Welcome to the ICM Forum.
Check out our Magazine

If you notice any issues please post in the Q&A thread. Email issue should be fixed. If you encounter this issue, contact PeacefulAnarchy
Podcast: Talking Images (Episode 54 released July 1st: The Disappointment That is Leos Carax' Annette)
iCinema Magazine: WE ARE LIVE! (We just need more content)
ICMForum Film Festival 2022: Mon Nov 14 - Dec 12
Polls: 1990s (Results), Germany (May 30th), 2021 (Jun 30th), New Zealand (Jul 3rd), Swan Songs (Jun 30th), 1962 (Jul 30th), Performers (Jul 31st), Unofficial Checks (Jul 31st)
Challenges: Canadian, Unofficial Movies, Personal Toplists
About: Welcome All New Members, Terms of Use, Q&A

ICMF-FF6: Programmer's Thread

Post Reply
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#201

Post by St. Gloede »

Happy to announce solid 2/3 support for each of my recent viewings, with one exception, that managed to push itself up to a 3/3. 

Mila / Apples (2020, Christos Nikou)

Image

A strong Greek Weird Wave concept film set in a time when a pandemic is erasing people's memories. In the standard cold, calculated, sparse and darkly humorous fashion these films have been known for we follow the "New Identity program" through the eyes of one of the insomniacs, who is gradually building up a new memory gallery by completing tasks, from riding a bike to a car crash. 

Tensions amount as he starts a friendship and possibly a romantic relationship with a woman going through the same series of tasks, just one or two steps ahead of him - which adds an interesting layer of seeing a glimpse of what is coming up for him. I don't think it has the visual identity of Lanthimos, and is a step below Pity from last year's program, but is still a very clever and intriguing work well worth seeking out. 2/3


Friends and Strangers (2020, James Vaughan)

Image

I can instantly see why people are referencing Rohmer when talking about this film, as Friend and Stangers share core ideas of investigating space and the contrast between nature and the city, as well as largely being carried by dialogue and revealing itself through relationships and encounters. It is also very clearly a summer film, another thing Rohmer is quite known for, though it does not evoke the feeling of summer in the same way The Green Ray or A Summer Tale does. That said, it does evoke something quite different, the clear disappearance of the indigenous population of Australia.

Friends and Strangers offer a duality of form. On one hand, it is a tale of wayward and lost 20 somethings, in particular our male protagonist, who moves between awkward situations and seems a bit unsure of where to go with his life - and on the other, the overt and invoked absence of the aboriginals. The film starts with pleasantly drawn imagery of the conquest of Australia, complete with several depictions of battle. Then, in two instances, one close to the beginning and one close to the end, we get direct references - one to a tourist attraction - and the latter a tourist literally asking where the aboriginals are - before a title card drives the point how further.

As such, Friends and Strangers is simultaneously a quirky indie comedy, complete with the slightly off acting style, and a bit more mumbling than I sometimes like - but also a lot of very well done uneasy conversations and encounters - as well as a contemplating, I suppose, of the identity of white Australians and the context they find themselves within. This duality, along with its breezy comedy, brings it very close to greatness. 2/3


Mowa ptaków / Bird Talk (2019, Xawery Zulawski)

Image

In a way a love letter from Zulawski Jr. to Zulawski Sr., adopting his father's final script into a mini-epic that could have been and perhaps tries to be a very blunt dissection and attack at polish society and the increase of Fascism - but ends up being a familiarly bizarre being that jumps all over the place and becomes a meta film with bank heists, people shooting off their penises, etc. 

Zulawski Sr. is a director I have never managed to care much for, and coming from the perspective of a Zulawski detractor it is interesting that the film not made by him is the one I like the most. In some ways, it feels like a Sion Sono epic, with a massive cast, multiple chapters/character focuses and a beast that turns into a big meta-commentary. The humour is not quite my thing, but there is so much passion and love involved here that while it is too messy it is hard not to be smitten. 2/3


Ci sha xiao shuo jia / A Writer's Odyssey (2021, Yang Lu)

Image

While elements of both its concept and characters are underdeveloped (and perhaps it has to be) and sometimes tooo simple, A Writer's Odyssey certainly displays an incredible amount of creativity and enthusiasm, more so than we see from most Hollywood blockbusters. It is huge, all-encompassing, blending full on fantasy and revenge, feeling like a bit of a mix between more dark South Korean action and the fantasy of the big Chinese epics into a crazy, action packed and fun gem, with your classic evil billionaire tropes, a missing daughter and more. 

The central premise is somewhat simple, if odd: A father looking for his young kidnapped daughter is told by a mega-corporation that they can reunite them if he kills a writer. Why? Because the writer's fantasy novel appears to be impacting their Steve Jobs like CEO's health. What follows is a mix of the action packed, pulpy fantasy novel and the grittier real world as the father comes to term with the killing. However, while the characters are thin, the action and fantasy is absorbing in a near video game fashion. It makes me interested in seeing more recent Chinese action films for sure. 2/3


And finally, the 3/3 film. 


Hvítur, hvítur dagur / A White White Day (2019, Hlynur Palmason)

Image

You instantly get the feeling that this film will be different when the opening time-lapse is explored with short static shots all of the same location, as we move from winter to spring/autumn to winter to spring/autumn. The seasons and years just wash away after the opening tragedy, with the stoic landscape, horses, cars and the occasional small human figure are all we see. No characters have yet to be introduced, and it takes a certain time before we realise who has died and the impact it has left.

However, with all the abstractions of the opening 5 minutes, and all its stoic, slow-brooding nature, the central connection of its film, between an ageing police officer and his granddaughter is surprisingly close and warm - and the contrast is felt, as is, slowly, the sense of loss. Occasionally violent, and even scary/unnerving A White White Day is a strong meditation of loss that wears its emotions far from its sleeves, but still lets them be known, much like our central character.

