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Which Films Did You See Last Week? [Week 03, 2022]

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Onderhond
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Which Films Did You See Last Week? [Week 03, 2022]

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Post by Onderhond »

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First of all, a word from our sponsor:

"Please share with us which films you saw last week. It would be great if you could include some comments on each film. It would be awesome if you could also take some time to comment on everyone else's viewings. Please also note that this is intended as a movie discussion thread, not a large image posting thread. Having too many large images makes this thread difficult to navigate through. If you wish to include more than five images in a reply, please use spoiler tags - [ spoiler ][/ spoiler ] - to hide extra images." - sol

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01. 4.5* - Mad God by Phil Tippett (2021)
A film 30 years in the making. Mad God is special effects master Phil Tippett's passion project, and that passion shows. It's a weird, bewildering film that wasn't made with any clear commercial goal in mind, but people who love dark, nightmarish fantasy will no doubt find lots to love. The structure of the plot is needlessly convoluted, the music isn't quite on point and the live-action parts are a bit of a downer, but the stop-motion work is beyond impressive and the outlandish, freaky designs are dead gorgeous. A unique project that deserves all the support it can get.

02. 3.5* - Infinite by Antoine Fuqua (2021)
A big blockbuster that never made it to the big screen (for some or other reason). It's a film that wouldn't look out of place next to a random Marvel flick or the latest Bond, except that it is much shorter and punchier. And for that reason alone, it deserves a fair bit of praise, I certainly wouldn't have liked a 2+ hour version of this quite as much. When Evan tries to sell a sword for a bag of pills, he is taken in by the police. An odd guy comes in to question him, telling Evan he's known him for hundreds of years. Evan doesn't remember him, but he'll soon find himself in a century-spanning battle between two factions of Infinites, people who reincarnate after they die. The action scenes are pretty cool and Wahlberg is perfect for his part. The lore here is somewhat basic, not dragging it out as if it was something that actually warrants a lot of attention is genius though. This is just a bit of expensive action/fantasy fun and does a great job at that. It also has a perfect premise for doing some Cloverfield-like sequels, though I don't think we'll be that lucky.

03. 3.5* - Soul Mate [Qi Yue Yu An Sheng] by Kwok Cheung Tsang (2016)
Derek Tsang is a talented director, that much is certain. It's a shame his films have a tendency to get a bit too sentimental. Soulmate is a film driven by drama that keeps on piling up. A more considerate pacing and a less convoluted narrative would've greatly improved the film, if only he could edit himself down a little. When Ansheng and Qiyue meet each other for the first time, they immediately feel they're going to be best friends for life. Their friendship is tested when Jiaming joins them. The two girls are attracted to the boy, and even when their lives starts to diverge, Jiaming continues to stress their relationship. The cinematography is beautiful, and the performances are great. Zhou Dongyu is by far one of the biggest talents to have come out of China this past decade. The music is a bit too poppy and overbearing, whereas the plot is just too dramatic for my liking. The potential and quality is there, some of Tsang's films have already illustrated that, but Soul Mate was just a tad too dramatic for me.

04. 3.5* - Black Sheep by Jonathan King (2006)
New Zealand likes a good horror comedy, so when they make a film about killer sheep, you know it's not going to be a straight-faced production. As someone who grew up around sheep, I'm fully aware of their complete incapability to be scary, which is exactly what King loves exploiting here. Henry and Angus both grew up on a sheep farm, but Henry moves to the city after a traumatic event. When he returns years later, Angus has changed the operations of the farm to include genetically modified research. The research isn't very sound, and when one of the changed sheep escapes, nobody is safe. The idea is utterly daft, and the execution mimics that perfectly. The performances aren't quite on the same level, and the horror elements do come off a little underdeveloped. Black Sheep is still a pretty fun film and an easy recommend for fans of horror/comedies, it's just not quite good enough to remain a personal favorite.

05. 3.0* - The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then the Bigfoot by Robert D. Krzykowski (2018)
A very peculiar genre film. The plot sounds like juicy pulp (and it truly is), but that's just a guise to tell a more intimate story about a character you usually only see in B-flicks. It's a pretty tough balancing act and the film doesn't always get it right, but it's quite a bit better than I expected. Calvin is a soldier who served in WWII and became famous for killing Hitler. He doesn't consider himself much of a hero, and he retreats to the Canadian wilderness, where he hunts for Bigfoot. Years later, the FBI seek him out, with a peculiar proposition to hunt and kill Bigfoot using their help. The cinematography is slick, the performances are strong, and the film does a great job combining its pulpy elements with a more lavish execution. The film's a bit too slow and the more action-oriented scenes don't fit well with the rest, but if you're looking for something different, this one won't disappoint.

06. 3.0* - The Ultimate Teacher [Kyofun no Byoningen Saishu Kyoshi] by Toyoo Ashida (1988)
A pretty random anime comedy. Based on a manga of course, although I wonder if reading that would make this more sensible. The randomness is in fact part of its charm. It's a pretty short film, full of batshit crazy ideas, which it doesn't mind committing to. It's perfect filler, but only if you like this kind of zany stuff. Ganpachi is a teacher who enlists himself in the worst school in the neighborhood, hoping to turn it into a better place. The students won't have it, but Ganpachi outsmarts them every time. Until he has to face Hinako, a girl who draws superpowers from her special panties. Yups, you read that right. Takenaka is great as Ganpachi, the animation is basic but well over-the-top and the jokes are pretty fun. There's a pleasant 80s vibe and at 60 minutes, there's no time to get bored. In the end, this is a pretty forgettable anime and certainly nothing too unique, but if you're looking for daft amusement, this one ticks all the boxes.

07. 3.0* - The Battle at Lake Changjin [Chang Jin Hu] by Kaige Chen, Dante Lam, Hark Tsui (2021)
So, China found out that people love a good war flick. In recent years, there's been a notable rise of blockbuster war films, with big-name directors tied to them. The Battle of Lake Changing did even better and tied no less than three of the biggest directors in China to its production, just to manage its scope. The plot isn't all that interesting, except that for Westerners it might be somewhat novel to see the US army as the bad guys, whereas The Chinese soldiers are the heroes. You basically get three battles round and about Lake Changing, highlighting the bravery, perseverance and comradery of the Chinese army. You can't escape propaganda in a film like this, and if that triggers you, it's probably best to ignore this film altogether. If on the other hand you just see good guys smashing up bad guys, the film certainly delivers in spades. The scenes with the tank in the little village are superb, the rest of the action is on point too, but three hours is a little much. It's not a great film, certainly not up to the level of the names attached, but I had fun with it.

08. 3.0* - Nirvana Island: The Last 47 Days [Higanjima: Derakkusu] by Takeshi Watanabe (2016)
A pretty random anime adaptation, that may be a little tough to get into for those who are unfamiliar with the franchise. The setup isn't too complex though and there's enough oddball appeal to make this a fun watch for any unsuspecting cult fan, as long as you don't worry too much about the plot and characters. Akira finds himself on Nirvana Island, a place that is teeming with vampires and other dark creatures. His brother is also on the island, so is the cure for the condition that has turned most of the inhabitants into monsters. Together with his friends, Akira sets out to save the island from the vampires. Samurai zombies, giants, vampire soldiers, a giant worm with a woman's face on its side ... there's plenty of fun to be had with the creatures, Watanabe also gives the action scenes some extra flair. The performances are pretty poor though and the CG is dead cheap, but this is a film that compensates its limitations with weird creatures, fast pacing and outrageous action. Good fun, but very pulpy.

