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Last Movie Seen

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prodigalgodson
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Re: Last Movie Seen

#2161

Post by prodigalgodson » May 18th, 2020, 8:30 pm

Thrilled to watch my first Rohmer in a while, A Winter's Tale. I must've gotten in the spirit of it, pardon the verbose take:

Made me smile to be back in Rohmer's world; all those little ironies, nuances, mischaracterizations paint such a genuine, relatable, and across the course of his career, encompassing portrait of humanity. His exacting dialogue illuminates the inner essences of the characters and constructs consistent, philosophically sound exchanges, mostly focused on the complications of human passions, affording us a glance into a realm of effortless insight. Most of his films have such a warm palate its refreshing to see one cast shadowless by a wintry sky; the interiors maintain the vibe with gainy low lighting. It's also one of his tightest films, with a lovely musical editing rhythm; shit just flows. It ultimately hones in on a theme of faith, harking back to the Pascal preoccupation of the Moral Tales with the payoff of The Green Ray. I'm not crazy about the tidiness of the ending, but I'm not sure I'm supposed to be -- the lack of some final irony is certainly unexpected. There's also a dig at Godardian politics that made me laugh:

"I just know it's in America."
"North?"
*rolls eyes* "I assume."

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#2162

Post by prodigalgodson » May 19th, 2020, 7:22 am

New Hong too! :D Right Now, Wrong Then:

Another fascinating reflection on how we construct truth and reality, and the various possibilities arising from divergent behaviors, from the master. It uses Hong's signature doubled story to present different subjective perspectives of similar events, the second variation being more awkward (a recurring word in the dialogue), generally less flattering to Hong's philandering proxy, and, it's hinted in Kim Min-hee's dialogue, a more honest interpretation of events (her doubled performance particularly stands out). I love seeing the evolution of his protagonists as Hong's stature grows as a director, and especially appreciate his timely grappling with me-too-related themes given that he's largely built his career on a lecherous reputation (ironically, the filming of this led to an affair between Kim and Hong that formed the basis for one of his wisest and most fully realized meditations a couple years later, On the Beach at Night Alone). There are some classic Hong set pieces: the usual temple and sake bar scenes, a drunken shindig in a claustrophobic apartment walled in by bookshelves and plastered posters of the likes of Magritte and Carax, and a film festival Q&A with about five people in an otherwise empty auditorium. Overall it didn't blow me away, but it's a worthy piece of one of cinema's great tapestries, and damn it made me crave a cigarette.

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#2163

Post by joachimt » May 19th, 2020, 8:29 am

I watched Coffy last night and I really don't understand all the decent ratings I'm seeing from my kumpels on Criticker (meaning you guys). The acting is horrible, the fighting scenes are ridiculous, the story hardly makes sense and the director is just thinking of pathetic ways to show boobies. On the other hand it's not in the so-bad-it's-good-league, so what are you guys seeing in this? Maybe if you like soul music? Or is it a lame attempt to make fun of this criminal part of society? If so, it falls flat.
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#2164

Post by equanimitty » May 21st, 2020, 3:11 am

The Seventh Seal -1957- I.Bergman.
I have decided to watch those three films MARKARETA LAZAROVA-ANDREI RUBLEV-THE SEVENTH SEAL

For me its like I am watching history of EUROPE from those black and white images with 400 and 500 years back life settings..Which appeals to me nice ...

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#2165

Post by prodigalgodson » May 21st, 2020, 4:13 am

Sounds like a great triple feature.

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#2166

Post by joachimt » May 21st, 2020, 5:44 am

Tony Manero
He's an asshole, but we have no idea why.
He can grab any tit he likes and every woman lets him fuck her, but we have no idea why.
He's obsessed with John Travolta, but he looks pathetic.
He randomly kills people, but we have no idea why.
Oh right, he's a psychopath. That was clear from the beginning. No change in character. End of movie.
4/10
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#2167

Post by funkybusiness » May 21st, 2020, 5:53 am

more poetry reviews please

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#2168

Post by mightysparks » May 21st, 2020, 6:13 am

joachimt wrote:
May 19th, 2020, 8:29 am
I watched Coffy last night and I really don't understand all the decent ratings I'm seeing from my kumpels on Criticker (meaning you guys). The acting is horrible, the fighting scenes are ridiculous, the story hardly makes sense and the director is just thinking of pathetic ways to show boobies. On the other hand it's not in the so-bad-it's-good-league, so what are you guys seeing in this? Maybe if you like soul music? Or is it a lame attempt to make fun of this criminal part of society? If so, it falls flat.
Haven’t seen it in a long time, and I’m not a fan of boobies or soul, but I remembered it being pretty fun. All the stuff you thought was horrible and ridiculous I found charming and entertaining.
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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#2169

Post by Ebbywebby » May 22nd, 2020, 10:31 am

Speaking of boobies. I'm only the second to check this?