P.S. Fergen - Is your rating a mistake. Noticed you nominated it but only have it down as a 2, with Beavis and myself giving it 3.
User avatar
Fergenaprido
Donator
Posts: 7210
Joined: June 3rd, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

#202

Post by Fergenaprido »

St. Gloede wrote: May 22nd, 2022, 5:43 pm And finally, the 3/3 film.

Hvítur, hvítur dagur / A White White Day (2019, Hlynur Palmason)

P.S. Fergen - Is your rating a mistake. Noticed you nominated it but only have it down as a 2, with Beavis and myself giving it 3.
No, my rating is correct. I often nominate films I only gave a 2 because while I like them well enough, I think others will like them more and/or I think they are great films for what the festival is trying to achieve even if they aren't solid favourites for me. :) In this case, I only liked the film (7.4/10, not enough to be a favourite or make my regular ballots), but I felt it was a film that was worthy of inclusion and that other programmers and forum users would like more than I did, and it seems my hunch was correct. If, by the end, my 2 needs to become a 3 in order for it be eligible for the main slate ballot, I'd probably be okay with changing it, but a 2 is more accurate of my thoughts on the film right now.
🧚‍♂️🦫
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#203

Post by zzzorf »

I also have watched a couple more nominations, still a bit behind the others in total watched but I'm keeping just a bit behind consistently.

Twilight Kiss - A really nice simple look at the meeting, falling in love and ending(?) of a relationship between two mature men. I was pretty invested throughout though the ambiguous ending did leave me wanting more. 3

Mad God - This looked beautiful but the lack of a story made it a touch below a full enjoyment. 2


I have also started watching more potential nominees for the slates which are being neglected (animation, Africa, Latin) as we are slowly running out of time and a few of us are also running out of nominations to help fill them. So far I have two which will be todays and next weeks (as long as I don't find something better before then) which allows me to stop debating which of my potential nominations for the more travelled slates I put up. Still if anyone sees something in my iMDB list they would support but don't want to nominate themselves I will be happy to change my order.
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#204

Post by zzzorf »

Nomination #20

The Spine of Night (2021)

Image

Preferred Slate: Animation

Alternate Slate: JBD, Indie

Director: Philip Gelatt, Morgan Galen King

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd: :Crtiticker:






IMDb Plot Summary: To put an end to the eternal vigil of the all-powerful guardian of the last light of the gods, an unfathomable source of inexhaustible cosmic knowledge and power, Tzod, the fierce high priestess of the great jungle swamp called Bastal, braves the elements ascending an unforgiving, snow-covered mountaintop. As her long and arduous journey finally comes to an end, Tzod encounters the ancient sentinel of the bloom and its mystical blue flame and recounts the tale of how a single spore has changed the world below: a blood-soaked, centuries-old story of corruption, greed, tyranny, and destruction against the backdrop of the never-ending quest for control, influence, and illumination. But, humankind's atrocities echo through eternity, and heroes are always those who are expendable. Can a single petal of the small blue flower restore balance to the universe?

Wikipedia Information: The Spine of Night is a 2021 American adult animated dark fantasy horror film written and directed by Philip Gelatt and Morgan Galen King. It stars Richard E. Grant, Lucy Lawless, Patton Oswalt, Betty Gabriel, and Joe Manganiello.

The film was completed using rotoscoped animation, and traces the centuries-long journey of a magical plant that bestows terrible power upon the user, as it inspires despots, empires, and black magic.

My Two Cents: I know I'm maybe overkilling the American Animated Fantasy/Horror section for our animation slate but honestly they do seem to be the best things out there at the moment. This is a good throwback to the 80's stuff like Fire and Ice and worth the time for any fan of the genre.


Image

Image

Image
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 3670
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#205

Post by beavis »

zzzorf wrote: May 22nd, 2022, 11:01 pm I have also started watching more potential nominees for the slates which are being neglected (animation, Africa, Latin) as we are slowly running out of time and a few of us are also running out of nominations to help fill them. ... Still if anyone sees something in my iMDB list they would support but don't want to nominate themselves I will be happy to change my order.
I went through your list again just now

Black Medusa (2021) is one I have on my watchlist for ASAP... but I see you don't support it... so that hasn't got much potential for the FFF...?
African Kung-Fu Nazis (2019) is something I have on bluray in my collection... another 0 :)
You list a lot of animated possibilities, but if i'm honest none of them seem to have something special going for them that makes me want to seek them out with priority

For Latin I myself have a lot of possibilities in Brazil, but my current watching is more towards Asia (currently China, Japan and India big themes for the year, Malaysia and Israel as minor foci) and for the festival I hope to see more US Indie, so I haven't given those much priority in my planning for the year...
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#206

Post by zzzorf »

beavis wrote: May 23rd, 2022, 12:25 pm
zzzorf wrote: May 22nd, 2022, 11:01 pm I have also started watching more potential nominees for the slates which are being neglected (animation, Africa, Latin) as we are slowly running out of time and a few of us are also running out of nominations to help fill them. ... Still if anyone sees something in my iMDB list they would support but don't want to nominate themselves I will be happy to change my order.
I went through your list again just now

Black Medusa (2021) is one I have on my watchlist for ASAP... but I see you don't support it... so that hasn't got much potential for the FFF...?
African Kung-Fu Nazis (2019) is something I have on bluray in my collection... another 0 :)
You list a lot of animated possibilities, but if i'm honest none of them seem to have something special going for them that makes me want to seek them out with priority

For Latin I myself have a lot of possibilities in Brazil, but my current watching is more towards Asia (currently China, Japan and India big themes for the year, Malaysia and Israel as minor foci) and for the festival I hope to see more US Indie, so I haven't given those much priority in my planning for the year...
Black Medusa could be something for you to enjoy, our tastes don't align much but it does have potential for those who like it's style but I believe general consensus is a dislike.

African Kung-Fu Nazis is just bad, plain and simple.

As to the Animation the only one in the list I'm even contemplating is Josep. The main issue with the list is it is also a dump list containing anything eligible. A lot of that animation are family movies which I wouldn't even consider but they appear there. I could take them out, which I did last year but they found their way back in this time.

