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Silent Era Challenge (Official, September 2021)

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Silent Era Challenge (Official, September 2021)

#1

Post by peeptoad »

Welcome to the Official Silent Era Challenge 2021


Image



Goal:
Watch as many silent-era silent films as you can. Only silent films made during the silent era (~1894-1930) are eligible, if you have any doubts as to whether a film counts or not feel free to ask.
Challenge runs from September 1, 2021 to September 30, 2021 in your local time zone.

Rules:
- Rewatches are welcome.
- A feature film (at least 40 min) counts as one entry.
- A total of 80 minutes of short films count as one entry.
- Please include year of release when listing your viewings.


Official lists:
The Top 300 Silent Era Films
Silent but not Forgotten
IMDB 1910s
IMDB 1920s

Unofficial lists:
iCM Forum's Favourite Silent Films
iCM Forum's Favourite Silent Movies, 2nd edition

Cinemacom's 200 Important Silent Films
BFI Screen Guide: 100 Silent Films
TSPDT's Top 25 Films per year: 1920s
St. Gloede's complementary silent selection



Participants
RankNameCount
1Traveller33
2jdidaco30
3sol25
4Knaldskalle12
5DudeLanez11
6PUNQ10
7Lonewolf20039
7peeptoad9
9Arkantos8
103eyes7
10Cippenham7
10flavo50007
10frbrown7
14ororama5
15cinephage4
16blocho1
16maxwelldeux1
16zzzorf1
Last edited by peeptoad on September 17th, 2021, 12:49 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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#2

Post by 3eyes »

One of my favorite challenges. In! Thanks, Peeptoad!
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#3

Post by Traveller »

Thanks for hosting, peeptoad. I'm in.
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September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#4

Post by Knaldskalle »

Definitely in. I'll even try to get around to actually watching some silent movies in September.
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#5

Post by Arkantos »

I look forward to having an informed opinion on the eternal Chaplin vs Lloyd vs Keaton debate by the time this is over. :D
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#6

Post by sol »

It starts! First in. :D

1a. The Battle of the Century (1927) 19min
1b. Putting Pants on Philip (1927) 20min
1c. Their Purple Moment (1928) 22min - pictured
1d. Do Detectives Think? (1927) 19min

Image

A batch of Laurel and Hardy shorts:

The Battle of the Century begins pretty well with pre-City Lights boxing ring madness with Ollie as the easily frustrated boxing coach of Stan who does not quite understand all the rules. After this strong start though, the short becomes very episodic and eventually descends into pies literally being thrown in faces. Not one of the duo's strongest outings.

In Putting Pants on Phillip, Stan plays a kilt-wearing Scotsman who keeps jumping in the air whenever he sees a dame. He also has a tendency to do Marilyn Monroe's bit from The Seven-Year Itch - almost 30 years before she did it - which of course shocks everyone around him. The gags from Stan trying to stand still for a tailor work the best though.

Their Purple Moment is really funny as Stan and Ollie try but fail to sneak out of a nightclub after realising that Stan's wife has stolen his money, leaving them unable to pay the bill. Everything descends into pie fights (again--ugh), but this mostly works, most notably when they finally get out of the room, only to accidentally re-enter it by another door!

Stan and Ollie are inept detectives in Do Detectives Think?, hired by the always delightful James Finlayson as a judge scared of retribution by a man who he sentenced. Finlayson (trying to hide in a bath at one point!) absolutely steals the show, but the duo do some funny sped-up running and the film is available in a curious colourised print on YouTube.
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#7

Post by 3eyes »

1. The secret game (1917)

Sessue Hayakawa plays a Japanese secret service agent out to foil a German spy ring during WW I. This is the first movie I've ever seen indicating that the Japanese were on the Allied side during WW I. Weak and confusing ending, but otherwise a good watch.
Spoiler
Meanwhile, during WW II... My grandfather had a player piano and we cousins used to dance to the piano rolls. One was called "National Anthems of the Allies". We couldn't understand why the Japanese national anthem was included - but when it started playing, instead of standing reverently at attention we would lie down on the floor and hold our ears and make faces.
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#8

Post by peeptoad »

Hope everyone enjoys. No bonus challenge this time around, but I'll try to post some stats weekly or at least twice this month or when I update the leaderboard. :cheers:

p.s. I like the anecdotes, 3eyes.
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#9

Post by Traveller »

01. The Scarlet Letter (1926) - 7/10
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#10

Post by cinephage »

01. Credo ou la tragédie de Lourdes, by Julien Duvivier (1924) 4,5/10

Very poor story, a lot of religious undertones... The filming of Lourdes in 1924 was quite interesting, though... The movie works better as a documentary.

