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Run the Actor Challenge (Official, July 2021)

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Kublai Khan
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Run the Actor Challenge (Official, July 2021)

#1

Post by Kublai Khan »

Welcome to the...

The Official "Run The Actor" Challenge!!


ImageImage

Acting is not about being someone different. It's finding the similarity in what is apparently different, then finding myself in there.
- Meryl Streep


It's been said--usually in a dismissively sardonic fashion--that actors are professional liars. But it's an undeniably true statement. They are paid to be on set, wearing the right clothes and makeup, and read words written by someone else. But there's more to acting than just the mechanics. Actors have to infuse themselves into the part to truly make it memorable. Every performance they give, they add a piece of their soul into it to give it life. Accordingly if we were to take a moment to focus on their performances, we could get to know the true actor and appreciate how chameleonic they can be.

This is the "Run the Actor" challenge. The spirit of this competition is to celebrate the actors who perform in the movies we all love. To appreciate the range and versatility they use to bring a variety of characters to life.

The spirit of the challenge is to watch actors in starring roles where they are on screen for the majority of the movie. To gain a better understanding of their craft and recognize how impressive their performances vary from one role to the next. Theoretically you could watch a series of random movies that happen to have the same character actor in a 2-line part. But why do that? Watch movies to learn something about the actors, not to mechanically make a number go up by one!

Now let’s pay close attention to the rules on this one. They are a little more involved than the typical challenge here!
Rules:
- You have to watch a minimum of three films featuring the same actor for them to count.
- You cannot use the same entry to count for two different actors.
- Each feature film (over 40 minutes) counts as one entry.
- 80 minutes of short films or miniseries/TV episodes counts as one entry. (No more than 80 minutes of a single TV series can count as an entry)
- Films must be watched one at a time and at single speed (not sped up).
- Re-watches are allowed and are good for the soul.
- Please include year of release when listing your viewings.
- Please indicate each actor when listing your viewings otherwise your score will NOT be included in the leaderboard.

Not against the rules, but discouraged for being against the spirit of the challenge:
- There is no minimum amount of time an actor has to be in a movie for it to count. (i.e. Marlon Brando being top billed in Superman despite only 8 minutes on screen)
- Watching multiple entries where the actor is playing the same character is allowed, but only 80 minutes of the same TV series can be counted. (i.e. watching Emma Watson as Hermione Grange in 8 Harry Potter movies is okay, but watching 235 episodes of Friends for Jennifer Aniston is not.)

- When beginning a new run, please declare the actor the run is for and post a minimum of three films from the actor to start the run. Future consecutive posts tied to the same actor can be less than three entries as long as the actor does not change. If you change actors and return to a previous actor, then the 3-entry initial post rule would apply again.
Examples
Correct:
Post #1
1. Michael Clayton (George Clooney, 2007)
2. Gravity (Clooney, 2013)
3. ER Season 1, Episodes 2-3 120 min (Clooney, 1994)

Post #2
4. Ocean's Eleven (Clooney, 2001)

Post #3
5. The Fault in Our Stars (Ansel Elgort, 2014)
6. Divergent (Elgort, 2014)
7. Baby Driver (Elgort, 2017)

Post #4
8. The Ides of March (Clooney, 2011)
9. Good Night, and Good Luck (Clooney, 2005)
10. O Brother, Where Art Thou? (Clooney, 2000)

Not Correct:
Post #1
1. The Last of the Mohicans (Daniel Day-Lewis, 2007)
2. Lincoln (Day-Lewis, 2012)
3. Gangs of New York (Day-Lewis, 2002)

Post #2
4. Alien (Sigourney Weaver, 1979)
5. In the Name of the Father (Day-Lewis, 1993)
6. Ghostbusters (Weaver, 1984)
7. Dave (Weaver, 1993)

Post #3
8. My Left Foot (Day-Lewis, 1989)
LEADERBOARD
Rank Participant Count Actors
1 flavo5000 119 29
2 DudeLanez 57 19
3 Kublai Khan 52 12
4 jdidaco 42 14
5 Lu-Chin 37 12
6 sol 36 11
7 peeptoad 27 9
8 shugs 24 8
9 OldAle1 21 5
10 maxwelldeux 19 5
11 blocho 18 5
12 Lonewolf2003 13 2
13 AB537 9 3
13 Lammetje 9 3
15 vortexsurfer 6 2
16 ryebass 3 1


BONUS CHALLENGE #1: #Oscar
From Emil Jannings to Anthony Hopkins or from Janet Gaynor to Frances McDormand, the Academy Award for Best Actor and Actress are always controversial and debated.
A challenge for us as a group to see how many of the Oscar winners we can evaluate during this challenge! I will cross out completed actors in the list below. Note: You don't have to watch the performance they won the award for.
BC#1: Academy Award
1. Emil Jannings
2. Warner Baxter
3. George Arliss
4. Lionel Barrymore (shugs)
5. Wallace Beery
6. Fredric March
7. Charles Laughton (DudeLanez)
8. Clark Gable
9. Victor McLaglen
10. Paul Muni (blocho)
11. Spencer Tracy (AB537)
12. Robert Donat (Kublai Khan)
13. James Stewart
14. Gary Cooper
15. James Cagney
16. Paul Lukas
17. Bing Crosby
18. Ray Milland
19. Ronald Colman
20. Laurence Olivier
21. Broderick Crawford
22. Jose Ferrer
23. Humphrey Bogart (AB537)
24. William Holden
25. Marlon Brando
26. Ernest Borgnine
27. Yul Brynner
28. Alec Guinness
29. David Niven
30. Charlton Heston
31. Burt Lancaster
32. Macimilian Schell
33. Gregory Peck (shugs)
34. Sidney Poitier
35. Rex Harrison
36. Lee Marvin
37. Paul Scofield
38. Rod Steiger
39. Cliff Robertson
40. John Wayne
41. George C. Scott
42. Gene Hackman
43. Jack Lemmon
44. Art Carney
45. Jack Nicholson
46. Peter Finch
47. Richard Dreyfuss (ryebass)
48. Jon Voight
49. Dustin Hoffman
50. Robert De Niro
51. Henry Fonda (shugs)
52. Ben Kingsley
53. Robert Duvall (shugs)
54. F. Murray Abraham
55. William Hurt
56. Paul Newman
57. Michael Douglas
58. Daniel Day-Lewis
59. Anthony Hopkins
60. Al Pacino
61. Tom Hanks
62. Nicholas Cage (vortexsurfer)
63. Geoffrey Rush
64. Roberto Benigni
65. Kevin Spacey (blocho)
66. Russell Crowe
67. Denzel Washington (sol)
68. Adrian Brody
69. Sean Penn
70. Jamie Foxx
71. Philip Seymour Hoffman
72. Forest Whitaker
73. Jeff Bridges
74. Colin Firth
75. Jean Dujardin
76. Matthew McConaughey (Kublai Khan)
77. Eddie Redmayne
78. Leonardo DiCaprio
79. Casey Affleck
80. Gary Oldman
81. Rami Malek
82. Joaquin Phoenix
83. Janet Gaynor
84. Mary Pickford
85. Norma Shearer
86. Marie Dressler
87. Helen Hayes
88. Katherine Hepburn
89. Claudette Colbert
90. Bette Davis
91. Luise Rainer
92. Vivien Leigh
93. Ginger Rogers
94. Joan Fontaine
95. Greeg Garson
96. Jennifer Jones
97. Ingrid Bergman
98. Joan Crawford
99. Olivia de Havilland
100. Loretta Young
101. Jane Wyman
102. Judy Holliday
103. Shirley Booth
104. Audrey Hepburn
105. Grace Kelly
106. Anna Magnani
107. Joanne Woodward
108. Susan Hayward
109. Simone Signoret
110. Elizabeth Taylor
111. Sophia Loren
112. Anne Bancroft
113. Patricia Neal
114. Julie Andrews
115. Julie Cristie
116. Barbra Streisand
117. Maggie Smith (sol)
118. Glenda Jackson
119. Jane Fonda
120. Liza Minnelli
121. Ellen Burstyn
122. Louise Fletcher
123. Faye Dunaway
124. Diane Keaton (Kublai Khan)
125. Sally Field (maxwelldeux)
126. Sissy Spacek
127. Meryl Streep
128. Shirley MacLaine
129. Geraldine Page
130. Marlee Matlin
131. Cher
132. Jodie Foster
133. Jessica Tandy
134. Kathy Bates
135. Emma Thompson
136. Holly Hunter
137. Jessica Lange
138. Susan Surandon (shugs)
139. Frances McDormand
140. Gwyneth Paltrow
141. Hilary Swank
142. Julia Roberts (sol)
143. Halle Berry (shugs)
144. Nicole Kidman
145. Charlize Theron (flavo5000)
146. Reese Witherspoon (Lammetje)
147. Helen Mirren (Lu-Chin)
148. Marion Cotillard
149. Kate Winslet (peeptoad)
150. Sandra Bullock
151. Natalie Portman
152. Jennifer Lawrence (shugs)
153. Cate Blanchett
154. Julianne Moore
155. Brie Larson
156. Emma Stone
157. Olivia Colman
158. Renee Zellweger
BONUS CHALLENGE #2: #International
That other Bonus Challenge is certainly US-centric. What about the rest of the world?
This bonus challenges awards the user who watches films from actors born in the most countries. Tag your entries with the country of birth of the actor.

