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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
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#121

Post by flavo5000 »

ChrisReynolds wrote: February 9th, 2021, 12:13 am

10. Enter the Ninja / Ninja I (1981) 703 checks, 0 official lists
After purchasing Cannon films in 1980 with his cousin Yoram Globus, Golan became the producer on a vast number of films aiming to cash in on pop culture fads. Enter the Ninja is one of his most successful in this regard, being in at the ground floor of the ninja craze of the 1980s and becoming hugely influential. There seem to have been a lot of production problems, with Golan firing the original director, Emmett Alston, after three days and taking over himself, which may explain why the quality is rock bottom, appearing to have been slapped together in a rush and featuring lots of unconvincing fights and acting. The story is a lethargic "cleaning up the town" narrative for the most part, but then springs to life at the end when Sho Kosugi arrives and the viewer is rewarded with twenty minutes of silly ninja action.
4/10
The epitome of the Cannon ninja series is of course Ninja III: The Domination from possibly even more ridiculous director Sam Firstenberg who did the American Ninja films and Breakin 2: Electric Boogaloo! Hm... I wonder if a Firstenberg run is in order....
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
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#122

Post by flavo5000 »

Clint Eastwood

Image

I did a couple of write-ups on Eastwood back in December after watching two different documentaries about him, so I won’t go into it again here. Suffice it to say that over time Eastwood has proven himself as capable a director as he had as an actor with a truly impressive longevity that continues to this day. He’s a no-nonsense kind of director that gravitates to dramatizations of real events, especially in recent years, and has a certain economy of style that brings to mind classic Hollywood directors like John Ford and Howard Hawks.

ImageImageImage

64. Changeling (2008)
Changeling tells the fascinating story based on true events of a woman whose child goes missing but after several years the police claim to have located him. When she meets him at the train station, she’s horrified to discover she doesn’t recognize him as her son at all. After her continual insistence that he isn’t her son, the police have her committed to an asylum for treatment. Meanwhile, even more horrific events unfold beyond the sanitarium walls. The shot composition and period detail here is very good and Angelia Jolie’s performance is much better than her typical Hollywood fare. If the film has flaws, it’s trying to wrangle the unwieldy stranger-than-fiction stories that intersect and overlap in places. Still, it’s one of the better latter day Eastwood films I’ve seen.

65. J. Edgar (2011)
J. Edgar is about, as one would surmise from the title, the life of J. Edgar Hoover, head of the newly formed government agency charged with rooting out radicals. The film tackles several major events in his life, both public and personal, including the Lindbergh Baby kidnapping case that led to several new investigative techniques, his blackmailing of Martin Luther King Jr. later in life as well as his personal history of his struggles with his alleged homosexuality. Di Caprio is very good here although the film itself just feels too muddy and middling to really stand out for me. The make-up effects weren’t very convincing and the movie seemed to lack focus, playing more like a greatest hits package instead of really getting at the core of Hoover.

66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)
This recounts the events that transpired just a few years ago on a commuter train in France involving three men, friends, who thwarted a potentially terrible terrorist attack. The film makes the curious choice of casting the three actual young men who were involved in the rescue, and while that might have sounded like a good idea on paper, their acting abilities are well below average. This wouldn’t be that big of a deal if the majority of the film was the staging of the attack, but that only comprises about the last 30 minutes. The first hour is more of a biopic of the three friends, how they met, how their lives progressed up to that point, and how they became the people they were that led them to act so bravely and impulsively against an armed terrorist. The first two acts just feel like amateur hour with a bigger budget. Having said that, the actual incident it leads up to is quite exciting to watch. Unfortunately, like Eastwood’s Sully, there just isn’t enough story here to sustain a full-length picture. Maybe he should have combined this and Sully together into a “Profiles in Courage” style anthology picture.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)
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ChrisReynolds
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Posts: 2643
Joined: December 29th, 2011, 7:00 am
Location: Berlin, Germany
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#123

