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The Official African American/Blaxploitation Challenge (february 2020)

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The Official African American/Blaxploitation Challenge (february 2020)

#1

Post by albajos » January 31st, 2020, 1:02 pm

wikipedia wrote:Blaxploitation or blacksploitation is an ethnic subgenre of the exploitation film that emerged in the United States during the early 1970s. The films, while popular, suffered backlash for disproportionate numbers of stereotypical film characters showing bad or questionable motives, including criminals, etc. However, the genre does rank among the first in which black characters and communities are the heroes and subjects of film and television, rather than sidekicks or villains or victims of brutality. The genre's inception coincides with the rethinking of race relations in the 1970s.

Blaxploitation films were originally aimed at an urban African-American audience, but the genre's audience appeal soon broadened across racial and ethnic lines. Hollywood realized the potential profit of expanding the audiences of blaxploitation films across those racial lines.

Variety credited Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song and the less radical, Hollywood-financed film Shaft (both released in 1971) with the invention of the blaxploitation genre. Blaxploitation films were also the first to feature soundtracks of funk and soul music.
Image

What Exactly Is African-American Cinema?
Far be it from me to actually define what African-American Cinema is. So I'll offer up the following (taken from an introduction to an essay on this very topic):
The category “African American Cinema” presents important conceptual challenges for scholars, critics, and moviegoers. Before laying out those challenges, though, it is important to note that African American cinema is often thought of as part of American cinema, while at the same time, African American cinema is also often thought of as part of a global black diasporic cinema. Consequently, other articles in this bibliography that focus on elements of American cinema include entries relevant to research on African American cinema, and many articles on non-US cinemas—for example, African Cinema, British Cinema, Cuban Cinema, and Transnational and Diasporic Cinemas—include entries relevant to researching topics in “black cinema.” Now back to the conceptual challenges African American cinema presents: To clarify these challenges, think about three prepositions: by, of, for. Does African American cinema mean films made by African Americans? If so, who are the key figures in the making: director, writer, performers, producers, financiers? Does it matter if the finance comes from Hollywood or independent sources? If a researcher is interested in “by,” then the articles on Authorship and Auteur Theory and on the black directors Charles Burnett, Spike Lee, and Oscar Micheaux, and actor- director Sidney Poitier, may be of interest. Does African American cinema mean films of—films that depict—African Americans? If so, must such depictions make an African American a central figure? Must that figure be “positive” or “realistic” or, indeed, performed by an actor who would self-identify as African American or black? If a researcher is interested in “of,” see also The Birth of a Nation, The Jazz Singer, King Kong, and more general categories like blackface, blaxploitation, Exploitation Film, Pop, Blues, and Jazz in Films, Race and Cinema, and African American Stars. Does African American cinema mean films that seem to be for African Americans—films that aim to address or appeal to African American moviegoers or films that, by whatever measures (say, box office success or critical approbation by black critics), succeed with African American audiences? If a researcher is interested in “for,” see also Exhibition and Distribution and also entries on various genres and modes of filmmaking. Underlying many of the critical and scholarly studies of African American cinema are additional questions of—and passionate arguments about—how politics, activism, social connections and commitments, aesthetics, pleasure, entertainment, art, and commerce interrelate with one another—and how they should interrelate with one another. This article does not favor one position in these debates over another, but aims to present a range of positions in the scholarship on African American cinema.

- source

How Will This Challenge Be Judged?
Any film that illustrates the African American experience in America would be acceptable for this challenge.
But if you need any pointers. The lead(s) should be African American. And to make the movie more "woke" either the director, screenwriter or original author should also be african american.

Rules:
- Rewatches allowed.
- A feature film (at least 40 min) counts as one entry.
- A total of 60 minutes of short films count as one entry.
- For TV/mini-series, the usual 40/60 rules apply.
- And not neccessary to post NSFW pictures. I will read this forum on the bus.

