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Last Movie Seen

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peeptoad
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Re: Last Movie Seen

#1881

Post by peeptoad » May 31st, 2019, 1:12 pm

Kublai Khan wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 3:24 am
What a coincidence. I just watched Moonlight for the first time just the other day as well.

I think you're trying to jam the pieces together to see a different story than what the director intended. The story is about Chiron dealing with his homosexual identity in an environment and culture that is hyper toxic to it.
SpoilerShow
Mahershala Ali's character was the father figure to Chiron and taught him the ways of the street's culture. That he has to hide his vulnerabilities and never expose himself to danger (even down to whee to sit at a table). After Juan died, when Chiron was in high school, he did try to to experience a little vulnerability an closeness with his friend, only to have to backfire. So Chiron truly closes off and embraces all the lessons Juan taught him and he basically is living Juan's life instead of his own. He tells his friend that he's not been together with anyone else.

Basically..
The first part is Chiron learning from Juan that he has to suppress all vulnerabilities to survive.
The second part is Chiron having that lesson reinforced by him immediately being hurt (physically and emotionally) after a vulnerable moment.
The third part is a little ambiguous, I'll grant you that. I think Chiron is jarred into figuring out that just surviving isn't enough. He has no real deep connection with anyone and even his mom's tearful apologies don't really move him.
Hi Kublai Khan... thanks for your response. I respect your thoughts on my critique of the film, but I do think I had a grasp (at least in a general sense) of the intent of the director prior to viewing. Although complex in nature the story is actually rather simple (which isn't to say that I think the film is simplistic because I don't). I was expecting a coming-of-age type drama involving the character as you describe in a rather hostile world vs. the identity issues. It's the type of plot that I can usually connect with since those are issues that many people go through in one way or another while growing up and learning to navigate the world. Maybe there is a deeper component that I missed.
The first act had me intrigued, the second piece is where is started to falter slightly for the reasons I mentioned above (mainly the removal of one of the main characters with barely any acknowledgement) and I found it to be really predictable. That in and of itself is not a failure, but even with the predictions I was able to make accurately* nothing that happened resonated with me in any way. Best I can do is describe the film as a hollow shell of what really may have happened. By the third act I was really hoping for some adhesion to bring the entire film (all three sequences) together as a cohesive unit and it failed big time for me in that regard. I got nothing out of the final act... except that about 5 times I thought to myself, is this really the same character from the first two? That can't be him... he's way too much of a stereotype compared to the younger Chiron. Maybe that was the point that I missed. Maybe he was supposed to have evolved into a stereotype, but for me that has a strong cheapening effect for the entire piece. I can't imagine that was the intent, but maybe it was.
If this film hadn't won or been nom'd for so many awards, then I probably wouldn't be picking it apart to this extent. I'm trying to understand what about it made it loved by so many...maybe that's the real question I have.

*for example
SpoilerShow
the intimacy on the beach scene and the subsequent bullying episode at the school involving that same friend
Ebbywebby wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 5:20 am
Moonlight: There were three segments, and I liked each one less than the previous one. Not the right trajectory for a film. By the end, I was thinking, jeez, all that promise and he just turned into a stock character? Oh well.
Agree completely. And though I didn't touch on the adult Chiron being a stock character of sorts that's exactly how it came across to me... hence part of my disappointment and the reason why the third act is so weak imho. It was difficult for me to fathom that that character was even the same character from the previous two sequences. I think that's partly where my non-interlocking puzzle piece analogy came from.

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#1882

Post by Ivan0716 » May 31st, 2019, 10:09 pm

Sunset (László Nemes, 2018)
Rewatch, didn't think this would hold up on a second viewing, but I enjoyed it just as much as I did back in October, if not more so.

Watched it on my TV through Curzon Home Cinema, so I wasn't nearly as impressed with the technical side of things as last time(on a fresh 35mm print). It does mean less time spent admiring the film and more time trying to follow it - maybe that's why I was able to pick up a lot more on what was happening this time round. Even found myself laughing a few times(Judit Bardos' death stares; Irisz being the employee from hell). Still the most singular film I've seen from this decade, not one I would recommend blindly though.