Unless more animation comes my way I think I'm done there, just nothing is coming my way but I should be able to help the other slates with my last 10 nominations.
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#207

Post by St. Gloede »

Due to animation struggling again I'll renominate the runner up for the slate last year:

Nomination #11

Nos ili zagovor netakikh / The Nose or Conspiracy of Mavericks (2020)

Image

Preferred Slate: Animation

Alternate Slate: NA

Director: Andrey Khrzhanovskiy

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd:


Image


The Nose or Conspiracy of Mavericks is not just a visually creative animated opera production of The Nose. It simultaneously stages the creation of the story, the opera adaptation, the actual performance(s) of the opera, the reactions against it and even the creation of the film itself. It is a reflection of Russian and USSR heritage, a highly comical takedown of Stalin's regime and also just all out operatic surrealism.

Image


The film actually opens in the real world, as passengers on a plane watch various movies on their small screens. Some rather tacky American productions and blockbusters, others Russian classics - and it is in this kind of collective consciousness that The Nose or Conspiracy of Mavericks is born. This is a film that in certain ways is even a little informative, and sets the stage, while in others is just all-out ridiculous. 

Image


Extremely fast-paced, and almost throwing too much at you in too high a tempo - and maybe not thinking through each of its ideas. It is genuinely not uncommon for a sequence to include the animator creating that very sequence - and the visual style and the topic at hand is constantly moving and changing. Let's just put it like this: there is never a dull moment. The Nose or Conspiracy of Mavericks manages to be visually intense and spellbinding, funny and melancholic, all at the same time - while managing to speak of both the love of creation and the history of Russia/USSR.

---

Minor note: I'm not sure if there will be any contention on the forum in terms of having Russian films as part of the slates, but as I have seen this brought up in regard to physical festivals it is worth noting that Khrzhanovskiy (and the broader animation community in Russia) has condemned the invasion of Ukraine: https://www.animationmagazine.net/peopl ... en-letter/
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#208

Post by St. Gloede »

I also keep looking for new African (and Animated) releases that would work well for our festival. I'm particularly interested in seeing Saloum and The Gravvedigger's Wife. Has anyone caught them yet or know where I can find them?

I do have threeAfrican viewings planned. The one I'm most excited for is Night of the Kings (Senegal), which got decent praise in S&S but I know Beavis was not that impressed by. The others are The Fisherman's Diary (Cameroon) and Lusala (Kenya), which I have not heard anything about.
User avatar
Onderhond
Posts: 8789
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
Contact:

#209

Post by Onderhond »

A random find, but might fit well into the Dawn slate. This is my 9th nomination:

Image

09. All My Friends Hate Me by Andrew Gaynord [Dawn]
Source: Rent Online
IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt9340892/ (1.2K votes)

Black comedies aren't that common, certainly not ones that commit until the very end. The fun thing here is that the main character is also one of the writers, and he based the film/character on his own experience. And then decides to have a good old laugh at his own expense. Pete used to be a bratty student, but he bettered his life. After a decade or so he decides to meet up with the old college gang to celebrate his birthday, which makes him very uncertain about himself. This uncertainly only grows during the weekend, so expect a lot of awkwardness and painful comedy.
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 3670
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#210

Post by beavis »

St. Gloede wrote: May 24th, 2022, 9:36 am Night of the Kings (Senegal), which got decent praise in S&S but I know Beavis was not that impressed by.
It got a lot of praise in general, which is why it was so widely distributed, so people probably will like it. I dislike prison films and macho bullshit and this one was full of that, even if it tries to come across as something more... fantastical, maybe... there is an element about storytelling in there... but it was a lot of macho bullshit that left me with a bad taste. The nominated doc about gangs is the new widely praised African movie about criminals that has been doing the festival rounds, but I'm going to skip that (so atleast it won't get a negative rating ;))
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#211

Post by St. Gloede »

Yes, I can see Zinder running into a similar issue with you, though the female Gaze may have a counter-effect.

Re: Prison films. I was thinking of nominating Great Freedom for the LGBT slate. Did you catch that one?
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 3670
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#212

Post by beavis »

Yeah, I've seen that one, and it is thankfully devoid of macho bullshit. Georg Friedrich plays a character that would be a typical prison character I don't care for, but he is given a lot of depth and grows throughout the movie. I've written about viewing it before on the forum, but I'm not sure in which thread...

EDIT: found the post viewtopic.php?p=757211&hilit=beavis#p757211
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#213

Post by St. Gloede »

beavis wrote: May 24th, 2022, 10:29 am Yeah, I've seen that one, and it is thankfully devoid of macho bullshit. Georg Friedrich plays a character that would be a typical prison character I don't care for, but he is given a lot of depth and grows throughout the movie. I've written about viewing it before on the forum, but I'm not sure in which thread...

EDIT: found the post-viewtopic.php?p=757211&hilit=beavis#p757211
:thumbs-up:

And thanks for sharing the mini-write-up. I'm not sure about the German prison system, but I don't find it odd that they kept meeting in prison, as it is generally common to be sent to the closest prison (fitting the type of crime) with one character serving out the same sentence. I personally liked the camera work, and did not mind the lack of stylistic changes (as it made it feel like an endless loop and created a more heightened sense of claustrophobia for me) though I do think the direction/camera work would certainly have made it better, the minimalism could also have been tweaked slightly with a stronger director. I fully agree on the performances though.

With the positive feedback at hand, I'll nominate it later, along with Brother's Keeper. Just need to do the mini-write-ups.
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 3670
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#214

Post by beavis »

I had read a review (or interview with the director...? unsure now) beforehand that talked about stylistic changes between the periods that got me more interested, as the theme was not "my thing"... although I probably would have gone to see it because of the actors... but while viewing this aspect did not come across much for me, which is why I noted it.
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#215

Post by St. Gloede »

Yes, I saw no changes in the visual style at all!
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#216

Post by zzzorf »

St. Gloede wrote: May 24th, 2022, 9:36 am I also keep looking for new African (and Animated) releases that would work well for our festival. I'm particularly interested in seeing Saloum and The Gravvedigger's Wife. Has anyone caught them yet or know where I can find them?