Stats & Formatting:
- Original title (year) is the preferred format. Year is neccessary. Probably not many akas in this challenge, but do make a note if you use another title than the one on imdb/originally released as. If the original title uses the N-word I would actually prefer you using the aka.
- For TV episodes, please use "Series Title: Episode Title" as the title
- New posts are preferred over edited posts

Official Lists:
Still none

African-American Cinema Lists:
http://www.library.ufl.edu/spec/belknap ... nemaaa.htm <-- Max really like this list.
http://www.listchallenges.com/100-must- ... ican-films
https://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list ... ack-movies
https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/slat ... /monoglot/ (via 3eyes)
https://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/28+d ... rodosonix/ (via 3eyes/frbrown)

Netflix African American Cinema collection: https://www.netflix.com/title/80161851
mostly stolen from max, thanks for hosting last time

Record:
Held once before in 2018, psychotronicbeatnik has the highest score with 62.

Bonus Challenge:
See at least one movie with: Mainly actors: Ruby Dee, Pam Grier, Rudy Ray Moore, Sidney Poitier, Richard Roundtree, Octavia Spencer, Denzel Washington, Fred Williamson, Writer: Mara Brock Akil, Directors: Charles Burnett, Spike Lee, Oscar Micheaux, Dee Rees, John SIngleton or Melvin Van Peebles for a max of 15 points. To enter the bonus challenge write: bonus and name - ex. [bonus:Singleton] after the title.
RankParticipantVIPDeeGrierMoorePoitierRondtreeSpencerWashingtonWilliamsonAkilBurnettLeeMicheauxReesSingletonVP
1psychotronicbeatnik5-X-----X---X-XX
2albajos4-XXX---X-------
3cinephage1--------------X



RankParticipantPointsPers. rec.
1psychotronicbeatnik2562
2albajos14-
3sol1214
4jdidaco1010
5blueboybob8-
6blocho44
7allisoncm35
7jeroeno316
73eyes39
7vortexsurfer3-
11hurluberlu29
12cinephage11
12flavo50001?
12maxwelldeux142
906,42 avr.



updated to post #82
Last edited by albajos on February 8th, 2020, 11:46 pm, edited 11 times in total.

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#2

Post by albajos » January 31st, 2020, 1:26 pm

And since if it's Oscar season, try to keep those white saviour titles to a minimum. :p

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#3

Post by flavo5000 » January 31st, 2020, 4:45 pm

A couple of Blaxploitation lists:
Spazz's Official List Of Must See Blaxploitation Films
A general list of various blaxploitation movies

Some of the above i wouldn't consider blaxsploitation but would still fit the bill of African American Cinema (Cooley High for instance).

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#4

Post by allisoncm » January 31st, 2020, 4:58 pm

Bonus Challenge:
See at least one movie with or directed by Melvin Van Peebles, Richard Roundtree, Fred Williamson, Rudy Ray Moore, Sidney Poitier, Denzel Washington, Pam Grier, Octavia Spencer, Spike Lee or John SIngleton for a max of 10 points. (more (important) people can be suggested and the bonus challenge can thus be expanded.). To enter the bonus challenge write: bonus and name - ex. [bonus:Singleton] after the title.
suggestion:
Charles Burnett

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#5

Post by allisoncm » January 31st, 2020, 4:59 pm

I rented a movie with Tiffany Haddish for this challenge (plus some other ones that seemed to be more about the African American experience). I'll watch/list it for the challenge if she plays a central role. She usually does.

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#6

Post by OldAle1 » January 31st, 2020, 5:24 pm

allisoncm wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 4:58 pm
Bonus Challenge:
See at least one movie with or directed by Melvin Van Peebles, Richard Roundtree, Fred Williamson, Rudy Ray Moore, Sidney Poitier, Denzel Washington, Pam Grier, Octavia Spencer, Spike Lee or John SIngleton for a max of 10 points. (more (important) people can be suggested and the bonus challenge can thus be expanded.). To enter the bonus challenge write: bonus and name - ex. [bonus:Singleton] after the title.
suggestion:
Charles Burnett
Seconded.

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#7

Post by 3eyes » January 31st, 2020, 5:29 pm

I appreciate your thoughtful introduction to this. I aim to watch a few.

[typo in title: Blaxploitation]
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#8

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » January 31st, 2020, 5:40 pm

Thanks for hosting, albajos.

I'll second Allison's rec of Charles Burnett for the Bonus challenge and I would also like to suggest Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee and Oscar Micheaux be added.

What about TV? Shows like Julia (1968) paved the way for a more positive representation of Black America and should be included here. The Rules stop at Mini-series and do not mention series television although they are mentioned in the guidelines.