BC#2: #International
Rank Participant Country Count Countries
1 Lu-Chin 11 Argentina, Demark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Iran, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, UK, USA
2 flavo5000 10 Canada, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, UK, USA
2 DudeLanez 10 Austria, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Japan, Norway, Sweden, UK, USA
4 jdidaco 9 Brazil, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Norway, Sweden, UK, USA
5 Kublai Khan 7 Canada, China, Malaysia, Spain, Sweden, UK, USA
6 OldAle1 5 Canada, Iran, Netherlands, UK, USA
7 peeptoad 4 Cote d'Ivoire, Ireland, UK, USA
7 sol 4 Canada, Scotland, UK, USA
9 maxwelldeux 3 India, Sweden, USA
9 Lammetje 3 Canada, India, USA
11 blocho 2 Austria-Hungary, USA
11 Lonewolf2003 2 Cuba, Hungary
11 AB537 2 Germany, USA
14 vortexsurfer 1 USA
14 shugs 1 USA
14 ryebass 1 USA
Last edited by Kublai Khan on July 29th, 2021, 1:35 am, edited 14 times in total.
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#2

Post by Kublai Khan »

Opening/posting this a little early to hash at any questions, issues, concerns, etc..
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#3

Post by shugs »

I'm in! Really digging the bonus challenges. :cheers:
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#4

Post by peeptoad »

Thanks for hosting, Kublai Khan. Got two runs lined up already... :thumbsup:
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#5

Post by flavo5000 »

I'm all over this one! I've got a bunch of runs lined up with some sub-themes.
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#6

Post by sol »

It starts! First in. :D

1. Nobody (2021) Bob Odenkirk #USA
2a. Fargo - S1 : E1 (2014) Bob Odenkirk #USA
2b. Fargo – S1 : E2 (2014) Bob Odenkirk #USA
3. Girlfriend's Day (2017) Bob Odenkirk #USA

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Bob Odenkirk

While I had seen nine films with Bob Odenkirk prior to this month, none were starring-role movies, and only two those (Nebraska and The Post) are films were he listed in the top five names in the credits. Add to this that I have never seen Breaking Bad or Better Call Saul, and these four titles felt pretty much like discovering Odenkirk for the first time.

While the first episode of Fargo do not give him a lot to do, he has some decent moments in the second episode. I especially enjoyed the dynamics between him and his deputy and his attempts to not grill the protagonist despite her convictions. The other two titles though give him much more to do. He has a great slightly ruffled everyman appearance and the fact that he doesn't look as glamorous as Keanu Reeves or Viggo Mortensen really played to his advantage for me with Nobody. He really felt like just an ordinary guy. Girlfriend's Day is more of him playing everyman very well. Not as solid a film, but another relatable Odenkirk turn.

I feel like I should say a bit about Fargo too, if not necessarily on his performance. What a dynamite first couple of episodes! Fargo has long been my least favourite Coens movie, but this is really quite different, more sinister and darkly comical rather than goofy. Billy Bob Thorton is simply excellent too. I especially loved the part where he talks a cop into letting him drive away, as well as his ability to get a nameless package delivered to him in the second episode. It is a shame we don't see more of Odenkirk in these first two episodes, but I assume that changes in episodes to come.
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#7

Post by Torgo »

Kublai Khan wrote: June 29th, 2021, 2:59 am - Watching multiple entries where the actor is playing the same character is allowed, but only 80 minutes of the same TV series can be counted. (i.e. watching Emma Watson as Hermione Grange in 8 Harry Potter movies is okay, but )

- When beginning a new run, please declare the actor the run is for and post a minimum of three films from the actor to start the run. Future consecutive posts tied to the same actor can be less than three entries as long as the actor does not change. If you change actors and return to a previous actor, then the 3-entry initial post rule would apply again.
It appears the sentence with Hermione is missing an ending, or am I missing something? :sweat:

Good, clear introduction. Good luck, guys!
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#8

Post by Kublai Khan »

Torgo wrote: July 1st, 2021, 11:28 pm
Kublai Khan wrote: June 29th, 2021, 2:59 am - Watching multiple entries where the actor is playing the same character is allowed, but only 80 minutes of the same TV series can be counted. (i.e. watching Emma Watson as Hermione Grange in 8 Harry Potter movies is okay, but )

- When beginning a new run, please declare the actor the run is for and post a minimum of three films from the actor to start the run. Future consecutive posts tied to the same actor can be less than three entries as long as the actor does not change. If you change actors and return to a previous actor, then the 3-entry initial post rule would apply again.
It appears the sentence with Hermione is missing an ending, or am I missing something? :sweat:

Good, clear introduction. Good luck, guys!
Whoops, thanks for noticing. Apparently I stopped writing mid-thought. Fixed.
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#9

Post by DudeLanez »

Greta Garbo #Sweden

1. The Kiss (1929, Feyder) 6/10
2. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 6/10
3. Camille (1936, Cukor) 7/10

Image
Anna Christie (1930)
Run the Actor
Greta Garbo #Sweden
1. The Kiss (1929, Feyder) 6/10
2. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 6/10
3. Camille (1936, Cukor) 7/10
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#10

Post by peeptoad »

Image

Paddy Considine
1. Dead Man's Shoes (2004) 8+
2. Submarine (2010) 7
3. Blitz (2011) 6
Last edited by peeptoad on July 5th, 2021, 1:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#11

Post by maxwelldeux »

Padma Lakshmi, India

Admittedly, this is a weird person to lead off this challenge with. But I'm nearing 100 hours of watching her in Top Chef this year, so I thought I'd see if it was even possible to do a run with her. And it is (though I wouldn't advise it) - I picked the two films I could find where she had top-5 billing. I'm a huge fan of hers, as I think she's a genuinely good person. Sadly, though, my admiration for her does not extend to her acting chops.