I do have threeAfrican viewings planned. The one I'm most excited for is Night of the Kings (Senegal), which got decent praise in S&S but I know Beavis was not that impressed by. The others are The Fisherman's Diary (Cameroon) and Lusala (Kenya), which I have not heard anything about.
Fisherman's Diary was ok, nothing great but still a respectable film and would get a 2 from me. My next nomination will most probably be Our Lady of the Nile (Rwanda) which can be found in Mubi if you are looking for other African stuff. Also if you are having trouble finding Kapana which is already nominated by me I am happy to help out.
User avatar
filmbantha
Posts: 734
Joined: July 10th, 2013, 6:00 am
Contact:

#217

Post by filmbantha »

My latest viewings:

Buoyancy (3) - This was a powerful and hard-hitting film about a young Cambodian teenager who heads to Thailand to make his fortune but ends up in a far worse situation than he could ever have imagined. Inspired by true events, Buoyancy is a troubling film that doesn't shy away from depicting the darker side of human nature. It's a great option for the Asian slate though I hope if others watch this it could have a chance of making the main slate.

Hearts and Bones (1) - A moving Australian drama about a war photographer dealing with PTSD who finds an unlikely friend in a refugee when their paths cross and they discover they have an unlikely shared history. The acting is mostly excellent though the story is quite predictable and the film is not particularly cinematic.

Eyimofe - (2) This is a strong contender for the African slate, although I wish the focus of the film had remained on the same protagonist throughout as I found the first part far more engrossing than the second. It's a touching depiction of the lengths people will go to for their families and I can see why it has recently been picked up by Criterion.

I'm pleased to see lots of support coming from Gloede on a number of my nominations :cheers:

I don't have any further nominations for the African slate unfortunately but I do have another animated film that I was hoping to nominate - Absolute Denial. The only problem is it still seems to be waiting on a release date! One of my other potential nominees for the just before dawn section - Two Witches - has been given a release date of October so sadly I'll have to push this one over to next year but I'm glad I will get to see it again in a few months time.
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#218

Post by St. Gloede »

zzzorf wrote: May 24th, 2022, 3:17 pm
St. Gloede wrote: May 24th, 2022, 9:36 am I also keep looking for new African (and Animated) releases that would work well for our festival. I'm particularly interested in seeing Saloum and The Gravvedigger's Wife. Has anyone caught them yet or know where I can find them?

I do have threeAfrican viewings planned. The one I'm most excited for is Night of the Kings (Senegal), which got decent praise in S&S but I know Beavis was not that impressed by. The others are The Fisherman's Diary (Cameroon) and Lusala (Kenya), which I have not heard anything about.
Fisherman's Diary was ok, nothing great but still a respectable film and would get a 2 from me. My next nomination will most probably be Our Lady of the Nile (Rwanda) which can be found in Mubi if you are looking for other African stuff. Also if you are having trouble finding Kapana which is already nominated by me I am happy to help out.
Thanks zzzorf, I'll probably put Fisherman's Diary on the backburner in this case. I have access to Kapana, but based on your description I'm not that drawn to it. Does it do anything interesting with mood/atmosphere, form, style, have powerful performances, etc?
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#219

Post by zzzorf »

St. Gloede wrote: May 25th, 2022, 12:49 pm
zzzorf wrote: May 24th, 2022, 3:17 pm
St. Gloede wrote: May 24th, 2022, 9:36 am I also keep looking for new African (and Animated) releases that would work well for our festival. I'm particularly interested in seeing Saloum and The Gravvedigger's Wife. Has anyone caught them yet or know where I can find them?

I do have threeAfrican viewings planned. The one I'm most excited for is Night of the Kings (Senegal), which got decent praise in S&S but I know Beavis was not that impressed by. The others are The Fisherman's Diary (Cameroon) and Lusala (Kenya), which I have not heard anything about.
Fisherman's Diary was ok, nothing great but still a respectable film and would get a 2 from me. My next nomination will most probably be Our Lady of the Nile (Rwanda) which can be found in Mubi if you are looking for other African stuff. Also if you are having trouble finding Kapana which is already nominated by me I am happy to help out.
Thanks zzzorf, I'll probably put Fisherman's Diary on the backburner in this case. I have access to Kapana, but based on your description I'm not that drawn to it. Does it do anything interesting with mood/atmosphere, form, style, have powerful performances, etc?
I won't say it does anything artistically important, it is more just the local flavour that is its main drawing point. You may like it but I think Ferg would be the more intended audience.
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#220

Post by St. Gloede »

I caught Lusala yesterday, and I really liked it. I think it is certainly a film Fergen or Zzzorf would like enough to nominate. It is quite short, barely over 60 minutes, but manages to pack in a very comprehensive story about a young boy who escapes his abusive father, is adopted by a wealthy family and is then pushed away by them as an adult, in particular by the mother. It plays very well with our perception and character motivations and frankly took me off-guard in where it was going. Kudos also to the star of last year's breakaway film Supa Modo, who has a very key role here as the younger sister and absolutely shines as she gets more to work with as the film progresses and she (and another foster/adopted sister) turn against the family. She seems to be becoming quite the Kenyan child star. This film, like Supa Modo, has a clearly smaller budget, and it does not shine to the same extent (but then I loved Supa Modo and only like this one) but manages to shine despite the limitations. I would give it 2/3 if nominated.
User avatar
Fergenaprido
Donator
Posts: 7210
Joined: June 3rd, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

#221

Post by Fergenaprido »

zzzorf wrote: May 25th, 2022, 8:39 pmYou may like it but I think Ferg would be the more intended audience.
:lol:
St. Gloede wrote: May 26th, 2022, 2:46 pm I caught Lusala yesterday, and I really liked it. I think it is certainly a film Fergen or Zzzorf would like enough to nominate. It is quite short, barely over 60 minutes, but manages to pack in a very comprehensive story about a young boy who escapes his abusive father, is adopted by a wealthy family and is then pushed away by them as an adult, in particular by the mother. It plays very well with our perception and character motivations and frankly took me off-guard in where it was going. Kudos also to the star of last year's breakaway film Supa Modo, who has a very key role here as the younger sister and absolutely shines as she gets more to work with as the film progresses and she (and another foster/adopted sister) turn against the family. She seems to be becoming quite the Kenyan child star. This film, like Supa Modo, has a clearly smaller budget, and it does not shine to the same extent (but then I loved Supa Modo and only like this one) but manages to shine despite the limitations. I would give it 2/3 if nominated.
You've caught my attention with this one. Hadn't heard of it before; it's this film, right? https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10515866/
Looks like the director wrote the screenplay and was the acting coach for Supa Modo, so there's another connection there.
Thanks for the heads up; I'll add it to my watchlist and seek it out.

