russia that fall far outside the mainstream. Herzog pursues this topic in his typical way, with a series of unrelated interviews and episodes. But he departs from his usual method by not appearing himself in the documentary. His presence would have helped by providing more of an authorial voice. As it is, I don’t come away feeling like I learned much about Russia or Russian religion. Left unaddressed, for example, is the question of how the end of 70 years of state atheism has affected the spiritual activities that we see. Instead, we get things as unrelated as lake crawling, a speech by a self-styled Jesus figure, and two scenes of Tuvan throat-singing. According to Wikipedia, the lake crawling scenes are fakes. Herzog paid off some people to crawl over the ice. They’re not actually pilgrims. Do I care about this chicanery? With any other filmmaker, I would. With Herzog, who has so often muddied the waters between fiction and non-fiction films, I don’t think I do.

The Wild Blue Yonder
Here’s the plot of this movie according to IMDb: “An alien narrates the story of his dying planet, his and his people's visits to Earth and Earth's man-made demise, while human astronauts attempt to find an alternate planet for surviving humans to live on.”

I don’t think that’s an accurate plot description. Brad Dourif’s protagonist does not seem like an alien at all. He seems a lot more like the stranger sitting next to you on the train who insists on telling you some of his odd ideas. We’ve all run into people like this, haven’t we? I remember the man in a hostel in Dublin who told me he had worked out a mathematical formula to prove the existence of God. I remember the man at a cafe in California who told me how the lizard people walk among us. These people are kooks. And that’s what Dourif is playing, a kook who looks directly into the camera and tells an odd story about being an alien. Dourif’s narration powers the movie’s narrative, but he’s actually rarely seen on screen. Instead, we get massive amounts of stock footage. This isn’t laziness or cost-cutting on Herzog’s part. It makes sense that our kook’s fantasy is composed of common images, a curated selection from the scattered detritus of visual culture: astronauts floating in their space shuttle, divers descending into the ocean below an ice sheet, scientists pontificating about theoretical astrophysics. The Wild Blue Yonder, thus, is not an exploration of an alien’s journey but rather an exploration of a kook’s alternate construction of reality. Does the movie provide a compelling exploration? Only occasionally. It has its moments: some beautiful images, an alien jellyfish that apparently speaks Arabic, a monologue from Dourif about the impracticality of intergalactic travel and the drawbacks of the Neolithic Revolution. But there are also five-minute stock footage shots of astronauts doing nothing in particular.
User avatar
Lonewolf2003
Donator
Posts: 14492
Joined: December 29th, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#144

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

Martin Scorsese
12. The Color of Money (1986, Martin Scorsese) rewatch: ? > 7.5
13. Kundun (1997, Martin Scorsese): 7.5
14. The Age of Innocence (1993, Martin Scorsese): 6.5
15. The Last Temptation of Christ (1988, Martin Scorsese) rewatch: 8.0 > 8.5
Directors seen: 3; Longest Run: Tony Scott (7)
Tony Scott
1. Top Gun (1986, Tony Scott) rewatch: ? > 7.2
2. Loving Memory (1971, Tony Scott): 7.2
3. The Hunger (1983, Tony Scott): 7.8
4. Enemy of the State (1998, Tony Scott) rewatch: ? > 6.5
5. Man on Fire (2004, Tony Scott): 6.2
6. Deja Vu (2006, Tony Scott): 7.0
7. Unstoppable (2010, Tony Scott) rewatch: 7.5 > 8.0
Sam Raimi
8. Spider-Man 2 (2004, Sam Raimi) rewatch: 8.0 > 8.0
9. Spider-Man 3 (2007, Sam Raimi) rewatch: 8.0 > 6.5
10. Crimewave (1985, Sam Raimi): 4.5
11. Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022, Sam Raimi): 7.0
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#145

Post by Silga »

Steven Spielberg TSPDT Top 250

34. Savage (1973) 5/10
35. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) 6/10 rewatch
36. Hook (1991) 4/10
Spoiler
John Woo TSPDT Top 250
1. Face/Off (1997) 6/10 rewatch
2. Blackjack (1998) 2/10
3. Windtalkers (2002) 7/10

Martin Scorsese TSPDT Top 250
4. Street Scenes (1970) 6/10
5. Italianamerican (1974) 8/10
6. The Aviator (2004) 9/10 rewatch

Steven Soderbergh TSPDT Top 250
7. King of the Hill (Steven Soderbergh, 1993) 10/10
8. The Girlfriend Experience (Steven Soderbergh, 2009) 8/10
9. Unsane (Steven Soderbergh, 2018) 7/10

Phil Alden Robinson
10. Field of Dreams (1989) 5/10
11. The Sum of All Fears (2002) 8/10 rewatch
12. The Angriest Man in Brooklyn (2014) 4/10

Antoine Fuqua
13. Lightning in a Bottle (2004) 7/10
14. Shooter (2007) 6/10 rewatch
15. The Guilty (2021) 4/10

Sidney Lumet TSPDT Top 250
16. Bye Bye Braverman (1968) 6/10
17. Lovin’ Molly (1974) 7/10
18. Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007) 8/10

Clint Eastwood TSPDT Top 250
19. Bronco Billy (1980) 6/10
20. Firefox (1982) 6/10 rewatch
21. Space Cowboys (2000) 7/10 rewatch

Brian De Palma TSPDT Top 250
22. Greetings (1968) 3/10
23. Casualties of War (1989) 6/10
24. Mission to Mars (2000) 5/10 rewatch

Alfred Hitchcock TSPDT Top 250
25. Saboteur (1942) 8/10
26. Topaz (1969) 6/10
27. Family Plot (1976) 5/10

David Cronenberg TSPDT Top 250
28. Crimes of the Future (1970) 4/10
29. Fast Company (1979) 5/10
30. Crimes of the Future (2022) 3/10

Woody Allen TSPDT Top 250
31. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) 9/10
32. Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) 7/10 rewatch
33. Everyone Says I Love You (1996) 7/10

Steven Spielberg TSPDT Top 250
34. Savage (1973) 5/10
35. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) 6/10 rewatch
36. Hook (1991) 4/10
User avatar
RolandKirkSunglasses
Posts: 492
Joined: January 15th, 2021, 12:54 pm
Contact:

#146

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

Kon Ichikawa

35. Bridge of Japan (1956)
36. Gokumon-to (1977)
37. Queen Bee (1978)
Spoiler
1. Nobuko (1940)
2. Introspection Tower (1941)
3. Children of the Beehive (1948)
4. Tokyo Profile (1953)
5. The Black Tulip (1964)
6. The Bellman (1945)
7. Adorable Creatures (1952)
8. L'Enfer des Anges (1941)
9. Boule de Suif (1945)
10. Voyage sans Espoir (1943)
11. Charterhouse of Parma (1948)
12. Jean de Florette (1986)
13. Manon des Sources (1986)
14. Germinal (1993)
15. Golgotha (1935)
16. Tales of Manhattan (1942)
17. The Burning Court (1962)
18. Le Golem (1936)
19. The Great Waltz (1938)
20. Marianne of my Youth (1955)
21. While the Door was Locked (1946)
22. The Banquet (1948)
23. The Girl from the Third Row (1949)
24. Manji (1964)
25. Irezumi (1966)
26. Lullaby of the Earth (1976)
27. Black Test Car (1962)
28. Wife of Seishu Hanaoka (1967)
29. The Way to the Stars (1945)
30. The Woman in Question (1950)
31. The Importance of Being Earnest (1952)
32. The Winslow Boy (1948)
33. Libel (1959)
34. The Browning Version (1951)
35. Bridge of Japan (1956)
36. Gokumon-to (1977)
37. Queen Bee (1978)
User avatar
DudeLanez
Posts: 838
Joined: August 25th, 2020, 12:22 am
Location: Germany
Contact:

#147

Post by DudeLanez »

Bo Widerberg
33. Raven's End (1963) 7/10
34. Adalen 31 (1969) 6,5/10
35. Man on the Roof (1976) 6,5/10
36. All Things Fair (1995) 6,5/10

That's it for me. Thanks for hosting, shugs.
Spoiler
Gustaf Molander
01. Intermezzo (1936) 5,5/10
02. A Woman's Face (1938) 6/10
03. Ordet (1943) 6/10
Jan Troell
04. Here Is Your Life (1966) 7,5/10
05. Who Saw Him Die? (1968) 7/10
06. As White as in Snow (2001) 7/10
Aleksey Balabanov
07. Brother (1997) 7/10
08. Brother 2 (2000) 6,5/10
09. Cargo 200 (2007) 6,5/10
10. The Castle (1994) 6,5/10
11. The River (2002) 7/10
12. Me Too (2012) 7,5/10
13. Blind Man's Bluff (2005) 6/10
14. It Doesn't Hurt Me (2006) 6/10
15. Morphine (2008) 7/10
16. The Stoker (2010) 6,5/10
William Friedkin
17. Sorcerer (1977) 7/10
18. Cruising (1980) 6/10
19. To Live and Die in L.A. (1985) 6,5/10
Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne
20. The Promise (1996) 7/10
21. The Son (2002) 6,5/10
22. The Unknown Girl (2016) 7,5/10
Tage Danielsson
23. The Apple War (1971) 3/10
24. Release the Prisoners to Spring (1975) 2,5/10
25. The Adventures of Picasso (1978) 4/10
Philippe Garrel
26. Liberty at Night (1984) 5,5/10
27. Emergency Kisses (1989) 5,5/10
28. The Birth of Love (1993) 7/10
29. Night Wind (1999) 6/10
Chang-dong Lee
30. Green Fish (1997) 6,5/10
31. Oasis (2002) 7/10
32. Poetry (2010) 6,5/10
Bo Widerberg
33. Raven's End (1963) 7/10
34. Adalen 31 (1969) 6,5/10
35. Man on the Roof (1976) 6,5/10
36. All Things Fair (1995) 6,5/10
:ICM: icm - :letbxd: letterboxd - :imdb: imdb

Challenges in July
Image -> 325/500
ororama
Posts: 2898
Joined: June 19th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#148

Post by ororama »

John Ford


18. Kentucky Pride (1925) * 71 min.
19. The Black Watch (1929) * 92 min.
20. Men Without Women (1930) * 73 min.

Three unusual movies from Ford. Kentucky Pride is a silent with a horse as the primary narrator. The Black Watch, his first talkie, is a typical British India adventure. Men Without Women is the strangest, a hybrid silent/talkie with music and sound effects, some spoken dialogue, often unintelligible, but mostly intertitles. The songs at the beginning are the only parts of the sound that really work.
Spoiler
Orson Welles
1. The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice (1951) * 93 min.
2. Filming 'Othello' (1978) * 83 min.
3. The Immortal Story (1968) * 57 min.
Lee Grant
4. The Willmar 8 (1981) * 51 min.
5. When Women Kill (1983) * 54 min.
6. What Sex Am I? (1985) * 58 min.
William A. Wellman
7. Robin Hood of El Dorado (1936) * 85 min.
8. Safe in Hell (1931) * 73 min.
9. Stingaree (1934) * 76 min.
Mani Kaul
10. Uski Roti (1970) * 105 min.
11. One Day Before the Rainy Season (1971) * 119 min.
12. Duvidha (1973) * 81 min.
Robert Bresson
13. A Man Escaped (1956) * 101 min.
14. Pickpocket (1959) * 76 min.
15. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962) * 64 min.
Lee Grant
16. Down and Out in America (1986) * 58 min.
17. Battered (1989) * 58 min.
*First time viewing
User avatar
sol
Donator
Posts: 14384
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Perth, WA, Australia
Contact:

#149

Post by sol »

Spoiler
1. Strangers on a Train (1951) Alfred Hitchcock REVISION
2. North by Northwest (1959) Alfred Hitchcock REVISION
3. Rebecca (1940) Alfred Hitchcock REVISION
4. Laura (1944) Otto Preminger REVISION
5. Anatomy of a Murder (1959) Otto Preminger REVISION
6. Bunny Lake is Missing (1965) Otto Preminger REVISION
7. Kill Buljo (2007) Tommy Wirkola
8. The Trip (2021) Tommy Wirkola
9. Død Snø (2009) Tommy Wirkola REVISION
10. Død Snø 2 (2014) Tommy Wirkola REVISION
11. Involuntary (2008) Ruben Östlund
12. Play (2011) Ruben Östlund
13. The Square (2017) Ruben Östlund REVISION
14. Force Majeure (2014) Ruben Östlund REVISION
15. The Deep (2012) Baltasar Kormákur
16. Jar City (2006) Baltasar Kormákur
17. 101 Reykjavik (2000) Baltasar Kormákur
18. Men & Chicken (2015) Anders Thomas Jensen
19. Flickering Lights (2000) Anders Thomas Jensen
20. Riders of Justice (2020) Anders Thomas Jensen
21. The Green Butchers (2003) Anders Thomas Jensen
22. Bleeder (1999) Nicolas Winding Refn
23. Pusher 3 (2005) Nicolas Winding Refn
24. The Neon Demon (2016) Nicolas Winding Refn REVISION

ImageImageImage

Nicolas Winding Refn

Best known as a master of neon cinema, this was an interesting batch of NWR films to watch this month, since The Neon Demon is perhaps his most neon-infused film to date, while his two much earlier offerings in this trio show off little of NWR's flair with neon to come. Pusher 3 like The Neon Demon though is a great audio assault on the senses, with a rather similar music design involving taunting bursts of music. The grisly directions which both stories take actually renders them somewhat similar films too despite the worlds of drug smuggling and high fashion modelling being words apart.

If not the best, Bleeder was the most fascinating NWR film in this bunch though - largely a character-driven piece focused on Mads Mikkelsen as a guy obsessed with movies and who thinks nothing weird about talking about films all the time. It's really quite different to late career RWF stuff like Only God Forgives and Drive, which are much more mood and atmosphere orientated. It is a pretty good film on its own account though and Mads as the all-too-human individual is the Mads I like to see. Sure, it is interesting to see him go batty in the films of Anders Thomas Jensen, but for me it is NWR all the way.