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#2170

Post by equanimitty » May 22nd, 2020, 11:30 am

River of Fundament is a 2014 operatic experimental film written and directed by American artist and filmmaker Matthew Barney, and co-directed by longtime collaborator Jonathan Bepler. It was produced by Barney and the Laurenz Foundation and is loosely based on the 1983 novel Ancient Evenings by Norman Mailer.

FIRST PART I HAVE SEEN ...

BOOM BOOM I can say now just...

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#2171

Post by cinewest » May 22nd, 2020, 3:12 pm

equanimitty wrote:
May 22nd, 2020, 11:30 am
River of Fundament is a 2014 operatic experimental film written and directed by American artist and filmmaker Matthew Barney, and co-directed by longtime collaborator Jonathan Bepler. It was produced by Barney and the Laurenz Foundation and is loosely based on the 1983 novel Ancient Evenings by Norman Mailer.

FIRST PART I HAVE SEEN ...

BOOM BOOM I can say now just...
Just saw the trailer to that... looks wild. I remember reading Ancient Evenings during my college years. About 1000 pages, and pretty x-rated.

How did your triple feature of medieval Europe / Russia go? Can't imagine watching more than one of those at a sitting, with plenty of time in-between...

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#2172

Post by equanimitty » May 23rd, 2020, 1:44 am

Ancient Evenings is a 1983 historical novel by American author Norman Mailer. Set in ancient Egypt and dealing with the lives of the characters Menenhetet One and Meni, the novel received mixed reviews. Reviewers noted the historical research that went into writing it and considered Mailer successful at conveying the nature of ancient Egyptian life. However, they also criticized the novel's narration and questioned its literary merit. Ancient Evenings has been compared to the work of the poet James Merrill and the novelist Thomas Pynchon, as well as to Mailer's novel Harlot's Ghost (1991). Some have suggested that its opening passage is its strongest part. Ancient Evenings served as an inspiration for the artist Matthew Barney's operatic film River of Fundament (2014).

Wow Thanks to reply. its in my reading list.

Today I ll watch Second part of the movie - River of Fundament (2014).

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#2173

Post by prodigalgodson » May 23rd, 2020, 2:34 am

I haven't read any Mailer but Ancient Evenings sounds right up my alley. I dig some of Barney's stuff a lot, though I haven't seen anything recent.

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#2174

Post by cinewest » May 23rd, 2020, 3:10 am

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 2:34 am
I haven't read any Mailer but Ancient Evenings sounds right up my alley. I dig some of Barney's stuff a lot, though I haven't seen anything recent.
Mailer was an interesting writer, but he tended towards over-writing, or bloating his subject matter, if only because he was in love with his own voice and ability to play with language.

One of my favorite books by him was his journalistic / novel Executioner's Song. A collection of shorter pieces called Advertisements for Myself is also a pretty interesting foray into his work.

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#2175

Post by prodigalgodson » May 23rd, 2020, 3:34 am

cinewest wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 3:10 am
prodigalgodson wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 2:34 am
I haven't read any Mailer but Ancient Evenings sounds right up my alley. I dig some of Barney's stuff a lot, though I haven't seen anything recent.
Mailer was an interesting writer, but he tended towards over-writing, or bloating his subject matter, if only because he was in love with his own voice and ability to play with language.

One of my favorite books by him was his journalistic / novel Executioner's Song. A collection of shorter pieces called Advertisements for Myself is also a pretty interesting foray into his work.
Nice, thanks for the recommendations. Never heard of Advertisements for Myself, I tend to like short stories.

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#2176

Post by blocho » May 23rd, 2020, 3:52 am

cinewest wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 3:10 am
Mailer was an interesting writer, but he tended towards over-writing, or bloating his subject matter, if only because he was in love with his own voice and ability to play with language.
Wow, that encapsulates my feelings on Mailer better than anything I could write myself. I read three of his books and they were OK, occasionally good. But his enormous self-regard in his non-fiction work is annoying.

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#2177

Post by cinewest » May 23rd, 2020, 4:04 am

blocho wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 3:52 am
cinewest wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 3:10 am
Mailer was an interesting writer, but he tended towards over-writing, or bloating his subject matter, if only because he was in love with his own voice and ability to play with language.
Wow, that encapsulates my feelings on Mailer better than anything I could write myself. I read three of his books and they were OK, occasionally good. But his enormous self-regard in his non-fiction work is annoying.
He comes from that school of journalism where the journalist is at least as important as his subject matter. This was a popular style, particularly in the 60's and early 70's. Ever read Hunter Thompson?

As for his verbose but playful style, it worked well in his "fiction for hire" crime drama, Tough Guys Don't Dance, and since he was doing it quickly, and purely for the money, it's only about 300 pages

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#2178

Post by blocho » May 23rd, 2020, 6:52 am

I read only The Rum Diary, which was a lark. But I would put Thompson and Mailer in slightly different categories because Thompson started out as a journalist while Mailer started as a novelist and then took non-fiction work later in his career. I find Mailer much more interesting for having gotten away with the attempted murder of his wife and for later running for mayor of New York on a secessionist platform.

