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blocho
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#3001

Post by blocho »

What a colossal loss. Actor, director, activist, diplomat. Maybe we should just keep posting pictures of Poitier looking cool as ice.

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Or video of one of the all-time great moments in cinema history:
Last edited by blocho on January 7th, 2022, 4:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#3002

Post by Knaldskalle »

OldAle1 wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:55 pm
Knaldskalle wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:51 pm
OldAle1 wrote: January 7th, 2022, 3:25 pm The fact that tripe like Guess Who's Coming to Dinner and Lilies of the Field are even watchable is a testament to the giant ability of this actor, certainly one of the greatest of his generation.
To be fair, I think the presence of Spence Tracy and Katherine Hepburn had a little to do with it as well in the case of Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?
Sure, though I personally think they both gave pretty poor (especially by their standards) performances; it's Poitier - even though he's playing a ridiculously perfect character - who really stands out. But most of the problem in that film is in the writing and direction - I can't think of a more heavy-handed and obvious film dealing with race in America during that period, and there are a lot of contenders, many of which also star Poitier, who is just about always the best thing in them.
I knew someone who had that take on The Defiant Ones, thinking it was the most unsubtle "race movie" ever made. Not sure he was wrong, but I still enjoyed it when I saw it a decade ago or so.
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#3003

Post by OldAle1 »

Knaldskalle wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:58 pm
OldAle1 wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:55 pm
Knaldskalle wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:51 pm

To be fair, I think the presence of Spence Tracy and Katherine Hepburn had a little to do with it as well in the case of Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?
Sure, though I personally think they both gave pretty poor (especially by their standards) performances; it's Poitier - even though he's playing a ridiculously perfect character - who really stands out. But most of the problem in that film is in the writing and direction - I can't think of a more heavy-handed and obvious film dealing with race in America during that period, and there are a lot of contenders, many of which also star Poitier, who is just about always the best thing in them.
I knew someone who had that take on The Defiant Ones, thinking it was the most unsubtle "race movie" ever made. Not sure he was wrong, but I still enjoyed it when I saw it a decade ago or so.
Well, also a Stanley Kramer film. Maybe the most un-subtle director ever. But...to play devil's advocate with myself, maybe that was the only way these films could get made for real Hollywood money, and distributed. There are a lot of better films about race from the period - some films from Shirley Clarke, Corman's The Intruder, The Phenix City Story - but how many people saw any of those? I think only the last of them got any kind of real wide distribution. So maybe Kramer's bluntness was needed to get through some of the barriers at the time?

Anyway I liked The Defiant Ones a fair amount myself; maybe because it's more of a genre film and has a fair amount of action, it was easier to overlook some of the simplistic pieties, which are so in-your-face in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.
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#3004

Post by Lammetje »

Lammetje wrote: January 6th, 2022, 9:24 pm When I clicked Neffy's link and saw Peter Bogdanovich's picture, I recognized him from that award ceremony with Monty Python (the one with the urn and John Cleese with his funny speech).
Never mind, I'm a dummy; that was someone else. I must have recognized him from some other thing I've seen. Probably a short doc about a Hitchcock movie.
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#3005

Post by Ebbywebby »

blocho wrote: January 7th, 2022, 6:34 am
Torgo wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:59 am I know this comes off as a two-line-length borderline troll post
Yes, it does. And as such should be ignored.
Not trollish at all. Just a sober, unsentimental opinion.

"Targets" is a fun B-movie. "What's Up, Doc?" is a squarely commercial comedy that owes most of its success to Barbra Streisand's charisma. Shrug. But if I granted that four of his 30+ films (all near the beginning of his career) were important rather than two, would that really be so much more impressive?
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#3006

Post by St. Gloede »

Ebbywebby wrote: January 7th, 2022, 8:49 pm
blocho wrote: January 7th, 2022, 6:34 am
Torgo wrote: January 7th, 2022, 4:59 am I know this comes off as a two-line-length borderline troll post
Yes, it does. And as such should be ignored.
Not trollish at all. Just a sober, unsentimental opinion.