1. Top Chef Seattle (2012, 2ep, 86 minutes)
This season is fun because I recognize the landmarks. Otherwise, it's a food competition show - if you like that sort of thing (which I do, because I like to cook), the show is solid.

2. Sharpe's Challenge (2006) 4/10
British colonialism meets India. Bleh.

3. Boom (2003) 3/10
Diamond thievery meets Indian high fashion. Bleher.
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#12

Post by Torgo »

peeptoad wrote: July 2nd, 2021, 9:39 am Paddy Considine
1. Dead Man's Shoes (2004) 8+
:thumbsup:
I really like him. This and Tyrannosaur (2011) are pretty tough and great watches ..
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#13

Post by flavo5000 »

Masters of Horror Spotlight:
Vincent Price

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Nationality: USA (St. Louis, MO)

The delightfully devious, deliciously devilish Vincent Price is a consummate horror actor, and while he was featured in many non-genre efforts, particularly earlier in his career, like his excellent roles in film noir melodramas and mysteries like Laura, Dragonwyck and Leave Her To Heaven as well as westerns like The Baron of Arizona, he often portrayed a villain, Hollywood taking advantage of the sinister undertones with which he could imbue the most syrupy sincere line. From his iconic string of Edgar Allan Poe films with Roger Corman to juicy, madcap ghoulish pictures like Theatre of Blood and The Abominable Dr. Phibes, Price is hands-down one of the greatest actors in the horror genre and fully deserving of the legendary status he has achieved.

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1. The Monster Club (Roy Ward Baker, 1981)
In the '60s as Price began to take his career less seriously and embrace his genre work fully, he began to appear in more comedies like Beach Party, Dr. Goldfoot and as Egghead in the Batman '66 TV series as well as movies like Comedy of Terrors and Bloodbath at the House of Death. With The Monster Club coming pretty late in his career, Price once again leans into the comedy a little with a role as an oddly polite and genteel vampire. Price pulls it off admirably by actually keeping the scenery chewing dialed down a little and layering on the charm. Incidentally it's the only time Price ever played a vampire if you can believe it! The film as a whole is a decent, entertaining swansong for Amicus anthology horror with a nice mix of styles from gothic love story to tounge-in-cheek dark humor to straight up grim horror. It's not one of Amicus' best but for fans of of their anthology films, you'll still have a good time seeing old favorites like Price, John Carradine and Donald Pleasance all making appearances.

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2. Horror Hall of Fame (Charles Braverman, 1974)
This is a TV special hosted by Vincent Price and ostensibly a combination of talk show and clip show with Price interviewing various guests like John Astin and John Carradine interspersed with Price introducing clips from various "hall of fame" horror films, from the early Universal monster features to The Exorcist. Price is pleasantly delightful to watch in full ham mode slinging puns like nobody's business, and his interview with Carradine reminiscing about their first film appearances is genuinely delightful with them conversing like old friends. For big fans of Price and other classic horror, this is actually a pretty decent watch if you can stand the cheesiness of the whole affair.

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3. The Three Musketeers (George Sidney, 1948)
While this isn't one of Price's horror pictures, it's a fine example of Price in full villainous splendor as the dastardly, underhanded Richelieu. Price is in top form as Richelieu seeks to unfold his malicious machinations. The film as a whole is a little spotty as an adaptation though giving some of character development short shift. Having said that, I will say it's a fun flick if you like your spry swordplay. Gene Kelly in particular adds such a sense of fun to the proceedings that it's almost worth it for him alone.

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4. Madhouse (Jim Clark, 1974)
Madhouse is a nice little proto-slasher with a dash of meta-horror starring Price as a horror actor (a stretch I know) who's accused of murdering his wife and institutionalized. Years later when he gets out, more murders start happening in the style of the deaths in his films. Is he subconsciously responsible or is something more sinister at play? Price is very good here playing both the overly theatrical actor he's more known for as well as a more tired, disillusioned person who's afraid their past is coming back to haunt them. He shows a subtlety in some scenes here that I don't often see with Price making this one well worth a watch for fans of Price and general horror fans alike.
All the world's a stage
1. The Monster Club (Roy Ward Baker, 1981)
2. Horror Hall of Fame (Charles Braverman, 1974)
3. The Three Musketeers (George Sidney, 1948)
4. Madhouse (Jim Clark, 1974)
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#14

Post by Kublai Khan »

Image
Diane Keaton (#USA) (#OSCAR)

1. Sleeper (Woody Allen-1973)
2. Reds (Warren Beatty-1981)
3. Father of the Bride (Charles Shyer-1991)
4. The First Wives Club (Hugh Wilson-1996)

Hard to ignore that Diane Keaton really has a feminist streak and it's noticeable in this randomish collection of these four movies from different periods of Keaton's career. Sleeper has Keaton being liberated and joining a resistance group and Reds also has Keaton as a subversive leftist reporter. Yes, both roles are defined by their relationship to the main characters (and Keaton's love interests at the time--Woody Allen and Warren Beatty), but she does portray independence in both roles.

Father of the Bride is maybe the least feminist as she plays the role of a patient, doting wife without much else going on outside her own family. She does the mom-role well and I understand that the sequel involves her being pregnant, so maybe there's more there.

The movie in which she is the strongest feminist is oddly the role where she is the meekest. In The First Wives Club, she schemes with female friends to gain revenge for being wronged, but she delivers the best performance of this run by delivering over-the-top emotionally fragile performance.
Last edited by Kublai Khan on July 5th, 2021, 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#15

Post by sol »

Running on Actors
1. Nobody (2021) Bob Odenkirk #USA
2a. Fargo - S1 : E1 (2014) Bob Odenkirk
2b. Fargo – S1 : E2 (2014) Bob Odenkirk
3. Girlfriend's Day (2017) Bob Odenkirk
4. Stella Dallas (1937) Barbara Stanwyck
5. The Furies (1950) Barbara Stanwyck
6. Baby Face (1933) Barbara Stanwyck
7. Meet John Doe (1941) Barbara Stanwyck

Image Image Image Image

Barbara Stanwyck

It is impossible to think of Barbara Stanwyck without also thinking of Double Indemnity, but I gave it some thought and I could think of The Lady Eve, Ball of Fire and Sorry, Wrong Number. Upon looking it up, I had actually seen thirteen performances from Stanwyck prior to this month - though most not in memorable films, and most unmemorable turns too - so this month seemed like a great opportunity to see what she had to offer beyond her noir and screwball comedy stuff.

Curiously enough, even though I picked four Stanwyck films to watch that sounded very different to each other, she actually plays the same sort of character in three of them. From her aspirant social climber in Stella Dallas to her land-coveting rancher's daughter in The Furies to her seductress in Baby Face who uses and manipulates men, she plays characters in each of these three films who are highly materialistic and do not care who they hurt in the name of personal gain.