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#1883

Post by Kublai Khan » May 31st, 2019, 10:58 pm

peeptoad wrote:
May 31st, 2019, 1:12 pm
Hi Kublai Khan... thanks for your response. I respect your thoughts on my critique of the film, but I do think I had a grasp (at least in a general sense) of the intent of the director prior to viewing. Although complex in nature the story is actually rather simple (which isn't to say that I think the film is simplistic because I don't). I was expecting a coming-of-age type drama involving the character as you describe in a rather hostile world vs. the identity issues. It's the type of plot that I can usually connect with since those are issues that many people go through in one way or another while growing up and learning to navigate the world. Maybe there is a deeper component that I missed.
The first act had me intrigued, the second piece is where is started to falter slightly for the reasons I mentioned above (mainly the removal of one of the main characters with barely any acknowledgement) and I found it to be really predictable. That in and of itself is not a failure, but even with the predictions I was able to make accurately* nothing that happened resonated with me in any way. Best I can do is describe the film as a hollow shell of what really may have happened. By the third act I was really hoping for some adhesion to bring the entire film (all three sequences) together as a cohesive unit and it failed big time for me in that regard. I got nothing out of the final act... except that about 5 times I thought to myself, is this really the same character from the first two? That can't be him... he's way too much of a stereotype compared to the younger Chiron. Maybe that was the point that I missed. Maybe he was supposed to have evolved into a stereotype, but for me that has a strong cheapening effect for the entire piece. I can't imagine that was the intent, but maybe it was.
If this film hadn't won or been nom'd for so many awards, then I probably wouldn't be picking it apart to this extent. I'm trying to understand what about it made it loved by so many...maybe that's the real question I have.

*for example
SpoilerShow
the intimacy on the beach scene and the subsequent bullying episode at the school involving that same friend
Hmm. I think you're right. I think Chiron realizes that becoming a stereotype was just a security blanket and that he hadn't grown as person. It does also ties back to the first segment in which his friend wrestles him to make sure he's "tough".

I thought it was pretty good. I enjoyed the tragedy of it all. I think it's possible you just went in with really high and misguided expectations. It's not really a complex drama, it's more of just a rumination on how things are, and shot pretty beautifully at that.

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#1884

Post by Rainy Red Carpet » June 15th, 2019, 7:05 am

Acute Misfortune. The trailer was better than the film.
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#1885

Post by SkilledLunatic » June 28th, 2019, 2:22 pm

I just recently saw Toy Story 4. Everyone had been praising it and I loved the series so far - although I did think number 3 was the perfect bookend for the story.

The animation is absolutely gorgeous, as we come to expect, the voice acting and characters are great and funny but somehow it all felt hollow. I can’t put my finger on it but something just felt off. Lifeless. Maybe I’m just too cynical nowadays...

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#1886

Post by Ebbywebby » June 28th, 2019, 7:23 pm

"The Dead Don't Die" is Jarmusch's worst film. I figured it only could be a trolling "Fuck you, see how stupid these movies are?" to the zombie-film industry, but then I looked up a few Jarmusch interviews and he's actually serious about it. Raving about his love for George Romero and the like. And then he stressed the film's undercurrent of social commentary about fracking, consumerism, MAGA, etc. but, really, he just parroted "Dawn of the Dead"'s concept without adding any fresh wrinkles. Sorry to say, seeing Tom Waits in a far-out role is about the only good reason to see this.

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#1887

Post by OldAle1 » June 28th, 2019, 8:55 pm

Ebbywebby wrote:
June 28th, 2019, 7:23 pm
"The Dead Don't Die" is Jarmusch's worst film. I figured it only could be a trolling "Fuck you, see how stupid these movies are?" to the zombie-film industry, but then I looked up a few Jarmusch interviews and he's actually serious about it. Raving about his love for George Romero and the like. And then he stressed the film's undercurrent of social commentary about fracking, consumerism, MAGA, etc. but, really, he just parroted "Dawn of the Dead"'s concept without adding any fresh wrinkles. Sorry to say, seeing Tom Waits in a far-out role is about the only good reason to see this.
I think I liked it more than you, but I basically agree. I might say that Night on Earth was weaker, but I haven't seen that since it came out - really need to re-watch all of JJ's pre-Dead Man work at this point. I was entertained by the new one for the most part, but it definitely felt like a lark and an excuse for him to just work with all of his favorite actors and not have to put too much work into anything.

