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Country Poll: United Kingdom [CLOSED]

500<400, Favourite 1001 movies, Doubling the Canon, Film World Cup and many other votes
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Fergenaprido
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#161

Post by Fergenaprido »

Melvelet wrote: December 9th, 2021, 3:23 pm I especially need a ruling on The Lobster

8 The Lobster 2015
Okay, I've delved into Lanthimos's English-language films, so I'll discuss them all here.

The Lobster (2015) - Ireland/UK co-production, not eligible
The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) - Ireland/UK co-production, not eligible

The Favourite (2018) - UK/Ireland co-production, eligible

All three films seem to be primarily co-productions between Element Pictures (Ireland) and Scarlet Films (UK), with other funding sources coming from their respective governments and other production companies in France, Greece, Netherlands, and the USA. The first two seem to be considered to be both Irish and British by their respective film communities, and the production of both of those films do seem to have been initiated by Element Pictures. The Favourite, however, was not nominated for any Irish Film & Television Awards (after Lobster earned a nom for Colin Farrell in lead, and Killing earned a win for Barry Keoghan in supporting and noms for the film and Farrell in lead again), which makes me think it wasn't eligible, and thus is primarily a British film. Complicating things is that there was a combined ceremonty for 2018 and 2019 films at the IFTAs, so it's conceivable that the film was crowded out, though it was such a hit with other awards ceremonies that's kind of surprising.

If anyone has information that contradicts this ruling, please share. I found a few articles but nothing more than confirmations of the above or just ambiguous "co-production" stuff.
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#162

Post by zomgmouse »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 16th, 2022, 7:49 pm
zomgmouse wrote: December 7th, 2021, 1:08 am
peeptoad wrote: December 4th, 2021, 1:50 pm I'm going with Wake in Fright (1971) as Australian... ? (IMDB says UK/Aus/US). If it's deemed UK let me know because it would be ranked high on my list.
Yeah would love a ruling on this as well! Also for Straw Dogs
Yeah, Wake in Fright is Australian, and Straw Dogs is American.
Thank you!
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#163

Post by matthewscott8 »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 16th, 2022, 10:38 pm
matthewscott8 wrote: December 7th, 2021, 1:02 pm 8. Red Riding (2009 - Julian Jarrold, James Marsh & Anand Tucker)
This is the first I've heard of this being a mini-series instead of a trilogy of films. I can't find much more about this, and the imdb entry you list is missing a lot of information (it doesn't even have any episodes included) and feels retroactive (considering it was created about 10 years after the initial release of the films, based on the ttid), instead of reflective of reality. Most of the source links in the wikipedia article are broken. Are you able to provide more context to this?
Reviewed in the Guardian television section and mentioned as being aired on successive Thursdays: https://www.theguardian.com/culture/200 ... n-channel4. The links on wikipedia are just dead because it was a long time ago now. Usually if people are talking about a series of films they've been aired in completely different years. These were all completed at the same time with the same cast, with a continuous story line. The premiere was on tv as confirmed here: https://www.alternateending.com/2009/10 ... ngdom.html

In my memory from the time I think part of the game was that they could be seen as films or tv. Whilst they're continuous and were released at the same time, each film could be watched without seeing the other 2 and you'd still walk away with something complete. So in a way they did this to confound you Ferg, it's an experiment, both TV miniseries and 3 films at the same time.
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#164

Post by Fergenaprido »

Thanks for the info, matt. I still think of it as 3 films (and that second link seems to waver back and forth between considering them three distinct films and one singular piece), but I'll accept the mini-series for this project. :thumbsup:
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#165

Post by beasterne »

It would be nice if a vote for The Up Series would only count as one entry. I would definitely include it, but I’m thinking they are separate films and I struggle to determine which one film I should include to represent all of them.

Any thoughts on this one Ferg?
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#166

Post by Fergenaprido »

beasterne wrote: January 17th, 2022, 3:38 pm It would be nice if a vote for The Up Series would only count as one entry. I would definitely include it, but I’m thinking they are separate films and I struggle to determine which one film I should include to represent all of them.