Post by ChrisReynolds »

flavo5000 wrote: February 9th, 2021, 3:25 am The epitome of the Cannon ninja series is of course Ninja III: The Domination from possibly even more ridiculous director Sam Firstenberg who did the American Ninja films and Breakin 2: Electric Boogaloo! Hm... I wonder if a Firstenberg run is in order....
Great idea! It would allow me to finish off the ninja series and get in another of Firstenberg's films. Maybe next weekend.
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Lonewolf2003
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#124

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

flavo5000 wrote: February 9th, 2021, 3:25 am
ChrisReynolds wrote: February 9th, 2021, 12:13 am

10. Enter the Ninja / Ninja I (1981) 703 checks, 0 official lists
After purchasing Cannon films in 1980 with his cousin Yoram Globus, Golan became the producer on a vast number of films aiming to cash in on pop culture fads. Enter the Ninja is one of his most successful in this regard, being in at the ground floor of the ninja craze of the 1980s and becoming hugely influential. There seem to have been a lot of production problems, with Golan firing the original director, Emmett Alston, after three days and taking over himself, which may explain why the quality is rock bottom, appearing to have been slapped together in a rush and featuring lots of unconvincing fights and acting. The story is a lethargic "cleaning up the town" narrative for the most part, but then springs to life at the end when Sho Kosugi arrives and the viewer is rewarded with twenty minutes of silly ninja action.
4/10
The epitome of the Cannon ninja series is of course Ninja III: The Domination from possibly even more ridiculous director Sam Firstenberg who did the American Ninja films and Breakin 2: Electric Boogaloo! Hm... I wonder if a Firstenberg run is in order....
American Ninja :worship: :ph43r: Fistenberg only did the first two of the series.
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
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#125

Post by flavo5000 »

Noboru Iguchi

Image

Noboru Iguchi was, after the powerhouse talent of Takashi Miike and Sion Sono, one of the more prominent directors in the Sushi Typhoon collective. Sushi Typhoon was a production company formed by a group of gonzo Japanese directors interested in devoting time and talent into producing unique visions of batshit insanity. The closest western comparison to this group of filmmakers is most likely the anarchic celluloid wackiness of Lloyd Kaufman’s Troma films or the somewhat recent internet sensation Kung Fury. While Sushi Typhoon officially only produced seven films, the indelible combination of over-the-top action and gore, ridiculous special effects and kitchen sink plots can be found in many films associated with the filmmakers involved both before and after the official era Sushi Typhoon operated. Iguchi started his career directing mostly adult videos in the late ‘90s and early ‘00s. His first film to really establish the tone and sensibility he would adopt for much of the rest of his career was with the horror comedy A Larva To Love which featured the first collaboration with Sushi Typhoon special effects guru Yoshihiro Nishimura. They would reteam for several more collaborations including Iguchi’s breakout film The Machine Girl, the first of these style of films to gain an international audience. He would go on to direct the official Sushi Typhoon films Mutant Girls Squad (with two other directors) as well as his ode to classic tokusatsu TV shows of the past Karate-Robo Zaborgar. After Sushi Typhoon went into hibernation, Iguchi continued to direct the kinds of crazy films that retained the spirit of the production company, if not necessarily the major budgets. Frankly, Noboru Iguchi’s films rarely make a lot of sense, but they are generally a hell of a lot of fun. I’ll gladly take the gleeful decadence of Sushi Typhoon over much of the somber, depressing arthouse fare that others put on a pedestal.

ImageImageImage

67. Deddo sushi (2012)
Dead Sushi concerns the daughter of a famous sushi chef who was strictly trained all her life in the art of sushi preparation who sets out on her own but gets mixed up in a crazy plot by a disgruntled scientist to bring sushi to life as murderous food to wreak revenge on his former employers. She must use her kung fu sushi skills to fight back this menace and save the lives of everyone involved. Calling a Noboru Iguchi film ridiculous is redundant because of course it is, but I’ll say it anyway. This movie is ridiculous. With Iguchi ramping up the comedy elements even compared to previous films, this one feels even more like a Troma film than many of his others (the designs for the killer sushi even resemble the murderous prophylactic from the Troma-distributed Killer Condom). The effects are ultra-cheese and character motivations are confounding, but that doesn’t matter. It’s a hell of a ride worth watching for fans of schlock cinema everywhere.