02. La divine croisière, by Julien Duvivier (1929) 9/10

Fantastic cinematography, great shots of sailors and Brittany, and a fine story as well. This is certainly one of Duvivier's hidden gems...
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#11

Post by DudeLanez »

1. Seven Years Bad Luck (1921, Linder) 6/10
Spoiler
1. Seven Years Bad Luck (1921, Linder) 6/10
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#12

Post by 3eyes »

2. Dante's Inferno (1924)
Mellerdrammer about a callous rich man whose destitute neighbor gives him a copy of the Inferno and...

Very bad print. The Inferno part is pretty strange if you're familiar with the original.


3. Les gaz mortels (Fr 1916)

Confusingly overplotted thriller (I guess) by Abel Gance. Part of the plot involves poison gas during WW I. (Gance was gassed during the war himself).
Shh!
1. The secret game (1917)
2. Dante's Inferno (1924)
3. Les gaz mortels (Fr 1916)
Last edited by 3eyes on September 2nd, 2021, 11:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#13

Post by Arkantos »

1. Nosferatu, eine Synphonie des Grauens (1922, F.W. Murnau), 4/5

This is also my 800th check on ICM, a rather humble milestone but a milestone nonetheless. I liked it, the playing with shadows was nifty, Nosferatu was creepy (as was his agent Knock), and I didn't think it dragged too much.
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#14

Post by Traveller »

02. The Sea Hawk (1924) - 3/10
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#15

Post by Knaldskalle »

1. The Mystery of the Cliffs of Kador (Peret, 1913). This wasn't bad, but is obviously hampered by its limited film language (static cameras, actors enter and exit "stage", no cross cutting etc.). My 9 year old commented on what a bad time Suzanne was having: Poisoned, catatonic, shocked back to reality by seeing her loved one's death, shocked again by seeing her loved one alive and then learning that her uncle was the man who tried to kill her. Yeah, that's enough to ruin your day.

2. Queen of Spades (Protazanov, 1916). Somewhat more well-paced, but this was in a bad shape, unfortunately. I've never read the Pushkin story, so this was all new to me. Not a bad story, not a bad movie.
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#16

Post by Knaldskalle »

3eyes wrote: September 2nd, 2021, 1:45 am 2. Dante's Inferno (1924)
Mellerdrammer about a callous rich man whose destitute neighbor gives him a copy of the Inferno and...

Very bad print. The Inferno part is pretty strange if you're familiar with the original.
I hope that none of us are familiar with the original Inferno.
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#17

Post by Arkantos »

2. Speedy (1928, Ted Wilde), 5/5

This was both thrilling and hilarious. The
Spoiler
pocket crab, the dog, the old people fighting in baseball gear, the Great Bambino himself, the race at the end,
it was all fantastic stuff.
Silent Era Challenge
1. Nosferatu, eine Synphonie des Grauens (1922, F.W. Murnau)
2. Speedy (1928, Ted Wilde)
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#18

Post by 3eyes »

:D
Knaldskalle wrote: September 2nd, 2021, 4:44 am
3eyes wrote: September 2nd, 2021, 1:45 am 2. Dante's Inferno (1924)
Mellerdrammer about a callous rich man whose destitute neighbor gives him a copy of the Inferno and...