As such, Meet John Doe was finally a refreshing change of pace. Her tearjerker scenes toward the end of the film are definitely not her forte, but it was so great seeing her playing a non-materialistic and even somewhat altruistic young woman who just wants to keep her job. Still, at the end of day, it is Double Indemnity that is going to remain my Stanwyck go-to film, with perhaps The Lady Eve as a notable but distant second.
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#16

Post by peeptoad »

Torgo wrote: July 2nd, 2021, 3:12 pm
peeptoad wrote: July 2nd, 2021, 9:39 am Paddy Considine
1. Dead Man's Shoes (2004) 8+
:thumbsup:
I really like him. This and Tyrannosaur (2011) are pretty tough and great watches ..
Me too. He's good in everything I've seen him in so far. I plan on watching Tyrannosaur relatively soon since I'm on a sort of ongoing, contemporary British film quest right now.
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#17

Post by ryebass »

In please. Going to begin with Richard Dreyfuss.
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#18

Post by Lammetje »

Kublai Khan wrote: July 3rd, 2021, 3:26 am 4. The First Waves Club (Hugh Wilson-1996)
There's a typo in your first wave of movies. ;)
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#19

Post by flavo5000 »

Ida Lupino

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Nationality: Born in United Kingdom
Ida Lupino is not only known for her gritty, naturalistic hard-nosed acting roles but was also one of the few female directors during the Studio Era in Hollywood of the '40s through '60s. While Lupino acted in a wide variety of pictures like the acclaimed The Hard Way and The Sea Wolf, she is almost certainly most well-known for her many appearances in film noir like They Live By Night, High Sierra and On Dangerous Ground (which she was rumored to have co-directed when Nicholas Ray become ill during filming). She had the beauty and charm necessary to carry these pictures while also displaying a hard-nosed edge that many actresses couldn't pull off. She once jokingly referred to herself "the poor man's Bette Davis" which frankly does a huge disservice to her acting style. Lupino was capable of conveying a kind of sad desperation in her eyes and mannerisms that gave her a certain gravitas that allowed her to steal many a scene she was in. Lupino is easily one of my favorite Hollywood Golden Era actresses and has left a great legacy of gritty, determined women that any star would be proud of.

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5. Out of the Fog (Anatole Litvak, 1941)
Man, Lupino seems to always have a thing for the bad boys (as we'll see again later). In this somewhat meagerly scripted story, we have a couple of fishermen being extorted by a gangster (played by John Garfield) with Lupino as the daughter of one of them who falls for the gangster. Lupino and Garfield are both solid in carrying the film with their dangerous dalliance but the actual racketeering plot just doesn't feel that fleshed out. It's not bad but not at the same level as many of Lupino's best films.

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6. Woman In Hiding (Michael Gordon, 1950)
Once again Lupino is paired with yet another dangerous man. This time it's Stephen McNally who marries her after her father dies (or was he killed!?!?). Unfortunately for Lupino, her new husband has sinister motives at play which leaves her running for her life. This one isn't a terribly memorable picture and frankly doesn't give Lupino a whole lot to do but fret and hide (I mean, the title says as much). Still it's competently made and acted and goes by at a solid pace, so it's not a total waste of time.

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7. Beware, My Lovely (Harry Horner, 1952)
This was a humdinger of a little extended suspense set piece. Lupino is a widow who lives alone and hires a repairman played by Robert Ryan to fix some issues with her rented room. Apparently she has never seen anything else Robert Ryan has been in otherwise she would've known immediately this was a bad idea. The film is something of a tightrope walk at first with the audience clued in that Ryan may not be a totally stable, dependable fellow while Lupino is totally in the dark about his apparent mental instability. Ryan is just dynamite here seesawing between congenial and disturbed, really conveying mental illness better than a pulpy flick like this has any right to. Ryan's character actually reminds a little of Anthony Perkins in Psycho with his ability to show a pleasant demeanor on the outside with an internal simmering darkness possibly waiting to explode. Lupino also shows more depth than this type of role would necessarily require with a kind of quiet sadness in certain moments that give glimpses at her inner character. I could see the ending of this one turning some people off but in a way I thought it was pretty interesting.

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8. Woman in Chains (Bernard Kowalski, 1972)
A parole officer goes undercover in a prison with a notorious reputation for abuse in order to expose them. After being jailed, she is confronted by the tough-as-nails and cruel prison warden played by Ida Lupino who pretty quickly starts providing her with examples of the prison's abuses. Since this was a TV movie, much of the usual unsavory nudity, sex and more over-the-top torture content is missing from this Women-In-Prison film. Instead it tries to convey the horrors of the prison with Lupino's character showing a flagrant intolerance and playing mind games. When the parole officer tries to get a fellow inmate medical help, she's placed in solitary along with another inmate who complained about the unfair treatment. Will these injustices ever get exposed?

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9. Deep Valley (Jean Negulesco, 1947)
Lupino yet again falls for the bad boy in this noir about a man who escapes from a prison chain gang and hides out in Lupino's father's barn while Lupino's young innocent waif aids him in his efforts to evade the police while also falling for his sweaty charms. Lupino is very good here as a docile introvert with a stutter who slowly starts to come out of her shell as she tries to protect the man she loves while deceiving a detective who has the hots for her. It's a solid flick although the ending felt a little unsatisfying.
All the world's a stage
1. The Monster Club (Roy Ward Baker, 1981)
2. Horror Hall of Fame (Charles Braverman, 1974)
3. The Three Musketeers (George Sidney, 1948)
4. Madhouse (Jim Clark, 1974)
5. Out of the Fog (Anatole Litvak, 1941)
6. Woman In Hiding (Michael Gordon, 1950)
7. Beware, My Lovely (Harry Horner, 1952)
8. Woman in Chains (Bernard Kowalski, 1974)
9. Deep Valley (Jean Negulesco, 1947)
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#20

Post by OldAle1 »

I kind of love it when I can start out a challenge sort of by accident. I noticed TCM was going to show an obscure Val Lewton-produced film I hadn't seen, and then I noticed who starred in it, and I looked her up and realized that I'd really liked her in a few things, but hadn't seen much so, why not?

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Bonita Granville
1923-1988
America's Naughty Little Sweetheart


Born in Chicago, Bonita Granville was the daughter of two stage performers, so the profession came naturally to her, and she started appearing on stage at 6, and in films at 9 in 1932's Westward Passage. She played in a couple of significant pictures over the next few years - the 1933 Little Women and Best Picture winner Cavalcade - but her roles were mostly small and insignificant until 1936's scene-stealing bad girl performance in These Three earned her an Oscar nomination. Apart from that film she is probably best remembered today for playing Nancy Drew in the four Warner Brothers B-pictures released in 1938-9, and for supporting roles in a couple of significant classics in the early 40s - Now Voyager and The Glass Key. But she continued to play bad girls and got occasional lead roles right through 1947, when she married oil millionaire and producer Jack Wrather, after which she made only a couple more films, essentially retiring from performing at 24 though she did go on to produce the highly successful Lassie TV series in the 50s and directed one episode. Watching these four films in addition to several over the years before, I'm convinced she had a chance to be one of the big femme fatales in noir and probably could have done a lot of other things as an actress; her size (5'0" and quite slim through her career) probably could have provided for several years more playing ingenue types as well. But at least she was lost to the industry due to marriage and motherhood rather than the bottle or a car crash.