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#1888

Post by matthewscott8 » July 7th, 2019, 7:25 pm

Midsommar (2019 - Ari Aster)

I think this is the first time I've watched a movie and felt really sick in my stomach afterwards, like having to think about holding it down. It's vile and intoxicating, troublingly misandristic and unhinged. But I wouldn't have missed it for the world. My arms are shaking now and the whole world feels weird and fucked up. I saw a creepy comment on the cinema notice board after coming out "Yes, all men, you are the sun" (they invite public comments and have little cards and pens). Then I saw some random little shrine made of flowers walking home which freaked me out.

I guess this is one of the reasons to go to the cinema, a good old shake up.

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#1889

Post by Coryn » July 10th, 2019, 11:16 am

Mr. Nobody (2009) *****

What a gem. This one blew me totally away. Fun that it is Belgian as well. It went from Sci fi to romance to mystery back to romance and somehow it all worked and fell together.

Even if the story is not for you, the visuals are amazing. Every shot is beautiful. I can see myself rewatching this a dozen times in my life.
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#1890

Post by chrispeddler » July 15th, 2019, 11:56 am

I've watched Shaft 2 on Netflix. So far so good. It's more about family than focusing on shaft himself. I'm entertained though.

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#1891

Post by 1859 » July 21st, 2019, 12:38 am

Uuuuh, I just finished Chappie.

Then I went to check opinions and I'm surprised that so many human beings are immune to its charm. Different opinions, okay.... I didn't like District that much, as far as I remember... But it's like Paddington of sci fi, same cuteness <3

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#1892

Post by RedHawk10 » July 23rd, 2019, 9:35 pm

Ms. 45 was great, a nightmarish vision of a woman struggling to process violent trauma in a relentlessly prurient world. Not at all humorless, though - laughed so hard when the kid in the ape suit randomly scared the protagonist's neighbor.

Wish I had started with Ferrara here instead of The Addiction. :yucky:

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#1893

Post by Ebbywebby » July 31st, 2019, 8:37 pm

I hoped "Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood" would turn out to be my favorite Tarantino film (I've always had a "thing" for vintage hippie movies), but instead it's my LEAST favorite. What a grave disappointment. I've always been a Tarantino skeptic, and now I feel even more skeptical.

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#1894

Post by explorer95 » August 6th, 2019, 3:26 am

I have watched the Funny Games (1997). It's the most disturbing film i've ever watched.

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#1895

Post by St. Gloede » August 6th, 2019, 6:17 am

Are you its incarnation?

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#1896

Post by cinewest » August 6th, 2019, 6:26 am

Coryn wrote:
July 10th, 2019, 11:16 am
Mr. Nobody (2009) *****

What a gem. This one blew me totally away. Fun that it is Belgian as well. It went from Sci fi to romance to mystery back to romance and somehow it all worked and fell together.

Even if the story is not for you, the visuals are amazing. Every shot is beautiful. I can see myself rewatching this a dozen times in my life.
I also liked this one a lot- one of my top 10 of the year, I think.The same filmmaker made a couple of earlier movies I also like quite a bit: Toto les heroes, and The Eighth Day

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#1897

Post by Coryn » August 6th, 2019, 6:28 am

cinewest wrote:
August 6th, 2019, 6:26 am
Coryn wrote:
July 10th, 2019, 11:16 am
Mr. Nobody (2009) *****

What a gem. This one blew me totally away. Fun that it is Belgian as well. It went from Sci fi to romance to mystery back to romance and somehow it all worked and fell together.

Even if the story is not for you, the visuals are amazing. Every shot is beautiful. I can see myself rewatching this a dozen times in my life.
I also liked this one a lot- one of my top 10 of the year, I think.The same filmmaker made a couple of earlier movies I also like quite a bit: Toto les heroes, and The Eighth Day
Also seen Toto le hero and Le huitième jour. Both rated 8 out of 10 so liked them very much.
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#1898

Post by cinewest » August 6th, 2019, 6:45 am

Ebbywebby wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 8:37 pm
I hoped "Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood" would turn out to be my favorite Tarantino film (I've always had a "thing" for vintage hippie movies), but instead it's my LEAST favorite. What a grave disappointment. I've always been a Tarantino skeptic, and now I feel even more skeptical.
What are you “skeptical” of?