Very bad print. The Inferno part is pretty strange if you're familiar with the original.
I hope that none of us are familiar with the original Inferno.
:D
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#19

Post by sol »

Arkantos wrote: September 1st, 2021, 3:53 am I look forward to having an informed opinion on the eternal Chaplin vs Lloyd vs Keaton debate by the time this is over. :D
Arkantos wrote: September 2nd, 2021, 6:32 am 2. Speedy (1928, Ted Wilde), 5/5

This was both thrilling and hilarious.
Speedy was my first (sounds like it might have been yours too?) Harold Lloyd comedy and I similarly loved it. Seen it a couple of times and it still stands up as one of his best. Almost everything he is done is worth checking out, but the 500<400 eligible Dr. Jack and Safety Last! are his two best for my money.
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#20

Post by sol »

Defeaning Silence
1a. The Battle of the Century (1927) 19min
1b. Putting Pants on Philip (1927) 20min
1c. Their Purple Moment (1928) 22min
1d. Do Detectives Think? (1927) 19min
2a. Leave 'em Laughing (1928) 23min
2b. You're Darn Tootin' (1928) 21min - pictured
2c. Call of the Cuckoo (1927) 18min
2d. From Soup to Nuts (1928) 18min

Image

Another batch of Laurel and Hardy shorts:

Leave 'em Laughing ends on a strong note with a funny final third as the boys get high on laughing gas and befuddle everyone around them when they take a drive during heavy traffic. The first two thirds of the short though are not especially easy to get through with icky gags involving trying to pull out a sore tooth and fears of pain at the local dentist surgery.

The duo are orchestra musicians in You're Darn Tootin' with some very funny moments early on as a live concert goes awry; watching Ollie try to retrieve music sheet from under his conductor's stomping feet is especially amusing. Things get less interesting as they are fired though with the short ultimately descending into dull pants-stealing shenanigans.

Stan and Ollie are mere supporting players in Call of the Cuckoo and only have a minute or two of screen time (this came out before they broke out into stardom). James Finlayson is on hand too but has even less screen time than the boys with the majority of the plot here instead circling around a house falling apart One Week style (but not as funny as that).

From Soup to Nuts has Stan and Ollie as bumbling waiters hired for a private dinner party. There are a lot of repetitive gags in the mix as the duo keep slipping on the same peel and as one woman's mask keeps falling down, but Stan's reaction to being told to serve the salad "undressed" and the shenanigans that follow are great, leading to a strong final note.
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#21

Post by peeptoad »

1. Stachka/ Strike (1925) 7
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#22

Post by sol »

The Silent Partner
1a. The Battle of the Century (1927) 19min
1b. Putting Pants on Philip (1927) 20min
1c. Their Purple Moment (1928) 22min
1d. Do Detectives Think? (1927) 19min
2a. Leave 'em Laughing (1928) 23min
2b. You're Darn Tootin' (1928) 21min - pictured
2c. Call of the Cuckoo (1927) 18min
2d. From Soup to Nuts (1928) 18min
3a. Young Mr. Jazz (1919) 13min
3b. Billy Blazes, Esq. (1919) 12min
3c. Get Out and Get Under (1920) 25min
3d. Bumping Into Broadway (1919) 24min
3e. By the Sad Sea Waves (1917) 10min - pictured

Image

A batch of Harold Lloyd shorts:

Young Mr. Jazz gets off to a great start with Harold trying to court/romance a young woman while she spends time on the beach with her overprotective dad. From shadowing the father, to snorkeling through the sand, Harold is hilarious. The majority of the short though occurs in a shady bar full of pickpockets, which is amusing but gives way to less physical humour.

Set during the Old West, Billy Blazes, Esq. gives Harold Lloyd some great gunplay scenes, holding two pistols at once and accurately pointing them even when facing away. Alas, he does not enter the short until five minutes in. The ending/epilogue is very weak too, but the scenes of Lloyd whipping guns out of others' hands and holding them akimbo are excellent.

Get Out and Get Under is another Lloyd short where the middle is much stronger than the start and end. Lloyd's love heartbreak in the intro is a bit 'eh' and his play performance at the end is just okay. Watching him jump in and out of moving cars while evading the police in the middle stretch is Classic Lloyd comedy gold though (and a fun Hot Water precursor).

Broke and unable to pay his rent, Lloyd has several funny moments in Bumping to Broadway that predate Safety Last! as he tricks his landlady and an employee of hers who tosses out non-paying tenants... literally. The rest of the short is a bit of an up-and-down bag, but seeing Bebe Daniels in a Lloyd short was something else (I expected Mildred Davis).