1. These Three (William Wyler, 1936)

I haven't read Lillian Hellman's play "The Children's Hour" upon which this first adaptation is, but I have seen Wyler's remake under the play's title from 1961, which is apparently significantly closer to the play and restores something of the lesbian subtext - entirely missing from this film made at the height of the Production Code. Granville plays the bitchy, spiteful Mary Tilford, whose malicious lies threaten to ruin the lives of "these three" - schoolteachers Miriam Hopkins and Merle Oberon, and doctor Joel McCrea who is helping them put together their school and falls in love with Oberon. I haven't seen all the nominees for Best Supporting Actress for this year, but if there were 5 better than Granville, it was a great year. She was only 13 at the time and was the youngest acting nominee up to that point; her performance might be considered fairly one-dimensional, but that's the character - in any case Granville embodies the vicious, spiteful character brilliantly, and seems at all times older and more devious than her age would indicate, very adult in her designing ways - but never "precocious" as is more typical of smart kids in films. It probably helps that she has a sort of low, throaty voice for her age too; in any case it's no surprise that her career continued to thrive on playing terrible girls and women even as she got to play the heroine or protagonist as well occasionally. The film as a whole is notable mostly for it's acting, all of which is fine - Marcia Mae Jones, 12, as Rosalie, one of the other girls who Mary blackmails, is nearly as good as Granville and the scene with the two of them where Mary reduces Rosalie to screaming hysteria is really quite amazing. But the bowdlerization of the source, and the more-or-less happy ending really don't do this material any favors.

2. Hitler's Children (Edward Dmytryk/Irvin Reis, 1943)

A propaganda film about the brainwashing of the Hitler Youth, essentially, done in a melodramatic story with Granville as a determined German-born American girl attending, then teaching at an American school in Germany (the timeframe is 1933-9 but nobody ages of course), and falling in love with eventual Gestapo officer Tim Holt; it's narrated by Granville's principal, Kent Smith, and there's an impressive lineup of character actors on hand in supporting roles like Otto Kruger, H.B. Warner and Hans Conried. This has a few laugh-out-loud moments where the dialogue in particular is just too silly, but it's heart is in the right place and it has a surprisingly downbeat tone (I say surprising because in this kind of overt propaganda, you expect all the good guys to come out on top and a very hopeful message, and you don't get it here). And it's really quite well directed - mostly by Dmytryk I guess, Reis apparently quit early on over disagreements with the studio - with special note being a scene where Granville is running away in the rain and ends up in a church; and surprisingly enough, the religiosity isn't overdone. Really one of the better such films I've seen, and the cast seems fairly committed and serious about it, especially Granville.

3. Youth Runs Wild (Mark Robson, 1944)

Val Lewton produced just 14 films in 9 years, but even with such a small and concentrated output there's a vast disparity in critical reception between the 9 horror-noir-suspense films that have been boxed together for decades, and the 5 leftovers. 4 of those five aren't anything close to the other 9 in terms of genre - a costume period drama, a couple of romances, a western - but Youth Runs Wild isn't quite so far off the map. If it came 10 years later it'd be called a juvenile delinquent film, but that category didn't really exist before the mid-50s, and those films that involve crime and young people from the war years and earlier tend to be even less realistic and sillier than a lot of the JD films of the 50s and 60s, and this is unfortunately no exception. Granville plays a bad girl again - top-billed but this is really an ensemble piece with at least a half-dozen characters vying for the most screen time. We start of with very good-girl Mary (Jean Brooks, who actually looks a LOT like Granville, just a few inches taller and a few years older) awaiting her husband's return from the war, and trying to deal with her younger brother, who's got a thing for Sarah (Vanessa Brown) the girl next door and who might be a bad influence on account of her hard-drinking, card-playing parents. Horrors! Granville plays Toddy (what a name - tells you something right away) the girl who works at the cheap club who is simultaneously protective of Sarah when her parents throw her out, but also obviously leading her down a bad path, alongside her own bad sort-of-boyfriend played by none other than real bad-boy actor Lawrence Tierney. There's also Dickie Moore as a little boy who keeps getting in trouble, and Kent Smith again, as the wounded husband coming back from the war, whose function is to be the moral conscience and guide for the film. Don't go out to pool-halls and bars, kids! This is propaganda done all wrong, and it's sad because with the cast and just a few tweaks it feels like there could be a first-rate grim little noir under there somewhere.

4. The Guilty (John Reinhardt, 1947)

Then again, that noir might have been no better than The Guilty, the film where Granville met her husband-to-be, who produced this bit of low-budget Monogram junk. Just as in the previous film it's got some ingredients that might lead you to expect, or hope for something better - Granville starring, and playing a dual role as twin sisters, one good and one bad; Robert Presnell Sr, an Oscar-nominated screenwriter, adapting a Cornell Woolrich novel; cinematography by Henry Sharp, who had done ace work on a few previous noirs including Fritz Lang's Ministry of Fear. Sometimes things just don't work out. I think Monogram's very cheap production certainly hurts - this is all shot on just a couple of threadbare sets and little seems to have been done to disguise that, and the short running time gives us little opportunity to really distinguish the twin sisters (one of them is murdered a few minutes in, and that's the crime that the film revolves around), which unfortunately gives Granville less opportunity to make an impression. The main star of the film is really Don Castle as Mike Carr, a kind of sleazy guy who narrates the film and talks about how he and his war-wounded roommate both romanced both of the sisters in a fairly creepy, incestuous-feeling backstory, until one of the winds up dead, and the roommate is under suspicion. This also suffered from being a terrible copy, and it's possible that better sound and picture would help it a bit, though I must say that the ending feeling of noir-doom was actually pretty good, so overall it gets a modest - VERY modest - thumbs up. Just. Barely.
Here's to the fools who dream.
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#21

Post by DudeLanez »

Charles Laughton #United Kingdom

4. The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933, Korda) 6/10
5. Rembrandt (1936, Korda) 8/10
6. Jamaica Inn (1939, Hitchcock) 5/10

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Rembrandt (1936)
Run the Actor
Greta Garbo #Sweden
1. The Kiss (1929, Feyder) 6/10
2. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 6/10
3. Camille (1936, Cukor) 7/10

Charles Laughton #United Kingdom
4. The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933, Korda) 6/10
5. Rembrandt (1936, Korda) 8/10
6. Jamaica Inn (1939, Hitchcock) 5/10
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#22

Post by jdidaco »

Thank you for hosting, Kublai Khan!

(Screeenshot from 'La vengeance d'une femme'),

Isabelle Huppert

1. Örökség/Les héritières (The Inheritance, Márta Mészáros, 1980) 7.5/10
2. Cactus (Paul Cox, 1986) 8/10
3. La vengeance d'une femme (A Woman's Revenge, Jacques Doillon, 1990) 8/10

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Béatrice Dalle

4. Clubbed to Death (Lola) (Yolande Zauberman, 1996) 7/10
5. H Story (Nobuhiro Suwa, 2001) 8.5/10
6. Lux Æterna (Gaspar Noé, 2019) 7.5/10
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#23

Post by vortexsurfer »

Nicolas Cage

1. Next (Lee Tamahori, 2007) - 6/10
2. City of Angels (Brad Silberling, 1998) - 6/10
3. Outcast (Nick Powell, 2014) - 6/10

Jennifer Lopez

4. The Boy Next Door (Rob Cohen, 2015) - 6/10
5. Second Act (Peter Segal, 2018) - 6/10
6. Hustlers (Lorene Scafaria, 2019) - 8/10
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#24

Post by flavo5000 »

Gutter Trash Maestros Presents: Richard Harrison

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Early in his career Richard Harrison wasn't treated with the utmost respect and often relegated to musclebound thug roles within the Hollywood system. All that changed when he moved to Italy and started appearing in a variety of genre pictures more major roles particularly playing strongmen in peplums like Perseus against the Monsters and Giants of Rome as well as quite a few spaghetti westerns. As the genre boom of the '70s gave way to the cheap action film of the '80s, Harrison found his career entering a new phase.
John Ford & John Wayne. Werner Herzog & Klaus Kinski. Martin Scorsese & Robert De Niro. Godfrey Ho & Richard Harrison. That's right. When one thinks of cinema's greatest director/actor pairings, Harrison and Ho are legendary. And yes, this is basically a backdoor GODFREY HO-DOWN!!!