Any thoughts on this one Ferg?
No, they're separate films, sorry.
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#167

Post by ororama »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 16th, 2022, 11:24 pm
ororama wrote: December 7th, 2021, 1:12 pm Several questions:
Hunger?
The Masque of the Red Death?
V for Vendetta?
The Hunger (1983) - UK-USA co-production, eligible
The Masque of the Red Death (1964) - USA-UK co-production, not eligible
V for Vendetta - USA production, not eligible
I'm sorry. I meant Hunger (2008, Steve McQueen). Thanks for the other two.

I think you're going to drive yourself crazy with the amount of research that you're putting in, but hopefully it will be downhill after you get past France.
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#168

Post by Fergenaprido »

ororama wrote: January 17th, 2022, 4:38 pm
Fergenaprido wrote: January 16th, 2022, 11:24 pm
ororama wrote: December 7th, 2021, 1:12 pm Several questions:
Hunger?
The Masque of the Red Death?
V for Vendetta?
The Hunger (1983) - UK-USA co-production, eligible
The Masque of the Red Death (1964) - USA-UK co-production, not eligible
V for Vendetta - USA production, not eligible
I'm sorry. I meant Hunger (2008, Steve McQueen). Thanks for the other two.

I think you're going to drive yourself crazy with the amount of research that you're putting in, but hopefully it will be downhill after you get past France.
Ah. Yeah, folks, please be more specific in your questions, lol :P

Hunger (2008) is eligible - UK/Irish co-production. British director, set in Northern Ireland, with majority British production companies involved. This bit from wikipedia seals it for me: "After financing for Hunger was turned down by the Irish Film Board, the film was instead co-funded by Northern Ireland Screen, Broadcast Commission of Ireland, Channel 4, Film4 Productions, and the Wales Creative IP Fund." - It won numerous awards in Ireland and the UK, and seems to have been considered British by most festivals.

And naw, I like the research. I learn new things about the films in the process, even if it's not directly related to the questions at hand. I'm the type of person who can get lost for hours down a Wikipedia rabbit hole, following links and just reading about various things. But yes, I do anticipate the amount of research will go down after a while. It helps me keep my spreadsheet uptodate anyway. :)
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#169

Post by Fergenaprido »

TraverseTown wrote: December 9th, 2021, 10:24 pm I have a lot of dubious ones, so please let me know what the eligibility decisions are. I'll include my runner ups so I can quickly make adjustments if needed.

5. Suddenly Last Summer
20. The Lobster
25. The Killing of a Sacred Deer
These are the only two that are dubious.

As posted above, I'm considering The Lobster and The Killing of a Sacred Deer as Irish for these polls.

For Suddenly Last Summer, I've always considered it American. It does seem to be a co-production with the UK, but it seems more so on paper only. The American producer, Sam Spiegel, created a British production company for his films, but everything else about this film is American (other companies, case, director, source, etc.), and it was filmed in the UK and Spain. So I'm going to consider it American and ineligible for this poll.
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#170

Post by Fergenaprido »

matthewscott8 wrote: December 9th, 2021, 11:25 pm
TraverseTown wrote: December 9th, 2021, 10:24 pm1. Mister Lonely
It won't make the final results one way or another, but I find the concept that it could be regarded as a British film pretty astonishing. Film 4 gave Korine some money, va bene, but this is simply not British. It is the epitome of an international production, and culturally American if something has to be picked.
I had this as American originally, but looking into it, I'm counting it as British. Produced in Britain and filmed in Britain with an international cast. I admit when I saw the film I didn't realize they were in Scotland until after, but that's on me, lol.
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#171

Post by TraverseTown »

Thanks for checking my ballot, I fixed it.
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#172

Post by Fergenaprido »

Gordon_Gekko wrote: December 10th, 2021, 11:28 am
Gordon_Gekko wrote: December 6th, 2021, 11:56 am One to decide:
Animal Farm (1954)
Imo it's british. But there was some not unimportant US-funding so...
Two other films i am not shure:
Lion (2016) - Australia or GB? (I would say australien )
Gosford Park - USA or GB? (I would say british)

And because it's stil under "ongoing discusion":
Eastern Promises definitly british.
Lion (2016) is Australian, so not eligible here.

Gosford Park (2001) is trickier. I had thought it solely British, but then the driving forces behind the film, Altmand & Balaban, are both American, and both American and British companies are involved. The European Awards and the Césars and Goyas considered it British enough to nominate it in their ceremonies for their respective Best European Film awards. Almost all of Altman's films were American, and he doesn't seem like he was a "director for hire" like some folks, and he produced his own films. The only other British film by him is Images (1972), but even that I'm not sure about.