68. Robo-geisha (2009)
Two sisters are trained as assassins by a steel company their father works for, eventually incorporating cyborg components to aid in their deadly pursuits. When one of them is sent on a suicide mission and is blow apart but put back together, robocop-style, by former employees who seek to take down the steel company, much robo-geisha action ensues. This one isn’t as overtly silly as Dead Sushi (although it’s still plenty silly), more in tone with Iguchi’s previous Machine Girl. The bizarre goblin mask women provide an amusing foil with their goblin face bras spewing milk and shurikens and swords coming out their butts. Like other Iguchi films, this one is a lot of fun that is best watched with a group.

69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)
Ghost Squad is one of Iguchi’s more recent films, and it’s immediately apparent he doesn’t have the budget he did in the Sushi Typhoon days. The film is shot on very few sets. There are only a couple of more elaborate special effects and even those aren’t close to the craziness of Machine Girl or Robo-Geisha. The ghosts are basically just teens in white face make-up, one of whom has a dog puppet that eats off faces. In some ways though, I think Iguchi uses these limitations to tell a more character-driven story with a more melancholy tone as it explores how the girls become ghosts and how they seek to fulfill what’s missing in their afterlife. It’s still an Iguchi film though and as such gets super goofy in places with over-the-top acting and extreme reactions at times. Still, it’s not a bad film, just not as suited to a party watch as some of his previous ones.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

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Onderhond
Posts: 6179
Joined: December 23rd, 2012, 7:00 am
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#126

Post by Onderhond »

flavo5000 wrote: February 9th, 2021, 5:46 pm and it’s immediately apparent he doesn’t have the budget he did in the Sushi Typhoon days.
Yesterday I watched Iguchi's Lock-On Love, with is a straight up no-budget high school romance. The poor guy :D
I've also watched Yudai Yamaguchi's Rokuroku this morning, and again very apparent there just isn't any budget anymore for these films. The ideas are still there though.
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
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#127

Post by flavo5000 »

Andy Warhol

Image

More known for his massive persona in the world of pop art than as a film director, Warhol saw cinema as another canvas on which to project his controversial ideas. His earliest films are some of his more infamous, often referred to as “static films” due to their stationary camera observing a banal occurrence. These include Empire, an 8-hour static shot of the Empire State Building over the course of an afternoon and evening, Eat, a 45-minute film of the artist Robert Indiana eating, Sleep, six hours of a man sleeping, and Blow Job, 30 minutes of a static shot of a man’s face as he receives a blow job out of frame. He would also make several films that are essentially improvised conversations between regulars of his Factory with little to no camera movement in single takes. His most celebrated work is most likely Chelsea Girls, a three hour film composed of two separate reels projected simultaneously side-by-side with sound modulated to favor one vs the other as the films progress. Warhol would mostly retreat from filmmaking after an attempt on his life (dramatized in the film I Shot Andy Warhol) deferring the Factory’s film output mostly to director Paul Morrissey. Personal feelings aside (incidentally I pretty much find nearly everything he’s done borderline unwatchable), one can’t argue the impact Warhol has had on both the art community and the avant-garde film movement.

ImageImageImageImage

70. Blue Movie (1969)
Blue Movie was Warhol’s final film before retiring from filmmaking and was highly controversial on its release for its graphic depiction of sex on screen. The film is primarily a series of static shots of a couple (Warhol superstar Viva and actor Louis Waldon) as they joke around, wax philosophic about nothing in particular, have sex, watch TV, shower, and then have more sex in the bathtub. As a film, it’s pretty tedious but it does have the distinction of influencing a wave of adult films accepted by the mainstream in the ‘70s like Deep Throat and Behind the Green Door. As an additional note, the copy I saw was dubbed in German but I was able to use a combination of Google Translate’s transcript functionality and excerpts of the Blue Movie book published in 1971 that contained all the dialogue from the film to follow the flow of the conversation. Although it really doesn’t matter much. There is no narrative and no consistent themes. They make a lot of sexual innuendo type jokes and muse about the nature of love and past experiences. Like other improvised Warhol films, there’s little of true substance here.

