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Cannes 2019

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Cannes 2019

#1

Post by flaiky » April 18th, 2019, 12:27 pm

We have the line-up peeps (probably with a few titles still to come). I can't find an article that gives a summary of each of the films, hopefully one will appear.

Edit: added brief summaries that I found on the net.
Competition

The Dead Don’t Die (dir: Jim Jarmusch) – opening film "The peaceful town of Centerville finds itself battling a zombie horde as the dead start rising from their graves" w/ Bill Murray, Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton

Atlantique (dir: Mati Diop) "recounts the odyssey of Senegalese friends who attempt a life-threatening boat crossing. Melancholic and mysterious, the film urgently and elegantly addresses the perils of illegal migration."

Nighthawk (dir: Kleber Mendonça Filho & Juliano Dornelles) "involves a filmmaker visiting the interiors of Brazil to film a documentary. However, when a small village loses their eldest matriarch, the 144 year old Dona Carmelita, strange things begin to happen amongst the villagers, who appear to be harboring troubling secrets." w/ Sonia Braga

Frankie (dir: Ira Sachs) "Three generations grappling with a life-changing experience during one day of a vacation in Sintra, Portugal, a historic town known for its dense gardens and fairy-tale villas and palaces." w/ Isabelle Huppert, Marisa Tomei, Brendan Gleeson, Greg Kinnear

A Hidden Life (dir: Terrence Malick) "The Austrian Franz Jägerstätter, a conscientious objector, refuses to fight for the Nazis in World War II." w/ Matthias Schoenarts, Bruno Ganz

It Must Be Heaven (dir: Elia Suleiman) "sees the director travel to different places and finds points of comparison with his homeland [Palestine]. In Paris, in New York, in every city, there are cops and bureaucracy and checkpoints and bigotry."

Les Misérables (dir: Ladj Ly) "With a gun at his belt and a truncheon in his hand, Pento has just joined the Seine-Saint-Denis anti-crime brigade. With his teammates, he develops specific methods."

Little Joe (dir: Jessica Hausner) "A genetically engineered plant scatters its seeds and seems to cause uncanny changes on living creatures. The afflicted appear strange, as if they were replaced - especially for those, who are close to them. Or is it all just imagination?" w/ Ben Whishaw

Matthias and Maxime (dir: Xavier Dolan) "said to be set in Québec and focuses on a group of late-twentysomethings" w/ Dolan, Anne Dorval

Oh Mercy! (dir: Arnaud Desplechin) "A police chief in northern France tries to solve a case where an old woman was brutally murdered." w/ Léa Seydoux

Parasite (dir: Bong Joon-ho) "a psychological thriller about a family who conceive an interest in their next-door neighbours – which gets them into a world of trouble" w/ Song Kang-ho

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (dir: Céline Sciamma) "An intimate and thoughtful love story between a painter and her model in 18th century France" w/ Noémie Merlant, Adèle Haenel

Sibyl (dir: Justine Triet) "A jaded psychotherapist returns to her first passion of becoming a writer." w/ Adèle Exarchopoulos

Sorry We Missed You (dir: Ken Loach) "A hard-up delivery driver and his wife struggle to get by in modern-day England."

Pain and Glory (dir: Pedro Almodóvar) "A film director reflects on the choices he's made in life as past and present come crashing down around him." w/ Penelope Crez, Antonio Banderas

The Traitor (dir: Marco Bellocchio) "The real life of Tommaso Buscetta the so called "boss of the two worlds", first mafia informant in Sicily 1980's." w/ Pierfrancesco Favino

La Gomera (dir: Corneliu Porumboiu) "A police officer comes to the Spanish island of La Gomera to learn the language of El Silbo and to free Zsolt, a controversial businessman arrested in Bucharest."

The Wild Goose Lake (dir: Diao Yinan) "concerns a gangster on the run, sacrificing everything for his family and a woman he meets while on the lam." w/ Liao Fan

The Young Ahmed (dir: Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne) "A Belgian teenager hatches a plot to kill his teacher after embracing an extremist interpretation of the Quran."

Un Certain Regard

Adam (dir: Maryam Touzani)
Dylda (dir: Kantemir Balagov)
A Brother’s Love (dir: Monia Chokri)
Bull (dir: Annie Silverstein)
The Climb (dir: Michael Covino)
Evge (dir: Nariman Aliev)
Liberté (dir: Albert Serra)
Invisible Life (dir: Karim Aïnouz)
Jeanne (dir: Bruno Dumont)
Room 212 (dir: Christophe Honoré)
Papicha (dir: Mounia Meddour)
Port Authority (dir: Danielle Lessovitz)
Summer of Changsha (dir: Zu Feng)
The Swallows of Kabul (dir: Zabou Breitman & Eléa Gobé Mévellec)
A Sun That Never Sets (dir: Olivier Laxe)
Zhuo Ren Mi Mi (dir: Midi Z)

Out of competition

The Best Years of a Life (dir: Claude Lelouch)
Diego Maradona (dir: Asif Kapadia)
La Belle Époque (dir: Nicolas Bedos)
Rocketman (dir: Dexter Fletcher)
Too Old to Die Young – North of Hollywood, West of Hell (TV series – creator: Nicolas Winding Refn)

Midnight screenings
The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (dir: Lee Won-Tae)

Special screenings

Family Romance, LLC (dir: Werner Herzog)
For Sama (dir: Waad Al Kateab, Edward Watts)
Que Sea Ley (dir: Juan Solanas)
Share (dir: Pippa Bianco)
To Be Alive and Know It (dir: Alain Cavalier)
Tommaso (dir: Abel Ferrara)

•The Cannes film festival runs 14-25 May. The Jury President will be Alejandro G. Iñárritu.
Many good directors here - I'm delighted that Celine Sciamma finally has a film in competition and it's easily one of my most anticipated of the year. I was hoping to see the new Leos Carax film among the mix, though, I wonder if it's not finished or not good enough?
Last edited by flaiky on April 18th, 2019, 11:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#2

Post by GruesomeTwosome » April 18th, 2019, 12:56 pm

Cool, thanks for posting this! I'm also happy to see that Sciamma's film is in the mix, looking forward to seeing that one. Pleasantly surprised that The Wild Goose Lake is in competition, I liked that director's Black Coal, Thin Ice. The Dead Don't Die should be a fun way for them to kick off the festival.
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#3

Post by flaiky » April 18th, 2019, 2:14 pm

Yeah, Black Coal Thin Ice is a very cool film, I'm also interested in the director's follow-up (especially since it stars the same lead actors, who were both great).