I think I'm going to have to call this American, though I'm not confident in that. It's another film I need to replace on my own ballot, lol.

I'll do all the Cronenberg films in one post later, but yes, I'm leaning toward British for Eastern Promises as well.
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#173

Post by Fergenaprido »

AB537 wrote: December 16th, 2021, 3:34 am I'm assuming The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Prestige and In Bruges qualify, but can substitute if this is not correct. Rulings would also be helpful for In the Name of the Father (Jim Sheridan, 1993 - hoping this is Ireland) and Match Point (Woody Allen, 2005), not sure if others have already requested these.

EDIT: I see The Prestige is ineligible, so have dropped it, moved 13-20 up to 12-19 and inserted The Hit at #20. Will edit again if more changes are necessary, or depending on the result of my questions above.
Kwai and Bruges are in, Prestige is out. :)

In the Name of the Father is Irish
Match Point is a British-American co-production, I'll count it for this poll.
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#174

Post by Fergenaprido »

Gorro wrote: December 18th, 2021, 11:10 am 7. The Pianist
20. Children of Men

Reserves
21. Seance on a Wet Afternoon
22. Atonement
The Pianist is French, not eligible.
Children of Men is American, not eligible.


Both of your reserves are fine, though.
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#175

Post by Fergenaprido »

beasterne wrote: December 20th, 2021, 3:44 pm 15. Shakespeare in Love (1998)
19. Dunkirk (2017)
Shakespeare in Love is American.

I'll get to Nolan's films later, but Dunkirk is probably his most British film since his debut.
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#176

Post by Fergenaprido »

cayado-coro wrote: December 24th, 2021, 3:35 pm In chronological order:
Robin and Marian
United 93
Eastern Promises
As far as I can tell, Robin and Marian is an American production filmed in Spain. Wikipedia says it's British-American, but I see no British involvement anywhere (aside from the fact that Robin Hood is a British legend). So, not eligible for this poll.

United 93 is an America-British co-production, but mostly American, so not eligible for this poll.

Eastern Promises I'll get to later, but it'll probably be deemed British.
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#177

Post by Fergenaprido »

gromit82 wrote: December 25th, 2021, 1:09 am I'd like to get a ruling on United 93 (Paul Greengrass, 2006). I didn't think of it as British, but if it counts for the UK I will put it on my list.
Just worked on it for cayado's ballot. Not British for this poll.
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#178

Post by Fergenaprido »

cayado-coro wrote: December 26th, 2021, 10:51 am
Torgo wrote: December 24th, 2021, 4:03 pm
cayado-coro wrote: December 24th, 2021, 3:35 pm In chronological order:
Just to make this as clear as possible - you're handing a list that is unranked, right.
That's right.

Regarding United 93, it was mostly shot at Pinewood Studios by a British director/writer and a British cinematographer and that is more than other eligible movies can say. Even so I know it is not an example of Britishness.
Regarding that, where a film was shot isn't always indicative of the country the film is from, especially when so many countries have big tax credits to try and entice production companies to film there.

I also found this on wikipedia (with an external source): "The location was chosen both for its financial incentives and to shield actors from unwanted public scrutiny they might have received in the United States."
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#179

Post by Teproc »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 17th, 2022, 8:02 pm Regarding that, where a film was shot isn't always indicative of the country the film is from
I mean, it isn't because you personally decided it isn't a major criterion. Which is fine, but you know.
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#180

Post by AB537 »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 17th, 2022, 7:23 pm
AB537 wrote: December 16th, 2021, 3:34 am I'm assuming The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Prestige and In Bruges qualify, but can substitute if this is not correct. Rulings would also be helpful for In the Name of the Father (Jim Sheridan, 1993 - hoping this is Ireland) and Match Point (Woody Allen, 2005), not sure if others have already requested these.