:ICM:

And that's it for me. Thanks for hosting, shugs. I'm glad I got to write up something about each of the directors I got around to, even if my Ruben Östlund write-up received no replies and no expressions of interest for joining Gloede and myself in an Östlund podcast. (u) While two of the Östlund films that I watched were revisions, he was easily my biggest (re)discovery this month. (l) Can't wait for Triangle of Sadness to make it over here.
|iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | Gold Derby
Image
Long live the new flesh!
User avatar
shugs
Donator
Posts: 961
Joined: November 15th, 2014, 7:00 am
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Contact:

#150

Post by shugs »

--- Walter Hill (cont.) ---
24. Trespass (Walter Hill, 1992, 🇺🇸) - 6/10

Managed one more Hill, doubt will have time to do any more.
Spoiler
--- Joachim Trier ---
1. Reprise (Joachim Trier, 2006, 🇳🇴) - 8/10
2. Oslo, August 31st (Joachim Trier, 2011, 🇳🇴) - 6/10
3. Thelma (Joachim Trier, 2017, 🇳🇴) - 6/10
4. The Worst Person in the World (Joachim Trier, 2021, 🇳🇴) - 7/10

--- Peter Hyams ---
5. Capricorn One (Peter Hyams, 1977, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
6. Narrow Margin (Peter Hyams, 1990, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
7. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (Peter Hyams, 2009, 🇺🇸) - 6/10

--- Robert Zemeckis ---
8. What Lies Beneath (Robert Zemeckis, 2000, 🇺🇸) - 4/10
9. The Walk (Robert Zemeckis, 2015, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
10. Death Becomes Her (Robert Zemeckis, 1992, 🇺🇸) - 7/10

--- Radu Muntean ---
11. One Floor Below (Radu Muntean, 2015, 🇷🇴) - 7/10
12. Alice T. (Radu Muntean, 2018, 🇷🇴) - 8/10
13. Visiting Room (Alexandru Baciu, Radu Muntean, 2011, 🇷🇴) - 7/10

--- Walter Hill ---
14. 48 Hrs. (Walter Hill, 1982, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
15. Hard Times (Walter Hill, 1975, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
16. Another 48 Hrs. (Walter Hill, 1990, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
17. Brewster’s Millions (Walter Hill, 1985, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
18. Southern Comfort (Walter Hill, 1981, 🇺🇸) - 9/10
19. The Long Riders (Walter Hill, 1980, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
20. Geronimo: An American Legend (Walter Hill, 1993, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
21. Extreme Prejudice (Walter Hill, 1987, 🇺🇸) - 8/10
22. Supernova (Walter Hill, Jack Sholder, 2000, 🇺🇸) - 4/10
23. Wild Bill (Walter Hill, 1995, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
jdidaco
Posts: 1948
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#151

Post by jdidaco »

(Screenshots from 'L'angelo bianco' & 'Kokoro'),

Raffaello Matarazzo

49. I figli di nessuno (Nobody's Children, Raffaello Matarazzo, 1951) 9/10
50. L'angelo bianco (The White Angel, Raffaello Matarazzo, 1955) 10/10
51. Amore mio (My Love, Raffaello Matarazzo, 1964) 9/10

Image

Kon Ichikawa

52. Kokoro (The Heart, Kon Ichikawa, 1955) 9/10
53. Kuroi jûnin no onna (Ten Dark Women, Kon Ichikawa, 1961) 8/10
54. Hakai (The Outcast, Kon Ichikawa, 1962) 8.5/10

Image

Tatsumi Kumashiro

55. Kagi (The Key, Tatsumi Kumashiro, 1974) 8/10
56. Kushi no hi (Love in a Small Room, Tatsumi Kumashiro, 1975) 9/10
57. Die Frau mit dem roten Hut/Akai bôshi no onna (Woman with the Red Hat, Tatsumi Kumashiro, 1984) 7.5/10

Marco Bellocchio

58. Il gabbiano (The Seagull, Marco Bellocchio, 1977) 9.5/10
59. Salto nel vuoto (Leap Into the Void, Marco Bellocchio, 1980) 9/10
60. Il sogno della farfalla (The Butterfly's Dream, Marco Bellocchio, 1994) 7.5/10

That's it for me. Tnaks again for hosting, shugs!

!seen 60
Spoiler
Eizô Sugawa

1. Yajû shisubeshi (The Beast Shall Die, Eizô Sugawa, 1959) 9/10
2. 'Minagoroshi no uta' yori kenjû-yo saraba! (Get 'em All, Eizô Sugawa, 1960) 8.5/10
3. Kemonomichi (Beast Alley, Eizô Sugawa, 1965) 9/10

Yasuzô Masumura

4. Tadare (Stolen Pleasure, Yasuzô Masumura, 1962) 9/10
5. Tsuma futari (Two Wives, Yasuzô Masumura, 1967) 9/10
6. Yakuza zesshô (A Fine Yakuza Song, Yasuzô Masumura, 1970) 8/10

Henning Carlsen

7. Kattorna (The Cats, Henning Carlsen, 1965) 7.5/10
8. Klabautermannen (We Are All Demons, Henning Carlsen, 1969) 8/10
9. Hør, var der ikke en som lo? (Did Somebody Laugh?, Henning Carlsen, 1978) 8/10

Kôji Wakamatsu

10. Chi wa taiyô yori akai (Blood Is Redder Than the Sun, Kôji Wakamatsu, 1966) 8/10
11. Gendai sei hanzai ankokuhen: aru torima no kokuhaku (Dark Story of a Sex Crime: Phantom Killer, Kôji Wakamatsu, 1969) 7.5/10
12. Seibo Kannon daibosatsu (Eros Eterna, Kôji Wakamatsu, 1977) 8/10

Larry Jordan

13. The Old House, Passing (Larry Jordan, 1967) 7.5/10
14. Rime of the Ancient Mariner (Larry Jordan, 1977) 8/10
15. The Black Oud (Larry Jordan, 1992) 8/10

Paul Schrader

16. Adam Resurrected (Paul Schrader, 2008) 7.5/10
17. First Reformed (Paul Schrader, 2017) 8/10
18. The Card Counter (Paul Schrader, 2021) 7.5/10

Kô Nakahira

19. Mikkai (A Secret Rendezvous, Kô Nakahira, 1959) 9/10
20. Dorodarake no junjô (Trampled Innocence, Kô Nakahira, 1963) 8/10
21. Suna no ue no shokubutsu-gun (Plants from the Dunes, Kô Nakahira, 1964) 10/10

Tai Katô

22. Mabuta no haha (In Search of Mother, Tai Katô, 1962) 8/10
23. Choueki juhachi-nen (Eighteen Years' Imprisonment, Tai Katô, 1967) 8/10
24. Showa onna bakuto (Modern Lady Gambler, Tai Katô, 1972) 9/10

Monte Hellman

25. Back Door to Hell (Monte Hellman, 1964) 6/10
26. Flight to Fury (Monte Hellman, 1964) 7/10
27. Road to Nowhere (Monte Hellman, 2010) 8.5/10

Abel Ferrara

28. 9 Lives of a Wet Pussy (Abel Ferrara, 1976) 5/10
29. Welcome to New York (Abel Ferrara, 2014) 8/10
30. Tommaso (Abel Ferrara, 2019) 8/10

