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Last Movie Seen

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OldAle1
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Re: Last Movie Seen

#2041

Post by OldAle1 » January 30th, 2020, 7:14 pm

Cinepolis wrote:
January 30th, 2020, 7:05 pm
I'm gonna watch "Tajouj" in cinema tomorrow. One day later and it would fit the Africa challenge, but what can you do, right?
Be thankful that you live in a place where you actually have the opportunity to see an African film (or for that matter any film not from your own country and/or in your own language or made before the last couple of years) in the cinema.

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#2042

Post by Cinepolis » January 30th, 2020, 8:59 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
January 30th, 2020, 7:14 pm
Cinepolis wrote:
January 30th, 2020, 7:05 pm
I'm gonna watch "Tajouj" in cinema tomorrow. One day later and it would fit the Africa challenge, but what can you do, right?
Be thankful that you live in a place where you actually have the opportunity to see an African film (or for that matter any film not from your own country and/or in your own language or made before the last couple of years) in the cinema.
I still have to travel 20 km to watch this movie, but I'm still thankful to get the honor of watching "Tajouj" in a watchable copy. I normally never go to the cinema at home because there's only one of them near me. This is an exception because "Tajouj" is shown in the afternoon. Else I would have to drive all this way back home in the dark.

Update: My cold suddenly got worse, so I couldn't go to the cinema anyway :(

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#2043

Post by GruesomeTwosome » February 1st, 2020, 8:26 pm

I just went to see 1917...the one-take gimmick does make it quite immersive, but ultimately I found it to be a rather hollow/shallow experience. With that said, though it’s a low bar, it might be the best video game movie we’ve had so far.
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#2044

Post by RedHawk10 » February 2nd, 2020, 12:39 am

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 8:26 pm
I just went to see 1917...the one-take gimmick does make it quite immersive, but ultimately I found it to be a rather hollow/shallow experience. With that said, though it’s a low bar, it might be the best video game movie we’ve had so far.
The video game thing is being said a lot but it really is spot on. I don't think 1917 is a bad movie - it's solid enough and has a few impactful scenes - but the execution of a lot of it was pretty wonky, and that very last scene leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

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#2045

Post by OldAle1 » February 2nd, 2020, 3:02 pm

Agreed on all points with you guys. I've also been thinking about how on the flipside from it's technical innovations, it's traditional in the worst way - in the othering of the enemy, who are seen as nothing but The Bad Guy Out to Get You here. We've had generations of war movies now where filmmakers have tried to show that war is rarely a case of good v evil, and that "our side" is rarely if ever saintly, and I'm not sure there's ever been a major war where that was more true than WWI, a pure colonialist conflict, but here we get more or less a kill the jerry film on a par with lots of Hollywood takes on the war movie in the 40s and 50s.

The more I think about it the less I like it.

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#2046

Post by cinewest » February 8th, 2020, 4:19 pm

Just watched A Sun (Taiwan) on Netflix, and thought it one of the best movies i've seen from 2019. Kind of took me by surprise, and didn't really let on where it was going. Beautifully shot, too.

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#2047

Post by Onderhond » February 8th, 2020, 4:29 pm

cinewest wrote:
February 8th, 2020, 4:19 pm
Just watched A Sun (Taiwan) on Netflix, and thought it one of the best movies i've seen from 2019. Kind of took me by surprise, and didn't really let on where it was going. Beautifully shot, too.
Well, Mong-Hong Chung is an amazing director. If you haven't seen his other films, it's really worth seeking them out. Knowing your taste, The Fourth Portrait is probably the one with the biggest chance of success, Soul & Godspeed are great too, but a bit more genre-infused. Haven't watched A Sun yet, mostly because of its running time and because I'm suddenly hit by a spell of great films, with little time to review them all.

I just came back from watching Gretel & Hansel in cinemas. No idea who figured it was a good idea to give this film a cinema run (its commercial appeal, especially as a horror film is virtually non-existent), but I sure am grateful to that person! Very stylish and moody indeed.