71. Beauty #2 (1965)
Speaking of other improvised Warhol films, Beauty #2 is a 65-minute static shot of Edie Sedgwick and Gino Piserchio in their underwear on a bed answering questions at the prompt of Chuck Wein, only a voice off-screen. Wein’s questions seem to exist solely to annoy Edie and by the end of it, there’s really not much that has happened. In the words of Edie, ‘B-O-R-E-D. Bored...’

72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)
Here we have a group of Warhol’s shorts including some of his many, many Screen Tests that are just 4-minute shots of various people who came through The Factory as well as the infamous Blow Job mentioned in the intro and Mario Banana, two four-minute shots of the transvestite Mario Montez eating a banana. The one that is probably of the most interest is Outer and Inner Space wherein Edie talks to herself video a pre-recorded and superimposed television image that is then doubled, in classic Warhol style. It has echoes of Chelsea Girls produced the same year.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

Run #20: Andy Warhol
70. Blue Movie (1969)
71. Beauty #2 (1965)
72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)
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Lu-Chin
Posts: 117
Joined: November 18th, 2020, 3:58 pm
Contact:

#128

Post by Lu-Chin »

Spoiler
Arturo Ripstein
1. El castillo de la pureza (1973) 8/10
2. Profundo carmesí (1996) 8/10
3. El imperio de la fortuna (1986) 7/10

Chantal Akerman
4. Hôtel Monterey (1973) 5/10
5. News from Home (1977) 6/10
6. D'Est (1993) (1993) 6/10

Paul Verhoeven
7. De vierde man (1983) 6/10
8. Turks fruit (1973) 8/10
9. Zwartboek (2006) 8/10

Emilio Fernández
10. Víctimas del pecado (1951) 6/10
11. Enamorada (1946) 7/10
12. Pueblerina (1949) 5/10

Dardenne brothers
13. The Promise (1996) 8/10
14. The Kid with a Bike (2011) 8/10
15. Young Ahmed (2019) 8/10

Jean-Luc Godard
16. Numéro deux (1975) 4/10
17. Film socialisme (2010) 5/10
18. Je vous salue, Marie (1985) 6/10
19. Notre musique (2004) 7/10
20. Le livre d'image (2018) 7/10

Alfred Hitchcock
21. To Catch a Thief (1955) 7/10
22. Marnie (1964) 8/10
23. Spellbound (1945) 6/10

Dziga Vertov
24. Entuziazm (Simfoniya Donbassa) (1930) 7/10
25. The Sixth Part of the World (1926) 6/10
26. Three Songs About Lenin (1934) 6/10

Chantal Akerman
27. Je tu il elle (1974) 6/10
28. Toute une nuit (1982) 6/10
29. Nuit et jour (1991) 8/10

Michael Snow
30. To Lavoisier, Who Died in the Reign of Terror (1991) 2/10
31. Wavelength (1967) 3/10
32. Back and Forth (1969) 5/10

Stan Brakhage
33. Anticipation of the Night (1958) 5/10
34. The Text of Light (1974) 4/10
35. 23rd Psalm Branch: Part I (1967) 7/10 33 min.
23rd Psalm Branch: Part II (1978) 5/10 31 min.
Star Garden (1974) 5/10 22 min.

Deborah Stratman
36. O'er the Land (2009) 7/10
37. The BLVD (1999) 6/10
38. From Hetty to Nancy (1997) 4/10
Bruce Baillie
39. Quixote (1965) 5/10
40. Quick Billy (1971) 6/10
41. On Sundays (1961) 4/10 26 min
Mass for the Dakota Sioux (1964) 4/10 20 min
To Parsifal (1963) 4/10 15 min
Castro Street (1966) 5/10 10 min
Valentin de las Sierras (1971) 6/10 10 min.