Just realised that Roy Andersson is also conspicuously missing from the line-up. I guess he'll be at Venice again, unless he's a late addition here.
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#4

Post by GruesomeTwosome » April 18th, 2019, 2:51 pm

Otherwise there are several usual suspects like Ken Loach and the Dardennes...not that I'm complaining really, but these guys' films ALWAYS seem to be in competition at Cannes, lol.
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#5

Post by beavis » April 18th, 2019, 5:11 pm

Sciamma is cool, also new work from hausner, serra, laxe, honore and more i'll look forward to!

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#6

Post by blueboybob » April 18th, 2019, 5:22 pm

IMDB list of all films please...

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#7

Post by Traveller » April 18th, 2019, 5:55 pm

Didn't know Malick had another film coming up so soon.
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But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#8

Post by GruesomeTwosome » April 18th, 2019, 5:59 pm

Traveller wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:55 pm
Didn't know Malick had another film coming up so soon.
Maybe the new title threw you off? It was called Radegund up until recently.
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#9

Post by PGonzalez » April 18th, 2019, 6:02 pm

I'll be there this year for a weekend, which is cool. First time visiting a major festival. I think I'll only have tickets for the parallel sections though (Un Certain Regard is looking incredible, so no complaints here).

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#10

Post by Traveller » April 18th, 2019, 6:10 pm

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:59 pm
Traveller wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:55 pm
Didn't know Malick had another film coming up so soon.
Maybe the new title threw you off? It was called Radegund up until recently.
Ah, that's it! Thanks for clearing that up for me.
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But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#11

Post by flaiky » April 18th, 2019, 7:50 pm

PGonzalez wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 6:02 pm
I'll be there this year for a weekend, which is cool. First time visiting a major festival. I think I'll only have tickets for the parallel sections though (Un Certain Regard is looking incredible, so no complaints here).
Amazing, lucky you! Make sure to report back to us.
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#12

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » April 18th, 2019, 11:40 pm

Too Old to Die Young – North of Hollywood, West of Hell (TV series – creator: Nicolas Winding Refn)


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#13

Post by connordenney » April 19th, 2019, 1:20 am

I've heard that Andersson's film wasn't done, which explains his absence.

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#14

Post by brokenface » April 19th, 2019, 12:08 pm

blueboybob wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:22 pm
IMDB list of all films please...
there's an event page up:

https://www.imdb.com/event/ev0000147/2019/1/

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#15

Post by cinewest » April 19th, 2019, 2:05 pm

All of the films that I thought would get chosen did except for 4, two of which have already been mentioned (the new ones by Leo Carax and Roy Andersson- probably not finished) by posters, here. The other two are Bergman Island by Mia Hansen-Love (also, probably not finished) and Ema by Pablo Larrain.

There were quite a few films made by women chosen this year, and quite a few by former winners, as well. All in all an interesting slate, as is Un Certain Regard. Looking forward to hearing more about theses films as they screen.

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#16

Post by cinewest » April 19th, 2019, 2:05 pm

@PGonzalez,

Wow, lucky you.

I have been attending film festivals in and around San Francisco for years, and also hit a few others while living abroad, but I have always fantasized about Cannes, and some of the other old film festivals in Europe.

As flaky said, I hope you drop in to post while you are there.

Cheers

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#17

Post by allisoncm » April 20th, 2019, 12:58 am

PGonzalez wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 6:02 pm
I'll be there this year for a weekend, which is cool. First time visiting a major festival. I think I'll only have tickets for the parallel sections though (Un Certain Regard is looking incredible, so no complaints here).
I'll be there too! Looking forward to my first Cannes.

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#18

Post by outdoorcats » April 21st, 2019, 1:53 pm

The lineup looks really cool this year. Of course all eyes are on the Malick.

Is this Corneliu Porumboiu's first film in competition? :cheers:

Also Mati Diop is the first Black woman to have a film chosen for the Cannes official competition. That's...a little late (it's 2019?), but congratulations to Mati! (who by the way is Djibril Diop Mambéty's niece :o )

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MATT: That's the guy I was telling you about.

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#19

Post by GruesomeTwosome » April 23rd, 2019, 6:26 pm

The films screening for the Directors' Fortnight have been revealed:

Opening Film:
Deerskin (Quentin Dupieux)

Official Selection:
Alice and the Mayor (Nicolas Pariser)
And Then We Danced (Levan Akin)
The Halt (Lav Diaz)
Dogs Don’t Wear Pants (Jukka-Pekka Valkeapää)
Song Without a Name (Melina León)
Ghost Tropic (Bas Devos)
Give Me Liberty (Kirill Mikhanvovsky)
First Love (Takashi Miike)
The Lighthouse (Robert Eggers)
Lillian (Andreas Horwath)
Oleg (Juris Kursietis)
Blow It to Bits (Lech Kowalski)
The Orphanage (Shahrbanoo Sadat)
Les Particules (Blaise Harrison)
Perdrix (Erwan Le Duc)
For the Money (Alejo Moguillansky)
Sick Sick Sick (Alice Furtado)
Tlamess (Ala Eddine Slim)
To Live to Sing (Johnny Ma)
An Easy Girl (Rebecca Zlotowski)
Wounds (Babak Anvari)
Zombi Child (Bertrand Bonello)

Closing Film:
Yves (Benoît Forgeard)

Special Screenings:
Red 11 (Roberto Rodriguez)
The Staggering Girl (Luca Guadagnino)
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#20

Post by Ivan0716 » April 28th, 2019, 3:19 am

Damn, they're screening new restorations of Kanal and A tanú.

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#21

Post by cinewest » April 28th, 2019, 10:29 am


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#22

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » May 7th, 2019, 12:02 pm

My tips:

Palme: d'Or: Pain & Glory (Almodovar)
Grand Jury Prize: Sybil ( Justine Triet F)
Jury Prize: Wild Goose Lake (Diao Yi' nan)
Director: Parasite (Bong Joon-ho)

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#23

Post by cinewest » May 8th, 2019, 12:09 am

Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal wrote:
May 7th, 2019, 12:02 pm
My tips:

Palme: d'Or: Pain & Glory (Almodovar)
Grand Jury Prize: Sybil ( Justine Triet F)
Jury Prize: Wild Goose Lake (Diao Yi' nan)
Director: Parasite (Bong Joon-ho)
Why do you think so?