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#9

Post by albajos » January 31st, 2020, 5:49 pm

psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 5:40 pm
What about TV?
albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 1:02 pm
- For TV episodes, please use "Series Title: Episode Title" as the title
If I don't specify NOT, then it's allowed. Even The Cosby Show

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#10

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » January 31st, 2020, 5:53 pm

albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 5:49 pm
psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 5:40 pm
What about TV?
albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 1:02 pm
- For TV episodes, please use "Series Title: Episode Title" as the title
Dyno-mite!

I promise not to say that again this month.


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#12

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » January 31st, 2020, 10:06 pm

albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 1:02 pm

Record:
Held once before in 2018, psychotronicbeatnik has the highest score with 88.

Actually, it's just 62 - which seems very low for a challenge record these days.

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#13

Post by albajos » January 31st, 2020, 10:35 pm

psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 10:06 pm
Actually, it's just 62 - which seems very low for a challenge record these days.
Bah, wrong column

I still think 62 is upper/mid tier, maybe around 40th (we have done about 80 different, I think). When I joined in 2016 people seemed content to see one movie/day so many challenges ended in the 30s. So did I in my first nordic challenge. Which gave me 2nd place.

The first 5 years it was basically just sci-fi, noir and horror that was a certain 100+

I'll update the leaderboard soon, but last year we have had 23 different type of challenges with 100+, I'm guessing 30 now, of those 80 different categories.

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#14

Post by sol » February 1st, 2020, 2:33 am

It starts! First in. :D

1. Native Son (1986)

Image

An African American chauffeur tries to cover up a crime against his Caucasian employer in this morality play movie. Based on a 400 page novel, the story feels compressed as a two-hour feature (abrupt ending; limited build-up) but as a look at guilt and grappling with misdeeds though, it is very hard to pass up. Lead actor Victor Love has some great moments, only barely looking up from the ground as his employer's boyfriend is grilled over his crime.
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#15

Post by vortexsurfer » February 1st, 2020, 5:14 am

1. Dolemite (D'Urville Martin, 1975) [bonus:Rudy Ray Moore]

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#16

Post by albajos » February 1st, 2020, 10:25 am

Nominations for bonus challenge has closed. 15 is a number that should be manageable by most, so I'll limit it there.

Every two days I'll introduce one of them, and we start with the most obvious one perhaps
Denzel Washington
(Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. - December 28, 1954, New York (age 65))

Image

In a career that now have lasted 43 years, including 9 academy award nominations and 2 wins. 9 Golden Globe nominations and 2 wins. 7 SAG nominations and 1 win. The Cecil B. DeMille Award. 14 Black Reel Award nominations and 6 wins. 24 NAACP Image Award nominations and 17 wins. He has also won the Silver Bear in Berlin twice.

Denzel Washington really became the go to guy for any filmmaker if they wanted to make a serious movie about an african american. His breakthrough was at the age of 33, when he portrayed Steve Biko. And soon after he got nominated both for Glory and Malcolm X, and then really became a household name. So he has done less of the type of movies we are looking for in this challenge, as he has been a mainstream actor for most of his career.
Tom Hanks said working with Washington on Philadelphia (1993) was like "going to film school". Hanks said he learned more about acting by watching Denzel than from anyone else.
Frequently works with directors Spike Lee, Tony Scott, Edward Zwick, and Antoine Fuqua

Has in the later years tried to direct, and the fourth one Fences (2016) did get a best picture nominaton that year.

Top movies to watch for this challenge: (all doubles)
Malcolm X
Glory
Fences
And would also pinpoint his debut movie, Wilma, a TV movie about Wilma Rudolph in the 1960 olympics. I haven't seen it, but I guess it fits.

Personally I have seen 4 of his movies in cinema (maybe 5), from Cry Freedom to Courage Under Fire. I did maybe see Training Day, but I have to check that.
Last edited by albajos on February 1st, 2020, 4:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#17

Post by sol » February 1st, 2020, 4:52 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)

2. Just Mercy (2019)

Image

If a bit overly sentimental, the central case here is very potent and the performances are on the mark. Running through a whole gamut of emotions, from disbelief, to despair to cynicism etc, Jamie Foxx is excellent, while Michael B. Jordan shines, if sometimes overly naive/idealistic. The supporting cast are generally in good form too - especially Rob Morgan and Tim Blake Nelson as other unfairly treated prisoners - though Brie Larson is wasted.
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#18

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 1st, 2020, 7:34 pm

albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 10:35 pm
psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 10:06 pm
Actually, it's just 62 - which seems very low for a challenge record these days.
Bah, wrong column

I still think 62 is upper/mid tier, maybe around 40th (we have done about 80 different, I think). When I joined in 2016 people seemed content to see one movie/day so many challenges ended in the 30s. So did I in my first nordic challenge. Which gave me 2nd place.