ImageImageImage
10. The Ninja Squad (Godfrey Ho, 1986)
11. Hands of Death (Godfrey Ho, 1988)
12. Inferno Thunderbolt (Godfrey Ho, 1986)
In The Ninja Squad we have a purple ninja as the good guy. In Hands of Death the purple ninja is the bad guy. Inferno Thunderbolt features NO PURPLE NINJAS AT ALL. But it does feature Richard Harrison as "Inspector Richard", a police inspector who's a big fan of interrupting folks mid-coitus which is almost as good.
All the world's a stage
1. The Monster Club (Roy Ward Baker, 1981)
2. Horror Hall of Fame (Charles Braverman, 1974)
3. The Three Musketeers (George Sidney, 1948)
4. Madhouse (Jim Clark, 1974)
5. Out of the Fog (Anatole Litvak, 1941)
6. Woman In Hiding (Michael Gordon, 1950)
7. Beware, My Lovely (Harry Horner, 1952)
8. Woman in Chains (Bernard Kowalski, 1974)
9. Deep Valley (Jean Negulesco, 1947)
10. The Ninja Squad (Godfrey Ho, 1986)
11. Hands of Death (Godfrey Ho, 1988)
12. Inferno Thunderbolt (Godfrey Ho, 1986)
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#25

Post by blocho »

Paul Muni (Austro-Hungarian Empire)

Like a bunch of other talented actors in the early Hollywood era, Muni came out of the Yiddish theater. He was a character actor through and through with no defined on-screen persona, though he tended towards playing tempestuous characters under great strain. Partly that was because he was powerful enough in his heyday to choose his own roles, an option that very few actors had during an era when the studio system was at its highest power. But it seems also a result of his techniques, which involved an extraordinary amount of research and preparation. Though it may be wrong to call him a method actor avant la lettre, there was certainly something about his approach that makes one think of Daniel Day-Lewis.

Like most people, I had seen Muni in Scarface and I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, and it's difficult not to be very impressed by his performances in those movies. The three movies below are not as good as those two. In each, Muni plays a flinty old man at war in some way with the rest of society. The first two are biopics and unfortunately the posters are better than the movies themselves.

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1. The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936)
Muni as the great microbiologist in perpetual conflict with the French scientific establishment. The drama here is a bit slack because his opponents are just so snobbish and wrong. The hero and villain roles are too clear cut for there to be much interest. The part I most enjoyed was an early sequence in which ... I'm not sure the name of this editing technique. It's when someone says something in one scene and the camera cuts to a different time and place and a character in that scene says something that seems like an answer to what was said in the previous scene. Does anyone know what this is called? Here's an example from the movie:


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2. The Life of Emile Zola (1937)
Pasteur was so successful that Warner Bros. got Muni back together with director William Dieterle for another biopic of a famous 19th century Frenchman. In this case, the focus is mostly on Zola's involvement with the Dreyfus Affair, and much of the narrative unfolds inside a courtroom. The movie is perhaps most notable for doing its utmost to avoid mentioning anti-Semitism or saying the word Jew. There's also a long plea by Zola for international peace. So this is a product of that era when the studios were trying to make political movies that didn't ruffle any feathers.

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3. The Last Angry Man (1959)
In his final role, Muni plays an elderly doctor devoted to his patients in a section of Brooklyn experiencing mid-century white flight. A TV producer becomes obsessed with making this doctor, who is not really interested, into a media sensation. This is a pretty good movie that deserves more attention, though the final third doesn't work so well. Muni's performance is very strong. This is also Billy Dee Williams' film debut.
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#26

Post by Torgo »

flavo5000 wrote: July 4th, 2021, 8:21 pm That's right. When one thinks of cinema's greatest director/actor pairings, Harrison and Ho are legendary. And yes, this is basically a backdoor GODFREY HO-DOWN!!!
Hell yeah! :circle:
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#27

Post by DudeLanez »

Lauren Bacall #USA

7. Woman's World (1954, Negulesco) 7/10
8. HealtH (1980, Altman) 5/10
9. Birth (2004, Glazer) 7/10

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Woman's World (1954)
Run the Actor
Greta Garbo #Sweden
1. The Kiss (1929, Feyder) 6/10
2. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 6/10
3. Camille (1936, Cukor) 7/10

Charles Laughton #United Kingdom
4. The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933, Korda) 6/10
5. Rembrandt (1936, Korda) 8/10
6. Jamaica Inn (1939, Hitchcock) 5/10

Lauren Bacall #USA
7. Woman's World (1954, Negulesco) 7/10
8. HealtH (1980, Altman) 5/10
9. Birth (2004, Glazer) 7/10
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#28

Post by maxwelldeux »

flavo5000 wrote: July 4th, 2021, 8:21 pm
Gutter Trash Maestros Presents: Richard Harrison

Early in his career Richard Harrison wasn't treated with the utmost respect and often relegated to musclebound thug roles within the Hollywood system. All that changed when he moved to Italy and started appearing in a variety of genre pictures more major roles particularly playing strongmen in peplums like Perseus against the Monsters and Giants of Rome as well as quite a few spaghetti westerns. As the genre boom of the '70s gave way to the cheap action film of the '80s, Harrison found his career entering a new phase.
John Ford & John Wayne. Werner Herzog & Klaus Kinski. Martin Scorsese & Robert De Niro. Godfrey Ho & Richard Harrison. That's right. When one thinks of cinema's greatest director/actor pairings, Harrison and Ho are legendary. And yes, this is basically a backdoor GODFREY HO-DOWN!!!
[/spoiler]
Talk about an intro... :circle: :cheers:
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#29

Post by maxwelldeux »

Do the actors have to run?
"
Padma Lakshmi, India
1. Top Chef Seattle (2012, 86 minutes)
2. Sharpe's Challenge (2006)
3. Boom (2003)
"
Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, USA

I have been needing to work on the Box Office lists for a while, so why not watch a set of films that Rock? Plus, as an added bonus, I could watch an actor accounting for 1/3 of the API representation in American film in the last 12 years. So let's smell what this dude is cooking...

4. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017)
5. Jumanji: The Next Level (2019)
I actually liked these way more than I thought I would. Clever ways to provide an homage to the first while being fresh and new. Plus some hilarious jokes written in there. The first was better than the second, as the second was riddled with more plot holes than are ignorable.

6. Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
7. Fast & Furious 7 (2015)
What could be more American than watching a bunch of Americans travel around the world shooting guns and causing untold destruction while facing no consequences? Do you also need an overly-militarized cop with zero problem disobeying the rules and hurting people? Sold! Honestly, though, the send-off to Paul Walker at the end of 7 was really sweet and beautiful.
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#30

Post by Kublai Khan »

Lammetje wrote: July 3rd, 2021, 9:53 pm
Kublai Khan wrote: July 3rd, 2021, 3:26 am 4. The First Waves Club (Hugh Wilson-1996)
There's a typo in your first wave of movies. ;)
D'oh! :vrface:
(thanks for noticing)

5. Interiors (Woody Allen-1978)

Been busy last couple of days so I only continued the Diane Keaton run with Interiors which is Woody Allen's first dramatic movie and I was very impressed by it. Allen certainly proved himself a capable dramatic director, though his writing tends to make all his characters sound like him. I did think that this dramatic Keaton performance was better than Reds. She really disappeared into the role and made the character different than all the others.