09. 3.0* - First Myth: The Clash of Gods [Feng Shen Bang: Jue Zhan Wan Xian Zhen] by Boxun Li (2021)
A big fantasy epic that holds the middle between live action and animation. So much is done with CG here that it's really just a bunch of actors walking around in front of green screens. Which can be cool, sadly, the budget didn't really seem to be there for First Myth, and 90 minutes of subpar CG does weigh on a film like this. The story doesn't come with a big introduction, which made me think this might be part of a bigger franchise (or just well-known Chinese folklore). Whatever the case, you're watching a big battle between gods here, one faction trying to open the gates between the human and the deity worlds, the other trying to protect the human world from malicious gods. What saves this film is the mad pacing. Though the CG isn't great, there's happening so much that you'll hardly find the time to get annoyed by any technical hiccups. There's plenty of action, a series of familiar gods (Ne Zha is part of the team of heroes) and the film does feel pretty epic. The ambitions clearly outgrew the budget, but nonetheless a pretty amusing film.

10. 3.0* - Magic Lotus Lantern [Tian Di Bao Lian Deng] by Ryan He (2021)
Though China has been consistently improving its genre output, reliance on CG remains a weak spot. For a film like Magic Lotus Lantern, that goes for a more fantasy-led story, that's still a bit of an issue. There's simply too much in the way of poor computer graphics to enjoy a simple genre film without being constantly reminded of its low-budget roots. The story is a pretty familiar one, with Yang Jian (a demigod) being banished from the realm of the gods, after he is suspected of trying to steal the magic lotus lantern. He has to continue his life on Earth as a mere mortal, all he can do is try to retrieve the lantern, but malicious forces are also chasing the magic item, as it can free them from their imprisonment. The plot allows for quite a bit of fantasy/action fun, and the basic appeal is definitely there. It's just that the green screen CG is an eyesore, which means both the realm of the gods and the main bad guy look trite. Other than that, the film is short and well-paced, so genre fans would do well to give it a go. Just don't expect the world of it.

11. 2.5* - Scream by Matt Bettinelli-Olpin, Tyler Gillett (2022)
The latest Scream is just more Scream. Being the fifth in the franchise, it's becoming easier and easier for the films to be self-referential, though the writers make sure there are plenty of nods to other horror franchises and directors. Many are a bit too obvious, then again it's probably good to remember a lot of younger people might not even pick up on them. After a little hiatus, the ghost face killer returns to Woodsboro, and he starts killing people right away. This time, he focuses on victims who are in some way linked to the main characters of the first film. Enter the requel/legacyquel, a new kind of franchise continuation that has its own set of rules. It's a solid entry in the series, with plenty of internal and external references, jokes for horror fans and some meta-commentary on the horror scene itself. Bettinelli-Olpin and Gillett are a little wasted as their directorial style is swallowed by the strict format, but they do the Scream franchise justice. I prefer more visceral horror cinema, but this was decent fun nonetheless.

12. 2.5* - Mother/Android by Mattson Tomlin (2021)
Mother/Android is an attempt to make a more serious sci-fi production. And while it certainly is slower and more emotional than your average sci-fi flick, the messy plot and doubty sentiment doesn't really make this a very successful attempt. Writer/director Mattson Tomlin really needs to do better. Georgia and Sam are expecting a baby, but Georgia's pregnancy becomes a lot trickier when androids take over and set out to annihilate the human race. Their last hope is to get to Boston, where they might be able to leave the country by boat. Getting there is no easy feat, with androids circling the city. The plot makes some weird jumps and fails to cover some pretty big holes, the action scenes aren't too great and Moretz isn't really fit to handle a dramatic role like this. The budget was clearly there to make something of this film, but the result is a very basic and cheesy sci-fi/drama, that goes wildly off the rails in the final half hour.

13. 2.5* - Limit [Limite] by Mario Peixoto (1931)
An early Brazilian silent. Peixoto was still only in his early 20s when he made this film, inspired by the German expressionists of that era. It's no surprise then that there's hardly any dialogue and that the film is quite poetic/experimental in nature. That makes Limit one of the true grandfathers of arthouse cinema. The limited use of intertitles and the lack of a clear narrative mean that you do have to piece part of the story together yourself, but the main premise (three people - two women and one man) endlessly drifting in a boat and remembering events from their past) is simple enough to discern. It's clear Peixoto didn't mind experimenting a bit with the art form, there are some pretty cool scenes here that do stand out for a film from the early 30s. Two hours is a bit long though and the soundtrack was a bit too classical for my taste, not really in line with the mood of the film. This was an interesting watch, I just would've preferred it 30 minutes shorter.

14. 2.5* - Hotel Transylvania 4: Transformania by Derek Drymon, Jennifer Kluska (2022)
Transformania is already the fourth entry in the Hotel Transylvania franchise. It's a bit of an unlikely success, much of the original cast has moved on to work on other projects and the sequels don't add too much to the original, but it's also not the worst thing US animation has on offer. Dracula is planning to retire and leave the hotel to his daughter and son-in-law, but right before the big moment he chickens out and comes up with an excuse. The hotel can't be transferred as Johnny isn't a monster. Johnny asks Van Helsing for help, but his device has some unintended consequences. Johnny's character is a bit annoying and the plot is completely inconsequential, but there are some decent enough jokes, and it's nice to see a film with a slightly different art style. The pacing is solid, and the runtime isn't too long. Pretty decent filler in other words, but I do think it's time to end this series.

15. 2.0* - The Woman Who Ran [Domangchin Yeoja] by Hong Sang-soo (2020)
My first Sang-soo Hong. I wasn't too sure what to expect, though his arthouse/cinephile status predicted a more serious film. I'm also not certain how well The Woman Who Ran represents Hong's usual style, though looking at this film and the praise it received, I'm going to assume it's well in line with his other work. The plot is very thin, with three friends getting together for a drink and catching up on their past. Hong focuses more on the characters and the dialogue, as masks slowly start to slip and the conversations between the women gets a bit more intense. Don't expect any big narrative swings, in other words. I can't say I ended up really caring for any of the characters, nor for their little troubles. The cinematography was depressing (those random zooms in particular) and I can't even remember if there was an actual soundtrack. The performances are decent, and the film does have a few moments that stand out, but hardly enough to call it a good film.

16. 2.0* - It's a Mad, Mad, Mad World [Fu Gui Bi Ren] by Clifton Ko (1987)
A typical Clifton Ko comedy. I'm not a great fan of Ko 80s work, which isn't necessarily all that funny, just very loud and very chaotic. It's a Mad, Mad, Mad World is a textbook example. Immense overacting, a nonsensical plot and sketchy comedy really test the nerves, luckily there are also a few laughs. Bill is a mediocre news reporter who does his very best to support his family. He loves to be the sole provider, but things change when his wife wins the lottery. All of a sudden, she holds all the power. When word gets out that the family is rich, others are looking for ways to capitalize on their luck. Some of the more random, sketch-like scenes can be pretty fun and I do appreciate the rowdy and chaotic mess in short bursts, but 100 minutes of straight-up noise is just a bit too much. The performances are well over-the-top and there aren't too many explicit jokes, which makes this a pretty mediocre comedy.