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#24

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » May 8th, 2019, 7:42 am

All have good critic ratings. The two in the middle are just guesses but Almodovar and Joon-ho have a pretty impressive strike rates for delivering acclaimed films. Also Almodovar's film is about a director reflecting on his life, so there might sentimental reasons for giving him the Palme at this stage of his career, plus award judges usually like films about the industry.

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#25

Post by cinewest » May 9th, 2019, 2:09 am

Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal wrote:
May 8th, 2019, 7:42 am
All have good critic ratings. The two in the middle are just guesses but Almodovar and Joon-ho have a pretty impressive strike rates for delivering acclaimed films. Also Almodovar's film is about a director reflecting on his life, so there might sentimental reasons for giving him the Palme at this stage of his career, plus award judges usually like films about the industry.
I think you need to start out by considering the "political" climate, and then, the jury:

Main competition[edit]
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Mexican filmmaker, Jury President[4]
Enki Bilal, French author, artist and filmmaker[7]
Robin Campillo, French filmmaker[7]
Maimouna N'Diaye, Senegalese actress and filmmaker[7]
Elle Fanning, American actress[7]
Yorgos Lanthimos, Greek filmmaker[7]
Paweł Pawlikowski, Polish filmmaker[7]
Kelly Reichardt, American filmmaker[7]
Alice Rohrwacher, Italian filmmaker[7]

Your guess that Almodovar will win something is a good one, though not necessarily the top prize. He has tailed off recently in my estimation, though perhaps this is a return to more ambitious filmmaking. We'll see. One can't overlook Malick, here.
I think it is also a good bet that a woman will win something major besides the "best actress" award. Portrait of a Lady on Fire, or Little Joe seem like the best bets, here.
I also think that a film like Wild Goose Lake could surprise with a major award (Jury prize, or director), but that others like Bacurau, It Must Be Heaven, Oh Mercy, and Mathias & Maxime etc. could figure here, as well.
Another political angle is a nationalist one, where no doubt something French will score big.

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#26

Post by cinewest » May 10th, 2019, 10:41 pm

Here's another Cannes preview from Film Comment

https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/cannes ... =version_A

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#27

Post by OldAle1 » May 10th, 2019, 11:37 pm

cinewest wrote:
May 10th, 2019, 10:41 pm
Here's another Cannes preview from Film Comment

https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/cannes ... =version_A
Lav Diaz following up his 4-hour musical with a 4-hour science fiction film. I'm hoping for a 4-hour rom-com next year...

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#28

Post by funkybusiness » May 10th, 2019, 11:40 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
May 10th, 2019, 11:37 pm
cinewest wrote:
May 10th, 2019, 10:41 pm
Here's another Cannes preview from Film Comment

https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/cannes ... =version_A
Lav Diaz following up his 4-hour musical with a 4-hour science fiction film. I'm hoping for a 4-hour rom-com next year...
only four hours? he's getting rather pedestrian with those runtimes, isn't he

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#29

Post by OldAle1 » May 10th, 2019, 11:46 pm

Yeah I think I'll have to watch two in a row to get the full Diaz Effect.

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#30

Post by cinewest » May 15th, 2019, 12:04 pm

The first review is in, and this one I will skip:
https://variety.com/2019/film/reviews/t ... 203213609/

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#31

Post by max-scl » May 15th, 2019, 8:27 pm

Another "deadpan" comedy with Bill Murray, exactly what the world needs. :sleeping:

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#32

Post by OldAle1 » May 15th, 2019, 11:26 pm

As a Jim Jarmusch fanboy it's a high priority for me regardless of reviews, but I can't say I'm expecting anything great from it.

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#33

Post by outdoorcats » May 16th, 2019, 1:58 am

Doing my thing. :) As always, review snippets are listed from roughly most positive to most negative. I've eliminated almost all references to plot details as the reviews are of course highly spoiler ridden.

I won't be doing all the other sections this year, though I might pick out one or two titles that are getting interesting buzz. I'm just too busy this year.

MAIN SLATE:

The Dead Don’t Die (dir: Jim Jarmusch)

"The Dead Don’t Die is an amiable picture that happily and quite obviously borrows from the zombie canon...As always, Jarmusch knows how to get laughs with timing." TIME
"The upside of being Jarmusch’s slightest and most accessible film is also being one of his funniest. The contrast between his nonchalant house style and the urgent stakes of the scenario leads to some solid laughs" birth.movies.death.
"B-...Jarmusch tests the limits of [his] aesthetic in a genre that often demands a bit more urgency." Collider
"3/5 stars...Jim Jarmusch’s undeadpan comedy is laconic, lugubrious and does not entirely come to life, despite many witty lines and tremendously assured performances by an A-list cast." The Guardian
"Grade: C...[Jarmusch] assembles a big ensemble of name actors—many returning collaborators—and instructed them to deliver droll shtick while the plot of your average zombie potboiler unfolds around them." The AV Club
"[It] works better as an idea than as an actual movie...Jarmusch embraces all of the tired, outdated tropes of the genre, and none of the good." Thrillist
"It shambles along at the pace of a reanimated cannibal, and it contains no anti-consumerist satire that wasn’t in George A Romero’s seminal zombie films decades ago." BBC

Atlantique [aka Atlantics] (dir: Mati Diop)

"[A] lyrical, richly evocative ghost story... the film bubbles over with doubles and dualities, insiders and outsiders, and literally has ghosts of the dead dwelling inside the living...It has buckets of atmosphere to spare, enough to build a biome or two on Mars." The Hollywood Reporter
"B+...[A] dazzling ghost story...[an] absorbing, otherworldly vision of an alienated seaside life in Dakar...otherworldly, gorgeous" IndieWire
"Constantly intriguing, Atlantics successfully blends its disparate elements of love story, ghost story and female empowerment into a distinctive, involving drama." Screen Daily
"4/5 stars...Atlantique is a Voodoo-realist drama, or docu-supernatural mystery, whose dimension of strangeness is unself-consciously baked into the movie’s ostensible normality. But this doesn’t undermine the pertinent things it has to say about the contemporary developing world. It’s a winter’s tale of a film." The Guardian
"[A] romantic and melancholy film...[with some] flawed narrative choices that frustrate though don’t compromise the atmosphere of loss and female solidarity" Variety

Nighthawk (dir: Kleber Mendonça Filho & Juliano Dornelles)