"Targets" is a fun B-movie. "What's Up, Doc?" is a squarely commercial comedy that owes most of its success to Barbra Streisand's charisma. Shrug. But if I granted that four of his 30+ films (all near the beginning of his career) were important rather than two, would that really be so much more impressive?
If a director makes just 1 film considered among the all-time canon they are generally remembered well, just see Elem Klimov, Gillo Pontecorvo, etc. so I really don't think the situation is at all unusual.

Just one historically important film is enough to make you historically important, and the more historically important films you have, the more impressive, certainly.
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#3007

Post by St. Gloede »

Very sorry to hear about Sidney Poitier, an absolutely wonderful actor who could indeed elevate simple material. The only film I saw with him recently was The Slender Thread, which clearly had an incredibly small budget and a clearly inexperienced/used to TV Sydney Pollack in the director's chair - leading to very dull choices in terms of angles, camera movements, compositions, etc. and Poitier just went in there with enough power to really bring it to life (with some good help from Bancroft).

I remember having a bit of a Poitier phase when I was younger and saw a decent number of his films relatively close together. The Defiant Ones, as well as No Way Out were the ones that really won me over back then, but not seen them in years. There are also still some key films I just haven't seen, like To Sir, with Love, which I should correct soon (I think it is due to a previous burnout on teacher's coming into a trouble class and making an impression films :D )

Btw, have anyone seen any of the films he directed and would you recommend them?
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#3008

Post by beasterne »

RIP Sidney Poitier. His passing means that of the AFI’s 25 Actors and Actresses list, Sophia Loren is the last living honoree.
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#3009

Post by sebby »

Bogdanovich made two major films when he was quite young and also played the role of auteur very well. There's not any more to it. He could have had a boring, hack name like "John Ford" and history still would have treated him the same.
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#3010

Post by Ebbywebby »

Poor Hugh Hudson. Directed a Best Picture winner but, with a name that boring, he didn't have a chance. Who would ever say "Hey, let's go see the new Hudson film tonight"?

Casual riffing for an ever-humorless room....

Samuel Fuller: boring name, routinely cited as underrated
George Miller: can't get much going beyond "Mad Max" films
Anthony Mann, John Sturges: not too famous, considering all their renowned films
Oliver Stone, Peter Weir, Kevin Smith, Richard Kelly: where are they now?
John Sayles, James Benning, Michael Snow, Guy Maddin, Bill Douglas: only recognized by film buffs
Peter Yates, Robert Aldrich: forgotten
Tony Scott, Larry Clark: no respect
Peter Watkins, Hal Hartley, Ken Loach, Joseph Losey, Jane Campion, Alex Cox, Alan Parker, Neil Jordan, Charles Burnett, Elaine May, Robert Wise, Sally Potter, Ken Russell, Peter Medak, Jack Clayton, Lynne Ramsay, Les Blank, Claire Denis, Shirley Clarke, Alan Clarke, John Waters, Andrea Arnold, Jacques Demy, Roy Andersson, Bruce Robinson, Louis Malle, Albert Brooks, Joe Dante, Monte Hellman, Stephen Frears, William Castle, Mike Leigh: overlooked
Paul Thomas Anderson, David Gordon Green: realized they needed to add middle names to give themselves flavor
Coen brothers: had to double up to get ahead
Todd Haynes, Ang Lee: wobbly success rate
Michael Powell: needed Pressburger to get ahead, fell out of favor on his own
Victor Fleming: how many of the people who have seen "Gone with the Wind" can tell you who directed it?
Carol Reed: ask a person on the street what he directed, or even his gender
Christopher Nolan, Brad Bird: their films are much better known than their names
Franklin J. Schaffner: adding middle initial didn't help, dropped from "Papillon" to "Yes, Giorgio" in just nine years
Eric Rohmer: would be much more famous with a better last name
Jerry Lewis: underrated as a director
Richard Donner: multiple hits but gets no respect
George Lucas: often derided as a director
Alexander Payne, Danny Boyle, Walter Hill, Sam Mendes, Curtis Hanson, Rob Reiner, Hal Ashby, Dennis Hopper, John Landis, Mel Brooks, Kimberly Peirce: faded
John Badham: directed "Saturday Night Fever" and god knows what else
Arthur Penn: & Teller Get Killed
Jim McBride: Meat Loaf- To Hell and Back
Philip Kaufman: has managed to grab 13 directing credits in 50+ years, despite a couple of hits
Andrew Haigh: who dat?
Julie Dash: hopelessly buried
James Gray: maitre d's still turn him away
Adam McKay: making movies for Netflix
Barry Jenkins: don't bet on him for the long term
What the hell happened to Bill Forsyth?