17. 2.0* - The Thief of Bagdad by Raoul Walsh (1924)
A classic epic. It's quite long for a silent film, and there are some segments that could've used a bit of editing, but the lush sets and fun fantasy elements make sure it never becomes too big of a slog. It's not quite up there with its German counterparts, but it was better than I'd expected it to be. The film is a loose adaptation of One Thousand and One Nights (think Aladdin) and tells the story of Ahmed, a lowly thief who falls in love with the daughter of the ruler of the city. When three princes arrive to ask for her hand, Ahmed disguises himself as a rich nobleman and joins the challenge. The start of the film is a little rough, and it takes a while before the story gets interesting, but the decent performances, moody cinematography and grand sets managed to hold my attention. There's still about 45 minutes of cruft that probably shouldn't be there, other than that it's a pretty worthy classic.

18. 2.0* - The Boy from Hell [Jigoku Kozô] by Mari Asato (2004)
A lesser film in the Hideshi Hino series. A bit surprising maybe, as Mari Asato is a pretty decent horror director, and should've been capable enough to handle a film like this. Some effects are really too poor though (not to mention utterly pointless, like the car ride in the beginning of the film), which makes it a lot harder to enjoy this one. Daio is a young boy growing up in a loving family. A carefree car ride turns into a nightmare when the boy sticks his head out of the window and is decapitated by an oncoming truck. The mother is devastated, when she's given the chance to resurrect her son, she leaps at it right away. The boy who returns isn't quite the son she remembered. If properly executed, it could've been pretty interesting, but this felt more like a poor Teruo Ishii clone with bad CG. The effects are truly poor, the performances are awkward and the horror never really impresses. The film is pretty weird and out there, so there's at least some appeal, but not enough to save The Boy from Hell.

19. 1.5* - Hoffa by Danny DeVito (1992)
An alternate take on James R. Hoffa. It took me a little while to remember where I knew this story from, then I remembered Scorsese's The Irishman. I think DeVito's film turned out just a bit better, though that's mostly the shorter runtime and Nicholson's strong performances. Other than that, it wasn't that great. James Hoffa is famous for unionizing the truck laborers during the 30s. They were being exploited by the companies they worked for, Hoffa wanted to give them a better life. He wasn't a saint though, as he had strong ties with criminal figures who helped him get what he wanted. Hoffa is a pretty typical US crime film, that tries hard to recreate the appeal of its predecessors. Apart from Nicholson's performance, there wasn't really that much that I liked. The pacing is rather slow, the runtime is excessive and DeVito doesn't really add much to the many films that came before. Nice for fans of the genre, not so much for me.

20. 1.0* - The Matrix Resurrections by Lana Wachowski (2021)
Almost 20 years after the first trilogy, a new Matrix film arrives. It's mostly a commissioned film, a sequel made because that's what you do with popular IP. I never cared much for the franchise, so it didn't really pain me to see it mistreated like this, but I do feel for the many people who do loved the originals, as Resurrections is a truly poor effort. Neo is comfortably back inside the Matrix, living the life of a computer programmer who designed the first three Matrix games. Of course his stay there is limited, as a young rebel team yanks him out again and brings him back to the real world. A lot has changed since his last visit to reality. Everything here screams redundant sequel. Too many lazy references, not enough novel ideas, actors who appear old and tired, bland action sequences. The entire film feels contractual and corporate, very different from the first one. Maybe that was Wachowski's way of getting back at her bosses, but she didn't have to punish us for that.

21. 1.0* - Battlestar Galactica by Michael Rymer (2003)
My introduction to the Battlestar Galactica franchise. I was never a fan of these sci-fi TV series growing up, the cheap decors and schmaltzy plots were pretty off-putting. I was hoping for something extra, seeing as this is basically two feature films stuck together, but that turned out to be idle hope. Mankind is fleeing from the Cylons, a race of robots they created themselves and are now annihilating the human race. The last remaining humans manage to escape out into space and set off on a quest to find Earth, not knowing that the Cylons have evolved quite a bit without them realizing it. The sets are cheap, the CG is hideous, and the cast is C-grade. It's clear that on-screen action had to be avoided as much as possible, the characters are bland and unsympathetic though and the plot is as basic as it gets. They could've told this story in two TV episodes, it's a shame they dragged it out to a 3-hour crapfest.

22. 1.0* - A Room with a View by James Ivory (1985)
Some films caused quite a big fuss upon initial release, then faded into obscurity. Often with reason. A Room with a View is such a film. Not that I'm overly familiar with costume dramas, but I do know the bigger titles in most niches. I'd never heard of this film before, and ultimately, I wish I'd never had. The story revolves around Lucy Honeychurch, a young woman who rejects the strict and prim world she grows up in. She's travelling through Italy with a rather fussy chaperone, who doesn't appreciate Lucy's more rebellious behavior. Things don't improve when Lucy hooks up with George Emerson. A woman's fight to be slightly less prude in an overly prudish world isn't that exciting. The cinematography is utter kitsch, the soundtrack is poorly used and sentimental and the performances don't add much intrigue to the dull characters. Stretched to 120 minutes, this film turned out to be quite the ordeal.
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Lakigigar
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#2

Post by Lakigigar »

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FILMS:

Ride or Die (2021): 10/10 dir. Hiroki [JAPAN]

Well, it turns out that after all red is the warmest colour, isn't it?

I think this is an incredibly good film, a very good introduction to director Hiroki. The low ratings are there because of the controversial themes handled in the film, and because some people think a society where men aren't allowed to direct films with LGBTQ themes involved is a society better than the society of 50 years ago. On top of that, there are some sex scenes in the film, but the same people who criticize this film for it, love La vie d"Adèle which depicts far more sex scenes, and which is a film directed by a male as well who is known to have abused actresses he worked with on the set, but sure.

Needless to say, i think this is a film that very respectfully handle such themes. People are very diverse and complex, and despite maybe identifying with others at the end we are all very different and unique. This isn't a film about you, this isn't a film about me, it's a film about them. I think this is a highly emotional film, which mixed very tender moments with more painful & dramatic moments. Not really an easy film to comprehend, not an easy film to understand every single motive of the characters, but that's life. It reminds me sort of the movie Waves because it has that same vibe. At the end, the human brain is one of the most complex things in the universe in an already complex universe. Everything is complex.

I absolutely loved the film, i loved the personalities of the characters in this movie. The cinematography tends to be on the tender side, and i highly loved it. This is the work of a skilled cast & crew that came alive and were able to depict human emotions and desires very well. The music was great too, at the start of the movie also a bit more on the electronic side. It was refreshing. The songs were great too, felt like it fit very well into the movie, far better than the music typically used by directors for these kind of films.

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The Shape of Water (2017): 8/10 dir. Del Toro

This is an excellent movie, has been growing since i've seen it. I'm glad this one won the Academy Award for best film, the other one i liked THIS MUCH from this year's edition was Get Out. I have to see three others (Darkest Hour, Phantom Thread & The Post, but I don't expect them to like them). I like the use of colour in the movie. I also like the meaningful and frequent use of rain in the movie. It gives the movie a face. I think it's a very solid movie that works outside of the AA cliches as well, but it is also a really touching and romantic story, and I also believe that the setting works very well, even if a bit on the cliche side, but it works really well. Great movie! Especially with a nice and great aesthetic.