"With its brutally striated social divisions and a simmering violence, both written into the historical DNA of the region and bubbling over into everyday life, the film is a bracingly confrontational commentary on the direction the country is taking in the Bolsonaro era." Screen Daily
"Grade: B+...'Seven Samurai' meets 'Hostel'...a wonderful and demented Western about the perils of rampant modernization...a bloody and unapologetic 'fuck you' to anyone who thinks that cutting edge technology entitles them to see the world as their own personal slaughterhouse." IndieWire
"4/5 stars...Mendonça...has relinquished the quieter, more humanistic tones of his earlier pictures for this disturbing ultraviolent freakout...a hallucinatory trauma with something of Alejandro Jodorowsky, or Ted Kotcheff’s Wake in Fright." The Guardian
"It makes points about community and exploitation, and then it splatters those points with blood, sets them to blasting sci-fi music and dares you to remember what those points were in the first place. It’s disturbing and messy, a fever dream for a disturbing and messy time in Brazil. And occasionally, it’s a lot of fun, too." The Wrap
"[A] rare movie that probably would have been better if it had been dumber, or at least less ambitious...for all his skills as a director, Mendonça hasn’t quite mastered tension...[the] characters feel barely sketched, depending far too heavily on the personas of the actors who play them." Variety
"It's an impressively rich mix, but perhaps a little too rich, feeling both overstuffed and undercooked in places...this leisurely paced, tonally uneven curiosity feels light on dramatic bite" The Hollywood Reporter

Frankie (dir. Ira Sachs)

"Grade: B...It drifts by with all the force of a mild summer breeze, and — as is typical of Sachs’ jewel-like work — it leaves you feeling like you could have spent another 90 minutes with these characters. For better or worse, this one also leaves you feeling like Sachs could have spent another 90 minutes with these characters, too." IndieWire
"Without any big meltdowns or major dramatic turns, the film feels something like a family album, presenting a series of snapshots of various people at different stages of life gathered together at one particular point in time." The Wrap
"[It] may the closest that anyone has come to making an American version of an Eric Rohmer film...re-creates the deceptively casual and meandering but pinpoint Rohmeresque sensation of a small handful of characters wandering around, not doing much of anything but revealing, through conversation and (occasionally) through action, who they are and how, almost imperceptibly, over the course of one movie, they might change." Variety
"[It] lacks the emotional complexity and intense personal investment of Sachs' best work...this is definitely a second-tier entry from the director, and an odd choice for his debut in the Cannes competition" The Hollywood Reporter
"1/5 stars...Isabelle Huppert sleepwalks through a film that proves even great directors are capable of crimes against cinema... the lines of dialogue fill the actors’ mouths like damp cotton wool as they stand around on the lovely picturesque streets like tailor’s dummies..Sachs is such a talented film-maker, but this is a baffling misstep." The Guardian

A Hidden Life (dir: Terrence Malick)

"A return to form and a spiritual call to arms...It’s at once a linear, almost classically structured drama and an exploratory, intensely romantic work of art...If we understand pretension as an attitude that leaves no room for humility, then is there any filmmaker working today less pretentious than Terrence Malick, any artist more generous and unassuming in the way he exalts the beauty of the everyday?" The Los Angeles Times
"An epic return to form...While 'The Tree of Life' may have felt more grand — and how could it not, with that cosmic 16-minute creation sequence parked in the middle of the film — 'A Hidden Life' actually grapples with bigger, more pressing universal issues." Variety
"Anchored in story in a way his last few movies have not been, this World War II drama is the director’s most monumental work since 'The Tree of Life'...This is part love story, part tragedy and part meditation on faith and conscience — and it’s wholly Malick" The Wrap
"A-...Critic's Pick...Terrence Malick is back... [He] has finally rediscovered his conviction and returned to solid ground. And he hasn’t come back empty-handed...'A Hidden Life' is a lucid and profoundly defiant portrait of faith in crisis. It’s an intimate epic about the immense strength required for resistance, and the courage that it takes for one to hold fast to their virtue during a crisis of faith, and in a world that may never reward them for it. It is, without question, the best thing that Malick has made since 'The Tree of Life.'” IndieWire
"Well, it’s a big swing and a miss for strike three with A Hidden Life, which sees the massively talented but often mystifying writer-director take on true-life material for the first time [editor's note: The New World?] in this desperately indulgent and puzzlingly de-theologized study of an Austrian man...Unfortunately, instead of embracing the weighty moral, religious and political components of the story, Malick has alternately deflected and minimized them." The Hollywood Reporter
"There’s no tension in Terrence Malick’s A Hidden Life—only virtue, as if that were enough to hold a film together...Here at Cannes, after taking in the nearly-three-hour semi-historical opus that is A Hidden Life, some of those prodigal Malickians are crowing, 'The master is back!' Others are sighing deeply and muttering, 'Oh dear,' wondering what the others are thinking, or drinking...I do not find his films moving and mystical; I have rarely found them even bearable...oh, dear God, is he showing us those mountains again?" TIME Magazine

It Must Be Heaven (dir: Elia Suleiman)

"Continuing to chart his own path in a Palestinian film landscape generally perceived as monolithic, Elia Suleiman turns his delightfully absurdist, unfailingly generous gaze beyond the physical homeland, where parallels and dissonance abound...Whimsical and wistful yet infused with a yearning for the stability of place" Variety
"[Suleiman's] droll new comedy...contains the same close observation of paradoxical human behavior that made him famous...the cinematic language is painstaking controlled, yet subtle enough to pass unobserved." The Hollywood Reporter
"Grade: B+...This poignant, minor-key work from the only major filmmaker to carry the torch of silent comedy into the 21st century is rich with feeling, even as it enters a self-reflexive zone that sometimes distracts from the legitimate concerns at its core" IndieWire
"As a director, Suleiman knows how to compose the frame to get the most out of each gag, and as a performer, he recognizes that his arched eyebrows are powerful tools of comedy and employs them as such. Those are helpful assets for an easy-going film that coolly ambles forward as a series of short sketches and vignettes, while maintaining a fairly detached tone." The Wrap
"3/5 stars...There are times when the passive, elusive quality of It Must Be Heaven, as with other Suleiman films, eluded me and felt mannered and superficial, but they are stylishly made with a distinctive signature." The Guardian

Les Misérables (dir: Ladj Ly)

"An explosive debut feature...Ly’s film is executed with enormous confidence and energy, building up to an apocalyptic ending that delivers on a gradual build-up of nervous tension." Screen Daily
"The film is something like Hugo’s classic story remixed by The Wire and Training Day — a gritty and fiery urban thriller underscored by scathing social commentary on the current state of the Paris suburbs, depicted here as a powder keg ready to pop." The Hollywood Reporter
"Grade: B...a gripping and grounded procedural that probes the tensions between Paris’ anti-crime police and the poor Muslim population they torment and suppress" IndieWire
"It’s a furious work of social geography that satisfies slightly less as a character piece: In its ambitious attempt to dramatize the violent anxieties of men on both sides of the law, Les Misérables risks selling some victims a little short." Variety
"3/5 stars...But what begins as a fascinatingly tough cop procedural gets less interesting when the violence begins, and it becomes a solemnly ponderous issue movie on those familiar subjects of police brutality and community divisions." The Guardian