EDIT: I see The Prestige is ineligible, so have dropped it, moved 13-20 up to 12-19 and inserted The Hit at #20. Will edit again if more changes are necessary, or depending on the result of my questions above.
Kwai and Bruges are in, Prestige is out. :)

In the Name of the Father is Irish
Match Point is a British-American co-production, I'll count it for this poll.
Thanks - please note I'm editing my original post to swap Match Point into my ballot. If it would be easier for me to repost it here, I can also do that.
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#181

Post by Fergenaprido »

Panunzio wrote: December 26th, 2021, 12:58 pm 18. The Elephant Man (1980)
I'd thought The Elephant Man was British too, but digging further it turns out it's an American production from Mel Brooks's company, which received some additional financing from a British company. So it's ineligible for this poll.
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#182

Post by Fergenaprido »

Teproc wrote: January 17th, 2022, 8:04 pm
Fergenaprido wrote: January 17th, 2022, 8:02 pm Regarding that, where a film was shot isn't always indicative of the country the film is from
I mean, it isn't because you personally decided it isn't a major criterion. Which is fine, but you know.
I never said that, but you could think of it that way if you want. :shrug: However, I think you'd be hard-pressed to get people to agree with you that Amélie is German instead of French, Mission Impossible - Ghost Protocol is Canadian instead of American, or You Only Live Twice is Japanese instead of British.
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#183

Post by Teproc »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 17th, 2022, 10:50 pm
Teproc wrote: January 17th, 2022, 8:04 pm
Fergenaprido wrote: January 17th, 2022, 8:02 pm Regarding that, where a film was shot isn't always indicative of the country the film is from
I mean, it isn't because you personally decided it isn't a major criterion. Which is fine, but you know.
I never said that, but you could think of it that way if you want. :shrug: However, I think you'd be hard-pressed to get people to agree with you that Amélie is German instead of French, Mission Impossible - Ghost Protocol is Canadian instead of American, or You Only Live Twice is Japanese instead of British.
... I'm not saying it should be the only criterion. However, you're acting as if "which country a film is from" is some sort of objective truth one can use elements to find out, and that shooting location isn't predictive of it. Whereas I'd argue that it very much depends at which factors you're looking at: you're clearly prioritizing where the money is from, which is fine, but not what everyone would go with.
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#184

Post by Fergenaprido »

Mysterious Dude wrote: January 17th, 2022, 12:10 am Any verdict on The Elephant Man? One of my favorite movies, along with Children of Men, but I deemed them both to be not quite British enough for the British list and also not quite American enough for the American list.
Both considered American for this poll, so not eligible.
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#185

Post by Fergenaprido »

We had a snowstorm/blizzard overnight and this morning dumping about 2 feet of snow on us, so snow day and no work! Gave me enough time to finally finish going through all of the ballots. If I didn't specifically comment on yours it was because all of the films looked eligible. I still have about a dozen films to check over (mentioned in the second post of this thread), including a bunch of Nolan and Cronenberg films that I'm sure people are waiting for a decision about.

Deadline is about a week away. I'm going to start prepping the spreadsheet and see how things are turning up. Feel free to add or edit your list in the meantime. :)

Thank you all for your patience and participation. :cheers:
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#186

Post by Gordon_Gekko »

Fergenaprido wrote: January 17th, 2022, 5:53 pm
Gordon_Gekko wrote: December 10th, 2021, 11:28 am
Gordon_Gekko wrote: December 6th, 2021, 11:56 am One to decide:
Animal Farm (1954)
Imo it's british. But there was some not unimportant US-funding so...
Two other films i am not shure:
Lion (2016) - Australia or GB? (I would say australien )
Gosford Park - USA or GB? (I would say british)

And because it's stil under "ongoing discusion":
Eastern Promises definitly british.
Lion (2016) is Australian, so not eligible here.

Gosford Park (2001) is trickier. I had thought it solely British, but then the driving forces behind the film, Altmand & Balaban, are both American, and both American and British companies are involved. The European Awards and the Césars and Goyas considered it British enough to nominate it in their ceremonies for their respective Best European Film awards. Almost all of Altman's films were American, and he doesn't seem like he was a "director for hire" like some folks, and he produced his own films. The only other British film by him is Images (1972), but even that I'm not sure about.

I think I'm going to have to call this American, though I'm not confident in that. It's another film I need to replace on my own ballot, lol.