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Gladiator (2000): 7/10 (*) dir. R. Scott

Didn't properly watch it, so I gave this another try. I now could follow the beginning of the story more and probably historical films are more my thing than they used to be, but still this is nowhere near an unforgettable or masterpiece as some pretend it is, it's a bit overrated in the IMDb top 250, but it is however a very solid movie, with maybe one of the better Hans Zimmer scores. A bit oriented towards the male demographic, maybe kind of cliche (it actually is, but done well), not a fan of the beginning where without the introduction you're thrown into a battle, but other classics do the same thing. I guess it's solid, i'd liked it somewhat, but it is not a favourite of mine. I mean, i believe these kind of films have been done far better in historical tv series today, so that might explain why it felt a bit underwhelming, while i'm not a fan of how the action sequences are directed, because of highly epileptic editing to hide that the actors aren't really that great in swordfighting and stuff like that. What else is there to say about it. It's solid & good. It's fine.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013): 3/10
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 (2014): 2/10
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (2015): 2/10
The Hunger Games (2012): 2/10 (*)

A horrible franchise, which is IMO even worse than Divergent. Ridicilously overrated. I don't know whether the books were already bad, likely it was or if the films made it worse, likely this is the case as well. The setting is very annoying, not really fun and onedimensional especially compared to the standard set by other blockbusters. The games aren't frightening at all, likely due to the PG-rating that was set, but in the films she refrained from surviving in someways, and she also restrained from making life better for other people, up to the point it was annoying because of a romance that never worked out and which is possibly the worst chemistry i've ever seen in a romance, together with a hilariously bad script, but also she prefers this romance over contributing to a revolution. Very predictable franchise with characters that remind me more of cardboard boxes. Also, why did Mockingjay had to be split into two films. Nothing in the films justify it. Sidecharacters weren't interesting, didn't give a fuck about them. Only the performance of President Snow was okay. The high budget in the Mockingjay was visible in some of the action scenes, the Mockingjay films fullfilled all checkmarks to qualify as a blockbuster, but it just isn't done well. I prefer literally every other blockbuster film out there. So.... yes, to me it is THAT bad.

If you want to watch something with "hunger-like games" in them, watch Squid Game and Battle Royale. They're far more superior.

(*) = rewatch

SERIES:

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The Girl From Nowhere season 1 episode 1: 7/10 [THAI]
Fun language, had some good moments, but overall a little bit underwhelming.

The Big Bang Theory season 6 episodes 19-24: 6/10 (*)
The Big Bang Theory season 7 episodes 1-3: 6/10 (*)

(*) rewatch

ALBUMS:
FKA twigs - Caprisongs (2022): 7/10
Sonic Youth - EVOL (1986): 7/10
Both slightly disappointing albums i think. EVOL is the worst SY album i've listened so far. Liked the first three more, and also Daydream Nation. FKA twigs has better stuff too.

(*) = relisten

MISCELLANEOUS:



Hou Hsiao-Hsien - An Introduction (Personal)
The Beauty of Suspiria
The Beauty of Mulholland Dr.
We Don't Talk About Bruno (From "Encanto")
What if Antarctica MELTED?
Wide shot of Hardtack Umbrella SD (standard definition)
Underwater nuclear burst
Hunga Tonga Volcano Eruption Update; The Island and its Volcano are Gone
Hunga Tonga Volcano Eruption Update; New Images of Destroyed Volcano
Hunga Tonga Volcano Eruption Update; The Tsunami was Higher than First Thought
Hunga Tonga Volcano Eruption Update; The Caribbean Tsunami
Hunga Tonga Volcano Eruption Update; An Unexpected Eruption
Yellowstone Supervolcano Simulation
Why We Should NOT Look For Aliens - The Dark Forest
Why Alien Life Would be our Doom - The Great Filter
The Fermi Paradox - Where Are All The Aliens? (1/2)
The Fermi Paradox II — Solutions and Ideas – Where Are All The Aliens?
6 New Playable Cultures in Humankind Cultures of Africa DLC
The New Pokémon in Legends Arceus Look...Interesting (BAD) MAJOR LEAKS & SPOILERS
Top 10 New RPGs of 2022 (CRPG, ARPG, RPG, Indie RPG, Turn-based RPG, Soulslike)
Top 20 NEW Open World Games of 2022
This is Japan! M6.4 earthquake hits Kyushu Island
BREAKING NEWS: Turrialba Volcano in Costa Rica erupts again!
Krakatoa volcano explodes: spectacular huge eruption two months before 2018 tsunami
THIRD ROUND DRAW – CAF | FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022
Paris-Roubaix Hommes 2021 | Highlights | Cycling | Eurosport
Paris-Roubaix Femmes 2021 | Highlights | Cycling | Eurosport
Oostende politieman slaat 14-jarige bij arrestatie😳
The Active Volcano in Tonga; Tofua
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Torgo
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#3

Post by Torgo »

I'm the last one to defend the dreary Hunger Games franchise, but you don't seem like the person to watch 4 whole 2+ hours films of that if you don't like it at all?
Still having to cure illness, too little energy for films.

Keeping Up with the Joneses (2016) (5,5/10)
Dieses bescheuerte Herz (2017) (5,5/10)
The Tragedy of Macbeth (2021) (6,5/10)
Tick, Tick... Boom! (2021) (6/10 - maybe ..)
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Torgo
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#4

Post by Torgo »

Onderhond wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 9:37 am13. 2.5* - Limit [Limite] by Mario Peixoto (1931)
:o
Onderhond wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 9:37 am15. 2.0* - The Woman Who Ran [Domangchin Yeoja] by Hong Sang-soo (2020)
My first Sang-soo Hong.
:o
Onderhond wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 9:37 am 02. 3.5* - Infinite by Antoine Fuqua (2021)
A big blockbuster that never made it to the big screen (for some or other reason). It's a film that wouldn't look out of place next to a random Marvel flick or the latest Bond, except that it is much shorter and punchier. And for that reason alone, it deserves a fair bit of praise
One short question: Why did everyone, particularly every critic, hate it?
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Onderhond
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#5

Post by Onderhond »

Torgo wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 3:28 pm One short question: Why did everyone, particularly every critic, hate it?
You'd have to ask them :D

Maybe because the film isn't 2h+, and isn't too bothered explaining all its lore in excessive detail? It's certainly no dreary Marvel-like film, maybe that was a bit of a shocker?

Not quite sure why you're surprised about the other two quotes.
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Lakigigar
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#6

Post by Lakigigar »

Torgo wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 3:24 pm I'm the last one to defend the dreary Hunger Games franchise, but you don't seem like the person to watch 4 whole 2+ hours films of that if you don't like it at all?
you aren't the first to ask this question, i just did it so that i never had to watch it again, and because i was optimistic that the first one would be bad, the others maybe better, or the second was also bad, maybe the third and fourth would be better, but nah... that didn't turn out to be the case...

I'm just glad i never have to watch this again, even if someone else want me to watch it, i'd veto it or go outside (even if my future hypothetical girlfriend/wife) would... i would never do so, isolate myself, go outside, do something else, but no-one is ever going to force me to watch this again.

It wasn't boring though, that maybe was the only good thing, i mean it didn't drag but that's probably because of blockbuster structure, and because i don't know maybe because i didn't had to do anything else.
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#7

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

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新しい神様 / The New God (Tape by Yutaka Tsuchiya, June 1999) 8

図鑑に載ってない / Deathfix: Die and Let Live / The Insects Unlisted in the Encyclopedia / Zukan ni nottenai mushi (2007, 三木聡/Satoshi Miki) 6

L' anabase de May et Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi et 27 années sans images / The Anabasis of May and Fusako Shigenobu, Masao Adachi and 27 Years Without Images (2011, Eric Baudelaire) 6

鎖陰 / Closed Vagina / Sain / The Blocked Vagina / SA-IN (1963, 足立正生/Masao Adachi) 7+
i must be dreaming #153

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Les fruits de la passion / Fruits of Passion (1981, 寺山修司/Shuji Terayama) 6

Moron Movies (1983, Len Cella) 5+

Police Academy 2: Their First Assignment (1985, Jerry Paris & James Signorelli) (rewatch) 6+

The Cable Guy (1996, Ben Stiller) (11th+ viewing) 10+

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(Masters of Horror:) (John Carpenter's) Cigarette Burns (2005, John Carpenter) (2nd+ viewing) a'ight


shorts

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Los Dos: Preview Gumbo / "The Mode" trailer 1 (Justin Kelly, 2021) one... billion

Justin Kelly mastered the balance of what to show and what not to show. We see what Mr. Kelly wants us to see, which is what we need to see. It is, for all we non-L.A. residents know, a fabrication, a flight of fancy, perhaps evoking a world lost, but it is an attractive world that we wouldn't at all mind to get lost in along with it.