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#2048

Post by GruesomeTwosome » February 8th, 2020, 8:56 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 8th, 2020, 4:29 pm
I just came back from watching Gretel & Hansel in cinemas. No idea who figured it was a good idea to give this film a cinema run (its commercial appeal, especially as a horror film is virtually non-existent), but I sure am grateful to that person! Very stylish and moody indeed.
I really liked Oz Perkins’ previous films (especially February aka The Blackcoat’s Daughter), so I plan to check out Gretel & Hansel tomorrow. I saw Jojo Rabbit at the cinema today...”meh.”
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#2049

Post by cinewest » February 9th, 2020, 1:58 am

Onderhond wrote:
February 8th, 2020, 4:29 pm
cinewest wrote:
February 8th, 2020, 4:19 pm
Just watched A Sun (Taiwan) on Netflix, and thought it one of the best movies i've seen from 2019. Kind of took me by surprise, and didn't really let on where it was going. Beautifully shot, too.
Well, Mong-Hong Chung is an amazing director. If you haven't seen his other films, it's really worth seeking them out. Knowing your taste, The Fourth Portrait is probably the one with the biggest chance of success, Soul & Godspeed are great too, but a bit more genre-infused. Haven't watched A Sun yet, mostly because of its running time and because I'm suddenly hit by a spell of great films, with little time to review them all.

I just came back from watching Gretel & Hansel in cinemas. No idea who figured it was a good idea to give this film a cinema run (its commercial appeal, especially as a horror film is virtually non-existent), but I sure am grateful to that person! Very stylish and moody indeed.
Thanks for the tip, Onderhond, I browsed the director on imdb late last night, and wasn't surprised to find that he is also a cinematographer (who goes by another name) as the film was beautifully shot. This is exactly the kind of film from everywhere in the world that eludes most cinephiles because it receives very little attention from any publicity group, or any international critics. Yet if it were an American film made in English it would be winning plaudits and awards.

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#2050

Post by Onderhond » February 9th, 2020, 9:37 am

A Sun won a Golden Horse award though, so it should be picked up by ICM I think (or don't we have that list?).
Not quite sure why films/directors like these have such a hard time to be recognized though, apart from the fact that Chung's work isn't a full match with the kind of films expect to see from either China or Taiwan.
GruesomeTwosome wrote:
February 8th, 2020, 8:56 pm
I really liked Oz Perkins’ previous films (especially February aka The Blackcoat’s Daughter), so I plan to check out Gretel & Hansel tomorrow.
I liked Oz' previous films a lot, Gretel and Hansel is the first one I actually favorited though. A bit more on the nose maybe, but I like that.

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#2051

Post by matthewscott8 » February 12th, 2020, 10:33 pm

Captive State (2019 - Rupert Wyatt) It feels like this has really flown under the radar, has very poor ratings. Very clever and creative, excellent satirical elements. Sci fi set in Chicago in the future where aliens have occupied earth and humans are controlled.

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#2052

Post by Onderhond » February 12th, 2020, 10:42 pm

Promare :wub:

The camera work is truly otherworldly. I have no idea what goes on in Imaishi's head, but I'd love to take a peek in there.

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#2053

Post by mightysparks » February 13th, 2020, 12:58 am

matthewscott8 wrote:
February 12th, 2020, 10:33 pm
Captive State (2019 - Rupert Wyatt) It feels like this has really flown under the radar, has very poor ratings. Very clever and creative, excellent satirical elements. Sci fi set in Chicago in the future where aliens have occupied earth and humans are controlled.
I liked it, and it definitely had a lot of potential (the idea was awesome and the opening scene was really good), but i wish the characters had been a little more interesting.
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#2054

Post by matthewscott8 » February 13th, 2020, 1:39 pm

mightysparks wrote:
February 13th, 2020, 12:58 am
matthewscott8 wrote:
February 12th, 2020, 10:33 pm
Captive State (2019 - Rupert Wyatt) It feels like this has really flown under the radar, has very poor ratings. Very clever and creative, excellent satirical elements. Sci fi set in Chicago in the future where aliens have occupied earth and humans are controlled.
I liked it, and it definitely had a lot of potential (the idea was awesome and the opening scene was really good), but i wish the characters had been a little more interesting.
the slow burn is hitting me this morning. It felt like life had become meaningless under the legislators so wasn't overly surprised at the lack of character. I felt that the SIM card reveal gave you a lot of room to feel what the characters were like before. I thought it was very clever and diverse, whilst at the same time being able to have a pop at "wokists" with the twist. The commentary on analogue was very smart too. In so many ways it felt like a "look how much we have lost" movie. It feels crazy that something so urgent and relevant has basically sunk without a trace.

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#2055

Post by Onderhond » February 13th, 2020, 2:16 pm

Maybe because it was aimed at a younger audience who don't feel like we've lost all that much? Can't say I really got that from the movie though. Liked it a lot for what it was, but I didn't see anything deeper than just a fun sci-fi/thriller (which is probably a good thing, because tech-doom annoys the crap out of me).