John Frankenheimer: a lot of misses, forever enshrined
Darren Aronofsky, Paolo Sorrentino, Robert Zemeckis: will never be out of work
M. Night Shyamalan, David Cronenberg, Brian De Palma, Guillermo del Toro, the Wachowskis: ever overrated
Sofia Coppola: couldn't be more overrated
Richard LInklater, Steven Soderbergh: can do whatever they like, no matter how indulgent
Paul Verhouven: had no trouble rebounding from "Showgirls"
Alejandro G. Iñárritu: jumped on the A-list almost immediately
Theodoros Angelopoulos: no one has seen his movies, but his name still inspires awe
Kelly Reichardt: modest success but doesn't seem to have any trouble getting her ideal projects funded
William Friedkin: not much happening for 30+ years, but forever has cachet
Spike Jonze: can write his own ticket, but if he was Adam Spiegel, he'd still be shooting music videos
Rossellini, Renoir, Godard, Truffaut, Mankiewicz, Tarkovsky, Bresson, Coppola, Kieslowski, Eisenstein, Visconti, Cocteau, Spielberg, Kiarostami, Miyazaki, Riefenstahl, Fassbinder, Svankmajer, Kurosawa, Almodovar, Bunuel, Scorsese, Oshima, Greenaway, Fellini, Antonioni, Bertolucci, Mizoguchi, Cassavetes, Polanski, Argento, Herzog, Peckinpah, Lubitsch, Jodorowsky, Pasolini, Von Trier, Von Stroheim, Von Sternberg: inevitably legends

Orson Welles, Spike Lee, Fritz Lang, Edgar Wright, Blake Edwards, Errol Morris, Bela Tarr, Sydney Pollack, Lindsay Anderson, Wes Anderson, Nicholas Ray, Satyajit Ray, Buster Keaton, Milos Forman, Preston Sturges, Terrence Malick, Raoul Walsh, Ridley Scott, Jordan Peele, Woody Allen: saved by having interesting first names instead

Managed to do it the hard way: John Ford, Billy Wilder, Peter Jackson, Michael Mann, David Lean, Frank Capra, Martin Ritt, David Lynch, Tim Burton, David Fincher, John Huston, Edward Yang, Mike Nichols, George Stevens, James Cameron, Chris Marker.
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#3011

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

Two greats, close after each other :rip:
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#3013

Post by Good_Will_Harding »

Damn, 2022 is really coming with the hits :rip:
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#3014

Post by kongs_speech »

I'm not "here," but I had to pay my respects to Bob Saget. A dear, hilarious man. His comedy was part of my life, both the G-rated and NC-17 material. Rest In Peace.
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#3015

Post by GruesomeTwosome »

Directing Dirty Work is the only noteworthy Bob Saget item for me, but damn, only 65. Curious to find out what happened there. RIP.
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#3016

Post by WalterNeff »

I was part of the college comedy crowd when Bob Saget was starting out in Philly comedy clubs. RIP
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#3017

Post by maxwelldeux »

I grew up on Full House and America's Funniest Home Videos. My dad told me at one point in my adolescence that Saget's comedy was... dirty. I didn't believe him and assumed he was a old fuddy-duddy and wrong. Alas, 'twas I who was wrong. RIP Bob - I rewatched "The Aristocrats" in December and found I still loved his version of the joke among the best.
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#3018

Post by blocho »

Ronnie Spector, 78

American singer, best known as the lead singer of the Ronettes. You might have heard this tune before, which played over the opening credits of Mean Streets and Dirty Dancing.

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#3019

Post by OldAle1 »

Two European directors, one of at least moderate fame, the other...probably not outside of his own country (if that? Germans help me out) died yesterday.