Keisuke Kinoshita

31. Kyô mo mata kakute ari nan (Thus Another Day, Keisuke Kinoshita, 1959) 10/10
32. Futari de aruita iku haru aki (Ballad of a Worker, Keisuke Kinoshita, 1962) 8/10
33. Utae Wakôdotachi (Sing, Young People!, Keisuke Kinoshita, 1963) 7.5/10

Kaneto Shindô

34. Ningen (Human, Kaneto Shindô, 1962) 8/10
35. Akutô (A Scoundrel, Kaneto Shindô, 1965) 8.5/-10
36. Sanka (Hymn, Kaneto Shindô, 1972) 9/10

Christian de Chalonge

37. O Salto/Le saut (Voyage of Silence, Christian de Chalonge, 1967) 9/10
38. L'argent des autres (Other People's Money, Christian de Chalonge, 1978) 7.5/10
39. Le bel été 1914 (1914 the Glorious Summer, Christian de Chalonge, 1996) 8.5/10

Miklós Jancsó

40. Égi bárány (Agnus Dei, Miklós Jancsó, 1971) 8.5/10
41. La tecnica e il rito (The Technique and the Rite, Miklós Jancsó, 1972) 8/10
42. Roma rivuole Cesare (Rome Wants Another Caesar, Miklós Jancsó, 1974) 8.5/10

Markku Lehmuskallio & Anastasia Lapsui

43. Korpinpolska (The Raven's Dance, Markku Lehmuskallio, 1980) 8.5/10
44. Jumalan morsian (A Bride of the Seventh Heaven, Markku Lehmuskallio & Anastasia Lapsui, 2004) 8.5/10
45. Nedarma/Matka (Travelling, Markku Lehmuskallio & Anastasia Lapsui, 2008) 7.5/10

Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet

46. Cézanne - Dialogue avec Joachim Gasquet (Les éditions Bernheim-Jeune) (Cézanne - Conversation with Joachim Gasquet, Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet, 1990) 8/10
47. Une visite au Louvre (A Visit to the Louvre, Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet, 2004) 9/10
48. Quei loro incontri (These Encounters of Theirs, Jean-Marie Straub & Danièle Huillet, 2006) 9/10
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13891
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#152

Post by St. Gloede »

Really frustrated I won't have the time to do write-ups, but here are the films I have seen so far. I did start to work on something for Miklós Jancsó's period in Italy that I could publish on iCinema at least.

Miklós Jancsó

9. Fényes szelek / The Confrontation (1969) 8/10
10. Sirokkó / Winter Wind (1969) 8/10
11. La pacifista - Smetti di piovere / The Pacifist (1970) 6/10
12. La tecnica e il rito / Technique and Rite (1972) 8/10
13. Roma rivuole Cesare / Rome Wants Another Caesar (1974) 8/10
14. Vizi privati, pubbliche virtù / Private Vices, Public Pleasures (1976) 8/10


Emir Kusturica

15. Nevjeste dolaze / The Brides Are Coming (1978) 7/10
16. Sjecas li se, Dolly Bell / Do You Remember Dolly Bell? (1981) 8/10
17. Otac na sluzbenom putu / When Father Was Away on Business (1985) 8.5/10
18. Zivot je cudo / Life Is a Miracle (2004) 8/10


Stanislaw Rózewicz

19. Westerplatte (1967) 6/10
20. Drzwi w murze / The Wicket Gate (1974) 7/10
21. Rys / The Lynx (1982) 8/10
22. Kobieta w kapeluszu / Woman in the Hat (1985) 6/10


Claude Goretta

23. Le fou / The Madman (1970) 7(10
24. Pas si méchant que ça / The Wonderful Crook (1975) 6/10
25. Si le soleil ne revenait pas / If the Sun Never Returns (1987) 7.5/10


Louis Malle

26. Place de la République (1974) 6/10
27. Humain, trop human / A Human Condition (1974) 7/10
28. Milou en mai / May Fools (1990) 8/10

- May see Vanya on 42nd Street today.
morrison-dylan-fan
Posts: 1404
Joined: February 6th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#153

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

Image

Terence Fisher.


Image

FTV:14:Mantrap (1953)5.



Revealed in Tony Dalton's delightful book Terence Fisher: Master of Gothic Cinema that this title marked
the film maker returning to Hammer studios, co-writer (with Paul Tabori) / director Terence Fisher stylishly points towards his upcoming Gothic Horror in the final, where Fisher & cinematographer Reginald H. Wyer free the man from the murder mystery, with an extended first-person sequence, (a recurring motif in the Film Noir works by Fisher) being broken by a Scream Queen shriek.

Filmed round the streets St. Paul's Cathedral, Fisher follows Speight on the run in the bombed-out location, with jagged panning shots dipped in hanging low-lighting which reflects Speight having to go deeper underground to avoid the police.Joined by a wonderful Lois Maxwell as Thelma and Barbara Shelley making her screen debut, Kieron Moore gives a fittingly gruff performance as Speight, with Moore having Speight scratching his nails against the bombed-out walls, trying to find a brick to loosen in order to prove his innocence,and get out of the man-made trap.

FTV:15:The Black Glove (1954)6.

Image

Recorded as a murder suspect, Alex Nicol gives an oddly laid-back performance as Bradley, who when attempting to gather evidence to prove his innocence, is given a casual dialogue delivery by Nicol, while Ann Hanslip gives the title some Femme Fatale notes as doomed Jazz singer Halbard.Covered in Tony Dalton's terrific book Terence Fisher: Master of Gothic Cinema, that after he signed a deal with the studio for a second time, (taking a gap once his first contract had finished, due to not being pleased with the projects the studio were offering) this was the title which firmly established the relationship between Hammer and the film maker, (who shared a love of Jazz with Music's producer Michael Carreras.)

Joined by future regular collaborator Jimmy Sangster working as a assistant director, director Terence Fisher & Stolen Assignment (1956-also reviewed) cinematographer Walter J. Harvey spin a creepy Film Noir atmosphere of stylish distorted panning shots and dissolves over the killer waiting to commit the murder at the perfect moment to frame Bradley, Fisher continuing to expand on his major Film Noir motif of extended first-person sequences, and playing to a macabre final note, when Bradley finds the killer and skips a beat.

FTV:16: The Flaw (1955).4.

Image

Highlighted in Tony Dalton's excellent book Terence Fisher: Master of Gothic Cinema, that on looking back at the movies he made between his first and second Hammer contracts, that his options were limited,leading him to feel that "Beggars can't be choosers" on what he made in this era.Visibly working on a small budget that leads to the locations to feel tight and tiny, due to how firmly held the camera is towards the corner of rooms, and lacking the extended first-person sequences of other Film Noir titles he did, director Terence Fisher & cinematographer Cedric Williams bring a rough and tumble Thriller mood to the final sequence,where Fisher stylishly pans around the floor of the sailing boat,as Paul and Millway wrestle on the floor to their death.

Unwrapping Paul, (played with a slippery grin by John Bentley) laying out the plans for the murder of his wife, the screenplay by Brandon Fleming initial goes in the fast lane over the menacing threat of Monica (played with a icy edge by Rona Anderson) having the risk of being killed hang over her, be thrown away with a horribly abrupt ending,that leaves the film with a fatal flaw.
User avatar
flavo5000
Posts: 6011
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#154

Post by flavo5000 »

Alrighty. After a week break from movies for a family vacation, I return with a Masters of Horror two-fer.