Little Joe (dir: Jessica Hausner)

"Just about every horror movie has an opening stretch — it could be 20 minutes, or even the first 45 — that inches along in a creep-out mode of anticipatory anxiety... It takes audacity, and a special skill, to sustain that early mood of premonitory dread over an entire film. And that’s what happens in “Little Joe,” an artfully unnerving, austerely hypnotic horror movie about a very sinister plant." Variety
"Repurposing parental anxieties into psychological horror, Little Joe offers kind of thematic follow-up to David Lynch’s Eraserhead – only now the terror doesn’t come from an alien figure that requires constant care and attention, but one that has accepted that attention and is ready to move on." The Wrap
"Grade: C+...A horror film that dangerously compares antidepressants to an alien invasion...It’s a shame that anyone needs antidepressants, but it’s dangerous to suggest — as 'Little Joe' does for large swaths of its running time — that the 'happiness' those drugs provoke is somehow less genuine than the desolation they’re meant to extinguish... it’s hard to shake the feeling that Hausner’s film could have been so much richer if it asked people take stock of their personal happiness without delegitimizing it at the same time." [Editor's note: The whole review is like this.]
"2/5 stars...I was disappointed by [Hausner's] new film, her first in English...perhaps its numb weirdness is down to a director with no instinctive feeling for the English language...It is a mood piece. Whose mood leads nowhere." The Guardian
"A lifeless, tone-deaf variation on Invasion of the Body Snatchers...loaded with dull expository dialogue, dozens of identical lateral tracking shots, unconvincing casting and even a convenient shrink character who serves only as a faucet for the lead character’s concerns...an utter lack of any suspense or excitement" The Hollywood Reporter

Matthias and Maxime (dir: Xavier Dolan)

"Matthias & Maxime, a poignant and carefully realized drama about two childhood friends at a fraught crossroads, is the work of a maturing filmmaker, of someone learning to settle into their talent instead of trying to show it all off at once. The film has enough of Dolan’s trademark swoon to still qualify it as notably his, but it all exists in delicate proportion to the story he’s telling. I can’t wait to see more from this calmer, more contemplative Dolan." Vanity Fair
"A wistful, low-key love-and-friendship study...it feels at once younger and older, sweeter and more seasoned, than Dolan’s last few films...Dolan remains an unabashed sensualist, then, flooding his screen with feeling in the tangible form of sound and color." Variety
"Why does it feel as if Dolan’s blitzkrieg of a career had reached a crisis point where it badly needed a film as sharp and warm as this one?...'Matthias & Maxime' deals with friendship and self discovery in a way that will be familiar to fans of Dolan’s previous work, but it is a, dare we say, more mature work; there’s a reflection to go with the gleeful, transgressive energy, a sense of looking back fondly at the jarring but seminal moments that form identity." The Wrap
"4/5 stars...His movies, for me, have become increasingly watchable, accessible and enjoyable because the feelings involved are increasingly real and deeply felt. There is such tenderness and gentleness in this film." The Guardian
"B-...Dolan doesn’t always find the right groove, but it’s nice to hear that he still puts together a shoot-for-the-moon soundtrack like every emotion is the one that will last forever. In a film with an erratic structure that often works against it — that’s wound too tight by its ticking clock of a story, and doesn’t resolve with the oomph needed to sell its...climactic scenes — the music can often be counted on to come to the rescue." IndieWire
"There’s nothing glaringly wrong with the new movie...it’s amiable enough, even occasionally affecting...What’s missing is the blazing urgency — the purpose and passion that made movies like Laurence Anyways, Heartbeats, Tom at the Farm and Mommy, for all their excesses and errors of taste, play like the work of an artist putting his wildly, thrillingly, at times grotesquely beating heart right up on the screen." The Hollywood Reporter

Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo (dir. Abdellatif Kechiche)

"2/5 stars...[Kechiche's] epic female buttock fetish stretches to the far horizon. Kechiche has reaccentuated buttocks. He has doubled down on buttocks. Almost the very first shot is of a woman’s naked bottom, massively filling the screen, like an inflatable by Terry Gilliam." The Guardian
"Grade: C- ...It’s one thing to get people to stare at butts for a cumulative total of seven hours, but no one wants to see a piece of shit." IndieWire
"Grueling...A dismaying creative dead end from an abundantly gifted filmmaker, the new film escalates its predecessor’s cheeky protest to a form of acute auteur trolling...a grinding exercise in low-level cinematic voyeurism that plays a little like Gaspar Noé with all his hallucinogenics confiscated and replaced with Bacardi Breezers." Variety
"Feels like a director self-immolating... the film feels like a giant troll, a libidinous F-you to every one of the director’s critics. In amplifying everything deemed problematic about his previous work while stripping away all of their saving graces, Kechiche has basically thrown down the gauntlet and made a film that is nearly impossible to critique...To criticize 'Intermezzo' for spending too long obsessing on gyrating booties and glistening young flesh would be about as effective as criticizing Andy Warhol’s experimental film 'Empire' for only shooting one building in Midtown Manhattan — that’s the movie’s very point!" The Wrap
"Grade: D...The [Cannes] programmers, in their infinite sadism, saved the worst (and the longest) for close to last...That this colossal bore, the walk-out disaster of Cannes (à la Sea Of Trees or The Last Face, only twice the fucking length of either), earned a spot in the competition lineup is the only evidence you could ever need that once you’ve gotten into this club, you’re in." The AV Club
"The disaster of the Cannes Film Festival." Los Angeles Times

Oh Mercy! (dir: Arnaud Desplechin)