That's going to be my last Keaton and the next post will be a new actor.
Previously...
1. Sleeper (Woody Allen-1973)
2. Reds (Warren Beatty-1981)
3. Father of the Bride (Charles Shyer-1991)
4. The First Wives Club (Hugh Wilson-1996)
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  • FilmTotaal Top 100
  • IMDb's Animation Top 50
  • IMDb's Fantasy Top 50
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#31

Post by peeptoad »

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Kate Winslet
4. Sense and Sensibility (1995) 7
5. Hamlet (1996) 4
6. The Life of David Gale (2003) 7
stargazing
Paddy Considine
1. Dead Man's Shoes (2004) 8+
2. Submarine (2010) 7
3. Blitz (2011) 6
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#32

Post by sol »

Running on Actors
1. Nobody (2021) Bob Odenkirk #USA
2a. Fargo - S1 : E1 (2014) Bob Odenkirk
2b. Fargo – S1 : E2 (2014) Bob Odenkirk
3. Girlfriend's Day (2017) Bob Odenkirk
4. Stella Dallas (1937) Barbara Stanwyck
5. The Furies (1950) Barbara Stanwyck
6. Baby Face (1933) Barbara Stanwyck
7. Meet John Doe (1941) Barbara Stanwyck
8. Mona Lisa Smile (2003) Julia Stiles
9. Save the Last Dance (2001) Julia Stiles
10. 10 Things I Hate About You (1999) Julia Stiles

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Julia Stiles

Prior to this month, I had seen twelve films with Julia Stiles, but a third of them were Bourne flicks and most of the others were movies where her part was even slimmer than in those. Hustlers (where she is overshadowed by the rest of the cast) and The Omen remake (a film I barely remember) were the only films I had seen from her cast in a lead or co-lead role, so this month seemed like a perfect time to check out more of her stuff and the bigger parts she played over her career.

Given how few big roles and big films she has been in over the past decade and a half, it is hard to believe what a big name Stiles was twenty years ago. I still remember 10 Things I Hate About You being quite a big thing back in high school, so it was interesting finally catching up with it. Some of the comedy is simply goofy, but the whole thing was a lot wittier and zanier than I was expecting and Stiles does well delivering razor sharp lines and generally being a b*tch while gradually softening over the course of the movie.

As for the other two Stiles film that I saw during this run, Save the Last Dance gives her quite a few touching moments as she grapples with guilt over her mother's death. The rest of her performance is fairly humdrum though (and more concerned with racism than dancing). Mona Lisa Smile also gives her the occasional thing to do as she considers rebelling against gender roles, but her part is hardly the juiciest role of the film, and then the film is more about the Julia Roberts character rather than the girls she is teaching.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#33

Post by DudeLanez »

Geraldine Chaplin #USA

10. Ana y los lobos (Anna and the Wolves, 1973, Saura) 8/10
11. Mamá cumple 100 años (Mama Turns 100, 1979, Saura) 7/10
12. Elisa, vida mía (Elisa, My Life; 1977, Saura) 8/10

Image
Ana y los lobos (1973)
Run the Actor
Greta Garbo #Sweden
1. The Kiss (1929, Feyder) 6/10
2. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 6/10
3. Camille (1936, Cukor) 7/10

Charles Laughton #United Kingdom
4. The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933, Korda) 6/10
5. Rembrandt (1936, Korda) 8/10
6. Jamaica Inn (1939, Hitchcock) 5/10

Lauren Bacall #USA
7. Woman's World (1954, Negulesco) 7/10
8. HealtH (1980, Altman) 5/10
9. Birth (2004, Glazer) 7/10

Geraldine Chaplin #USA
10. Ana y los lobos (Anna and the Wolves, 1973, Saura) 8/10
11. Mamá cumple 100 años (Mama Turns 100, 1979, Saura) 7/10
12. Elisa, vida mía (Elisa, My Life, 1977, Saura) 8/10
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#34

Post by shugs »

The way I'm doing this challenge is selecting an actor at random from the Academy Award list. So, without further ado:

Actor #1: Jennifer Lawrence BC1: #151
Jennifer Lawrence
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1. Passengers (Morten Tyldum, 2016) - 5/10
2. Red Sparrow (Francis Lawrence, 2018) - 7/10
3. Mother! (Darren Aronofsky, 2017) - 6/10

Next stop, Gregory Peck!
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#35

Post by flavo5000 »

Amitabh Bachchan

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Nationality: India
Amitabh Bachchan is easily one of the most famous actors to come out of Bollywood and arguably one of the most famous actors in the world having won international acclaim from markets across the globe such as winning Actor of the Century at the Alexandria Film Festival in Egypt as well as being graced with a wax statue representation in Madame Toussaud's museums around the world. He gained early acclaim as a young, angry crusader of justice in films like Zanjeer, Deewaar and Sholay, the last two of which in particular catapulted him to superstardom, allowing him to branch out into a wider range of roles. His likability and charisma made for natural leading man status although after a series of injuries and illnesses, he briefly retired from film in the '80s to focus on politics. After becoming disgusted with the rampant corruption in the political sphere he started dipping his toe back into acting, making occasional appearances in films throughout the '90s and coming back in full form in the 2000s where he still continues to appear in films today.

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13. Zanjeer (Prakash Mehra, 1973)
Zanjeer is the story of an honest police detective in a corrupt system and was the film that really jumpstarted Bachchan's career. His character fights against the shady underworld in the city while dealing with the traumatic murder of his parents when he was young. After being framed and booted from the department, he decides ultimately to take on the underworld himself while also getting vengeance for his parents. It's easy to see why this film made Bachchan a star. He has a righteous intensity that serves him well in both the dramatic scenes as well as the solid action sequences. While the film falls victim to some of the same downfalls I have with many Indian films (over-the-top melodrama/unnecessary musical numbers), it still has a lot going for it and is overall a solid movie.

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14. Agneepath (Mukul Anand, 1990)
After Bachchan's brief political career, he attempted to get back into acting in the '90s but was greeted with a string of less-than-successful films, Agneepath being one of them. This film finds Bachchan in a somewhat different kind of role as a vengeance-fueled mafia don. The biggest difference though is in his acting style and voice which is almost comical in how ridiculous it is. I could see how long-time fans of Bachchan wanting more of his breezy, righteous delivery getting this weird, guttural, grizzled stew of grunts, mumbles and odd affectations delivered by a Bachchan with dark rings around his eyes and an uncomfortable sunken half-grin (which at times actually reminds of Robert De Niro) would recoil. Still the film has apparently garnered a cult following over the years for precisely how different it is from many of his other roles. The film itself is a watchable mix of extreme violence and hate carried mostly by Bachchan. The love story sub-plot with Bachchan's sister is probably the weakest element and could've been shorn out completely with little momentum lost. Still, I actually think it's worth a watch just for seeing such a bizarre performance from Bachchan.