Masters of Horror: John McNaughton

Image

John McNaughton burst onto the scene in 1986 with his directorial fiction debut Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, a lean, mean and intense depiction of visceral insanity. Throughout his career, McNaughton has had a pre-occupation with the seedy underbelly of society, with much of his filmography focused less on outright horror than on crime thrillers. From the audaciously sweaty and sleazy Wild Things to his work in television in series such as Homocide: Life on the Streets, McNaughton seems to find a fascination in exploring the psyche of the degenerate. It's no surprise that he began his career directing documentaries on Hollywood gangster films and their real life inspirations. And with his latest project in production an adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates' dark depiction of a killer, "A Good Man is Hard to Find", it looks like his career is coming full circle.

Image
135. The Harvest (2013)
A poor, sick boy is sheltered and over-protected by his parents played by Michael Shannon and Samantha Morton (channeling a little Misery-era Kathy Bates at times here). When an inquisitive girl next door tries to help the boy come out of his shell, she discovers a disturbing secret the couple has tried to keep hidden. The core premise behind this one is actually quite disturbing, especially if you're a parent. The execution is a little iffy at times. I felt like the films takes too long to get to the crux of the story, and the way it plays out feels a little lacking somehow. Still, it's got some solid acting and might be worth checking out even if it's not among McNaughton's best.

Image
136. Mad Dog and Glory (1993)
In a bit of a side step for McNaughton, he directs this laid back crime comedy starring Robert De Niro as a sad sack cop who saves the life of and begrudging befriends a mob boss played by Bill Murray who offers up bar girl Uma Thurman to De Niro for a week as a way of returning the favor. I'm sure some have said that De Niro should've been the mob boss but honestly that would feel a little lazy. Murray brings some humor to it and while he rarely comes across truly threatening, he's still fun to watch. Meanwhile De Niro is actually really good in a more withdrawn schmuck role he rarely gets to play. Thurman honestly isn't given a whole lot to do other than fall in love and look concerned, and the movie's third act in general has some problems. But overall, it's not a bad watch.

Image
137. The Borrower (1991)
Despite his place in Masters of Horror, this broad, goopy horror comedy may be McNaughton's most atypical film, feeling more like something that would come from Brian Yuzna or Charles Band than the hard-boiled background of McNaughton's world view. Despite all of that, it's a pretty entertaining ridiculous movie (I started cracking up in anticipation when I saw the alien approach the dog) and worth a watch for fans of these loopy late '80s/early '90s gore-coms that seemed all the rage at the time.

Masters of Horror: Lucky McKee

Image

Lucky McKee is probably most well-known for his cult horror Frankenstein riff May starring regular McKee collaborator Angela Bettis. His films tend to put women in starring roles with men mostly being either side characters or villains. He's also adapted Jack Ketchum multiple times directing Red, The Woman and producing The Lost. McKee is a pretty polished director with a noticeable visual flair that serves him well in creating interesting films that while not always my favorites have an undeniable quality to them that set them apart.

Image
138. All Cheerleaders Die (2013)
This is actually a more polished remake of McKee's and co-director Chris Sivertson's directorial debut. McKee was apparently proud enough of the original story that he wanted to produce it again in a more accessible package. While this film is wildly inconsistent in tone (somewhat intentionally), it does have some fresh, fun ideas that make for entertaining genre fare.

Image
139. Red (2008)
Brian Cox stars as an older man out fishing in the woods with his old dog when he's accosted by asshole teens who want to rob him and proceed to shoot and kill his dog while laughing about it. When Cox goes to the lead teen's father (played by Tom Sizemore) for some kind of disciplinary penance on behalf of the kid, Sizemore refuses to acquiesce and throws him out of the house. As the old man's attempts to get justice for his fallen friend continue, events begin to spiral out of control. This one was actually quite good. Cox is excellent and the film has a nice pacing for most part that belies expectations that this is going to be some kind of John Wick-style blood-soaked vengeance tale. Instead we get a sad portrait of an old man who can't let go of the path to his own detriment at times. The ending feels a little tonally off but overall, this one is recommended.