I'll do all the Cronenberg films in one post later, but yes, I'm leaning toward British for Eastern Promises as well.
Thanks for all your work :thumbsup:
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#187

Post by Fergenaprido »

Fergenaprido wrote: December 3rd, 2021, 11:06 pm Ongoing Discussions - Please do not take these as decisions yet, country listing/order based on preliminary information only.
Brooklyn (2014) - UK/Ireland/Canada - unsure
Gravity (2013) - USA/UK - unsure
Reunion (1989) - France/W. Germany/UK - French film, not eligible
Sleuth (1972) - USA/UK - unsure

Onderhond wrote: December 3rd, 2021, 2:18 pm The ones I'm not sure about (UK is a tricky country imo):

- Bronson by Nicolas Winding Refn
- Slumdog Millionaire by Danny Boyle
- An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn by Jim Hosking
- Sunshine by Danny Boyle
Lakigigar wrote: December 3rd, 2021, 7:04 pm Some I already am not sure about

Valhalla Rising (Refn)
Nolan's films
Spider (Cronenberg) - Canada/UK
Eastern Promises (Cronenberg)
A Dangerous Method (Cronenberg) - UK/Canada
Felicia's Journey (Egoyan) - UK/Canada
Metro Manila - UK/Philippines
Iron Maiden: Flight 666 - UK/Canada
The Eagle Huntress - UK/Kazakhstan
Borat 2 - UK/USA
I Am Not a Witch - UK
Ezra - Nigeria/UK
Seven Psychopaths - UK
For Sama
Virunga
Okay, I think these are the last films that need decisions. If I've forgotten anything, please let me know. Ballot deadline is coming up at the end of the weekend.

American Honey (2016) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
Borat 2 (2020) - USA - American film, not eligible
Bronson (2008) - UK - British film, eligible
A Dangerous Method (2011) - UK/Canada/Germany - British film, eligible
The Eagle Huntress (2016) - UK/USA/Mongolia - British film, eligible
Eastern Promises (2007) - UK/Canada - British film, eligible
An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn (2018) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
Ezra (2007) - France/other countries - unsure which one, but not British, not eligible
Felicia's Journey (1999) - UK/Canada - British film, eligible
For Sama (2019) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
I Am Not a Witch (2017) - UK/France/Germany - British film, eligible
Iron Maiden: Flight 666 (2009) - Canada/UK - Canadian film, not eligible
Metro Manila (2013) - UK/Philippines - British film, eligible
Seven Psychopaths (2012) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
Slumdog Millionaire (2008) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
Spider - Canada/UK - Canadian film, not eligible
Sunshine (2007) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
Valhalla Rising (2009) - Denmark/UK - Danish film, not eligible
Virunga (2014) - UK/DRC - British film, eligible

And finally, Nolan's films.

Following (1998) - unequivocally British, eligible
Memento (2000) - unequivocally American, not eligible
Insomnia (2002) - unequivocally American, not eligible
Batman Begins (2005) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
The Prestige (2006) - USA/UK - American, as mentioned above, not eligible
The Dark Knight (2008) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
Inception (2010) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
The Dark Knight Rises (2012) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
Interstellar (2014) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
Dunkirk (2017) - UK/USA - British film, eligible
Tenet (2020) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible

So aside from his debut, I think only Dunkirk is British, though, I could see arguments for it being American too.

For the 4 unsure films, I'll put them where they currently are, unless someone can convince me otherwise.
Brooklyn (2014) - UK/Ireland/Canada - British film, eligible
Gravity (2013) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
Reunion (1989) - France/W. Germany/UK - French film, not eligible
Sleuth (1972) - USA/UK - American film, not eligible
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#188

Post by Smoover »

Smoover wrote: December 5th, 2021, 10:21 am 1. Lawrence of Arabia
2. Barry Lyndon
3. Brief Encounter
4. 2001: A Space Odyssey
5. Repulsion
6. The Bridge on the River Kwai
7. A Clockwork Orange
8. On Her Majesty's Secret Service
9.Tyrannosaur
10.Ex Machina
11.Trainspotting
12.Monty Python and the Holy Grail
13.Life of Brian
14.Mr. Turner
15.Hot Fuzz
16.Yes
17.Ice Cold in Alex
18.Kind Hearts and Coronets
19.The House of Mirth
20.My Beautiful Laundrette


Spoiler
More bristish now.
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#189

Post by Arkantos »

Appreciate all the hard work you've had to do to for eligibility investigations, Ferg

Like the USA poll I'm once again going for "films my gut says I should rank"

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick)
2. Brooklyn (2015, John Crowley)
3. In Bruges (2008, Martin McDonagh)
4. Hot Fuzz (2007, Edgar Wright)
5. Slumdog Millionaire (2008, Danny Boyle)

6. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964, Stanley Kubrick)
7. Baby Driver (2017, Edgar Wright)
8. Bridge on the River Kwaii (1957, David Lean)
9. Kingdom of Heaven (2005, Ridley Scott) specifically the 194-minute director's cut version
10. Brief Encounter (1945, David Lean)

11. Attack the Block (2011, Joe Cornish)
12. Sunshine (2007, Danny Boyle)
13. Ex Machina (2014, Alex Garland)
14. Lawrence of Arabia (1962, David Lean)
15. Black Narcissus (1947, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger)

16. The 39 Steps (1935, Alfred Hitchcock)
17. Shaun of the Dead (2004, Danny Boyle)
18. The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)
19. Eastern Promises (2007, David Cronenberg)
20. 28 Days Later... (2002, Danny Boyle)
The IMDb links
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#190

Post by matthewscott8 »

Arkantos wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 3:27 am2. Brooklyn (2015, John Crowley)
Irish director, Irish star, shot in Ireland, a movie about the Irish experience. It feels a little insensitive to claim this one for the UK poll. UK is first in the list of names in the production line I guess but still.
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#191

Post by Arkantos »

matthewscott8 wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 9:47 am
Arkantos wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 3:27 am2. Brooklyn (2015, John Crowley)
Irish director, Irish star, shot in Ireland, a movie about the Irish experience. It feels a little insensitive to claim this one for the UK poll. UK is first in the list of names in the production line I guess but still.
I wanted to put it at #4 on my Canada ballot when that rolls around. :whistling: But the boss man has made his call and I wanted to make sure this film gets at least one shoutout in this project.
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#192

Post by Fergenaprido »

matthewscott8 wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 9:47 am
Arkantos wrote: January 23rd, 2022, 3:27 am2. Brooklyn (2015, John Crowley)
Irish director, Irish star, shot in Ireland, a movie about the Irish experience. It feels a little insensitive to claim this one for the UK poll. UK is first in the list of names in the production line I guess but still.
It wasn't just that it was listed first. Based on what I could find, it seemed like it was initiated by the British. Happy to change my mind if you've got better information. I had initially thought it was Irish too, before digging deeper.
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#193

Post by Leopardi »

I was a little reluctant to participate because of the borderline cases make it extra-challenging to put together a (ranked) list, but I figured I'd give it a try. Can someone check to see if there are any ineligible films in my list?

1. 2001: A Space Odyssey (Stanley Kubrick, 1968)
2. The Lady Vanishes (Alfred Hitchcock, 1938)
3. Kes (Ken Loach, 1969)
4. A Clockwork Orange (Stanley Kubrick, 1971)
5. The Remains of the Day (James Ivory, 1993)
6. A Canterbury Tale (Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, 1944)
7. A Man For All Seasons (Fred Zinnemann, 1966)
8. The Shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
9. Secrets & Lies (Mike Leigh, 1996)
10. The Third Man (Carol Reed, 1949)
11. The Lion in Winter (Anthony Harvey, 1968)
12. Billy Budd (Peter Ustinov, 1962)
13. The Bridge on the River Kwai (David Lean, 1957)
14. The Private Life of Henry VIII (Alexander Korda, 1933)
15. Frenzy (Alfred Hitchcock, 1972)
16. Moonlighting (Jerzy Skolimowski, 1982)
17. Naked (Mike Leigh, 1993)
18. Becket (Peter Glenville, 1964)
19. A Matter of Life and Death (Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, 1946)
20. Scrooge (Brian Desmond Hurst, 1951)
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#194

Post by beasterne »

beasterne wrote: December 20th, 2021, 3:44 pm 1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
2. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
3. The Wrong Trousers (1993)
4. The Red Shoes (1948)
5. Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
6. The Long Good Friday (1980)
7. The Ladykillers (1955)
8. The Third Man (1949)
9. Secrets & Lies (1996)
10. Kes (1969)
11. Hot Fuzz (2007)
12. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
13. They Shall Not Grow Old (2018)
14. The Wicker Man (1973)
15. The Lion in Winter (1968)
16. Brief Encounter (1945)
17. Dunkirk (2017)
18. Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)
19. 49 Up (2005)
20. The King’s Speech (2010)
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Replaced the Ineligible films with two others. Hopefully The KIng’s Speech qualifies?
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#195