The camera wooshes even when it doesn't, it's always alive with fleeting moments of quotidian beauty, like a shot of our Moon as it rises over a hill, a silent yellow disc emitting pale light rolling from behind a heap of earth into the sky, like a shy lone traveler forced to take a crowded path, hoping not to be noticed, not to be seen. But Kelly saw and captured the everyday miracles that we don't have eyes for anymore.

à la Mode / "The Mode" trailer 2 (Justin Kelly, 2022) one... gazillion

The past lives again in this up-to-date vision of the future we thought lost. à la Mode is abstract cinema delight for our all too sober age, showing an L.A. that most of us probably would have believed a thing of the past. All the attractiveness of L.A. as seen in films like 'Mulholland Dr.' plus the neon colors and light show of a Paul Clipson still seem to be alive right now in what is a candidate for best film trailer of the year. If this 3-minute remix is anything to go by then we are in for a treat, giving us a world we'd wish to see from inside a car or from anywhere, while blasting through the speakers is a soundtrack that makes us realize that jazz music hides a hip hop beat.

This sci-fi doc promises to be more than a mere new adventure from Justin Kelly, it is bound to be his hero's journey. In fact, these two trailers in and of themselves are already little masterpieces that border on being a heroic dose of Justin Kelly.


directed by Mirai Mizue:
The Dawn of Ape (2019) 8
DREAMLAND (2018) 7
Poker (2016) 7+
Modern No.2 (2012) 7

Rise of Alfred (2007 or earlier, Emily Youcis) 6+

(Darksided, Ep.2:) Sex Box (maybe 2012, M Dot Strange) 6+

Rubber Coated Steel (2017, Lawrence Abu Hamdan) 5

The Backrooms (2022 or September 23, 1996; Kane Parsons) 7

Tarantella (1989/1990, Christopher Edward Nolan & Roko Belic) (2 viewings) 6
What a joke! review

An Owl Is an Owl Is an Owl (1990, Chris Marker) 6

Chat écoutant la musique / Cat Listening to Music (1988, Chris Marker) (2nd viewing) 5


series

Star Trek: TOS - S02E19 - A Private Little War (1968, Marc Daniels) 6

Star Trek: TOS - S02E20 - Return to Tomorrow (1968, Ralph Senensky) 6

Star Trek: TOS - S01E09 - Dagger of the Mind (1966, Vincent McEveety) 7-


other

The Joe Rogan Experience - #1764 - Ari Shaffir, Shane Gillis & Mark Normand (2022) 6

partly experienced Rogans: #1767 James Lindsay (2022), #1761 Jim Gaffigan (2022)


ecstasy my ASS! aka didn't finish

Tenshi no kôkotsu / Ecstasy of the Angels (1972, Kôji Wakamatsu) [33 min]
Woman in the Dark (1934, Phil Rosen] [24 min]
What's Up, Tiger Lily? (1966, Woody Allen) [23 min]


notable online media

top:
Terence McKenna Metaverse Interview (Virtual Reality)
Parents lose it when 8-week-old baby speaks [CNN]
Dog Stops Tornado from Forming
Will Constructor Theory REWRITE Physics?
The Future of Cosmology: A live conversation with Brian Greene and Saul Perlmutter
It's Time to Live [by "Jordan B Peterson"]
What Makes The Coen Brothers Different
rest:
Chupa Chups Werbung 1994
Portal - Welcome to the Enrichment Center [Animation]
Attack on Titan - The Rumbling Animated
William Shatner Reviews Impressions of Himself | Vanity Fair
Jeff Goldblum Reviews Impressions of Himself | Vanity Fair
Alex Jones Vs Dan Crenshaw
The New God & other screenshot pleasures
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We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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Minkin
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#8

Post by Minkin »

Well this was kind of a week from hell for me, but hey, we still watched some stuff, including Six-String Samurai - which was a very annoying case of watching 45mins of it, then partner doesn't want to watch any more of it for 1.5 weeks, but also wanted to finish it for some reason (so I couldn't just finish it on my own)? So we finally bit the bullet and finished it, with me trying to champion it because its on the Badmovies list (which have mostly been great). Then our new situation going on means less time together for watching stuff, which I fucking hate, but guess that's 2022 for you - here's hoping 2023 is somehow better.

Anyway, it was all garbage, apparently, everything garbage, live in the garbage
Six-String Samurai (1998) - Inyo County - Rating: 3/10

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Somebody out there really wanted this aesthetic: a 1950s post-apocalypse world of guitars and sword fighting random tattered desert rats. Of course there’s also an obnoxious kid who spends the entire film going WAHHH + needing rescuing every other minute. Our hero, Buddy, acts as the kid’s caretaker throughout the movie – the thankless sacrifice of life and happiness, just for the duty of someone’s wellbeing. They’re headed to the mythical land of Lost Vegas, which stands out like a utopia against the rubble – as some last bastion of civilization. For the desert is a place filled with hearty souls, where just existence, however meager, stands as a triumph against the odds. It reminds me of battling an illness – where just surviving is enough of an accomplishment. But Buddy exists as a deity amongst the pretenders to the throne of Lost Vegas – for he can calmly walk head-first into an entire army of baddies and somehow know that his superior skills will leave him unscathed. For he can just do some martial arts and brain people with his sword/guitar combo and just carry on unphased, at least until he has to rescue the kid once more. Anyway, I appreciate that this is a desert of remnants of humanity, but I could never get behind the atmosphere the film creates, but maybe you’ll like it better than we did.
The Astro-Zombies (1968) - Los Angeles County - Rating: 2/10

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This is some nonsensical plot about “mad” doctor John Carradine trying to preserve the great minds of Earth in a memory bank (but his goals change every 5mins), but in the process he creates some “quasi men” who just wander around outside and kill people for no reason – oh and they’re solar powered too. Somebody decided this needed to be half about spies / bad foreign agents shooting at each other, and half just watching Carradine and his hunchback assistant, Franchot (who steals the show) do menial tasks, like unscrewing lids in painfully slow detail. Interestingly, Carradine also makes (among his other inventions) a “thought transfer device” – in order to put thoughts directly into people’s heads. This is exactly a typical schizo experience – that someone has inserted thoughts into your brain, as they are not your own. In my experience of this, I came to believe God was telling me things – that I must or must not do, which is a weird experience (to say the least). So, its great to see this in a film, even if its overshadowed by the “quasi men zombies” and not really mentioned ever again. Of course the zombies murder everyone in sight because their brains are from “psychopathic killers”. You’d think Carradine would give enough of a shit to put a stop to them, but he just responds with a “the next one is a moral brain”, oh ok, great. Oh, but Franchot is the real star here, with his silly faces and doing his own experiments in his free time (on bikini girls apparently) – I want to know more about Franchot and his gay relationship with Carradine. Anyway, this is a painfully slow watch with 70% of the runtime being laboratory technobabble, and then the zombies just sorta appear a couple times - as more people get shot than killed by the zombies.
Goin' to Town (1935) - Argentina / New York - Rating: 3/10