The first 5 years it was basically just sci-fi, noir and horror that was a certain 100+

I'll update the leaderboard soon, but last year we have had 23 different type of challenges with 100+, I'm guessing 30 now, of those 80 different categories.
When I won Directed By Women a couple of years back Allison noted that she didn't think anyone would ever top 100 in it so she was pleasantly shocked to see me do it. flavo smashed my record the following year! The winning numbers seem to keep climbing higher.

I enjoy the historical stats you post from time to time and look forward to the day when you complete stats for all the challenges.

Great idea to do an intro post for each of the Bonus Challenge names too. This Challenge was one of the most eye-opening for me when I did it 2 years ago - I hope to continue my education this year. I'm excited that are at least a couple of names in the Bonus that I know virtually nothing about.

:cheers:

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#19

Post by maxwelldeux » February 1st, 2020, 7:57 pm

Bonus challenge question: If you hit multiple people (e.g., Malcolm X could count for Denzel or Spike), do you get multiple points, or do you pick one?

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#20

Post by maxwelldeux » February 1st, 2020, 8:02 pm

sol wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 2:33 am
1. Native Son (1986)

An African American chauffeur tries to cover up a crime against his Caucasian employer in this morality play movie. Based on a 400 page novel, the story feels compressed as a two-hour feature (abrupt ending; limited build-up) but as a look at guilt and grappling with misdeeds though, it is very hard to pass up. Lead actor Victor Love has some great moments, only barely looking up from the ground as his employer's boyfriend is grilled over his crime.
That's on my list to watch this month - my wife read the book pretty recently and excitedly asked me to acquire all three versions of the movie (1951, 1986, and 2019). We've watched the 1951 version (starring the author of the novel), and were SORELY disappointed - she was telling me all about the nuance and struggles in the source novel, and all of it seemed to be scrubbed from the 1951 film. The 1986 one sounds significantly better based on your description, so I'm going to be pretty excited to get there.

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#21

Post by albajos » February 1st, 2020, 8:12 pm

01. Petey Wheatstraw (1977) USA 1 official list 104 checks [Bonus:Moore]
Blax. Postponed from last month. Wheatstraw/Moore makes a deal with the devil and try to trick him to get out of it.
02. The Mack (1973) USA 2 official lists 415 checks
AfAm. Screenplay by a former inmate. Final draft by the two lead actors and the director. Some mass scenes were improvised.
03. Uptown Saturday Night (1974) USA 415 checks [Bonus:Poitier]
Blax. Starts off normal enough, but almost turns into a Godfather parody by the end. Blaxploitation but lite as Poitier directed it himself, at least Cosby got arrested.
04. Willie Dynamite (1974) USA 1 official list 101 checks
Blax. Stereotypes all the way. A social worker tries to get a pimp to change his ways.

Watermelon count: 3/4

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#22

Post by maxwelldeux » February 1st, 2020, 11:33 pm

0. Maxwelldeux's a Moron (2020) - Worst Post [nom]

In this post, maxwelldeux posted to the wrong challenge. Let's all judge and mock him. :circle:
Last edited by maxwelldeux on February 2nd, 2020, 2:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#23

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 2nd, 2020, 12:05 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 11:33 pm
1. Kinsey (2004) Best Supporting Actress - Laura Linney [nom]

Wife has been wanting to watch this for a bit, so we did. I've seen it before (in the theater no less), but haven't seen it since, so it was a pretty fresh viewing for me. Loved the story Alfred Kinsey and his sex research and history of it, though the film seemed to try to do just a bit too much. The emotional tones at the end felt forced and not set up particularly well early on. But some clever writing and hilarious moments to it and worth watching. Linney was pretty good in it.
I'm guessing you meant to post this in Oscar, max!