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Jean-Jacques Beineix, 75, French director, still probably best known for his debut, Diva (1981); also directed the fairly well-known La Lune dans le caniveau / Moon in the Gutter (1983) and 37° 2 le matin / Betty Blue (1986); his later work such as 1989's Roselyne et les lions and 2001's Motel transfert got much less attention.


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Herbert Achternbusch, 83, German director, writer and painter whose somewhat surreal, very low-budget work seems to have gotten him virtually no international recognition, and maybe not much in his home country either; for some reason I've known the name for quite a while and I've been meaning to watch I Know the Way to the Hofbrauhaus (1992) for a while. For some icm context, none of his films has more than 11 checks, though he did work as an actor with Werner Herzog a couple of times on films that many people will have seen.
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#3020

Post by peeptoad »

:rip: Beineix
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#3021

Post by OldAle1 »

I think Diva was one of the first French films that I got to see (relatively) new in the cinema; IMDb says it's US release was in 1982, which was while I was still in high school and I definitely didn't see it then, but I feel like I did see it while in college sometime between 83-87, and it made something of an impact on me, something about the glossiness and neon and the pacing really took me in. Can't say it quite held up when I re-watched it 25 or so years later though I still liked it overall. Only other thing I've seen is the shorter, commercial release version of Betty Blue which I don't remember at all now.
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#3022

Post by Ebbywebby »

OldAle1 wrote: January 14th, 2022, 6:57 pm I think Diva was one of the first French films that I got to see (relatively) new in the cinema... Only other thing I've seen is the shorter, commercial release version of Betty Blue which I don't remember at all now.
I could have written the exact same post. Though I could go further and say "Diva" seems like the first non-English film I ever saw.
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#3023

Post by OldAle1 »

Ebbywebby wrote: January 14th, 2022, 7:23 pm
OldAle1 wrote: January 14th, 2022, 6:57 pm I think Diva was one of the first French films that I got to see (relatively) new in the cinema... Only other thing I've seen is the shorter, commercial release version of Betty Blue which I don't remember at all now.
I could have written the exact same post. Though I could go further and say "Diva" seems like the first non-English film I ever saw.
I saw some stuff on TV as a youngster - not much, the only one that really stands out is Grand Illusion which I think I saw when I was around 10-11; my parents were big PBS watchers and they occasionally showed foreign stuff (even foreign TV - I distinctly remember the 1979 German Buddenbrooks showing, though I have no idea if I saw all of it or when it aired). And I saw Das Boot on it's first release, though I think it might have been dubbed. But it was really going to college that started me on the road to awareness that, gee, the US wasn't responsible for 99% of all the movies out there.
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#3024

Post by sebby »

blocho wrote: January 13th, 2022, 4:21 am Ronnie Spector, 78

American singer, best known as the lead singer of the Ronettes. You might have heard this tune before, which played over the opening credits of Mean Streets and Dirty Dancing.

The Ronettes were perhaps the greatest of the 60s girl-groups. Everyone knows Be My Baby but virtually all their singles and many of their b-sides were pop perfection.
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#3025

Post by blocho »

Yvette Mimieux, 80

American actor, probably best known for her appearance in The Time Machine
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#3026

Post by tourdesb »

Gaspard Ulliel, 37, after a ski accident :'(
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#3027

Post by hurluberlu »

tourdesb wrote: January 19th, 2022, 2:38 pm Gaspard Ulliel, 37, after a ski accident :'(
:satstunned:
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#3028

Post by jeroeno »

A ski accident, damn
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#3029

Post by peeptoad »

That's terrible and it seems maybe a freak accident, but unfortunately not uncommon, https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-60036255
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#3030

Post by psychotronicbeatnik »

I'm a little late to this news but it's still very sad. I have always been a huge fan of Beinex's four 80s films - and kept hoping he would someone get that magic back. Too late for that now, but what an accomplishment those films were. IP5 and Mortal Transfer weren't bad either.