Image
140. Kindred Spirits (2019)
This one has a Heavenly Creatures meets Hand That Rocks the Cradle vibe to it, about a mother and daughter who's life is upended when a seemingly joyful but increasingly mentally unstable sister comes into the picture. This one was ok but had some pretty major plotting and pacing issues, especially in the third act. I felt the resolution in particular came across really rushed and kind of lazy.
Can't Stop, Won't Stop
1. Young Man with a Horn (1950)
2. This Is the Army (1943)
3. The Story of Will Rogers (1942)
4. Night and Day (1946)
5. The Hangman (1959)
6. Kid Galahad (1937)
7. Roughly Speaking (1945)
8. The Comancheros (1961)
9. Passage to Marseille (1944)
10. Gin gwai 10 a.k.a. The Eye 3 (2005) w/ Oxide Pang
11. Ah ma yau nan a.k.a. Leave Me Alone (2004)
12. Tung ngan a.k.a. The Child's Eye (2010) w/ Oxide Pang
13. My Voyage to Italy (1999)
14. Street Scenes (1970)
15. American Masters: No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)
16. The Hooked Generation (1968)
17. The Psychedelic Priest (1971/2001)
18. The Naked Zoo (1970)
19. Whiskey Mountain (1977)
20. Mako: The Jaws of Death (1976)
21. Jim, the World's Greatest (1976)
22. Kenny & Company (1976)
23. Survival Quest (1988)
24. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
25. Absolutely Anything (2015)
26. Erik the Viking (1989)
27. They Shall Not Grow Old (2018)
28. The Lovely Bones (2009)
29-31. The Beatles: Get Back (2021)
32. Death of a Salesman (1985)
33. Coup de grâce (1976)
34. Baal (1970)
35. Climbing High (1938)
36. The Running Man (1963)
37. The Agony and the Ecstasy (1965)
38. Bank Holiday (1938)
39. La mala ordina a.k.a. The Italian Connection (1972)
40. I padroni della città a.k.a. Rulers of the City (1976)
41. La città sconvolta: caccia spietata ai rapitori a.k.a. Kidnap Syndicate (1975)
42. Il poliziotto è marcio a.k.a. Shoot First, Die Later (1974)
43. La seduzione a.k.a. Seduction (1973)
44. La bestia uccide a sangue freddo a.k.a. Slaughter Hotel (1971)
45. Toni (1935)
46. Swamp Water (1941)
47. Le crime de Monsieur Lange (1936)
48. Blood Massacre (1991)
49. Fiend (1980)
50. Alien Factor 2: The Alien Rampage (2001)
51. Shooter (2007)
52. The Magnificent Seven (2016)
53. Southpaw (2015)
54. Zodiac Killer (2005)
55. Black Dahlia (2006)
56. Green River Killer (2005)
57. Zombie Nation (2004)
58. Nightstalker (2009)
59. Dungeon Girl (2008)
60. The Raven (2006)
61. Borderline Cult (2007)
62. Olivia (1983)
63. The Attic (2007)
64. Siesta (1987)
65. Strange Frequency (2001)
66. La corrupción de Chris Miller a.k.a. The Corruption of Chris Miller (1973)
67. La venganza (1958)
68. Esa pareja feliz a.k.a. The Happy Couple (1953)
69. Hana to Arisu a.k.a. Hana & Alice (2004)
70. Shigatsu monogatari a.k.a. April Story (1998)
71. Last Letter (2020)
72. Vampire (2011)
73. Let's Make Love (1960)
74. Keeper of the Flame (1943)
75. The Animal Kingdom (1932)
76. Travels with My Aunt (1972)
77. Pat and Mike (1952)
78. Tenshi no harawata: Akai memai a.k.a. Angel Guts 5: Red Vertigo (1988)
79. Yoru ga mata kuru a.k.a. Alone in the Night (1994)
80. Hana to hebi a.k.a. Flower and Snake (2004)
81. Stroker Ace (1983)
82. Rad (1986)
83. Bandit Goes Country (1994)
84. Bandit Bandit (1994)
85. Beauty and the Bandit (1994)
86. Bandit's Silver Angel (1994)
87. A doppia faccia a.k.a. Double Face (1969)
88. Murder Obsession (1981)
89. Estratto dagli archivi segreti della polizia di una capitale europea a.k.a. Tragic Ceremony (1972)
90. L'iguana dalla lingua di fuoco a.k.a. The Iguana with the Tongue of Fire (1971)
91. Napoli, Napoli, Napoli (2009)
92. 9 Lives of a Wet Pussy (1976)
93. Chelsea on the Rocks (2008)
94. Dangerous Game (1993)
95. Mulberry St. (2010)
96. Welcome to New York (2010)
97. Queen Kelly (1932)
98. The Merry Widow (1925)
99. The Great Gabbo (1929)
100. Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers (2022)
101. Michael Bolton's Big, Sexy Valentine's Day Special (2017)
102. The Watch (2012)
103. Let's Kill Uncle (1966)
104. The Americano (1955)
105. The Night Walker (1964)
106. Dreamgirls (2006)
107. Sister, Sister (1987)
108. Mr. Holmes (2015)
109. Candyman: Farewell to the Flesh (1995)
110. The Elusive Pimpernel (1949)
111. One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942)
112. Night Ambush (1957)
113. Our Man in Marrakesh a.k.a. Bang! Bang! You're Dead! (1966)
114. Hold the Dream (1986)
115. Dark Places (1974)
116. The Alphabet Killer (2008)
117. Saturn a.k.a. Speed of Life (1999)
118. The Boarder a.k.a. Room for Murder (2018)
119. Ninja Powerforce (1988)
120. Hei tai yang 731 si wang lie che a.k.a. Men Behind the Sun: A Narrow Escape (1994)
121. Manhattan Chase (2000)
122. Pearl Harbor (2001)
123. Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014)
124. 13 Hours (2016)
125. The Island (2005)
126. The Humbling (2014)
127. Jimmy Hollywood (1994)
128. The Wizard of Lies (2017)
129. Young Sherlock Holmes (1985)
130. In the Cold of the Night (1990)
131. The Wind (1986)
132. Nightmare at Noon (1988)
133. To koritsi vomva a.k.a. Death Has Blue Eyes (1976)
134. Darkroom (1989)
135. The Harvest (2013)
136. Mad Dog and Glory (1993)
137. The Borrower (1991)
138. All Cheerleaders Die (2013)
139. Red (2008)
140. Kindred Spirits (2019)
User avatar
RogerTheMovieManiac88
Posts: 2417
Joined: February 4th, 2017, 7:00 am
Location: Westmeath, Ireland
Contact:

#155

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 »

(Screenshots from 'The Queen of Spades' and 'The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders')

Image

Thorold Dickinson
22. Gaslight (1940) - 8 or 8.5/10
23. The Queen of Spades (1949) - 9.5 or 10/10
24. Secret People (1952) - 7/10

Felix E. Feist
25. The Devil Thumbs a Ride (1947) - 7.5/10
26. The Man Who Cheated Himself (1950) - 7.5 or 8/10
27. Donovan's Brain (1953) - 5.5/10

Terence Young
28. The Red Beret (1953) - 6/10
29. Tank Force! (1958) - 5/10
30. The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965) - 6/10
31. The Jigsaw Man (1983) - 5/10

Image
That's all, folks!
User avatar
shugs
Donator
Posts: 961
Joined: November 15th, 2014, 7:00 am
Location: Bucharest, Romania
Contact:

#156

Post by shugs »

--- Walter Hill (cont.) ---
25. Crossroads (Walter Hill, 1986, 🇺🇸) - 7/10

Well, this is my final movie for this challenge. Will be on a teambuilding until the end of Sunday, so be sure to get all your watches in until then. Also, please check the rankings, I might have made a mistake here or there.
Spoiler
--- Joachim Trier ---
1. Reprise (Joachim Trier, 2006, 🇳🇴) - 8/10
2. Oslo, August 31st (Joachim Trier, 2011, 🇳🇴) - 6/10
3. Thelma (Joachim Trier, 2017, 🇳🇴) - 6/10
4. The Worst Person in the World (Joachim Trier, 2021, 🇳🇴) - 7/10

--- Peter Hyams ---
5. Capricorn One (Peter Hyams, 1977, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
6. Narrow Margin (Peter Hyams, 1990, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
7. Beyond a Reasonable Doubt (Peter Hyams, 2009, 🇺🇸) - 6/10

--- Robert Zemeckis ---
8. What Lies Beneath (Robert Zemeckis, 2000, 🇺🇸) - 4/10
9. The Walk (Robert Zemeckis, 2015, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
10. Death Becomes Her (Robert Zemeckis, 1992, 🇺🇸) - 7/10

--- Radu Muntean ---
11. One Floor Below (Radu Muntean, 2015, 🇷🇴) - 7/10
12. Alice T. (Radu Muntean, 2018, 🇷🇴) - 8/10
13. Visiting Room (Alexandru Baciu, Radu Muntean, 2011, 🇷🇴) - 7/10

--- Walter Hill ---
14. 48 Hrs. (Walter Hill, 1982, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
15. Hard Times (Walter Hill, 1975, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
16. Another 48 Hrs. (Walter Hill, 1990, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
17. Brewster’s Millions (Walter Hill, 1985, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
18. Southern Comfort (Walter Hill, 1981, 🇺🇸) - 9/10
19. The Long Riders (Walter Hill, 1980, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
20. Geronimo: An American Legend (Walter Hill, 1993, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
21. Extreme Prejudice (Walter Hill, 1987, 🇺🇸) - 8/10
22. Supernova (Walter Hill, Jack Sholder, 2000, 🇺🇸) - 4/10
23. Wild Bill (Walter Hill, 1995, 🇺🇸) - 7/10
24. Trespass (Walter Hill, 1992, 🇺🇸) - 6/10
User avatar
Silga
Posts: 342
Joined: June 16th, 2021, 10:06 pm
Location: Vilnius, Lithuania
Contact:

#157

Post by Silga »

John Carpenter TSPDT Top 250

37. Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) 7/10
38. Big Trouble in Little China (1986) 6/10
39. Escape from L.A. (1996) 6/10

That's it for me. It's been a very good month. Thanks to this challenge I watched some great films. Thanks for hosting, Shugs!
Spoiler
John Woo TSPDT Top 250
1. Face/Off (1997) 6/10 rewatch
2. Blackjack (1998) 2/10
3. Windtalkers (2002) 7/10