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#24

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 2nd, 2020, 12:52 am

1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]


Ten Minutes to Live is my favorite Micheaux out of the 5-6 I've seen. It has the advantage of being pre-code plus having the usual Harlem Renaissance elements that I enjoy - lots of musical numbers plus a wild melodramatic plot played relatively straight. There's also several quiet scenes - typically showing a character just sitting and smoking - that have a relaxed and thoughtful quality about them.

I'll be taking my usual weekend away from the internet so I will not be back to post until Tuesday unless I manage to slip away earlier.
Happy Groundhog Day everyone! :cheers:

Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
Views: 4 / FTV’s: 2 / {334 m.}

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#25

Post by 3eyes » February 2nd, 2020, 2:53 am

1. The people vs O.J. Simpson (16) - Ep 1 - From the ashes of tragedy
2. The people vs O.J. Simpson (16) - Ep 2 - The run of his life

I couldn't find the documentary steaming on anything I can access, so settled for this.
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#26

Post by maxwelldeux » February 2nd, 2020, 2:56 am

psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
February 2nd, 2020, 12:05 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 11:33 pm
1. Kinsey (2004) Best Supporting Actress - Laura Linney [nom]

Wife has been wanting to watch this for a bit, so we did. I've seen it before (in the theater no less), but haven't seen it since, so it was a pretty fresh viewing for me. Loved the story Alfred Kinsey and his sex research and history of it, though the film seemed to try to do just a bit too much. The emotional tones at the end felt forced and not set up particularly well early on. But some clever writing and hilarious moments to it and worth watching. Linney was pretty good in it.
I'm guessing you meant to post this in Oscar, max!
:facepalm:

Thanks - I fixed it above. :thumbsup:

I mean, there was like a Black person or two in there, but probably not enough. :lol:

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#27

Post by sol » February 2nd, 2020, 3:25 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 8:02 pm
sol wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 2:33 am
1. Native Son (1986)

An African American chauffeur tries to cover up a crime against his Caucasian employer in this morality play movie. Based on a 400 page novel, the story feels compressed as a two-hour feature (abrupt ending; limited build-up) but as a look at guilt and grappling with misdeeds though, it is very hard to pass up. Lead actor Victor Love has some great moments, only barely looking up from the ground as his employer's boyfriend is grilled over his crime.
That's on my list to watch this month - my wife read the book pretty recently and excitedly asked me to acquire all three versions of the movie (1951, 1986, and 2019). We've watched the 1951 version (starring the author of the novel), and were SORELY disappointed - she was telling me all about the nuance and struggles in the source novel, and all of it seemed to be scrubbed from the 1951 film. The 1986 one sounds significantly better based on your description, so I'm going to be pretty excited to get there.
Don't get your hopes up too high; everyone who has read the book seems to despise the 1986 version. :shrug: It appears to be a pretty well-known text in America. As a non-US citizen though, and I haven't even heard of the novel beforehand and with little/no preconceptions, I found the movie fascinating to view. But I have always been big on films that focus on characters grappling with crimes, misdeeds and immoral actions that haunt them.
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#28

Post by sol » February 2nd, 2020, 3:28 am

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)

3. Dear White People (2014)

Image

The title here refers to a campus radio show that one of the four African American protagonists hosts and as the hostess in question, Tessa Thompson has some great lines, pointing out some of the less obvious racist ways of her peers. She is a curious character too with very firm views about the world, and the film could have benefited from more focus on her radio show. The other protagonists are decidedly less fascinating and less well developed.
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#29

Post by vortexsurfer » February 2nd, 2020, 7:33 am

2. Life (Ted Demme, 1999)

SpoilerShow
1. Dolemite (D'Urville Martin, 1975) [bonus:Rudy Ray Moore]
2. Life (Ted Demme, 1999)

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#30

Post by hurluberlu » February 2nd, 2020, 10:02 am

1. Us (Jordan Peele, 2019) 5
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#31

Post by sol » February 2nd, 2020, 11:32 am

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)

4. Death at a Funeral (2010)

Image

Released so soon after the original, this African American take on the lively British comedy has been called pointless. Moving the action across the Atlantic with some of America's finest black comedy actors must have sounded great on paper, yet the main location and the brightest gags are lifted directly from the original. The interactions between the African American cast generally work though and a cantankerous Danny Glover is a lot of fun.
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#32

Post by jeroeno » February 2nd, 2020, 1:03 pm

01. Losing Ground (1982)
02. Eve's Bayou (1997)

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maxwelldeux
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#33

Post by maxwelldeux » February 2nd, 2020, 6:38 pm

1. Lavell Crawford: Can a Brother Get Some Love? (2011)

I like to sprinkle in Black comedians into challenges like this because I enjoy hearing a different perspective on life in general. Lavell's not my favorite, though, largely because of the cadence of his comedy. Some solidly funny moments, but a little too one-note to be really good.