"Compared to all that has preceded it, 'Oh Mercy,' which premiered in Cannes on Wednesday, is [Desplechin's] most unconventional film to date – precisely because it feels so very conventional...We’re left with a particularly interesting case that comes to its natural resolution, anchored by a sympathetic inspector we could happily see again – in short, it would make a very good pilot." The Wrap
"The perhaps unwanted parallel to TV dramas isn’t helped by an opening text affirming that the crimes are real and victims exist, leaving audiences inevitably expecting the percussive beats of 'Law & Order' to come with the opening credits." Variety
"[Desplechin] gives us two movies for the price of one... one fascinating, hourlong movie about the lower classes and underbelly of contemporary northern France and the other an hourlong CSI: Roubaix episode that’s filled with not only familiar but also quite repetitive interrogations, prison-cell visits and reconstruction attempts at the actual crime scene." The Hollywood Reporter
"2/5 stars...Arnauld Desplechin’s lofty pretensions fatally split the tone of his new crime film...The story...is forced, supercilious and contrived, oddly, considering its true-crime origins." The Guardian
"Grade: C-....If the film is a literal homecoming, however, it’s also a striking figurative departure for a filmmaker best known (and most beloved) for intricate, frazzled, and hyper-loquacious comedic dramas...In that sense, this frigid misfire is most readily comparable to Hirokazu Kore-eda’s 'The Third Murder,' another flat genre flirtation from an otherwise reliable master." IndieWire

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (dir. Quentin Tarantino)

"4/4 stars...The film is Quentin Tarantino’s magnum opus, a sweeping statement on an entire generation of American popular culture" Slant Magazine
"Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is one of Quentin Tarantino's most affectionate films. It's also one of his best." TIME Magazine
"5/5 stars...Tarantino has created outrageous, disorientating entertainment...I just defy anyone with red blood in their veins not to respond to the crazy bravura of Tarantino’s film-making, not to be bounced around the auditorium at the moment-by-moment enjoyment that this movie delivers" The Guardian
"What is so beautiful - a word we don’t often get to attribute to Tarantino films - about Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood, which nods to the historical-fiction masterworks of Sergio Leone, is that Tarantino is taking pause to offer the pure generosity of spirit which he’s lent his fallen angels - from John Travolta to Pam Grier - and now to the eponymous Rick Dalton - and allowing some for himself." Screen Anarchy
"It’s a heady, engrossing, kaleidoscopic, spectacularly detailed nostalgic splatter collage of a film, an epic tale of backlot Hollywood in 1969, which allows Tarantino to pile on all his obsessions, from drive-ins to donuts, from girls with guns to men with muscle cars and vendettas, from spaghetti Westerns to foot fetishism."
"Grade: B...America’s master of zippy dialogue and high-minded pastiche consolidates those skills into a sprawling vision of the film industry in 1969, but Tarantino’s infectious love letter doesn’t have much of a plot...the filmmaker's weirdest movie" IndieWire
"3.5/5 stars...Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is lots of fun, but it’s also strangely, hauntingly sad...I usually find myself put off by Tarantino’s films...On the whole, I really liked it, possibly more than I’ve liked any of Tarantino’s other films." Vox
"Quentin Tarantino renews his vows as a devout fanboy, rifling through his formative influences in vintage American B-movies and TV, spaghetti Westerns, martial arts, popular music and an endless assortment of cultural ephemera in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood. In his ninth feature, the writer-director at the same time is having sly fun riffing on his own work, in particular his penchant for gleeful revisionist history. A sizable audience will doubtless share that enjoyment, even if the two ambling hours of detours, recaps and diversions that precede the [climax] are virtually plotless." The Hollywood Reporter

Parasite (dir: Bong Joon-ho)

"A tragicomic thrill ride...the coming public debate about Korean writer-director Bong Joon-ho’s Parasite will not be about whether it is or isn’t a great movie, but about whether it is or is (barely) not a perfect movie." Film School Rejects
"Bong Joon-ho is on excoriating form in his exceptional pitch-black tragicomedy about social inequality in modern Korea...A laugh turns into a snarl which gets stuck in the throat like a sob — or an arrow through the neck — in [his] latest wild, wild ride" Variety
"[A] wonder of an allegory...I staggered out of the theater thrilled by Parasite’s singular vision, yes, but also feeling pretty wrecked...There’s an anger at work in the film, but what’s more effective is its ruefulness—its ribbons of abiding hope, frayed and tattered but still there, somehow." Vanity Fair
"Grade: A-...[A] furious and fiendishly well-crafted new film...Bong’s latest offers another compassionate parable about how society can only be as strong as its most vulnerable people." IndieWire
"4/5 stars...a luxuriously watchable and satirical suspense drama" The Guardian

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (dir: Céline Sciamma)

"Grade: A...a painterly masterpiece...From the arresting first shots to its all-timer of a final shot and a second act choral performance that might even top the Rihanna singalong in 'Girlhood,' 'Portrait of a Girl on Fire' is an unforgettable film that cooks at a low simmer until going incandescent in its closing minutes...It’s a film that captures the feeling you get from the last scene of Roman Holiday and stretches it over a full two hours in which not a single moment is wasted." IndieWire
"5/5 stars...With this new story, [Sciamma] demonstrates a deeply satisfying new mastery of classical style...I was on the edge of my seat." The Guardian
"[As] intricately layered, coded and gilded with symbolism as an Old Master and made by a filmmaker who is herself, as we say in English nowadays, on fire. At this point, Sciamma is practically throwing off sparks and hot coals as she enters a confident, bigger-risk-taking phase of her career. Assaying her first period film, an exquisitely executed love story that's both formally adventurous and emotionally devastating, she sticks the landing like a UCLA gymnast in peak condition. It's so good you'll want to watch again in slow-motion immediately afterwards just to see how she does it." The Hollywood Reporter
"In Sciamma’s gifted hands, the film escapes cliché and becomes something glorious—a study of forbidden love that grandly highlights how much has been lost under the crush of hetero patriarchy...immolates as it emboldens, its love for its characters and the life so palpably possible within them just about burning a hole in the screen. It just may be the best thing I see at this festival." Vanity Fair
"Walk in blind and take in all that this piercingly intelligent treatise on art, agency and queer love in the 18th century has to offer. Go in with a touch more context, however, and this already self-reflexive work takes on an entirely new dimension...a film in conversation with itself and with the greater world — a movie made by a female director and a 99% female cast about the need to create authentically representative art that leads the way by doing exactly that." The Wrap

Sibyl (dir: Justine Triet)