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Mae West wins a fortune from some dude she was going to marry, and then spends the rest of the movie trying to win over the ONE guy who she can’t immediately land. In the process, she buys her way into horse racing, opera, and an uppity social title in Southampton, just to make the, again, one guy interested. She tries everything but change her personality – which remains stock Mae West. Its essentially about trying to feign aristocrat, without adapting to such in any conceivable manner – as this whole film is just an excuse to pit West against the fuddy duddies (instead of any sort of Pygmalion situation). But for any kind of class consciousness at play here, West seems to do nothing but embrace her wealth. For they travel to Buenos Aires, and all you see of it is horse racing and casinos – which is the worst representation of a country. Yet somehow, a certain social class of person thinks that’s fine – indulging in the worst of excessive wealthy vices – gambling and contempt (“I’ve been to Buenos Aires: stayed at the fanciest hotel, and only ate at Michelin restaurants”). I don’t really appreciate this story of someone who has every situation end up working out just perfect for them somehow – as it does for all wealthy or influential assholes out there; and then for her to do nothing at all to help anyone but herself. For West employs numerous people, but this accountant and a stable hand are the real source of her power – for they keep the ship running with their professional skills – and all would collapse pretty quickly without them. So its a story of winning the luck lottery (multiple times), then buying the loyal yes-men who do everything to get her what she wants, and they even give social cue advice (essentially acting as her caretaker – for navigating high society). Oh and at one point someone tries to get West into legal trouble by catching her in the midst of adultery…. which was and still is apparently a crime in some states (a felony in Wisconsin), wtf?! Anyway, Mae West is of course fantastic as usual, but her lustful retorts kind of run their course, and its difficult for me to root for the sort of person who just succeeds at every damn thing they put their mind to, thanks in no part to her personal team of unsung heroes. Oh and this film has some really shitty takes on suicide and addiction (along the lines of “they’re better off dead”…. thanks, film).
Cinema Safari (Currently working on Inyo County, CA + Zimbabwe upgrade) Help recommend me movies to watch) Letterboxd
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viktor-vaudevillain
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#9

Post by viktor-vaudevillain »

Great week for me:

略称連続射殺魔 / A.K.A. Serial Killer (Masao Adachi, 1969) - 9

Park Row (Samuel Fuller, 1952) - 8

Duelle (Jacques Rivette, 1976) - 9

The Crimson Kimono (Samuel Fuller, 1959) - 9-

Quatre nuits d'un rêveur / Four Nights of a Dreamer (Robert Bresson, 1971) - 10 theatrical 35mm rewatch

7th Heaven (Frank Borzage, 1927) - 9 theatrical

The French Dispatch (Wes Anderson, 2021) - 7++ theatrical


shorts:

Rubber Coated Steel (Lawrence Abu Hamdan, 2016) - 8+

Walled Unwalled (Lawrence Abu Hamdan, 2018) - 8+

Remedial Reading Comprehension (Owen Land, 1970)

Film in Which There Appear Edge Lettering, Sprocket Holes, Dirt Particles, Etc. (Owen Land, 1966)
Last edited by viktor-vaudevillain on January 23rd, 2022, 9:11 pm, edited 2 times in total.
not everything is fish, but fish are teeming everywhere
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RolandKirkSunglasses
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#10

Post by RolandKirkSunglasses »

@Onderhond

I wasn't in the right mood for "Limite" when I saw it, need to give it a rewatch at some point.
Silent version of "Thief of Bagdad" is way too long, the 1940 colour version is sligtly better mostly due to a shorter running time.

@Torgo

I hope you feel better soon.

@Viktor

Can't remember too much about "Four Nights of a Dreamer", Visconti's "White Nights" is based on the same Dostoevsky story.

Busy week, not much time for movies:

Mystery on the Rocks of Kador (1912):

When a slimy Count can win his niece's heart he tries to win her inheritance through deceit and trickery. A brief and interesting film for its use of a film camera to cure the niece's insanity, the decent acting and nice pacing overcomes the simplistic storyline.

Story of Gosta Berling (1924):

Reading the 300 page novel beforehand may have harmed my view of the movie, as it stands I can't see why this film runs 3 hours long. An alcoholic priest is defrocked and becomes an alcoholic looking for redemption, several women fall in love with him and there's a bunch of other characters in the town with their own problems. Whereas the book feels like a series of loosely-connected short stories with echoes of folk and fairy tales, the movie switches the order of the chapters around while remaining faithful to each individual chapter. The resulting film feels bloated, confusing and just plain boring, not even the appearance of a young Greta Garbo or the impressive house burning scene can justify the length of this film. The other silent films based on Selma Lagerlof's novels "Phantom Carriage" and "Sir Arne's Treasure" were far better than this.

Au Hasard Balthazar (1966):

Robert Bresson's simple parable about a Christlike donkey and the hugely flawed human beings around him. The visual storytelling and use of sound is pretty mesmerising, Bresson's love of blank acting makes Gerard far more sinister, doesn't really help Marie's character though. Apart from the heavy pessimism it's one of Bresson's better films (not as bleak as some of his later works).

Xala (1975):

A member of Senegal's new government takes a third wife (to the anger of his first two) but when he refuses to follow an old African custom he becomes impotent. He visits a couple shamans to cure his erectile dysfunction but gets into hot water after he's caught embezzling 100 tons of rice to fund his third marriage. Watching a low-quality print with white-on-white subtitles wasn't very helpful, the storyline itself made some decent political points and has some good interactions between El Hadj and his three wives but the film could've been 30 minutes shorter and the meandering structure didn't help either. Out of the other Sembene's I've seen it ranks in the middle.
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#11

Post by Ebbywebby »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 5:18 pm Closed Vagina / Sain / The Blocked Vagina / SA-IN (1963, 足立正生/Masao Adachi) 7+
Wow, never heard of this before. And it's from way back in 1963? Crazy. Now I'm curious.
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Silga
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#12

Post by Silga »

A fine week, but not without some disappointments. Soderbergh knocked it out of the park once again with amazing No Sudden Move. As for Eastwood's latest - I think it's his worst.

No Sudden Move (Steven Soderbergh, 2021) 9/10
The Card Counter (Paul Schrader, 2021) 7/10
The World's End (Edgar Wright, 2013) 7/10 (rewatch)
Free Guy (Shawn Levy, 2021) 5/10
Titane (Julia Ducournau, 2021) 4/10
Cry Macho (Clint Eastwood, 2021) 2/10

Short:
Star (Guy Ritchie, 2001) 3/10
Building No. 7 (Steven Soderbergh, 2006) 2/10
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prodigalgodson
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#13

Post by prodigalgodson »

Onderhond wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 9:37 am 13. 2.5* - Limit [Limite] by Mario Peixoto (1931)
An early Brazilian silent. Peixoto was still only in his early 20s when he made this film, inspired by the German expressionists of that era. It's no surprise then that there's hardly any dialogue and that the film is quite poetic/experimental in nature. That makes Limit one of the true grandfathers of arthouse cinema. The limited use of intertitles and the lack of a clear narrative mean that you do have to piece part of the story together yourself, but the main premise (three people - two women and one man) endlessly drifting in a boat and remembering events from their past) is simple enough to discern. It's clear Peixoto didn't mind experimenting a bit with the art form, there are some pretty cool scenes here that do stand out for a film from the early 30s. Two hours is a bit long though and the soundtrack was a bit too classical for my taste, not really in line with the mood of the film. This was an interesting watch, I just would've preferred it 30 minutes shorter.