I've seen a few festival films this month, but plan to see a lot more next month as it will be my primary forum-related film focus.
🧚‍♂️🦫
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#222

Post by St. Gloede »

Yes, that's the right film, enjoy!
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#223

Post by St. Gloede »

Nomination #12

Große Freiheit / Great Freedom (2021)

Image

Preferred Slate: LGBT

Alternate Slate: Europe

Director: Sebastian Meise

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd:


Image

Great Freedom is a quiet, slow-burning and restrained look at life in captivity, stripping away essentially everything but prison walls. Franz Rogowski is phenomenal as Hans Hoffmann, a young to middle-aged gay sentenced to jail decade after decade courtesy of Paragraph 175, which criminalized homosexuality in Germany. There is sorrow and melancholy throughout, but also a sense of acceptance, and possibly even the inability to function outside of the walls. Year after year he walks the same halls, and experiences the same looks of disdain, with the only real difference being his thinning and greying hair. A sense of claustrophobia connected to a seemingly endless cycle of imprisonment can be felt throughout.

One of the things which may at this point feel a little old-fashioned, but is due with a renewal, is the unlikely friendship blossoming between the bigot and the minority. It is a very underrated way to take viewers with homophobic views on a journey, while also showing them as complex human beings rather than monsters, which gives a lot of room to explore the character in question. Georg Friedrich plays the role of a junkie criminal Viktor wonderfully well, and brings in his own melancholy and inner battle. The relationship between them is also the core constant as other prisoners, including romantic and sexual relationships, drift away with the years. The relationship is brutal, and often filled with hate, even abuse, but somehow they start to form a genuine connection and friendship. The film could perhaps have been even more oppressive and brutal in its simplicity, but it is a film with wonderful acting, tender and brutal moments and a vague but raw energy and atmosphere that remains even after the ending credits have stopped rolling.
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#224

Post by St. Gloede »

Nomination #13

Okul tirasi / Brother's Keeper (2021)

Image

Preferred Slate: Europe

Alternate Slate: NA

Director: Ferit Karahan

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd:


Image

Brother's Keeper is set in a Turkish all-boys boarding school, and can best be described as a tale of fear, authority and accountability. Told through the eyes of a young child in a world where children are neither listened to nor taken seriously, the narrative becomes so frustrating and devastating that the hypocrisy on display, despite comedic touches, feels scathing rather than making us smile.

What Brother's Keeper really succeeds at is not just making us question how these children are treated but how it contrasts the child and the adults. The quiet, begging child asking for help for his increasingly sick friend is often pain inducing, but the adults bring in a far more uncomfortable layer, first punishing, screaming and ignoring them, for then to squirm and make excuses as the boy they have dismissed is clearly getting sicker and sicker.

There is a very clear sense of desperation and doom, with the sinking feeling that no help can be found. However, it is also likely to fuel the viewer's inner sense of justice and make us enraged and agitated. The film also brings up very intriguing questions of blame and who is ultimately responsible for the decisions made, as more and more is slowly brought to live. A wonderful and frankly beautiful tragic-comedic morality tale where we are the ultimate arbiter.

Side-note: I think the way Brother's Keeper works with and immerses us into the world of the children is very much akin to what some of the greatest Iranian films have done, and it is great to see a film from Turkey with similar sensitivities and power. I think we can also read more into the story than the school itself, and that the film may bring a larger critique against Turkish society, much like their Iranian counterparts often do to their own.
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#225

Post by zzzorf »

Nomination #21

Notre-Dame du Nil [Our Lady of the Nile] (2019)

Image

Preferred Slate: Africa

Alternate Slate: N/A

Director: Atiq Rahimi

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd: :Crtiticker:






IMDb Plot Summary: Set in 1973, this coming-of-age portrait follows a group of young Rwandan girls at a Belgian-run Catholic boarding school, taking inspiration from true events that would come to foreshadow the 1994 genocide during the Rwandan Civil War. Many of the girls belong to elite families, while others hold less privilege; further division is sown by ballooning anti-Tutsi rhetoric under existing Hutu rule. The terrain is tense, but in the foreground lies a bewitching yet unassuming story of colonial refusal, flanked by adolescent mischief and curiosity that is surely typical but has, in this case, much higher stakes.

Wikipedia Information: Our Lady of the Nile (French: Notre Dame du Nil) is a French-language novel by Scholastique Mukasonga, originally published in 2012 by Éditions Gallimard. It is Mukasonga's fourth book and first novel. The English-language translation, published in the United States in 2014 by Archipelago Books, was done by Melanie Mauthier, a poet and writer from the United Kingdom.
The story is about life at a Catholic boarding secondary school in Nyambinombe District, Rwanda circa 1980, prior to the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
In 2014, Charlotte Casiraghi bought the rights to the book and will be one of the producers of the film to be adapted from the novel. "Chapter 2", the production company run by Casiraghi's partner, Dimitri Rassam released the film in partnership with Les Films du Tambour, run by Marie Legrand and Rani Massalha.
The film was directed by Atiq Rahimi and stars Amanda Santa Mugabekazi, Albina Sydney Kirenga, Malaika Uwamahoro, Clariella Bizimana, Belinda Rubango Simbi, and Pascal Greggory. Its world premiere is scheduled for 5 September 2019 at the Toronto International Film Festival, where the film has been designated "Contemporary World Cinema Opening Film".