"Triet’s chic, blackly comic psychodrama piles up bad decisions like so many profiteroles in a croquembouche, admiring the teetering spectacle of its chaos as it goes...a film that effectively plays as cinematic dessert...It’s certainly the most purely enjoyable French fancy to play in Cannes’ top tier since François Ozon’s 'Double Lover' two years ago" Variety
"A meta-psychological thriller that’s something like a film within the making-of-a-film within a crime novel within an erotic dream within a therapy session run amok...It’s about as French as you can get, to a point that feels borderline absurd in places, and yet Triet handles the material gracefully and altogether skillfully" The Hollywood Reporter
"Triet mines [the characters'] neuroses to great comedic effect before swinging back towards pathos...[the film] offers the Cannes competition a perfect closing note" The Wrap
"Grade: B- ... For its first two-thirds, the movie hovers between the elegance and eroticism of a shrewd psychological thriller...Ultimately, 'Sibyl' becomes a brighter, sillier, film-within-a-film spoof of the Woody Allen variety" IndieWire
"2/5 stars...a muddled, silly comedy-drama...Fundamentally, Sybil is not funny because it is not convincing, and some of the acting is not of the highest order." The Guardian

Sorry We Missed You (dir: Ken Loach)

"At age 82, [Loach is] doing some of his strongest work in Sorry We Missed You, a drama of such searing human empathy and quotidian heartbreak that its powerful climactic scenes actually impede your breathing." The Hollywood Reporter
"5/5 stars...It’s fierce, open and angry, unironised and unadorned, about a vital contemporary issue whose implications you somehow don’t hear on the news." The Guardian
"The times have caught up with Loach, and they have pushed him to the top of his game...His new film, 'Sorry We Missed You,' is another intimate and powerful drama...He has become, in his way, as supple and popping a dramatist as Mike Leigh." Variety
"Grade: B... Loach is also not the most subtle filmmaker, but he grounds his intentions in emotional immediacy that lets the editorializing sink in. 'Sorry We Missed You' is the latest installment in this sprawling pantheon of cinematic activism, and delivers another tough, poignant look at desperate characters trapped by the only system that allows them to survive." IndieWire
"It’s hard to find much that’s fresh about Loach’s new film, no matter how effective a polemic it may sometimes be." The Wrap

Pain and Glory (dir: Pedro Almodóvar)

"Achingly beautiful...Pain and Glory is much more restrained than the films Almodóvar made in his glory days. But it’s hardly joyless...Everything about Pain and Glory is awake and alive, and Almodóvar’s nerve endings become ours, too." TIME Magazine
"I missed the anarchically queer lunacy of his early career...with 'Pain and Glory,' the director presents himself au naturel before audiences...This is the first time we’ve seen the master director’s soul so purely exposed." Variety
"Grade: A-...[it] has the emotional resonance of an artist coming to terms with the intimate nature of his work, and in the pantheon of the films-about-filmmaking genre, it’s a paragon of the form" IndieWire
"If there’s a house-of-mirrors aspect to [the film], the trickiness is one of the least important aspects of this lovely, gentle reverie a beautiful meditation on past and present...a memory piece that will nourish rather than provoke." The Wrap
"4/5 stars...Almodóvar has found a more intensely personal register than ever...an autumnal film in a ruminative minor key, with more pain than glory" The Guardian
"[Though] it might feel somewhat awkward that this particular sumptuous, exquisite love letter to the powerful cult of Almodovar has been made by the man himself, there’s still plenty about it to admire." The Hollywood Reporter
"The effect is a patchwork rather than an interwoven whole; the wistfully self-reflexive tone will appeal to fans of the less emphatic, more meditative end of the Almodovar spectrum...a somewhat fragmented story" Screen Daily

The Traitor (dir: Marco Bellocchio)

"It aims to be realistic rather than eye-popping and for that reason, can sometimes feel just a bit flat and unentertaining. But despite its lack of mafia money scenes — there’s no horse’s head in the bed, no family gunned down on the steps of a church — this is one of the most revealing portraits of the Cosa Nostra on film." The Hollywood Reporter
"It feels a bit too anonymous. It’s clearly made by a master filmmaker questioning the nature of repentance, and as such is far from superficial; and yet while it never loses our attention, it also doesn’t deliver much of a punch." Variety
"3/5 stars...The Traitor is big, bold, confident film-making...but somehow it lacks the lightning-flash of inspiration of something like Scorsese’s Goodfellas – a similar story of mobsters snitching – because it never quite relaxes into the gangsters’ ordinary lives." The Guardian
"As the first screening came to close, members of the Italian press greeted the film with effusive cheers, and that response left many of their international counterparts somewhat confused — or maybe just jealous — about what hint of genius they saw in this sturdy if somewhat uninspiring Mafia biopic." The Wrap
"Grade: C...by the time the film ends, [the protagonist] is as much of a stranger to us as he was when it started." IndieWire

La Gomera [The Whistlers] (dir: Corneliu Porumboiu)

"The Whistlers is no minimalist slice of realism [in re other Romanian New Wave films], but an oversized, deliciously twisted ride that runs on an endless supply of black humor and a sizeable body count. You won’t laugh much while you’re watching it, but it’s a hoot nonetheless...the ride is stylish fun the whole bloody way." The Wrap
"Grade: B+...Porumboiu, a cerebral director whose narrative style always comes equipped with a prankish spirit, imbues this slick ensemble piece with a wry agenda." IndieWire
"4/5 stars...[A] very watchable, rather exciting noir suspense thriller that has playful echoes of Neil Jordan’s Mona Lisa and even Orson Welles’ The Lady from Shanghai...An elegant and stylishly crafted piece of entertainment." The Guardian
"[A] highly entertaining but dense tale of a cop double-crossing both his department and the gangsters with whom he's in cahoots constantly corkscrews around in every sense...Some of the director's passionate followers may feel a bit bemused by this shift away from the long takes and scruffy production values of his earlier Romanian New Wave work. However, Porumboiu's recurring preoccupation with language, loyalty and the legacy of Nicolae Ceaușescu's repressive regime is still there, just approached from another angle." The Hollywood Reporter
"A deadpan, daffy noir...There’s a lot of fun to be had in the simple eccentricity of the premise, which is pulled back from silliness by the cast’s underplaying and Porumboiu’s natural inclination to tamp proceedings back into drollery...So why does The Whistlers feel comparatively minor?" Variety

The Wild Goose Lake (dir: Diao Yinan)

"4/5 stars...Full of moody attitude and glorious cinematography...The story itself, a twisty, hard-to-keep-track-of tale of revenge and double and triples crosses, is not especially remarkable. But that barely matters when there’s such virtuoso image-making on display. " Time Out
"There is something almost profound in how comprehensively 'The Wild Goose Lake' imagines film noir belonging in China’s seedy, second-tier suburban underbelly...this is a film that lives in its vibrant craft and fluid reimagining of scenarios that should be stale clichés by now." Variety
"Grade: B-...Ravishing but unfocused...it can’t help but feel like a mild comedown from the director’s Berlinale-winning 2014, 'Black Coal, Thin Ice.'" IndieWire
"This follow-up is bit less impactful and a lot more indulgent [than Black Coal, Thin Ice], but it can also be an awful lot of fun in spots." The Wrap
"3/5 stars...Now [Diao] has made his debut in the Cannes competition with a movie showcasing similar flourishes of brilliance, violent impacts and setpiece bravura - but also some of the same slightly stolid, opaque style that made me a little agnostic about [Black Coal, Thin Ice]." The Guardian