15. 2.0* - The Woman Who Ran [Domangchin Yeoja] by Hong Sang-soo (2020)
My first Sang-soo Hong. I wasn't too sure what to expect, though his arthouse/cinephile status predicted a more serious film. I'm also not certain how well The Woman Who Ran represents Hong's usual style, though looking at this film and the praise it received, I'm going to assume it's well in line with his other work. The plot is very thin, with three friends getting together for a drink and catching up on their past. Hong focuses more on the characters and the dialogue, as masks slowly start to slip and the conversations between the women gets a bit more intense. Don't expect any big narrative swings, in other words. I can't say I ended up really caring for any of the characters, nor for their little troubles. The cinematography was depressing (those random zooms in particular) and I can't even remember if there was an actual soundtrack. The performances are decent, and the film does have a few moments that stand out, but hardly enough to call it a good film.
Ayy, wrt Limite I'll take it!

The Woman Who Ran is definitely not prime Hong, though probably more rewarding if you've seen more of his stuff. I saw it a while ago when it came out here, but funnily enough I still remember the music queues (just brief swells at the beginning and end, and between the segments as I recall, though that's typical for Hong).
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#14

Post by prodigalgodson »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 5:18 pm
Los Dos: Preview Gumbo / "The Mode" trailer 1 (Justin Kelly, 2021) one... billion

Justin Kelly mastered the balance of what to show and what not to show. We see what Mr. Kelly wants us to see, which is what we need to see. It is, for all we non-L.A. residents know, a fabrication, a flight of fancy, perhaps evoking a world lost, but it is an attractive world that we wouldn't at all mind to get lost in along with it.

The camera wooshes even when it doesn't, it's always alive with fleeting moments of quotidian beauty, like a shot of our Moon as it rises over a hill, a silent yellow disc emitting pale light rolling from behind a heap of earth into the sky, like a shy lone traveler forced to take a crowded path, hoping not to be noticed, not to be seen. But Kelly saw and captured the everyday miracles that we don't have eyes for anymore.

à la Mode / "The Mode" trailer 2 (Justin Kelly, 2022) one... gazillion

The past lives again in this up-to-date vision of the future we thought lost. à la Mode is abstract cinema delight for our all too sober age, showing an L.A. that most of us probably would have believed a thing of the past. All the attractiveness of L.A. as seen in films like 'Mulholland Dr.' plus the neon colors and light show of a Paul Clipson still seem to be alive right now in what is a candidate for best film trailer of the year. If this 3-minute remix is anything to go by then we are in for a treat, giving us a world we'd wish to see from inside a car or from anywhere, while blasting through the speakers is a soundtrack that makes us realize that jazz music hides a hip hop beat.

This sci-fi doc promises to be more than a mere new adventure from Justin Kelly, it is bound to be his hero's journey. In fact, these two trailers in and of themselves are already little masterpieces that border on being a heroic dose of Justin Kelly.
Dude...thank you so much. When you're struggling to make something almost by yourself with no funding or support network, it's incredibly gratifying to know that one's effort is paying off for even a minute audience. It really means a lot to me, and I'm very glad you enjoyed so much. This inspires me all the more to try to make sure the final product comes out as well as it can, and does justice to the trailer haha

:cheers: doesn't say enough.
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#15

Post by cinewest »

Began the week with

Nuevo Orden (Franco, Mexico, 2020)- A socio / political dystopian fantasy where the only "good guys" are the "meek and caring," who are victimized by both sides. This film has a lot going for it in terms of the reality it imagines, but it doesn't quite come off as well as it could have. Still, a very worthwhile watch. 7+

The Tragedy of Macbeth (Coen, U.S. 2021)- Beautifully shot in B & W with a minimalist noir approach to Shakespeare that is intriguing but not wholly satisfying if only because it doesn't do enough to be relevant in the present. 7+

Fireball: Visitors from other worlds (Herzog, U.S. 2020)- Once again, Herzog invites us into interesting subject matter, but fails to explore it enough to make it fully satisfying. 6.5

The Worst Person in the World (Trier, Norway, 2021)- The first and best of 3 films exploring the travails and development of a young woman in Oslo. Trier is fully in command of his material and approach, and the performances are stellar. 8.5

Shiva Baby (Seligman, U.S. 2020)- This one is about a younger, Jewish woman coming into adulthood in New York, and though none of the characters are particularly likable, this film is often hilarious and very well written. 7.5+

Zola (Bravo, U.S. 2020)- This film seems like its going to be something a cross between Tangerine and Spring Breakers, and it's often very funny in the way those movies were, but it falls short in certain ways that I will not go into. here. 6.5 for worth seeing, but not fully satisfying.
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#16

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

Ebbywebby wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 10:37 pm
Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 5:18 pm Closed Vagina / Sain / The Blocked Vagina / SA-IN (1963, 足立正生/Masao Adachi) 7+
Wow, never heard of this before. And it's from way back in 1963? Crazy. Now I'm curious.
That's cool. Silga's listing of 'Tarantella' last week made me aware that this early short by Nolan is available, or that it even existed, so I have to thank him for that.
So, what about 鎖陰 is it exactly that makes your curious (yellow)? Is it the just title alone? Is it the content?
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#17

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

prodigalgodson wrote: January 25th, 2022, 2:01 am
Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 5:18 pm just my truthful account of witnessing magic
Dude...thank you so much. When you're struggling to make something almost by yourself with no funding or support network, it's incredibly gratifying to know that one's effort is paying off for even a minute audience. It really means a lot to me, and I'm very glad you enjoyed so much. This inspires me all the more to try to make sure the final product comes out as well as it can, and does justice to the trailer haha

:cheers: doesn't say enough.

I'm glad my little voice could be a motivator for you in your artistic endeavors. I was really into those trailers, structurally as well as in other ways they play a lot like mini-versions of your previous films. Except obviously for the pacing, as you had to compress your film into a couple of minutes, and you did a hell of a job doing it. I'm especially impressed with how they work musically, the job you did on the sound, the cuts and transitions between songs and diegetic sounds, the sudden switching of gears, it's all super-rhythmic and dynamic with all the impressions being almost overwhelming. It presents a lot of what I loved about 'Termite Gumbo' in particular, that it really was an experience. Now this just tends to be my own personal preference, I know that others who saw your films love the slowest parts most of all and probably would like it even more if you held a shoot for five minutes instead of just one minute and to them this is what constitutes being an experience. Also, be sure that I did also really dig the images you captured, I felt a lot of life and observed truth coming from them just by themselves individually. Not on the level of John Wilson in this department, but hey, that's John Wilson. I enjoy your framing and the aesthetic (à la mode is great just purely as a light and color show, that last shot sums it up perfectly), and the style with which you go all-out handheld I don't really see much in films nowadays and reminds me more of 60's and 70's experimental films...like Fulton, of course, but on video of our times it creates a new aesthetic and has something a different effect.
We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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Ebbywebby
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#18