In By the Sad Sea Waves, Harold is a young and upcoming lifeguard who does his best to annoy the older, more experienced lifeguard on his beach while trying to romance various young women. There are some fun antics with his various rescue attempts but most of the comedy comes from hoses in faces and changing room mix-ups, which are mostly sans Lloyd.
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#23

Post by Traveller »

03. What Price Glory (1926) - 4/10
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#24

Post by PUNQ »

Like last year, I'm only using the Silent challenge to see if any new silents have turned-up since last time I checked. Not going to do any re-watches, so this is purely be a new discovery adventure. And to show how little I've prepared for this challenge, these are the all feature films I had ready;


1. Mazeppa, der Volksheld der Ukraine (1919, Martin Berger) - 4/10
--- I didn't get all that was going on, but there was something about the way this film looked that made it fun to watch. An Ukrainian adventure with all types of awesome costumes and all kinds of stuff going on. Confusing, but entertaining in a rocky way.


2. Dunungen [The Downy Girl] (1919, Ivan Hedqvist) - 5/10
--- One of several screen dramatizations of Selma Lagerlöf books to be made around that time and the first feature film to be directed by Ivan Hedqvist, who also acted in the film. Kind of a smaller tale of country side romance with a class twist. Not always captivating, but always a pleasant watch in all its simplicity with beautiful Renée Björling as its main attraction.


3. Fangen fra Erie Country Tugthus (1918, Fritz Magnussen) - 3/10
--- A little difficult to give it full justice as the film is incomplete, but with over 50 minutes you get the sense it was too slow and serious to create enthusiasm. Some of the scenes were nicely done, but this heavily moral take on a crime story does little to make its story come alive.


4. Thora van Deken (1920, John W. Brunius) - 5/10
--- Really well acted, without that making me absorbed in the story. Felt there needed to be more going on to truly catch my imagination. And that's where credit to <n>Pauline Brunius goes. Her acting elevated everything, making it as good as it was.


5. The Battling Orioles (1924, Fred Guiol & Ted Wilde) - 5/10
--- A Hal Roach comedy and you got many of his stock actors involved, including the original Little Rascals cast and most prominent, Noah Young. The star of the show was Glenn Tryon, who was a typical light handsome guy they put in easy affairs as this one. Good actor that never truly appealed to me, though he did star in one real silent classic called Lonesome (1928). However, The Battling Orioles (1924) was more your standard Hal Roach slapstick'er escalating into a massive brawl. A good time regardless of not being the most original of formulas.
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#25

Post by Traveller »

04. The Spiders - Episode 1: The Golden Sea (1919) - 7/10
05. The Spiders, Part 2: The Diamond Ship (1920) - 6/10
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#26

Post by Arkantos »

sol wrote: September 2nd, 2021, 11:07 am
Arkantos wrote: September 1st, 2021, 3:53 am I look forward to having an informed opinion on the eternal Chaplin vs Lloyd vs Keaton debate by the time this is over. :D
Arkantos wrote: September 2nd, 2021, 6:32 am 2. Speedy (1928, Ted Wilde), 5/5

This was both thrilling and hilarious.
Speedy was my first (sounds like it might have been yours too?) Harold Lloyd comedy and I similarly loved it. Seen it a couple of times and it still stands up as one of his best. Almost everything he is done is worth checking out, but the 500<400 eligible Dr. Jack and Safety Last! are his two best for my money.
My second, I saw Safety Last! a few months back and loved it too, that building climb scene was more nerve-wracking than most modern horror films I've seen. I'll have to move Dr. Jack up to the top of my list to watch.
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#27

Post by Arkantos »

3. The Navigator (1924, Buster Keaton and Donald Crisp), 3/5

The weakest of Keaton's films I've seen so far, I didn't think there was much worthwhile about this one.
Silent Era Challenge
1. Nosferatu, eine Synphonie des Grauens (1922, F.W. Murnau)
2. Speedy (1928, Ted Wilde)
3. The Navigator (1924, Buster Keaton and Donald Crisp)
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#28

Post by Cippenham »

Can I join? Probably watch first film or films late today or tomorrow.
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#29

Post by peeptoad »