My Two Cents: I'm a big fan of coming-of-age films and this one is pretty unique for its setting and structure. Split into 4 chapters (Innocence, Sacred, Sacrilege, Sacrifice) the best idea is going in blind so you get the full impact of Sacrifice. The cinematography and the acting of the girls are the real winners though in this movie.


Image

Image

Image
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#226

Post by zzzorf »

Found another qualifier while I was in adding my latest nomination.


Potential Juror/Main Slate List:
1. Marygoround (Maryjki) [2020]
2. Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn (Babardeala cu bucluc sau porno balamuc) [2021]
3. Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy (Gûzen to sôzô) [2021]
4. Summer of 85 (Été 85) [2020]
5. Mad God [2021]
6. It Must Be Heaven [2019]
7. Caught in the Net (V síti) [2020]
8. The Sadness (Ku Bei) [2021]
9. New Order (Nuevo Orden) [2020]
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#227

Post by St. Gloede »

I was hoping to do longer write-ups for these, but I think it is worth giving the shout-out to the best ones as I have added a few 3/3s over the last week.

3/3s

Wildhood is one of my favourite viewings from the nominees so far and has the kind of emotive rather than strictly narrative storytelling I have come to love over the last decade, where dialogue often takes the backseat to the immersion in the world at hand. It simply feels alive, and the camera never stands still taking us along on the journey. The characters themselves are young, raw and flawed, growing up in non-ideal circumstances and often saying and doing the wrong thing, while also, clearly, showing regret. It is an excellent road movie, with a slowly budding romance and a backdrop against an indigenous narrative and heritage. An excellent choice for both Indie and LGBTQ+.

Style note: A quick way to describe it would a more toned down/less excessive version of the immersive filmmaking from Benh Zeitlin. Sidenote: I am very tempted to nominate Zeitlin's Wendy, but the reception has been so hit and miss I'm not sure how well it would do.


Wolf is a challenging and rather unrelenting look at an institution treating body dysmorphia of young people who believe they are or identify as animals. It is often unnerving but also escapes easy categorizations. It would have been so easy for it to lean into horror, playing up the practices of the doctors and the more unnerving nature of the patients, and it would similarly have been easy to play it as a dark comedy ala Lanthimos, gone for a more brutal minimalist or surrealist expression or delved into it as a character study and a drama. The fact that it finds itself somewhere in between may put some viewers off (tweaks could have taken it to JB4D for instance), but it is very captivating for what it is, and gives people are far harder and more complex road to read it and engage with it. I will add that George MacKay is incredibly evocative in the lead, conveying so face with his looks, as well as his whole body, while Paddy Considine is excellent as always, and may prove to be more of an animal than his patients.

Note: I think the 5.6 rating on IMDb is more related to how it does not have a clear built-in audience and does not fit neatly into any box rather than its potential to wow and impress. I also think this makes it an excellent choice for the Indie slate.


After Love is an intriguing drama (as well as an interesting near back-to-back viewing with A White, White Day) about a Muslim woman who discovers that her recently deceased husband was cheating on her, with tensions escalating as she travels across the English canal to confront the mistress in France and discovers the extent of the affair. Much of the film's success and power has to be credited to the wonderful and complex performance of Joanna Scanlan in the lead role, giving us a clear sense of grief, coupled with bewilderment, confusion and disbelief. The confrontation takes a very different approach than expected, and there are many spoken and unspoken points of conflict and longing that leaves us on a note of moral yet healing ambivilance.


2/3s

Young Hunter is instantly evocative as we trail a young gay teenager's rejection and possible first love connection, with fairly sparse settings and dialogue. This titular idea that he is hunting for something sets the mood, though the occasional unnerving music feels tonally odd - at least until the film takes a darker turn in its last half. The leads are strong here, and so much is said with looks and gestures, but what is revealed to be the film's core premise felt a bit underdeveloped.


Divine Love is an odd, quirky and quiet comedy about a near-future Brazil with drive-thru confessions and fundamentalist Christianity that is inclined towards orgies. At the centre of it all, you have a bureaucrat who is actively attempting to stop divorcing in the name of love and God, while also attempting to get pregnant with a husband she no longer connects with. Mixed with vivid, often neon colours and more muted reactions we follow her journey towards increasing despair as her efforts in both departments seem to fail. The child narrator is quite fitting, but the film, perhaps in a similar manner to Wolf, never quite commits in any one direction, and I'm not sure if it has real commentary or is simply a quirky semi-sci-fi dramedy.
User avatar
cinewest
Posts: 2732
Joined: February 15th, 2017, 7:00 am
Contact:

#228

Post by cinewest »

St. Gloede wrote: May 24th, 2022, 9:36 am I also keep looking for new African (and Animated) releases that would work well for our festival. I'm particularly interested in seeing Saloum and The Gravvedigger's Wife. Has anyone caught them yet or know where I can find them?

I do have threeAfrican viewings planned. The one I'm most excited for is Night of the Kings (Senegal), which got decent praise in S&S but I know Beavis was not that impressed by. The others are The Fisherman's Diary (Cameroon) and Lusala (Kenya), which I have not heard anything about.
I thought Night of Kings was very good, much more than "macho bullshit," which I suppose is one way to look at the reality of prison, especially one like this one. Of course, there is also the story of survival by way of extending one's story, like Scheherazade...
User avatar
Fergenaprido
Donator
Posts: 7210
Joined: June 3rd, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

#229

Post by Fergenaprido »

St. Gloede wrote: May 30th, 2022, 11:53 am I was hoping to do longer write-ups for these, but I think it is worth giving the shout-out to the best ones as I have added a few 3/3s over the last week.
Thanks for giving four of my nominations a go. I'm pleasantly surprised you actually liked them. :D

I think I read somewhere that Wildhood is coming to streaming in the US next month, I think on Hulu, if people are having trouble finding it.
🧚‍♂️🦫
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#230

Post by zzzorf »

I watched Dogs Don't Wear Pants last night. Definitely not where I expected it to go but still a good look at one man's grief and the downward spiral it can take him. I gave it a 2 in the spreadsheet.
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#231

Post by zzzorf »

Nomination #22

The First Wave (2021)

Image

Preferred Slate: Documentary

Alternate Slate: Indie

Director: Matthew Heineman

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd: :Crtiticker:






IMDb Plot Summary: A documentary following nurses, doctors, and administrators as they respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wikipedia Information: The First Wave is a 2021 American documentary film, directed and produced by Matthew Heineman. The film follows a hospital in New York City, as it battles the COVID-19 pandemic. Alex Gibney serves as an executive producer.
It had its world premiere at the Hamptons Film Festival on October 7, 2021. It is scheduled to be released on November 19, 2021, by Neon.