Martin Scorsese TSPDT Top 250
4. Street Scenes (1970) 6/10
5. Italianamerican (1974) 8/10
6. The Aviator (2004) 9/10 rewatch

Steven Soderbergh TSPDT Top 250
7. King of the Hill (Steven Soderbergh, 1993) 10/10
8. The Girlfriend Experience (Steven Soderbergh, 2009) 8/10
9. Unsane (Steven Soderbergh, 2018) 7/10

Phil Alden Robinson
10. Field of Dreams (1989) 5/10
11. The Sum of All Fears (2002) 8/10 rewatch
12. The Angriest Man in Brooklyn (2014) 4/10

Antoine Fuqua
13. Lightning in a Bottle (2004) 7/10
14. Shooter (2007) 6/10 rewatch
15. The Guilty (2021) 4/10

Sidney Lumet TSPDT Top 250
16. Bye Bye Braverman (1968) 6/10
17. Lovin’ Molly (1974) 7/10
18. Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (2007) 8/10

Clint Eastwood TSPDT Top 250
19. Bronco Billy (1980) 6/10
20. Firefox (1982) 6/10 rewatch
21. Space Cowboys (2000) 7/10 rewatch

Brian De Palma TSPDT Top 250
22. Greetings (1968) 3/10
23. Casualties of War (1989) 6/10
24. Mission to Mars (2000) 5/10 rewatch

Alfred Hitchcock TSPDT Top 250
25. Saboteur (1942) 8/10
26. Topaz (1969) 6/10
27. Family Plot (1976) 5/10

David Cronenberg TSPDT Top 250
28. Crimes of the Future (1970) 4/10
29. Fast Company (1979) 5/10
30. Crimes of the Future (2022) 3/10

Woody Allen TSPDT Top 250
31. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) 9/10
32. Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993) 7/10 rewatch
33. Everyone Says I Love You (1996) 7/10

Steven Spielberg TSPDT Top 250
34. Savage (1973) 5/10
35. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) 6/10 rewatch
36. Hook (1991) 4/10

John Carpenter TSPDT Top 250
37. Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) 7/10
38. Big Trouble in Little China (1986) 6/10
39. Escape from L.A. (1996) 6/10
morrison-dylan-fan
Posts: 1404
Joined: February 6th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#158

Post by morrison-dylan-fan »

Akira Kurosawa.

Time to open them up.

Image


Image


Image

Repeat viewing:17:Seven Samurai (1954) 9.
Repeat viewing:18:Sanjuro (1962) 8.

FTV:19 I Live in Fear (1955)8.

Image

"Everybody has to die, but I won't be murdered!"

Revealed in the third edition on The Films of Akira Kurosawa by Donald Richie that the script was originally planned to be a satire, with co-writer (with regular collaborators Shinobu Hashimoto, Hideo Oguni, and Fumio Hayasaka - who was a close friend and composer of earlier scores for the film maker,and had in-depth discussions on the title before his passing in 1955) / directing auteur Akira Kurosawa later saying "We decided together, and then talking to other people, that a satire would be the best way of saying what we wanted to do." But, as the writing continued, Kurosawa found "As we (the writers) worked on the script it became less and less satire and more and more something else."

Although far more serious then originally planned, the screenplay retains the biting urgency of satire, coming across most prominently in those around Kiichi attempting to counter his fear of another nuke being dropped on Japan,with the most paper-thin reasoning to try and normalize the situation. Landing as a companion work to Ikiru (1952-also reviewed), the writers brilliantly explore the 70 year old Kiichi, (played by 35 year old Toshiro Mifune, who captures the anxiety Kiichi is unable to escape from) trying to protect his family, from what he fears could be the end of their lives. The writers have the dread seeping into his dreams, (dreams being a major theme in Kurosawa's works) and leave Kiichi waking up to find, that the family have increased their labeling of his nuclear fears as mad, and pushed him deeper into a box, in order to keep their image of normalization intact.

Reuniting with his regular cinematographer of this period Asakazu Nakai, directing auteur Akira Kurosawa expands on their earlier boiling hot Film Noir Stray Dog (1949-also reviewed), via stylish panning shots gliding over everyone being sweaty, dripping wet and sitting next to fans to cool off, which ignites a superb atmosphere of everything reaching a boiling point. Blowing out the candle with a poetic final shot which builds on the differing stages of life for the generations highlighted in the birthday sequence of Ikiru, and panning shots on grinding machinery, with the increased importance of machines in the modern/business world, being a theme Kurosawa would go deeper in exploring, Kurosawa and Nakai give the audience no breathing space at all, thanks to tight, claustrophobic shots keeping Kiichi boxed in, to a eerie sound design of white blasts of thunder and a baby crying,as Kiichi lives in fear.

FTV:20:Throne of Blood (1957)10.

Image

"I feel I am already sleeping and have had a frightening dream. What that witch or spirit said, that is what I dream of."

Dripping plans into the ears of her husband over how they can solidify their power as dollops of blood trickle out of her blacken mouth, Isuzu Yamada works with the film maker for the first time,and gives a terrifying performance as Lady Asaji. Inspired by Noh Theatre, Yamada gives Asaji unsettling slow body language movements, that increasingly moves closer to her husband Taketoki, as the forest moves closer to the castle.Unable to shake out of a trance from the spirit foretelling him that he will become lord of the castle, Toshiro Mifune gives a blistering performance as Taketoki,who as Asaji becomes mad over the inability to wash the spot of blood off her hand, Mifune has Taketoki descend into a paranoid obsession, with Mifune having Taketoki throw all loyalties away,to lash out at anyone he fears wants to sit on this bloody throne.

Inspired by Noh as a method for staging his favourite Shakespeare play (with The Films of Akira Kurosawa by Donald Richie revealing that he originally planned to only write the script for the project), with The Warrior's Camera: The Cinema of Akira Kurosawa by Stephen Prince detailing the film maker looking back at the title and saying "The composition of leaving a large area white and drawing persons and things only within a limited section of the space is peculiar to Japanese art. The influence of such pictures goes deep with us, and comes out spontaneously in our arrangement of composition.

Reuniting with his regular cinematographer of this period Asakazu Nakai, co-writer (with regular collaborators of this era Ryuzo Kikushima, Shinobu Hashimoto and Hideo Oguni) /directing auteur Akira Kurosawa expands on the long lens wide-shots of Seven Samurai (1954-also reviewed) with a refine quality.Book-ending the film on the same shot, and holding back from big, emotional close-ups, Nakai and Kurosawa compose an ominous atmosphere that dip the camera with stylish mid-shots and dolly-shots into the large empty spaces of the castle where Taketoki and Asaji Washizu brew, surrounded by the ghostly sound of wind, lightning and birds, (a major recurring motif of the film maker), which crackle to Kurosawa's sharp, distinctive screen-wipes going back to the errie the Spider's Web Forest, where the spirit awaits to give Taketoki a new foretelling.