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#2056

Post by peeptoad » February 13th, 2020, 3:07 pm

Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (2011) very good. Might be the second or third best film I've seen this year so far. I highly rec it unless a person has an aversion to longer films. The run-time is long, but it didn't feel like it (as opposed to Knives Out, which felt like an eternity). :whistling:

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#2057

Post by matthewscott8 » February 13th, 2020, 6:49 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 13th, 2020, 2:16 pm
Maybe because it was aimed at a younger audience who don't feel like we've lost all that much? Can't say I really got that from the movie though. Liked it a lot for what it was, but I didn't see anything deeper than just a fun sci-fi/thriller (which is probably a good thing, because tech-doom annoys the crap out of me).
Well I think young people know that their lifestyles aren't better than their parents', and they're very engaged in environmental activism. But sure they don't have nostalgia for the post war pre digital era.

That movie was one of the most overt polemics I have ever seen, certainly the most political movie I have seen contemporaneously (obviously I can watch movies like Queimada and La Chinoise from before I was born).
SpoilerShow
Aliens have made their camps in the city centres, do they just happen to all be excellent sites for mining? No, the movie is talking about the gap between the rich and the poor because it has accelerated every year since the 70s (this is even mentioned specifically in the prologue). Now city centres are completely unaffordable and ghettos for the fabulously wealthy. The capitalist class isn't even slowing at its exploitation of the planet. These people are so removed from us that they are literally aliens.
C'mon y'all Captive State is an EVENT. No other film maker gets it, no other film maker is making compelling stories about this time period: right now.

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#2058

Post by cinewest » February 14th, 2020, 3:12 am

peeptoad wrote:
February 13th, 2020, 3:07 pm
Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (2011) very good. Might be the second or third best film I've seen this year so far. I highly rec it unless a person has an aversion to longer films. The run-time is long, but it didn't feel like it (as opposed to Knives Out, which felt like an eternity). :whistling:
This was one of my favorite films of the last decade. Loved the way that the investigation caravan introduced the landscape, characters, and story bit by bit, and slowly absorbed me as a viewer, building towards the scene where they stop for refreshments, and then finally when they interact with family of the murderer and do the autopsy. And though only a glimpse of these people and their realities is provided, it’s easy to imagine their world

In the course of what is essentially structured as a police procedural, an entire portrait of Anatolia is provided.
Amazing film!

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#2059

Post by peeptoad » February 14th, 2020, 2:03 pm

cinewest wrote:
February 14th, 2020, 3:12 am
peeptoad wrote:
February 13th, 2020, 3:07 pm
Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (2011) very good. Might be the second or third best film I've seen this year so far. I highly rec it unless a person has an aversion to longer films. The run-time is long, but it didn't feel like it (as opposed to Knives Out, which felt like an eternity). :whistling:
This was one of my favorite films of the last decade. Loved the way that the investigation caravan introduced the landscape, characters, and story bit by bit, and slowly absorbed me as a viewer, building towards the scene where they stop for refreshments, and then finally when they interact with family of the murderer and do the autopsy. And though only a glimpse of these people and their realities is provided, it’s easy to imagine their world

In the course of what is essentially structured as a police procedural, an entire portrait of Anatolia is provided.
Amazing film!
I completely agree on the gradual release of the story elements and the characters themselves. This last aspect really struck me as it worked very well; the characters were brought along gradually and in a completely believable manner. I really got invested in them and that was the glue that made the entire film stick in my brain. I loved their banter about anything and everything: so realistic and exactly what would happen if in a situation like the scenario in the film.
I also loved the beauty that was evident in things that might not normally be considered beautiful, like the unending and unwavering (non-changing, can't think of the adjective I am looking for) landscape of Anatolia. Maybe a harsh and at times unforgiving environment, but it looks wonderful and it is totally needed for the plot itself. Your last sentence above really hits it I guess...

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#2060

Post by cinewest » February 15th, 2020, 1:48 am

peeptoad wrote:
February 14th, 2020, 2:03 pm
cinewest wrote:
February 14th, 2020, 3:12 am
peeptoad wrote:
February 13th, 2020, 3:07 pm
Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (2011) very good. Might be the second or third best film I've seen this year so far. I highly rec it unless a person has an aversion to longer films. The run-time is long, but it didn't feel like it (as opposed to Knives Out, which felt like an eternity). :whistling:
This was one of my favorite films of the last decade. Loved the way that the investigation caravan introduced the landscape, characters, and story bit by bit, and slowly absorbed me as a viewer, building towards the scene where they stop for refreshments, and then finally when they interact with family of the murderer and do the autopsy. And though only a glimpse of these people and their realities is provided, it’s easy to imagine their world