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#2179

Post by cinewest » May 23rd, 2020, 8:02 am

blocho wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 6:52 am
I read only The Rum Diary, which was a lark. But I would put Thompson and Mailer in slightly different categories because Thompson started out as a journalist while Mailer started as a novelist and then took non-fiction work later in his career. I find Mailer much more interesting for having gotten away with the attempted murder of his wife and for later running for mayor of New York on a secessionist platform.
Yes, he was an interesting figure, something of a celebrity author and social commentator (his verbal battles with Gore Vidal are pretty entertaining).

He was such a strange combination of the traditional and cutting edge, the liberal and conservative, all wrapped into a very opinionated entertaining package.

He started out following somewhat in the footsteps of Hemingway: joined the army and wrote the great american war novel based on his experiences, and always wrote journalistic pieces until his career as a novelist really took hold. Advertisements For Myself includes some of those, and Executioner's Song, one of his most famous books, is based on his relationship with David Gilmore, a convicted murderer waiting on death row (I guess he was copying Truman Capote, there).
Last edited by cinewest on May 23rd, 2020, 8:33 am, edited 2 times in total.

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#2180

Post by Ebbywebby » May 23rd, 2020, 8:02 am

blocho wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 6:52 am
I would put Thompson and Mailer in slightly different categories because Thompson started out as a journalist while Mailer started as a novelist and then took non-fiction work later in his career. I find Mailer much more interesting for having gotten away with the attempted murder of his wife
But Burroughs essentially got away with the SUCCESSFUL murder of his wife.

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#2181

Post by funkybusiness » May 23rd, 2020, 8:12 am

Ebbywebby wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 8:02 am
blocho wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 6:52 am
I would put Thompson and Mailer in slightly different categories because Thompson started out as a journalist while Mailer started as a novelist and then took non-fiction work later in his career. I find Mailer much more interesting for having gotten away with the attempted murder of his wife
But Burroughs essentially got away with the SUCCESSFUL murder of his wife.
I was thinking the same thing.

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#2182

Post by blocho » May 23rd, 2020, 1:07 pm

Wow, I never knew that about Burroughs. Althusser also killed his wife and got off with three years in a psych ward.

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#2183

Post by OldAle1 » May 23rd, 2020, 2:47 pm

Very rich and very famous people (usually white men, in America at least) get away with murder every day - Burroughs being not so rich and not so famous at the time, and being a heroin addict to boot...pretty strange. The fact that it happened in another country, and there were no witnesses, and doubtless Mexican forensics and criminal investigative methods in general were less thorough than we would hope for today (maybe even in the 50s)... it's still a little weird but sadly probably not all that remarkable. When you're part of the dominant race/gender/etc, your living word is worth more than a dead woman's evidence.

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#2184

Post by matthewscott8 » May 23rd, 2020, 9:00 pm

prodigalgodson wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 2:34 am
I haven't read any Mailer but Ancient Evenings sounds right up my alley. I dig some of Barney's stuff a lot, though I haven't seen anything recent.
Ancient Evenings is mental, highly recommended.

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#2185

Post by funkybusiness » Yesterday, 4:09 am

blocho wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 1:07 pm
Wow, I never knew that about Burroughs.
Strange as it may seem, Cronenberg's Naked Lunch is based on a true story.

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#2186

Post by Ebbywebby » Yesterday, 4:16 am

cinewest wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 8:02 am
Executioner's Song, one of his most famous books, is based on his relationship with David Gilmore, a convicted murderer waiting on death row
GARY Gilmore. I think you got your signals crossed with Pink Floyd.

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#2187

Post by cinewest » Yesterday, 4:50 am

Ebbywebby wrote:
Yesterday, 4:16 am
cinewest wrote:
May 23rd, 2020, 8:02 am
Executioner's Song, one of his most famous books, is based on his relationship with David Gilmore, a convicted murderer waiting on death row
GARY Gilmore. I think you got your signals crossed with Pink Floyd.
Right you are. That kind of thing is happening more and more as I get older

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#2188

Post by funkybusiness » Yesterday, 4:56 am

coincidentally, I've got a David Gilmour book here on the table next to me, and it's not either of those Gilmours/mores.

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#2189

Post by cinewest » Yesterday, 8:03 am

funkybusiness wrote:
Yesterday, 4:56 am
coincidentally, I've got a David Gilmour book here on the table next to me, and it's not either of those Gilmours/mores.
I recognize that spelling. Which one is that?

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#2190

Post by funkybusiness » Yesterday, 8:21 am

cinewest wrote:
Yesterday, 8:03 am
funkybusiness wrote:
Yesterday, 4:56 am
coincidentally, I've got a David Gilmour book here on the table next to me, and it's not either of those Gilmours/mores.
I recognize that spelling. Which one is that?
this guy.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_David ... th_Baronet

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