Cippenham wrote: September 3rd, 2021, 6:40 am Can I join?
Of course! :cheers:
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#30

Post by sol »

The Silent Partner
1a. The Battle of the Century (1927) 19min
1b. Putting Pants on Philip (1927) 20min
1c. Their Purple Moment (1928) 22min
1d. Do Detectives Think? (1927) 19min
2a. Leave 'em Laughing (1928) 23min
2b. You're Darn Tootin' (1928) 21min
2c. Call of the Cuckoo (1927) 18min
2d. From Soup to Nuts (1928) 18min
3a. Young Mr. Jazz (1919) 13min
3b. Billy Blazes, Esq. (1919) 12min
3c. Get Out and Get Under (1920) 25min
3d. Bumping Into Broadway (1919) 24min
3e. By the Sad Sea Waves (1917) 10min
4a. An Eastern Westerner (1920) 24min REVISION
4b. Among Those Present (1921) 34min
4c. From Hand to Mouth (1919) 22min - pictured

Image

Another batch of Harold Lloyd shorts:

Rewatched after almost four years, An Eastern Westerner stood up well. I had forgotten most of the gags other than the circles of guns and Harold cheating at cards by pretending to be a bartender. His every attempt to impress The Girl was funny and charming and the ways he evades a hooded gang are amusing and clever (jumping into a clothes line at one point).

Among Those Present starts off as a fairly average Lloyd venture with him carrying on the pretence after mistaken for a nobleman/adventurer. The final ten minutes though are Lloyd comedy gold as he loses his pants and climbs up, down and around various buildings and hides behind others while trying to make his way back inside to put on another pair of pants.

Harold gets some great chase sequences in From Hand to Mouth as he has to evade bumbling cops after accidentally using counterfeit money and retrieving a stolen purse in a way that makes him look guilty. He is also saddled with a hyperactive preteen girl for part of the film. The young actress manages to outdo Harold, and it is a shame that her role is rather limited.
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#31

Post by 3eyes »

4. The bells (1926)
Lionel Barrymore shows a fine acting range in this tale of ambition, greed and remorse in an Alpine village, while Boris Karloff is sinister in a bit part.

One of the reviewers on IMDb says, "The film ends kind of abruptly, and although the picture is widely quoted as being 92 minutes long, the film I saw last night was just a shade over 70 minutes in length. What's up with that?" The ending is certainly abrupt and unsatisfying, so maybe there was another reel?
... Or maybe not. I just looked up the play on which it is based, Le Juif Polonais by Alexandre Chatrian and Emile Erckmann (1867) and the play ends differently. The movie's ending may just be typical Hollywood.
Shh!
1. The secret game (1917)
2. Dante's Inferno (1924)
3. Les gaz mortels (Fr 1916)
4. The bells (1926)
:run: STILL the Gaffer!
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#32

Post by flavo5000 »

Image
1. Old Ironsides (James Cruze, 1926)

Image
2. Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (Fred Niblo, 1925)
...
1. Old Ironsides (James Cruze, 1926)
2. Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (Fred Niblo, 1925)
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#33

Post by sol »

The Silent Partner
1a. The Battle of the Century (1927) 19min
1b. Putting Pants on Philip (1927) 20min
1c. Their Purple Moment (1928) 22min
1d. Do Detectives Think? (1927) 19min
2a. Leave 'em Laughing (1928) 23min
2b. You're Darn Tootin' (1928) 21min
2c. Call of the Cuckoo (1927) 18min
2d. From Soup to Nuts (1928) 18min
3a. Young Mr. Jazz (1919) 13min
3b. Billy Blazes, Esq. (1919) 12min
3c. Get Out and Get Under (1920) 25min
3d. Bumping Into Broadway (1919) 24min
3e. By the Sad Sea Waves (1917) 10min
4a. An Eastern Westerner (1920) 24min REVISION
4b. Among Those Present (1921) 34min
4c. From Hand to Mouth (1919) 22min
5a. The Haunted House (1921) 21min REVISION
5b. The Frozen North (1922) 17min REVISION
5c. The Play House (1921) 23min REVISION
5d. The Scarecrow (1920) 19min REVISIONpictured

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A batch of Buster Keaton shorts; all second-time viewings with the exception of The Haunted House.