Tarantino has always taken “trash” movies and tried to turn them into art with witty masturbations amongst the garbage, but he has never really gone beyond “pulp fiction,” which was his freshest, most creative and accomplished riff.

He will always be worthy of mention when talking about one strain of “post modern” cinema, but just about every filmmaker in this camp reminds me of the “emperor without any clothes.”

Pretty much agree with your response to Moonlight, as well, though I think Barry Jenkins shows some promise as a filmmaker (this was only his second film). What goes way overboard is a recent assessment of the decade (by a conglomerate of film critics...indiewire?) that I read naming Moonlight the top film of the 2010's. I thought it less flawed than La La Land (another second film that gets too much love), but I even don't have it in my top 100.

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#1899

Post by outdoorcats » August 7th, 2019, 1:45 am

Nah, Moonlight is definitely at least one of the best films of the 2000s. ;) Though I did prefer Beale Street which is even better. I think the play-like, 3-act structure and stronger focus on formalistic qualities makes Moonlight appeal more to critics. Not to mention Jenkins pretty much immediately had a mastery of the same type of filmmaking you see in directors whose work keeps appearing at the top of TSPDT's list (f.e. Dreyer, Ozu, Bresson), particularly when it comes to fully exploiting the emotional potential of the actor's face. In some ways it's very old-fashioned filmmaking in a sense that you don't often see in mainstream English-language filmmaking anymore, with its greater focus on interpersonal communication: faces, conversations, body language, unspoken words. The only other American filmmaker I can name with this kind of focus in their films is Todd Haynes. Most mainstream films nowadays focus more on 'actions' and an individual dynamically interacting with their environment, or the camera dynamically interacting with the environment, rather than the subtleties of interpersonal dynamics. That's the best way I can explain why many film critics have already included Jenkins (and Haynes) in the great directors canon, as well as fans of classic b&w cinema (when generally focusing on interpersonal dynamics was a much bigger part of filmmaking and film-watching).
Last edited by outdoorcats on August 7th, 2019, 5:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#1900

Post by Kublai Khan » August 7th, 2019, 3:24 am

I watched Rim of the World (2019) on Netflix.

The humor and cursing is too raunchy for parents. The skull-crunching scary aliens are too scary for young kids. But the plot and characters are so very generic and straightforward that it can't be meant for entertaining adults. The only way this movie makes sense if it was hyper-intended to specifically be watched by unsupervised middle school kids without their parents knowing. But on that level, everything about it makes sense.

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#1901

Post by cinewest » August 7th, 2019, 3:32 am

outdoorcats wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 1:45 am
Nah, Moonlight is definitely at least one of the best films of the 2000s. ;) Though I did prefer Beale Street which is even better. I think the play-like, 3-act structure and stronger focus on formalistic qualities makes it appeal more to critics. Jenkins pretty much immediately had a mastery of the same type of filmmaking you see in directors whose work keeps appearing at the top of TSPDT's list (f.e. Dreyer, Ozu, Bresson), particularly when it comes to fully exploiting the emotional potential of the actor's face. In some ways it's very old-fashioned filmmaking in a sense that you don't often see in mainstream English-language filmmaking anymore, with its greater focus on interpersonal communication: faces, conversations, body language, unspoken words. The only other American filmmaker I can name with this kind of focus in their films is Todd Haynes. Most mainstream films nowadays focus more on 'actions' and an individual dynamically interacting with their environment, or the camera dynamically interacting with the environment, rather than the subtleties of interpersonal dynamics. That's the best way I can explain why many film critics have already included Jenkins (and Haynes) in the great directors canon, as well as fans of classic b&w cinema (when generally focusing on interpersonal dynamics was a much bigger part of filmmaking and film-watching).
I don’t disagree with what you are saying here, and am, in general, much more a fan of European cinema for the very reasons you talk. About. I also applaud Jenkin’s intentions (I am also looking forward to seeing Beale Street). I just don’t think he pulled it off, completely (I found Haynes’ Carol, for example, to be a more mature film by comparison).
I also agree with ebbeywebby’s comment that that film weakens part by part, after starting off strong. I could see the film he wanted to make, but I just don’t think he fully managed it, and partly due to the performances of some of the actors.
Like I said in my post, Jenkins did show enough for me to consider him a promising director, and I am eager to see if there is growth in Beale Street, though it didn’t receive the same kind of acclaim.