Post by zomgmouse »

1. The Red Shoes - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0040725/
2. The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097108/
3. Ratcatcher - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0171685/
4. Orlando - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107756/
5. Secrets & Lies - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117589/
6. Under the Skin - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1441395/
7. Peeping Tom - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0054167/
8. The War Game - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059894/
9. A Clockwork Orange - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0066921/
10. if... - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063850/
11. The Duke of Burgundy - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2570858/
12. The Long Day Closes - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0104753/
13. Kind Hearts and Coronets - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0041546/
14. The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0056194/
15. Brazil - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088846/
16. The Ladykillers - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0048281/
17. Life of Brian - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079470/
18. Kill List - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1788391/
19. The Favourite - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5083738/
20. Hot Fuzz - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0425112/

if I were adding more than one film per director (bending it a bit with Powell already) I'd also have:
A Zed & Two Noughts, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, Naked/Life Is Sweet, Monty Python and the Holy Grail
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#196

Post by Fergenaprido »

beasterne wrote: January 24th, 2022, 5:06 amHopefully The KIng’s Speech qualifies?
Yep. Never seen it considered anything but British, though it seems there was some US funding.
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#197

Post by peeptoad »

peeptoad wrote: December 4th, 2021, 1:50 pm This was much more difficult to pare down vs. the US poll. The UK might be my favorite region for films (though a couple of others are close).
I'm going with Wake in Fright (1971) as Australian... ? (IMDB says UK/Aus/US). If it's deemed UK let me know because it would be ranked high on my list.
As before the questionable ones are marked * with alternates-

1. Blowup (1966)
2. Repulsion (1965)
3. The Wicker Man (1973)
4. Lucifer Rising (1972)
5. Trainspotting (1996)
6. Heartless (2009)
7.The Hit (1984)
8. The Third Man (1949)
9. Don't Look Now (1973)
10. Velvet Goldmine (1998)
11. Naked (1993)
12. This is England (2006)
13. Small Axe (2020)
14. Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982)
15. The Committee (1968)
16. Scum (1979)
17. Weekend (2011)
18. Images (1972)
19. Kes (1969)
20. County Lines (2019)

UK
Hi Ferg. I made a couple of edits. The updated is ^. If it's too late no worries. :thumbsup:
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#198

Post by OldAle1 »

Finally finished and updated. I think I enjoyed the discussion in this thread as much or more than looking at all the lists (which I didn't do to much of - just was not going to get around to watching more stuff in this category this month), and it had some effect. One major lack on my lists - and many - was Shakespeare; British cinema it seems to me derives from or is influenced by the country's literature as much or more than most, and I already had Chaucer (in a manner of speaking) at the #1 spot, so I felt I had to make room for ol' Willy. And I dropped the movie about the apes and spaceships, because I'm just not convinced that most of Kubrick's films belong here - the two that definitely do are A Clockwork Orange and Barry Lyndon, and neither of those makes the cut for my list. So sorry Stanley. But I think in the end I managed to highlight as much of what I love about British cinema as I can with only 20 films.

Anyway I think this will end up being at least a tiny bit more interesting in the results than the USA list was.
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#199

Post by jal90 »

1. A matter of life and death (Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, 1946)
2. The Plague Dogs (Martin Rosen, 1982)
3. Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965)
4. Room at the top (Jack Clayton, 1959)
5. The father (Florian Zeller, 2020)
6. Shaun the Sheep Movie (Mark Burton & Richard Starzak, 2015)
7. Barry Lyndon (Stanley Kubrick, 1975)
8. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (Jim Sharman, 1975)
9. Kind hearts and coronets (Robert Hamer, 1949)
10. The third man (Carol Reed, 1949)
11. Snatch (Guy Ritchie, 2000)
12. Eyes wide shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999)
13. Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)
14. The shining (Stanley Kubrick, 1980)
15. Blackmail (Alfred Hitchcock, 1929)
16. Distant voices, still lives (Terence Davies, 1988)
17. Shame (Steve McQueen, 2011)
18. Orlando (Sally Potter, 1992)
19. The lodger: A story of the London fog (Alfred Hitchcock, 1927)
20. Morvern Callar (Lynne Ramsay, 2002)
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#200

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Last edited by Good_Will_Harding on January 26th, 2022, 3:00 am, edited 2 times in total.
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