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15. Mohabbatein (Aditya Chopra, 2000)
Mohabbatein marked one of Bachchan's first big successes after a time of box office failures in the '90s having him co-starring with Shah Rukh Khan as a stern headmaster at a prestigious school who's routine is disrupted when Khan's more carefree romantic music teacher comes to the school to stir things up and fill the halls of the school with the love it has been deprived of through the years. Bachchan fully embraces his role as a kind of elder statesman of Bollywood delivering a couple of big speeches but otherwise acting as more of a hard-nosed foil to Khan's saccharin Dead Poet's Society-esque character. Just to be clear, this film is total garbage, embracing all of the aspects of Bollywood cinema I've come to hate: an exceedingly bloated runtime (over 3.5 hours!), far too many song & dance numbers, repetitive script and dialogue, intensely cheesy melodrama and incredibly shallow and predictable characters. Avoid this one like the plague.
All the world's a stage
1. The Monster Club (Roy Ward Baker, 1981)
2. Horror Hall of Fame (Charles Braverman, 1974)
3. The Three Musketeers (George Sidney, 1948)
4. Madhouse (Jim Clark, 1974)
5. Out of the Fog (Anatole Litvak, 1941)
6. Woman In Hiding (Michael Gordon, 1950)
7. Beware, My Lovely (Harry Horner, 1952)
8. Woman in Chains (Bernard Kowalski, 1974)
9. Deep Valley (Jean Negulesco, 1947)
10. The Ninja Squad (Godfrey Ho, 1986)
11. Hands of Death (Godfrey Ho, 1988)
12. Inferno Thunderbolt (Godfrey Ho, 1986)
13. Zanjeer (Prakash Mehra, 1973)
14. Agneepath (Mukul Anand, 1990)
15. Mohabbatein (Aditya Chopra, 2000)
Last edited by flavo5000 on July 7th, 2021, 3:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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peeptoad
Posts: 3012
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#36

Post by peeptoad »

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Shareefa Daanish
7. Ular Tangga (2017) Snakes & Ladder 5
8. Danur: I Can See Ghosts (2017) 5
9. The Night Comes for Us (2018) 7
stargazing
Paddy Considine
1. Dead Man's Shoes (2004) 8+
2. Submarine (2010) 7
3. Blitz (2011) 6
Kate Winslet
4. Sense and Sensibility (1995) 7
5. Hamlet (1996) 4
6. The Life of David Gale (2003) 7
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Kublai Khan
Posts: 1607
Joined: November 9th, 2014, 7:00 am
Location: Sarasota, FL
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#37

Post by Kublai Khan »

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Max Von Sydow
#Sweden

6. The Virgin Spring (Ingmar Bergman-1960)
7. Needful Things (Fraser C. Heston-1993)
8. Intacto (Juan Carlos Fresnadillo-2001)
9. Solomon Kane (M.J. Bassett-2010)

One of the things I wanted to do in this challenge was to watch actors under a variety of directors. So in doing Max von Sydow, I limited myself to just one Ingmar Bergman film (The Virgin Spring). Which is an excellent, if a little slow, story of revenge and questioning of faith. And apparently faith is the through-line of this volley of von Sydow films. Needful Things features the largest von Sydow role as he plays a evil super natural character who plunges a town into chaos as he collects souls (a little ambiguous on this). I read the Stephen King story it was based on long ago and thought it would be a really difficult role to pull off given the degree of charm and evil that it would require, but von Sydow does a solid job of it.

Solomon Kane was a religious action movie that had von Sydow second-billed but he's only in it for 2 scenes. Kinda the same with Intacto which was a Spanish movie about gifted people able to capture/control the luck of others. von Sydow plays the "big boss" character who is only in a few scenes, but he does well. I guess in the last few decades of his life he took smaller roles and overall had more of them.
Previously...
Diane Keaton
1. Sleeper (Woody Allen-1973)
2. Reds (Warren Beatty-1981)
3. Father of the Bride (Charles Shyer-1991)
4. The First Wives Club (Hugh Wilson-1996)
5. Interiors (Woody Allen-1978)
Owner of three platinums:
  • FilmTotaal Top 100
  • IMDb's Animation Top 50
  • IMDb's Fantasy Top 50
jdidaco
Posts: 1708
Joined: February 3rd, 2017, 7:00 am
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#38

Post by jdidaco »

(Screenshots from 'Riten' & 'Der kurze Brief zum langen Abschied'),

Ingrid Thulin

7. Domani non siamo più qui (Tomorrow We Will No Longer Be Here, Brunello Rondi, 1967) 9/10
8. Riten (The Rite, Ingmar Bergman, 1969) 8/10
9. La cage (The Cage, Pierre Granier-Deferre, 1975) 7/10

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Geraldine Chaplin

10. In memoriam (Enrique Brasó, 1977) 9/10
11. Der kurze Brief zum langen Abschied (Short Letter to the Long Goodbye, Herbert Vesely, 1978) 8/10
12. Os Olhos da Ásia (The Eyes of Asia, João Mário Grilo, 1996) 7.5/10

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Spoiler
Isabelle Huppert

1. Örökség/Les héritières (The Inheritance, Márta Mészáros, 1980) 7.5/10
2. Cactus (Paul Cox, 1986) 8/10
3. La vengeance d'une femme (A Woman's Revenge, Jacques Doillon, 1990) 8/10

Béatrice Dalle

4. Clubbed to Death (Lola) (Yolande Zauberman, 1996) 7/10
5. H Story (Nobuhiro Suwa, 2001) 8.5/10
6. Lux Æterna (Gaspar Noé, 2019) 7.5/10
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DudeLanez
Posts: 340
Joined: August 25th, 2020, 12:22 am
Location: Germany
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#39

Post by DudeLanez »

Jean Gabin #France

13. Les bas-fonds (The Lower Depths, 1936, Renoir) 8/10
14. Remorques (Stormy Waters, 1941, Grémillon) 7/10
15. En cas de malheur (Love Is My Profession, 1958, Autant-Lara) 4/10

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Les bas-fonds (1936)
Run the Actor
Greta Garbo #Sweden
1. The Kiss (1929, Feyder) 6/10
2. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 6/10
3. Camille (1936, Cukor) 7/10

Charles Laughton #United Kingdom
4. The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933, Korda) 6/10
5. Rembrandt (1936, Korda) 8/10
6. Jamaica Inn (1939, Hitchcock) 5/10

Lauren Bacall #USA
7. Woman's World (1954, Negulesco) 7/10
8. HealtH (1980, Altman) 5/10
9. Birth (2004, Glazer) 7/10

Geraldine Chaplin #USA
10. Ana y los lobos (Anna and the Wolves, 1973, Saura) 8/10
11. Mamá cumple 100 años (Mama Turns 100, 1979, Saura) 7/10
12. Elisa, vida mía (Elisa, My Life, 1977, Saura) 8/10

Jean Gabin #France
13. Les bas-fonds (The Lower Depths, 1936, Renoir) 8/10
14. Remorques (Stormy Waters, 1941, Grémillon) 7/10
15. En cas de malheur (Love Is My Profession, 1958, Autant-Lara) 4/10
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maxwelldeux
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#40

Post by maxwelldeux »

Do the actors have to run?
"
Padma Lakshmi, India
1. Top Chef Seattle (2012, 86 minutes)
2. Sharpe's Challenge (2006)
3. Boom (2003)
"
"
Dwayne ""The Rock"" Johnson, USA
4. Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (2017)
5. Jumanji: The Next Level (2019)
6. Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
7. Fast & Furious 7 (2015)
"
8. Rampage (2015) - More Rock!

This was certainly better than I thought, given that it's a movie based on the video game with the stupidest premise I've ever seen. But still a 4/10
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