My Two Cents: A very topical documentary for what we have been going through for the last few years we take a look at how a major hotspot deals with the onset of the pandemic. It is interesting to see how the front line workers were slowly getting demoralised as the pandemic grew. One doctor in particular it is interesting to see her downward spiral and rise with the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter revolution that happened a the same time.


Image

Image

Image
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#232

Post by St. Gloede »

Added full points to two more films: Nitram and Luzzu, might write more on them later.
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#233

Post by zzzorf »

St. Gloede wrote: June 6th, 2022, 9:18 am Added full points to two more films: Nitram and Luzzu, might write more on them later.
I saw your 3 for Nitram and I'm really happy someone watched it, it is easily one of my favourite new to me movies I've seen this year.
User avatar
Fergenaprido
Donator
Posts: 7210
Joined: June 3rd, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

#234

Post by Fergenaprido »

New nominations:
None this month

Films nominated by others:
Lúa vermella [Red Moon Tide] (2020 Spain) - 1 - Europe, Arthouse - I liked this Galician film even less than Endless Night, primarily because I got bored of the narration over people just silently standing there. I'm giving it a 1 instead of a 0 because I would fully support it in the arthouse slate. It hasn't been renominated yet, but it's now been seen by 5 of 6 programmers (with scores of 3, 3, 1, 1, 1 - very divisive).

Other films I've seen but haven't yet nominated:
None this month. I saw Flee, which I would have nominated immediately, but it's already past the 10k imdb threshold. The other eligible films I saw were all blockbusters or Netflix films and aren't suitable for the festival.
My Nominations
Holdovers
1. Divine Love (Divino Amor) (2019 Brazil) - 3 - Latin America
2. Matthias and Maxime (Matthias et Maxime) (2019 Canada) - 3 - LGBTQ+, Indie
3. Summer of 85 (Été 85) (2020 France) - 3 - LGBTQ+, Europe
4. The Shiny Shrimps (Les crevettes pailletées) (2019 France) - 3 - LGBTQ+, Europe
5. Young Hunter (El cazador) (2020 Argentina) - 3 - LGBTQ+, Latin America
New
6. Wildhood (2021 Canada) - 3 - LGBTQ+, Indie
7. Night Raiders (2021 Canada) - 3 - Indie, directed by a woman
8. Hvítur, hvítur dagur (A White, White Day) (2019 Iceland) - 2 - Europe
9. Wolf (2021 Ireland) - 3 - Indie, directed by a woman
10. The Long Walk [Bor Mi Van Chark] (2019 Laos) - 3 - Asia, directed by a woman
11. Luzzu (2021 Malta) - 3 - Europe
To Watch
The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open
Vai
Kapana
White on White
Little Girl
Marygoround
Two of Us
Straight Up
Switched out Kapana for Red Moon Tide. If I can get to half of the films on this list, I'll add some more of the recent nominations that interest me, but I don't want to overextend myself. Haven't watched a single film in a week, and won't have as much time for any filmwatching, festival-related or otherwise, for the next week or two either. :(
Other Films I'm considering
Holdovers
1. Young Juliette (Jeune Juliette) (2019 Canada) - 3 - directed by a woman
2. nîpawistamâsowin: We Will Stand Up (2019 Canada) - 2 - directed by a woman
3. The Awakening of the Ants (El despertar de las hormigas) (2019 Costa Rica) - 2 - directed by a woman
4. The Last Serb in Croatia (Posljednji Srbin u Hrvatskoj) (2019 Croatia) - 2
5. The Blond One (Un rubio) (2019 Argentina) - 3
6. Summer of 85 (Été 85) (2020 France) - 3
Others
Parwareshghah (The Orphanage) (2019 Afghanistan) - 2 - Asia, directed by a woman
Indianara (2019 Brazil) - 2 - Documentary, LGBTQ+, Latin America, co-directed by a woman
Anbessa (Lion) (2019 USA) - 2 - Africa, directed by a woman - nb: American funding, Italian director, Ethiopian cast and setting
The Death & Life of John F. Donovan (2018 Canada) - 2 - Indie, LGBTQ+
Hayom Sheachrey Lechti (The Day After I'm Gone) (2019 Israel) - 2 - Asia
Lemebel (2019 Chile) - 2 - Documentary about a queer activist. The film was good, but it was learning about this person I'd never heard of that was the most rewarding. - Documentary, LGBTQ+, Latin America, directed by a woman
Fever (A Febre) (2019 Brazil) - 2 - Latin America, directed by a woman
The Goddess of Fortune (La dea fortuna) (2019 Italy) - 3 - LGBTQ+, Europe
The Barbarians of the Bay (Les barbares de La Malbaie) (2019 Canada) - 2 - Indie (Quebec)
If Only (Magari) (2019 Italy) - 2 - Europe, directed by a woman
Coalesce [Les affluents] (2020 Cambodia) - a 1 or a 2 from me, but that doesn't mean I didn't enjoy it. Not sure if it would go over well with this crowd, but it's something I may nominate if we're lacking for Asian films by the summer.
🧚‍♂️🦫
User avatar
St. Gloede
Moderator
Posts: 13887
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
Contact:

#235

Post by St. Gloede »