The Young Ahmed (dir: Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne)

"Instantly recognizable as a Dardenne film, 'Young Ahmed' has that same deceptively 'rough' quality as the directors’ earlier work, a carryover from their documentary background. And yet, they are astonishingly efficient storytellers, weaving the necessary clues audiences need to evaluate — and at times entirely reconsider — their characters with the expertise of veteran detective novelists." Variety
"Grade: B...In the pantheon of Dardenne brothers movies from the past three decades, 'Young Ahmed' lies somewhere on the spectrum ahead of mediocre works like 'The Unknown Girl' but well behind the masterful real-time suspense of 'Two Days, One Night' or 'The Child.' While propelled by a handful of gripping encounters and the Dardennes’ usual economical storytelling, 'Young Ahmed' never quite gets beyond the fundamental challenge Ahmed faces to provide deeper insights into his behavior, even as it delivers on its timely, provocative concept in rather straightforward terms." IndieWire
"3/5 stars...Much of the subtlety and plausible dramatic interest of Young Ahmed is abandoned [at the climax], which the directors have created in the interests of a big finish, but this sequence and the final emotional gesture seem rushed and almost perfunctory. For all that, it is an involving story, with a strong lead performance." The Guardian
"When it comes to a subject as contentious and raw as religious extremism and its disenfranchised discontents, some viewers may feel their hands-off, stuff-happens, it-just-is approach to motivation won't quite cut it...what are we supposed to feel about him? What makes his story worth telling?... In the end, Young Ahmed feels like little more than a pained shrug, elegantly made, yes, but vaporous and virtue-signaling an empathy that's more gestural than heartfelt." The Hollywood Reporter
Last edited by outdoorcats on May 25th, 2019, 11:18 am, edited 14 times in total.

[a LION eats GOD. Gunshots ring out. MATT turns around]
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cinewest
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#34

Post by cinewest » May 16th, 2019, 2:04 am

OldAle1 wrote:
May 15th, 2019, 11:26 pm
As a Jim Jarmusch fanboy it's a high priority for me regardless of reviews, but I can't say I'm expecting anything great from it.
I have had mixed feelings about Jarmusch since the beginning, even to a point where I have changed my mind about many of his films after seeing them a second time, usually for the better, but not necessarily. My own sense is that his work is not nearly as "great" as many critics make it out to be, though I do agree that Dead Man is a postmodern masterpiece and generally like his films to one degree or other.
If I were to summarize, I would say that the majority of his movies just don't quite live up to their promise or the glowing reviews they usually receive, but that they are usually worthwhile.
Oddly enough, I find them much better upon rediscovery than when they first come out (and are so fawned over that perhaps my expectations are over-extended).
A common experience I have is that his movies could be more interesting than they actually are (deadpan and "stripped away," sometimes seem like excuses for not trying to do more) and there always seem to be scenes that stick out like sore thumbs, though perhaps that is part of his style.

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#35

Post by cinewest » May 16th, 2019, 2:07 am

I have a feeling that Mendonca's film might do very well with the jury

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#36

Post by PGonzalez » May 16th, 2019, 10:30 am

outdoorcats wrote:
May 16th, 2019, 1:58 am

"4/5 stars...Filho...has relinquished the quieter, more humanistic tones of his earlier pictures for this disturbing ultraviolent freakout...a hallucinatory trauma with something of Alejandro Jodorowsky, or Ted Kotcheff’s Wake in Fright." The Guardian
One of my pet peeves is seeing people call Mendonça "Filho".
outdoorcats wrote:
May 16th, 2019, 1:58 am
[A] rare movie that probably would have been better if it had been dumber, or at least less ambitious...for all his skills as a director, Mendonça hasn’t quite mastered tension...[the] characters feel barely sketched, depending far too heavily on the personas of the actors who play them." Variety
One of my other pet peeves is seeing critics claim a film would be better if it was dumbed down. That being said, this film looks extremely interesting (and I'm very grateful for your hard work outdoorcats :) )

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#37

Post by outdoorcats » May 16th, 2019, 9:37 pm

Thanks for the heads up PGonzalez, the mistake was actually mine--I'll edit it shortly.

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#38

Post by flaiky » May 16th, 2019, 10:36 pm

outdoorcats wrote:
May 16th, 2019, 1:58 am
Doing my thing. :)
Excellent, thank you.

Les Miserables sounds somewhat similar to Dheepan, which I liked very much. I didn't expect the Mendonca film to be described as dystopian and demented - Aquarius (his only work I've seen) is so grounded! Hmm, I'm intrigued though. As for Jarmusch, I wasn't sold by the trailer so I'm not disappointed by the muted response but I'm sure I'll see it anyway .

Current reception levels for these three:

The Dead Don't Die: 55% Rotten Tomatoes, 3.0/5 Letterboxd
Les Miserables: 75% Rotten Tomatoes, 3.3/5 Letterboxd
Nighthawk: 83% RT, 3.5/5 Letterboxd

It seems like both of today's competition screenings, Sorry We Missed You and Atlantics, were hits (especially the Loach).
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flaiky
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#39

Post by flaiky » May 16th, 2019, 11:26 pm

beavis wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:11 pm
Sciamma is cool, also new work from hausner, serra, laxe, honore and more i'll look forward to!
FYI there's a new one from the director of Winter Brothers. It screened as part of Critics Week; the review here makes it sound great.
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cinewest
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#40

Post by cinewest » May 17th, 2019, 12:39 am

flaiky wrote:
May 16th, 2019, 11:26 pm
beavis wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:11 pm
Sciamma is cool, also new work from hausner, serra, laxe, honore and more i'll look forward to!
FYI there's a new one from the director of Winter Brothers. It screened as part of Critics Week; the review here makes it sound great.
Thanks for that review, flaiky. the Unknown Saint (critic's week) also sounds good, and here is a story about women filmmakers that I thought you might like: https://variety.com/2019/film/festivals ... 203216837/

I don't necessarily like the reviews on variety, but they are the only publication I've found that covers everything at Cannes

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