In the course of what is essentially structured as a police procedural, an entire portrait of Anatolia is provided.
Amazing film!
I completely agree on the gradual release of the story elements and the characters themselves. This last aspect really struck me as it worked very well; the characters were brought along gradually and in a completely believable manner. I really got invested in them and that was the glue that made the entire film stick in my brain. I loved their banter about anything and everything: so realistic and exactly what would happen if in a situation like the scenario in the film.
I also loved the beauty that was evident in things that might not normally be considered beautiful, like the unending and unwavering (non-changing, can't think of the adjective I am looking for) landscape of Anatolia. Maybe a harsh and at times unforgiving environment, but it looks wonderful and it is totally needed for the plot itself. Your last sentence above really hits it I guess...
Yes, this is a perfect example of the way “slow film” can work to seep inside the viewer with the imagery of traveling through a landscape, and casual conversations, all of which take in much more meaning as the experience deepens, with the criminal investigation serving as a focal point.
It helps to see this film on the big screen, at least a good home theater where you can be enveloped in the experience, and during the course of the film I found myself imagining the lives and stories of everyone who featured, even those on the periphery, like the family at the farm, and family of the murderer, etc.

I think i also connected to it through my own worldly travels as a young man, when I wandered off the beaten track into regions and cultures I could taste in a similar way. I saw it when I first came out and still remember it very vividly, the sights and sounds, and filmmaking, which for me is the hallmark of a great movie, and cinematic magic of bringing something to life in all its subtle complexity.

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#2061

Post by Onderhond » February 16th, 2020, 6:11 pm

Just watched Knives Out ... Meh?
So many great films, but the things people get excited about. :shrug:

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#2062

Post by OldAle1 » February 16th, 2020, 6:40 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 16th, 2020, 6:11 pm
Just watched Knives Out ... Meh?
So many great films, but the things people get excited about. :shrug:
As to it's popularity, it's an old-school whodunit murder-mystery of the Agatha Christie variety, with the big star cast and lots of comedy - the kind of film that has been popular at various times in the UK and US since the beginning of the sound era (when it might have been the most popular genre - there were TONS of these films made in the early 30s). But they aren't that popular anymore so when one comes along once every year or two - the last one being the remake of Murder on the Orient Express, also a huge box office hit - they tend to do well, and people having the short memories that they have, they get over-praised for "originality" which one or two small narrative moments aside, this film doesn't show much that you couldn't have found in 1933. And I think this sort of thing is still more popular on TV (don't really know, don't watch enough TV to know) so people are still at least aware of it enough to get excited occasionally, unlike say new westerns.

I liked it myself, mostly for Daniel Craig getting to actually enjoy himself and show some personality, and Ana de Armas showing that she's more than a pretty face. I liked it enough that I could imagine seeing it again some day when I've forgotten most of the plot, but I certainly didn't think it was anything special and I'm glad I've seen enough better films from the year to bump it off my list for the poll now. But I'd just as soon watch a Charlie Chan or Philo Vance film from the 30s as watch any of the newer variations on this theme.

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#2063

Post by Onderhond » February 16th, 2020, 6:45 pm

I actually quite liked the last Murder on the Orient Express, but that one is getting a lot less praise than this one, which is why I was somewhat surprised. I mean, this gets an 8 average on IMDb :?

Also hated Craig and his terrible accent here, but none of the characters/actors did a good job imo. The stories in these films are always a little dull (there's not much to do for an audience but wait until everything is explained during the finale), but generally I can appreciate the mood. Sadly Johnson's director is incredibly dull and lifeless, so none of that either. Just a pretty big disappointment for me.

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#2064

Post by OldAle1 » February 16th, 2020, 6:51 pm

Craig's accent worked for me because he always seemed like kind of a charlatan in the first place - and I think in a sense he belongs to the tradition of such things, usually whoever plays Poirot in the Christie adaptations can't do the accent right. But you and I just have completely different ideas of what good acting, directing, writing, photography and pretty much everything else cinema-related are, so no surprises in our different reactions. :party:

Didn't see the new Murder myself, and don't remember the 70s one being that great. I'm not sure I've ever really liked a Christie adaptation, and this kind of murder-mystery is rarely compelling to me - I mean I like watching a lot of the older ones but I'm not sure there's a single film on my overall favorites list that's in this category. To me they tend to be enjoyable but forgettable fast-food, much like most American action films.

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