Thanks for checking it out Fergen! If it has a shot to join the arthouse slate I might renominate it.
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#236

Post by zzzorf »

Nomination #23

Kunstneren og tyven {The Painter and the Thief} (2020)

Image

Preferred Slate: Documentary

Alternate Slate: Euro

Director: Benjamin Ree

Links: :ICM: :imdb: :letbxd: :Crtiticker:






IMDb Plot Summary: Young Czech artist Barbora Kysilkova relocates from Berlin to Oslo to launch her career as a painter. In April of 2015, her two most valuable, large-format paintings are stolen - with care - in broad daylight from the windowfronts of Galleri Nobel in Oslo's city center. Desperate for answers about the theft of her paintings, Barbora is presented with an unusual opportunity to reach out to one of the men involved in the heist - Norwegian career criminal, Karl-'Bertil' Nordland. Filmmaker Benjamin Ree begins to document the story after Barbora unbelievably invites her thief to sit for a portrait, capturing the unlikely relationship that ensues as the equally damaged duo find common ground and form an inseparable bond through their mutual affinity for art.

Wikipedia Information: The Painter and the Thief is a 2020 Norwegian documentary film directed by Benjamin Ree. The film follows Barbora Kysilkova, an artist, forming a friendship with Karl-Bertil Nordland, a man who stole her artwork. The Painter and the Thief was ranked as the best documentary film of 2020 by the BBC, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe.

My Two Cents: The winner of the Amanda Award for Best Norweigan Film (and therefore an official check) this is a very touching documentary of the bond between two people and how much their encounter has changed both of them.


Image

Image

Image
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#237

Post by zzzorf »

OK so I've just finished taking a close look at the spreadsheet and started to get a little paranoid at our progress (probably don't need to be but my depression/stress level is playing up and I needed something to focus on for a little bit) so I thought I would try to get some discussion on where we stand at the moment.

Basically we have a little over a month left of our initial viewing period before we spend September finalising things. I found a few talking points that I think we might need to address over the next month to help make this year's festival as strong as last years.

1. Animation, Africa and Latin America have less than 10 nominations each while Documentary, Dawn and LGBT all have 13. Do we need to start getting someone to pay closer attention to these slates to help strengthen them?
My input: The documentary slate looks strong even if it has only 13 nominations and I know I still have a few I could nominate/up my sleeve to watch if we need more. I have a heap of potential Dawn nominations but I don't think any of them are that strong except The Medium but we already have a lot of Asian horror nominated for the slate. I'm tapped out on Animation for now except for Josep but Iwould only give it a two. My focus the last week has been Latin and I do have a nomination ready for my next one on Wednesday and I do have watches up my sleeve for LGBT and Africa if I get to them.

2. Do we need to consider changing back to the old way of choosing the juror's pool as one less juror and less watches by the programmers mean less are qualifying this year?
My input: I'm happy to keep going with last years format and see how it goes and if needed at the end allow the movies with only 2*3's but have at least 1*2 as well.

3. Would a new influx of nominations get motivation back for the programmers?
My input: with time running out there is still a maximum of another 83 nominations that could be made at the moment from our 6 programmers, is it time to start holding them back and utilise a lot of them?

4. Like last year do we need to start emphasisng certain nominations to each other to get more watches on the nominated movies?
My input: I remember last year we looked at different things like trying to get movies watched that were still only viewed by the nominator or ones close to making the cut. We also looked at sharing copies to make sure harder to find ones were out there, especially to ones most suited to the particular movie.


My main goal here though is to get some communication going again in this group as we draw closer to the end goal. Is there anything you guys think we need to discuss?
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 3670
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#238

Post by beavis »

Good action!

If it eases your worry a bit we have a little over TWO months left, and if we can't get a full African slate together this time, then we'll just go back to the usual AsAf configuration (or maybe LatAf!?).

I have been constantly watching recent cinema, but most of my hopefulls have turned out to be small dissapointments, and some of the movies I am really excited about don't seem to have a wider distribution yet. So I haven't had much chance to nominate anything more

This weekend I was at the "Sprouts" festival for instance

403. Cinema Durna Çırağı (2021) 9.0
404. Cinema Entre la niebla (2021) 7.5
405. Cinema Luzzu (2021) 7.0
406. Cinema La croisade (2021) 2.0
408. Cinema Neptune Frost (2021) 7.0
409. Cinema Sonne (2022) 7.5
410. Cinema Kdyby radsi horelo (2022) 7.0
411. Cinema Eltörölni Frankot (2021) 8.0

So I saw my first Hilal Baydarov film and it was a major new discovery (graduate of the Tarr Sarajevo school, Reygadas with a production credit, and those influences show)... but that one I can't nominate yet. I could nominate the Hungarian one, but that won't fill any holes in our programme at this time. I did enter suport for Luzzu in the spreadsheet. Entre la Niebla might interest some for the LatAm slate (I don't think it is widely available yet though...), but it is not something I would nominate myself.
User avatar
beavis
Posts: 3670
Joined: June 20th, 2011, 6:00 am
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact:

#239

Post by beavis »

342. Cinema Nuevo orden (2020) 8.0
378. Internet Los tiburones (2019) 7.5

For LatAm I've also seen these... I could maybe nominate Nuevo Orden... it is good, but it wasn't an instant "must nominate" for me... I actually have fonder memories for Los Tiburones, but it has got some standard coming-of-age formula/tropes that weakens the movie a bit...
User avatar
zzzorf
Posts: 2388
Joined: April 14th, 2018, 6:00 am
Location: Kempsey, NSW, Australia
Contact:

#240

Post by zzzorf »

beavis wrote: June 20th, 2022, 7:54 am Good action!

If it eases your worry a bit we have a little over TWO months left, and if we can't get a full African slate together this time, then we'll just go back to the usual AsAf configuration (or maybe LatAf!?).
Honestly that shows you the mood I was in, I completely forgot July existed, so therefore my 20th wedding anniversary and my youngest daughters 7th birthday just didn't exist, lol.
Post Reply