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#1902

Post by outdoorcats » August 7th, 2019, 4:02 am

I thought that each act of Moonlight was even better than the last. The last line and the very end literally took my breath away when I saw it in theaters, I remember unconsciously gasping a little and my chest hurting - I can count the number of films that have had that deep of an impact on me on one hand.

Carol is a better film, I agree, but better in the sense that Michael Jordan is better than Larry Bird. We can't just go around comparing everything to Carol.

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#1903

Post by cinewest » August 7th, 2019, 5:03 am

outdoorcats wrote:
August 7th, 2019, 4:02 am
I thought that each act of Moonlight was even better than the last. The last line and the very end literally took my breath away when I saw it in theaters, I remember unconsciously gasping a little and my chest hurting - I can count the number of films that have had that deep of an impact on me on one hand.

Carol is a better film, I agree, but better in the sense that Michael Jordan is better than Larry Bird. We can't just go around comparing everything to Carol.
I didn’t get to see it in the theater, and perhaps that lessened the degree to which I was drawn in, or how the film worked, but the kind of experience you describe is the best compliment I can think of.

I have read an interview with Jenkins, and love what he is about as a filmmaker, especially since there are so few American directors with his kind of interest and intention with the medium.

Looking forward to Beale Street

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#1904

Post by RedHawk10 » August 11th, 2019, 7:02 pm

Ebbywebby wrote:
July 31st, 2019, 8:37 pm
I hoped "Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood" would turn out to be my favorite Tarantino film (I've always had a "thing" for vintage hippie movies), but instead it's my LEAST favorite. What a grave disappointment. I've always been a Tarantino skeptic, and now I feel even more skeptical.
Funny enough, I had the exact opposite experience. Went in expecting to dislike it, came away from it stunned. I feel like people are misreading the ending, which I took as being tremendously sad. I think it's by far his best film, nothing else he's done comes remotely close.

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#1905

Post by blocho » August 11th, 2019, 9:16 pm

Just saw it the other day. I would call the ending bittersweet and melancholic. I liked that the movie provided a meta-commentary on the issue of violence in movies, a topic Tarantino has engaged in since he started and one which he has very much gotten tired of talking about in interviews.

I enjoyed it, but I can easily see how many people will hate this movie or be bored by it. I will say that I've never seen Tarantino more deeply indulge his movie nerdiness. And that's something all of us here can relate to.

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#1906

Post by GruesomeTwosome » August 11th, 2019, 11:21 pm

I just saw the new Tarantino as well. Still determining whether I liked the ending or not, but I definitely enjoyed all that came before it. Very engaging throughout.
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#1907

Post by RBG » August 11th, 2019, 11:34 pm

i had a blast watching minnelli's the cobweb (1955) just LOOK at it

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#1908

Post by rnilsson19 » August 20th, 2019, 9:19 am

I can't stop looking at Gloria Grahame as a brunette.

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#1909

Post by RBG » August 20th, 2019, 5:09 pm

i had a blast watching baahubali: the beginning! and there's a good copy on youtube! today i will watch part 2. yes i will have devoted 5+ hrs and it was worth every minute :lol: could've used more songs and i am not being sarcastic

maybe make some gifs later. absolute blast :circle:
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#1910

Post by RBG » August 22nd, 2019, 4:13 pm

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#1911

Post by Ebbywebby » August 27th, 2019, 10:01 am

"Titicut Follies"...overdue, my first Frederich Wiseman film ever. Unsettling, particularly if you don't care for the sight of old men's penises. The They Shoot Pictures, Don't They? site shares a calculated list of their top 250 directors, and I hadn't seen a major film by about 12 of them. Now, it's one less. A few other top names where I'm batting .000: Angelopoulos, Mekas, Naruse, Pialat, Kusturica, Zhang Yimou.

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#1912

Post by Ivan0716 » August 29th, 2019, 12:30 am

Late to the party but I saw Once Upon a Time in Hollywood yesterday. It's my third favourite of his behind Pulp Fiction and Inglourious Basterds. I wasn't sure what to make of the ending at first, but the more I think about it the more I like it, it actually made me more fond of the Sharon Tate parts in retrospect.