Jonas Mekas
42. In Between (1978) 6/10
43. The Brig (1964) 7/10
44. Out-Takes from the Life of a Happy Man (2012) 8/10

Matthew Barney
45. Cremaster 1 (1996) 5/10
46. Cremaster 2 (1999) 6/10
47. Cremaster 4 (1995) 4/10
48. Cremaster 5 (1997) 4/10

James Benning
49. After Warhol (2011) 5/10
50. Natural History (2014) 5/10
51. Casting a Glance (2007) 6/10
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jeroeno
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#129

Post by jeroeno »

33. Liberté, la nuit (Philippe Garrel, 1984)
34. Sauvage innocence (Philippe Garrel, 2001)
35. L'ombre des femmes (Philippe Garrel, 2015)

Les enfants désaccordés (Philippe Garrel, 1964) (15 min)
Actua I (Philippe Garrel, 1968) (6 min)
Obgeoff
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#130

Post by Obgeoff »

Director #12 - Tim Burton

Previous experience:
10 features, 1 @ 7, 5 @ 6, 2 @ 5, 1 @ 3, 1 @ 2

42. Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985, Burton) 6
43. Beetle Juice (1988, Burton) 5
44. Sleepy Hollow (1999, Burton) 6
45. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005, Burton) 7

Frequently like the worlds and atmosphere he builds but I can never connect to the silliness and get bored.

Director #13 - John Huston

Previous experience:
11 features, 1 @ 9, 4 @ 8, 3 @ 7, 3 @ 6

short - San Pietro (1945, Huston) 7 [32m]
46. Let There Be Light (1946/1980, Huston) 8
47. The Red Badge of Courage (1951, Huston) 6
48. Prizzi's Honor (1985, Huston) 7

Respect for the soldier, seeking understanding of their plight and wanting to share the ordeals that fighting men endured.
Spoiler
Director #1 - David Lean
1. Oliver Twist (1948, Lean) 8
2. Summertime (1955, Lean) 8
3. Ryan's Daughter (1970, Lean) 7
4. A Passage to India (1984, Lean) 7

Director #2 - Joseph L. Mankiewicz
5. A Letter to Three Wives (1949, Mankiewicz) 8
6. Julius Caesar (1953, Mankiewicz) 8
7. Cleopatra (1963, Mankiewicz) 7
8. Sleuth (1972, Mankiewicz) 7

Director #3 - Abel Ferrara
9. Ms .45 (1981, Ferrara) 8
10. The Addiction (1995, Ferrara) 6
11. New Rose Hotel (1998, Ferrara) 7

Director #4 - John Milius
12. Big Wednesday (1978, Milius) 6
13. Conan the Barbarian (1982, Milius) 6
14. Red Dawn (1984, Milius) 2

Director #5 - Blake Edwards
15. Days of Wine and Roses (1962, Edwards) 8
16. The Pink Panther (1963, Edwards) 6
17. Victor Victoria (1982, Edwards) 7

Director #6 - King Vidor
18. Hallelujah (1929, Vidor) 8
19. The Champ (1931, Vidor) 7
20. Our Daily Bread (1934, Vidor) 8
21. War and Peace (1956, Vidor) 7

Director #7 - Frank Borzage
22. A Farewell to Arms (1932, Borzage) 7
23. Man's Castle (1933, Borzage) 7
24. The Mortal Storm (1940, Borzage) 9

Director #8 - Henry King
25. State Fair (1933, King) 6
26. Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938, King ) 7
27. The Song of Bernadette (1943, King) 7
28. Twelve O'Clock High (1949, King) 8

Director #9 - Samuel Fuller
29. Park Row (1952, Fuller) 8
30. House of Bamboo (1955, Fuller) 7
31. Underworld, U.S.A. (1961, Fuller) 7
32. White Dog (1982, Fuller) 8

Director #10 - Louis Feuillade
33. Fantomas - A l'ombre de la guillotine (1913, Feuillade) 7
34. Juve contre Fantomas (1913, Feuillade) 8
35. Le mort qui tue (1913, Feuillade) 7
36. Fantomas contre Fantomas (1914, Feuillade) 7
37. Le faux magistrat (1914, Feuillade) 7