Post by Ebbywebby »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 25th, 2022, 9:48 pm
Ebbywebby wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 10:37 pm
Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 5:18 pm Closed Vagina / Sain / The Blocked Vagina / SA-IN (1963, 足立正生/Masao Adachi) 7+
Wow, never heard of this before. And it's from way back in 1963? Crazy. Now I'm curious.
That's cool. Silga's listing of 'Tarantella' last week made me aware that this early short by Nolan is available, or that it even existed, so I have to thank him for that.
So, what about 鎖陰 is it exactly that makes your curious (yellow)? Is it the just title alone? Is it the content?
I love subversive Japanese movies from the '60s, and the IMDb plot summary ("the struggles of a woman and her male partner - where the woman suffers from a sealed vagina - in a world that views her as an object of pleasure and reproduction") sounds interesting and provocative.
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Onderhond
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#19

Post by Onderhond »

RolandKirkSunglasses wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 8:44 pm Silent version of "Thief of Bagdad" is way too long, the 1940 colour version is sligtly better mostly due to a shorter running time.
I'll be watching that one in the coming weeks. I do tend to favor 20s/silents over 30s/40s talkies though, but as long as they keep their mouth shut, the shorter runtime should definitely be a blessing :)
prodigalgodson wrote: January 24th, 2022, 8:23 am The Woman Who Ran is definitely not prime Hong, though probably more rewarding if you've seen more of his stuff. I saw it a while ago when it came out here, but funnily enough I still remember the music queues (just brief swells at the beginning and end, and between the segments as I recall, though that's typical for Hong).
I guess I'll get a better feel for his style once I've seen a couple more films. Might be a while though, I don't really focus on SK cinema and his work seems to be rather niche to begin with. Ah well, in time :)
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Perception de Ambiguity
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#20

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

Ebbywebby wrote: January 25th, 2022, 10:05 pm
Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 25th, 2022, 9:48 pm
Ebbywebby wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 10:37 pm

Wow, never heard of this before. And it's from way back in 1963? Crazy. Now I'm curious.
That's cool. Silga's listing of 'Tarantella' last week made me aware that this early short by Nolan is available, or that it even existed, so I have to thank him for that.
So, what about 鎖陰 is it exactly that makes your curious (yellow)? Is it the just title alone? Is it the content?
I love subversive Japanese movies from the '60s, and the IMDb plot summary ("the struggles of a woman and her male partner - where the woman suffers from a sealed vagina - in a world that views her as an object of pleasure and reproduction") sounds interesting and provocative.
It certainly checks those boxes. Adachi is known for films with boldy sex-themed concepts, and unsurprisingly with this early experimental film he goes especially radically and brazen about it. With the high-contrast black-and-white imagery it's often difficult to decipher what one is looking at exactly. From the copy that is available online currently (an X-generation VHS rip) it's difficult to tell to what degree the indecipherability is intentional. It does add to its mystique and arguably it makes the film even more potent, given that much of the point of high-contrast B&W to begin with is to obscure the image or rather to obscure the reality behind the image. A crappy copy in such a case especially is at least as much evocative as it is frustrating.
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Onderhond
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#21

Post by Onderhond »

I should try to check out some of Adachi's directorial efforts. I guess it's strongly related to the work of Wakamatsu, as he is often credited as a writer on his films?
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prodigalgodson
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#22

Post by prodigalgodson »

Perception de Ambiguity wrote: January 25th, 2022, 9:49 pm
I'm glad my little voice could be a motivator for you in your artistic endeavors. I was really into those trailers, structurally as well as in other ways they play a lot like mini-versions of your previous films. Except obviously for the pacing, as you had to compress your film into a couple of minutes, and you did a hell of a job doing it. I'm especially impressed with how they work musically, the job you did on the sound, the cuts and transitions between songs and diegetic sounds, the sudden switching of gears, it's all super-rhythmic and dynamic with all the impressions being almost overwhelming. It presents a lot of what I loved about 'Termite Gumbo' in particular, that it really was an experience. Now this just tends to be my own personal preference, I know that others who saw your films love the slowest parts most of all and probably would like it even more if you held a shoot for five minutes instead of just one minute and to them this is what constitutes being an experience. Also, be sure that I did also really dig the images you captured, I felt a lot of life and observed truth coming from them just by themselves individually. Not on the level of John Wilson in this department, but hey, that's John Wilson. I enjoy your framing and the aesthetic (à la mode is great just purely as a light and color show, that last shot sums it up perfectly), and the style with which you go all-out handheld I don't really see much in films nowadays and reminds me more of 60's and 70's experimental films...like Fulton, of course, but on video of our times it creates a new aesthetic and has something a different effect.
Aww man, thank you thank you again for sharing. My main aspiration in working on these films over the last few years is to make the kind of movies I'd like to see and rarely find -- exploring the tension between static and kinesis that I've experienced as such a defining aspect of my life, with one end of the spectrum represented by the likes of Fulton and Brakhage and the other by Costa, Akerman, and their forebears and contemporaries -- within the limits of my skills and resources, so it's amazing when they have that resonance for others too. As a film fan in the internet age I'm blessed to stand on the shoulders of more giants than filmmakers in past generations have had access to, a gift I wish more people working in the mainstream would take advantage of. I'm still very much learning how to bridge the gap between my experience of something and the translation of that experience through the medium of digital video into an analogous experience for the viewer -- even myself -- but I feel I've been slowly progressing on that front, so again, so happy it's turning into an experience for even a small group of others too. Just gotta keep grinding; Rublev wasn't built in a day!

Hope the final product will live up to the hype. The first act is gonna be the most classically beautiful and will probably be the highlight of the film for most viewers, and the third act will hopefully build to a frenzied climax and go out with a cathartic bang, but the middle -- dealing with the accumulation of ennui, anxiety, and melancholy in the workaday world -- is gonna be the hardest to keep sufficiently varied and dynamic. I'll do my best! I'm about halfway through finalizing the script and have started working with my grandmother, who I want to narrate it, on the delivery.

I gotta check out this John Wilson guy! Is his HBO series a good place to start?
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prodigalgodson
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#23

Post by prodigalgodson »

Onderhond wrote: January 25th, 2022, 10:25 pm
prodigalgodson wrote: January 24th, 2022, 8:23 am The Woman Who Ran is definitely not prime Hong, though probably more rewarding if you've seen more of his stuff. I saw it a while ago when it came out here, but funnily enough I still remember the music queues (just brief swells at the beginning and end, and between the segments as I recall, though that's typical for Hong).
I guess I'll get a better feel for his style once I've seen a couple more films. Might be a while though, I don't really focus on SK cinema and his work seems to be rather niche to begin with. Ah well, in time :)
I suspect his interests will skew a bit mundane for your taste, but there's definitely a lot going on under the surface -- much more in his best work than in The Woman Who Ran. For some reason I think On the Beach Alone at Night might work best for you, but it's also much fresher in my mind than my other favorites of his. I found Night and Day utterly miraculous when I saw it during a retrospective of his work in high school.
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Perception de Ambiguity
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#24

Post by Perception de Ambiguity »

prodigalgodson wrote: January 27th, 2022, 8:17 am I gotta check out this John Wilson guy! Is his HBO series a good place to start?
Absolutely. With his short films he did pretty much exactly what he does now with the series (at least from what I have seen of them), and he only keeps getting better and more refined at it, and it slowly is getting more personal, I would say, like an unusual kind of video diary. I honestly don't know how he does it, even just in terms of collecting all the footage of wonderful and humorous little moments, he must pretty much be running around New York all day every day with camera in hand. Based on the credits he has some help on the series, but it still feels like as much of a one-man project as ever.

Working with ones grandmother on a film sounds lovely.
We do not have to understand new things, but by dint of patience, effort and method to come to understand with our whole self the truths which are evident.Image
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