Transferring the Scottish play to Feudal Japan, and not featuring the scenes of self-examination in Shakespeare 's play (with Kurosawa later saying on the play that "The images of men who lived through the age when the weak became a prey for the strong are highly concentrated. Human beings are described with great intensity. In this sense, I think there is something in Macbeth which is common in all other works of mine.")The writers superbly adapt Shakespeare's play into a a highly concentrated land of darkness, where the unshakable fog, maze of misery of the Spider's Web Forest, and lashings of rain against the dour walls of the castle, are manifestations of the black hearts the preying on those who might stand in their way Washizu's have, when sitting on the throne of blood.

FTV:21: The Lower Depths (1957)6.
"Lies trump the truth every time."


Image

Going in-depth on the production in the third edition of his book:The Films of Akira Kurosawa, Donald Eichie reveals that for the second title the film maker made in 1957, the cast and crew spent 40 days in rehearsals, (with the cameras running through empty,and the cast in full costume/make-up) and editor/ co-writer (with regular collaborator of this era, Hideo Oguni) / directing auteur Akira Kurosawa composes his second stage adaptation of the year,by teaming up for the first of two times with cinematographer Kazuo Yamazaki, and building on the long-lens gaze of Throne of Blood.

Filmed largely in sequence over 4 weeks, Kurosawa & Yamazaki descend to the lower depths with a beautiful 360 degree opening shot panning, which lands on a trimming of Kurosawa's distinctive screen-wipes, replaced here with delicate,long take panning shots across the confine location, drawing a intimate mood of witnessing an unfolding play, as the sound of heavy wind whistles in the background, until Kurosawa breaks it in the final scene, with rain (the use of weather being a major recurring motif in his works) lashing down on the drenched in somber slum.

Having 40 days to rehearse before cameras started rolling, the ensemble cast give excellent performances which perfectly compliment each-other, from a wiggling Toshiro Mifune as thief Sutekichi and Kyoko Kagawa screaming into the void as Okayo, to the harrowing turn by Kamatari Fujiwara as Danjuro, grasping in the dark for lines, he can no longer remember.
Differing from Kurosawa's earlier Shakespeare adaptation by containing large passages of Maxim Gorky's original text, the writers weave Gorky's play, with an exploration of those on the very outskirts of society holding dreams, (dreams being a major recurring theme in Kurosawa's works) which smash into a million pieces, on the harsh, fatalistic post-war landscape of Japan, as all the residence of the slum, sink into the lower depths.

FTV:22: The Hidden Fortress (1958)10

"I've seen people as they are, without pretense. I've seen their beauty and their ugliness with my own eyes."


Image

Appearing on the mountainside like a mirage, Misa Uehara gives a hypnotic debut performance as Yuki. Pretending to be mute around Tahei and Matashichi, Uehara expresses in her body language Yuki's feisty confidence just under the surface of her muted state,which reveals itself in the thrilling Action scenes, with Uehara trimming Yuki's fantasy princess into a burning, independent warrior, who joins in the long fighting across the land.Bickering across every step of the adventure whilst keeping their eyes on the prize, Kamatari Fujiwara and Minoru Chiaki give absolutely wonderful performances as Matashichi and Tahei, thanks to the duo criss-crossing snappy comedic exchanges with a scrambling desperation to flee to freedom, as they find themselves becoming entangled in a group.

Dragging the camera along the ground towards Tahei and Matashichi in the opening shot of the first movie he shot in widescreen, and the last he made for Toho studios, editor/ co-writer (with regular collaborators Ryuzo Kikushima, Shinobu Hashimoto & Hideo Oguni) / directing auteur Akira Kurosawa reunites with cinematographer Kazuo Yamazaki for the second, and final time, in order to expertly cross the up-close panning shots and close-ups of his Film Noir works such as Stray Dog (1949-also reviewed), with the long-lens, vast canvas shots of his historical titles such as Throne of Blood (1957-also reviewed.)

Filmed on location around the slopes of Mt. Fuji as the Kanagawa typhoon took place,and backed by a rousing Doh score from regular composer of this era Masaru Sato, (who was only given a week to do the score) Kurosawa follows the group crossing enemy lines in beautifully composed wide-shots, which Kurosawa fills the corners of with incoming action on the edges,and the long path in the centre, that they must walk down to reach freedom.Moving to the beats of Sato's score, Kurosawa's distinctive screen-wipes cut across with a refine eye of ultra-stylized panning shots of Matashichi and Tahei stumbling through every obstacle, as they get the ecstasy of gold from the hidden fortress.

FTV:23: The Bad Sleep Well (1960) 10.

FTV:24: Yojimbo (1961) 8.
ororama
Posts: 2898
Joined: June 19th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#159

Post by ororama »

21. Where Is the Friend's House? (1987) * 83 min.
22. Homework (1989) * 77 min.
23. And Life Goes On (1992) * 95 min.
24. Through the Olive Trees (1994) * 103 min.

Abbas Kiarostami shows a strong understanding of and ability to work with young boys in both fiction and  documentary movies. Indirectly, he shows his 
viewers a lot about their parents and other adults and their society, but it's also east to see the universal connection to kids, adults and societies in other places.

And Life Goes On has a director traveling to Koker to check on the welfare of two of his child actors from his (documentary?) film Where Is the Friend's House?, while Through the Olive Trees is a fiction film looking at the fictional romantic relationship between the actors who played the newlywed couple in And Life Goes On.
Spoiler
Orson Welles
1. The Tragedy of Othello: The Moor of Venice (1951) * 93 min.
2. Filming 'Othello' (1978) * 83 min.
3. The Immortal Story (1968) * 57 min.
Lee Grant
4. The Willmar 8 (1981) * 51 min.
5. When Women Kill (1983) * 54 min.
6. What Sex Am I? (1985) * 58 min.
William A. Wellman
7. Robin Hood of El Dorado (1936) * 85 min.
8. Safe in Hell (1931) * 73 min.
9. Stingaree (1934) * 76 min.
Mani Kaul
10. Uski Roti (1970) * 105 min.
11. One Day Before the Rainy Season (1971) * 119 min.
12. Duvidha (1973) * 81 min.
Robert Bresson
13. A Man Escaped (1956) * 101 min.
14. Pickpocket (1959) * 76 min.
15. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962) * 64 min.
Lee Grant
16. Down and Out in America (1986) * 58 min.
17. Battered (1989) * 58 min.
John Ford
18. Kentucky Pride (1925) * 71 min.
19. The Black Watch (1929) * 92 min.
20. Men Without Women (1930) * 73 min.
*First time viewing
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13891
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#160

Post by St. Gloede »

Decided to get to 30 with two more Miklós Jancsó films. I'm amazed by his consistency and his unique style which I can best describe as "circles", be that half-circles, pans back and forth, etc. we always return to the same spots - and often we are primarily kept at one-two open locations that are close together, with large groups and shifting focus characters fixed in a surrealistic dance. Most of his work is hard to decipher and feels metaphorical. I would love to read extended essays on his films as there seems to be so much to unpack and so much I'm missing. The films are (almost) always both darkly comedic surreal nightmares, and after this challenge, I just cannot get enough of József Madaras' shifty, ambiguous face and eyes - you just never know where you have him or what he will do next. One of the great actor-director pairings in history IMO.

29. A zsarnok szíve, avagy Boccaccio Magyarországon / The Tyrant's Heart (1981) 8/10
30. Szörnyek évadja / Season of Monsters (1987) 8/10
Post Reply