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#34

Post by albajos » February 2nd, 2020, 8:30 pm

05. Dolemite (1975) USA 2 official lists 540 checks
Blax. Starring the boom mike.
06. The Guy from Harlem (1977) USA 61 checks
Blax. I'm pretty sure this will be the worst one when the month is over. It's on level with 10-year olds borrowing their parents camcorder.
07. Coffy (1973) USA 2 official lists 1 556 checks [Bonus:Grier]
Blax. Coffy was the first black avenger.
08. Truck Turner (1974) USA 163 checks
Blax. A sudden Dick Miller appears!
09. The Greatest (1977) UK | USA 25 checks
AfAm. Muhammed Ali plays Muhammed Ali. James Earl Jones plays Malcolm X. Based on Ali's own book. So does he a good job being himself? Well, he get way too long sentences sometimes. More a lecture than dialogue. All matches are shown with archive footage of poor quality.
10. Lady Sings the Blues (1972) USA 185 checks [double]
AfAm. Diana Ross plays Billie Holiday. She got attacked by the clan once, but otherwise it seems society was ok with her career. (it's not a focus of the movie)

They call me Mister Tibbs!Show
01. Petey Wheatstraw (1977) USA 1 official list 104 checks [Bonus:Moore]
02. The Mack (1973) USA 2 official lists 415 checks
03. Uptown Saturday Night (1974) USA 415 checks [Bonus:Poitier]
04. Willie Dynamite (1974) USA 1 official list 101 checks
05. Dolemite (1975) USA 2 official lists 540 checks
06. The Guy from Harlem (1977) USA 61 checks
07. Coffy (1973) USA 2 official lists 1 556 checks [Bonus:Grier]
08. Truck Turner (1974) USA 163 checks
09. The Greatest (1977) UK | USA 25 checks
10. Lady Sings the Blues (1972) USA 185 checks [double]

!seen 10
Last edited by albajos on February 3rd, 2020, 5:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#35

Post by flavo5000 » February 3rd, 2020, 1:03 am

albajos wrote:
February 2nd, 2020, 8:30 pm
[
06. The Guy from Harlem (1977) USA 61 checks
Blax. I'm pretty sure this will be the worst one when the month is over. It's on level with 10-year olds borrowing their parents camcorder.
You are almost certainly correct. This movie was indeed incredibly terrible BUT the Rifftrax is one of the all-time best.

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#36

Post by sol » February 3rd, 2020, 12:34 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)

5. Def by Temptation (1990)

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Photographed by Ernest R. Dickerson (aka Spike Lee's right arm), this film often looks great, full of eerily lit fog and with lots of pronounced red and blue hues throughout. The first appearance of the succubus in a church flashback is pretty spooky too. As a narrative though, this is a poorly paced affair with lots of lulls in the action as the characters sit around and yap for minutes on end. The characters are never particularly interesting either.
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#37

Post by cinephage » February 3rd, 2020, 1:24 pm

01. Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song, de Melvin van Peebles (1971) 8/10 Bonus - Melvin van Peebles 1/15

Wow, this was intense ! I love the inventivity, the rage, and the power of these images. Too bad it becomes very repetitive at one point, but otherwise it's a fantastic movie.

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#38

Post by blueboybob » February 3rd, 2020, 1:39 pm

1. The Cool World (1963)
2. Putney Swope (1969)
3. The Watermelon Woman (1996)
4. Pariah (2011)

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#39

Post by 3eyes » February 3rd, 2020, 2:09 pm

Btw, there's a bunch of stuff coming on the Criterion Channel this month, including a Sydney Poitier retrospective (yes, with The slender thread).
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#40

Post by sol » February 3rd, 2020, 2:53 pm

It's been a while since I've seen it, but I don't recall race issues coming into The Slender Thread and I'm not sure how appropriate it would be as a film about the African American experience.
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