Also probably the best Leo performance I've seen.

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#1913

Post by blocho » August 29th, 2019, 4:22 am

Quite a day for me. Saw five movies, breaking my previous one-day record of four. I know in these parts those are unremarkable numbers. But it was special for me.

Body Heat
True Stories
Pee-wee's Big Adventure
Coeur Fidele
Stars in My Crown

I think I went 4-for-5, with only Pee-wee being a misfire.

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#1914

Post by maxwelldeux » August 29th, 2019, 5:32 am

blocho wrote:
August 29th, 2019, 4:22 am
Quite a day for me. Saw five movies, breaking my previous one-day record of four. I know in these parts those are unremarkable numbers. But it was special for me.

Body Heat
Body Heat blew me away - watched that the first time last month and it was everything I wanted and more. Sexy without being exploitive, consistently interesting, mysterious, entrenched in the setting, etc. Kinda sorry I waited so long to see it.

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#1915

Post by GruesomeTwosome » August 30th, 2019, 12:54 pm

Ivan0716 wrote:
August 29th, 2019, 12:30 am
Late to the party but I saw Once Upon a Time in Hollywood yesterday. It's my third favourite of his behind Pulp Fiction and Inglourious Basterds. I wasn't sure what to make of the ending at first, but the more I think about it the more I like it, it actually made me more fond of the Sharon Tate parts in retrospect.

Also probably the best Leo performance I've seen.
Yes, I agree with everything here :thumbsup: (i.e., eventually coming around to appreciating the ending when initially I was dismissive of it; and yeah - this might my favorite Leo performance as well).
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#1916

Post by Kublai Khan » August 31st, 2019, 5:27 pm

I just finished watching Strange Days (1995).

It's good, but.. it's flawed. And it's flawed in a way that's going to stick with me for a couple of days until I figure it out.

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Ebbywebby
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#1917

Post by Ebbywebby » September 9th, 2019, 7:39 pm

I saw "Sholay" (1975) yesterday, though it was a contemporary "remix" of sorts that I detailed my misgivings about elsewhere. But it was my first film checked from the Bollywood list! The only list where I had zero checks. (Weirdly, I'm likely to see a second film from the list -- "Pyaasa" -- in the near future. They're both available on Amazon Prime. And so is "Kaagaz Ke Phool.")

The Bollywood list is so unpopular that just checking this single film means there are now *13* other official lists where I have a lower ICM rank. Most of the 13 are highly mainstream lists based on action, martial arts, animation and box-office variables.

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jal90
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#1918

Post by jal90 » September 10th, 2019, 8:48 am

Godard's Les carabiniers is better than I thought... heck, it holds up perfectly to Vivre sa vie and Le mépris, and its charm is probably more of my thing. Its burlesque take on the subject of war is very effective, and the daring nature of the whole film both in thematic approach and execution is something to admire and enjoy immensely. I can't get how this piece of raw passion for film language, perfect encapsulation of the kind of philosophy the author applies to his entire body of work, can be considered as anything less than a quintessential Godard from the 60s, much less as a piece for completionists like I expected to find.

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RBG
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#1919

Post by RBG » September 10th, 2019, 12:19 pm

Ebbywebby wrote:
September 9th, 2019, 7:39 pm
I saw "Sholay" (1975) yesterday, though it was a contemporary "remix" of sorts that I detailed my misgivings about elsewhere. But it was my first film checked from the Bollywood list! The only list where I had zero checks. (Weirdly, I'm likely to see a second film from the list -- "Pyaasa" -- in the near future. They're both available on Amazon Prime. And so is "Kaagaz Ke Phool.")

The Bollywood list is so unpopular that just checking this single film means there are now *13* other official lists where I have a lower ICM rank. Most of the 13 are highly mainstream lists based on action, martial arts, animation and box-office variables.

pyaasa is much better than sholay
icm + ltbxd

NO GODS NO MASTERS

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rnilsson19
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#1920

Post by rnilsson19 » September 10th, 2019, 4:01 pm

I watched Sholay a couple of months ago and it put me off from watching any more Bollywood films for a while.


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