:rip: Jean-Jacques Beineix (1946–2022)
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#3031

Post by blocho »

Hardy Kruger, 93

German actor. He appeared in many high-profile European and American movies, including The Flight of the Phoenix, Sundays and Cybele, Barry Lyndon, The Wild Geese, The Red Tent, and Hatari.
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#3032

Post by jvv »

Meat Loaf, 74

Bit surprised he has 75 acting credits, since I primarily think of him as a singer. (EDIT: Oh wait, that includes music videos)
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#3033

Post by OldAle1 »

jvv wrote: Yesterday, 9:43 am Meat Loaf, 74

Bit surprised he has 75 acting credits, since I primarily think of him as a singer. (EDIT: Oh wait, that includes music videos)
Looks like he may have died of COVID, which unfortunately is no surprise - he had turned pretty right-wing in recent years and was supportive of other anti-vaxx musicians like Clapton and Van Morrison. Anyway I won't say he was one of my very favorites, but he had a great voice and it took somebody of his talent to make the over-the-top music of a guy like Jim Steinman (also dead fairly recently, alas) palatable -



RIP Mr. Loaf
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#3034

Post by peeptoad »

OldAle1 wrote: Yesterday, 3:54 pm Anyway I won't say he was one of my very favorites...
Me either, but hopefully he'll RIP anyway. One of my roommates freshman year of college played Bat Out of Hell so many times (like multiple times per day) that if I ever hear 'Two Out of Three Ain't Bad' again it'll be a dark day in hell.
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#3035

Post by OldAle1 »

peeptoad wrote: Yesterday, 5:49 pm
OldAle1 wrote: Yesterday, 3:54 pm Anyway I won't say he was one of my very favorites...
Me either, but hopefully he'll RIP anyway. One of my roommates freshman year of college played Bat Out of Hell so many times (like multiple times per day) that if I ever hear 'Two Out of Three Ain't Bad' again it'll be a dark day in hell.
Oh you had one of those people too? It wasn't a roommate for me, or freshman year (junior? senior? I forget now) - it was a guy across the hall who had the biggest loudest sound system on campus, and he had 4 albums - Dark Side of the Moon, Third Stage (Boston), Asia (1st album) and Time Warp (Eric Kunzel & the Cincinnati Pops). Yes after 35+ years I can still remember. I can deal with the last of these - because I had (and have) it myself and love it, but I don't think I'll ever be able to listen to Boston's single "Amanda" which he used to play for 12 hours straight at a time. It's probably still the single song I've heard the most, displacing the Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams" which a roommate a year or two earlier had played incessantly.
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#3036

Post by peeptoad »

OldAle1 wrote: Yesterday, 5:59 pm
peeptoad wrote: Yesterday, 5:49 pm
OldAle1 wrote: Yesterday, 3:54 pm Anyway I won't say he was one of my very favorites...
Me either, but hopefully he'll RIP anyway. One of my roommates freshman year of college played Bat Out of Hell so many times (like multiple times per day) that if I ever hear 'Two Out of Three Ain't Bad' again it'll be a dark day in hell.
Oh you had one of those people too? It wasn't a roommate for me, or freshman year (junior? senior? I forget now) - it was a guy across the hall who had the biggest loudest sound system on campus, and he had 4 albums - Dark Side of the Moon, Third Stage (Boston), Asia (1st album) and Time Warp (Eric Kunzel & the Cincinnati Pops). Yes after 35+ years I can still remember. I can deal with the last of these - because I had (and have) it myself and love it, but I don't think I'll ever be able to listen to Boston's single "Amanda" which he used to play for 12 hours straight at a time. It's probably still the single song I've heard the most, displacing the Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams" which a roommate a year or two earlier had played incessantly.
There's one somewhere in every dorm... never fails. I sort of got back at my roommate by playing Jane's Addiction 'Nothing Shocking' pretty regularly (though no competition for Mr. Loaf!) since that album was released shortly before I went away to school.
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#3037

Post by Ebbywebby »

And comedian Louie Anderson, who was a lot more my sort of thing than Saget. The TV series "Baskets" may be his crowning achievement, and it was right near the end.
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#3038

Post by shugs »

That blows. Life with Louie was a staple of my childhood, and probably of everyone born in the 90s in Romania (and most of Eastern Europe). :rip:
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