I have lost track of how many times I have seen The Haunted House. Maybe ten times? It never grows old. I certainly recall being disappointed at first with how slim the horror content is, but as a comedy it works perfectly throughout, particularly in the pre-haunted house bank scenes with sticky money shenanigans and Buster jumping literally all over the set.

All that I vividly recalled from The Frozen North was the scene where Buster uses a cardboard cutout to rob an entire room. It turns out that this is the first scene and the only really great part of the movie. We get some of the usual Buster antics (jumping out of windows; befuddled reactions) but Buster as an outlaw rather than a hapless everyman is a lot less funny.

Thanks to nifty cutting, The Play House gives us the novelty of seeing many Busters on screen at once. Where things get really amusing though is when we get to see Buster in drag/makeup, often interacting with other versions of himself. The multiple Busters part was shorter than I recalled though, and the subsequent scenes are less out-there - but still entertaining.

I had forgotten almost everything about The Scarecrow. While I had seen it the least recently of this bunch, I think my forgetting it is more due to how episodic the whole thing is. The individual ideas are great -- fold-away house; Keaton chased by a dog for minutes on end -- but the project is never too cohesive and is titled after a brief (if funny) gag towards the end.
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Long live the new flesh!
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frbrown
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#34

Post by frbrown »

sol wrote: September 3rd, 2021, 2:14 pm Image

A perfect loop :woot:
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Traveller
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#35

Post by Traveller »

06. Vanina (1922) - 5/10
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!
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#36

Post by Knaldskalle »

3. Shoes (Weber, 1916). Eh. I'm not particularly fond of morality tales, especially not the ones that give away the whole story right from the beginning, which is what this one does. It's only 47 minutes or so, but it so slow and leaden that it feels longer. There are some nice shots here and there (a reflection in a cracked mirror stands out), but... yeah, it's not great.
Spoiler
1. The Mystery of the Cliffs of Kador (Peret, 1913)
2. Queen of Spades (Protazanov, 1916)
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Please don't hurt yourself, talk to someone.
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maxwelldeux
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#37

Post by maxwelldeux »

1. Pandora's Box (1929)

Apparently HBO has a 131 minute cut of this. It was fine - loved the dance/stage sequence, but it do much for me beyond the visuals.
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#38

Post by DudeLanez »

2. For Heaven's Sake (1926, Taylor) 7/10
Spoiler
1. Seven Years Bad Luck (1921, Linder) 6/10
2. For Heaven's Sake (1926, Taylor) 7/10
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jdidaco
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#39

Post by jdidaco »

Silent September!!! (l) Thank you for hosting it, peeptoad!

(Gif from 'Rien que les heures'),

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1. Jánosík (Jaroslav Siakel, 1921) 7/10
2. Ukrizovaná (The Crucified, Boris Orlický, 1921) 7.5/10
3. Cikáni (Gypsies, Karl Anton, 1922) 9/10
4. Bud pripraven (Be Prepared!, Svatopluk Innemann, 1924) 7/10
5. Bílý ráj (White Paradise, Karel Lamac, 1924) 8/10
6. Rien que les heures (Nothing But Time, Alberto Cavalcanti, 1926) 10/10 (RV)
7. Svejk v civilu (Svejk in Civilian Life, Gustav Machatý, 1927) 7/10
8. Yvette (Alberto Cavalcanti, 1928) 8.5/10
9. Hríchy lásky (The Sins of Love, Karel Lamac, 1929) 8/10
10. Po horách, po dolách (Through Mountains and Valleys, Karel Plicka, 1930) 8.5/10
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#40

Post by 3eyes »

5. Dick Turpin (1925)
Me and Tom Mix (and, of course, his horse Tony) go back to 40s radio serials, but this only the 2d of his movies I've seen. A rousing actioner about a heroic highwayman.
REAL spoiler, read at your peril
Tony dies at the end.
Shh
1. The secret game (1917)
2. Dante's Inferno (1924)
3. Les gaz mortels (Fr 1916)
4. The bells (26)
5. Dick Turpin (1925)
:run: STILL the Gaffer!
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