Director #11 - Victor Sjöström
38. Terje Vigen (1917, Sjöström) 9
39. Ingeborg Holm (1913, Sjöström) 8
40. Berg-Ejvind och hans hustru (1918, Sjöström) 7
41. He Who Gets Slapped (1924, Sjöström) 7

Director #12 - Tim Burton
42. Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985, Burton) 6
43. Beetle Juice (1988, Burton) 5
44. Sleepy Hollow (1999, Burton) 6
45. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005, Burton) 7

Director #13 - John Huston
short - San Pietro (1945, Huston) 7 [32m]
46. Let There Be Light (1946/1980, Huston) 8
47. The Red Badge of Courage (1951, Huston) 6
48. Prizzi's Honor (1985, Huston) 7
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sol
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#131

Post by sol »

Running on Directors
1. The House of 1000 Corpses (2003) Rob Zombie #DDF
2. The Devil's Rejects (2005) Rob Zombie
3. 3 From Hell (2019) Rob Zombie
4. Cop Land (1997) James Mangold
5. Logan (2017) James Mangold
6. Heavy (1995) James Mangold #DDF
7. The Roost (2005) Ti West #DDF
8. The Innkeepers (2011) Ti West
9. Trigger Man (2007) Ti West
10. Flodder (1986) Dick Maas
11. Quiz (2012) Dick Maas
12. Saint (2010) Dick Maas
13. Creep (2014) Patrick Brice #DDF
14. Creep 2 (2017) Patrick Brice
15. The Overnight (2015) Patrick Brice
16. Almost Human (2013) Joe Begos #DDF
17. The Mind's Eye (2015) Joe Begos
18. VFW (2019) Joe Begos
19. Bliss (2019) Joe Begos
20. Pod (2015) Mickey Keating
21. Darling (2015) Mickey Keating
22. Carnage Park (2016) Mickey Keating
23. Blackkklansman (2018) Spike Lee REVISION
24. Inside Man (2006) Spike Lee REVISION
25. Oldboy (2013) Spike Lee
26. Unsane (2018) Steven Soderbergh REVISION
27. Haywire (2011) Steven Soderbergh
28. The Landromat (2019) Steven Soderbergh

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Steven Soderbergh

I love Steven Soderbergh's work in general. The man has an amazing eye for colour; there are several shots in the Ocean's trilogy that could be framed and hung on gallery walls with rich, supersaturated colours throughout. He is also a director unafraid to try something different, and from his borderline experimental Spalding Gray monologue films, to shooting films on iPhones, to breaking the fourth and having actors/actresses play themselves - all of his daringness to be different is super-fun to watch. Before this month, I had seen almost everything that Soderbergh had directed to date. I decided to use this month to fill in two of the very few gaps (and I think I only have two left now) as well as to rewatch one of my favourite films of recent years.

The good news is that Unsane works even better on revision. It is a downright chilling film, knowing everything to come and seeing just how easily Claire Foy is duped. Foy is amazing in the role too and the whole film sits so well alongside Contagion and Side Effects as a poke at modern medicine and things not quite working liking they should. The film also looks great considering that it was shot on an iPhone; Soderbergh's colours are as rich as ever while he gets in some really great and unusual framing by placing his camera on desks etc., quite unlike most conventionally shot films are framed.

Haywire and The Laundromat impressed me less. As per the images that I selected above, both are once again great testament to Soderbergh's skill with supersaturated colours but neither film really did much for me as a narrative. Haywire has some great action/suspense scenes but a really bland protagonist, while The Laundromat has two awesome ostensible protagonists in Antonio Banderas and Gary Oldman - only they aren't the protagonists and pretty much absent from most of the film which bounces between Meryl Streep and a whole bunch of other characters who we never really get to know. Both films were certainly reasonably entertaining, but not top tier Soderbergh by any means.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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flavo5000
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#132

Post by flavo5000 »

sol wrote: February 10th, 2021, 1:33 pm

I love Steven Soderbergh's work in general. The man has an amazing eye for colour; there are several shots in the Ocean's trilogy that could be framed and hung on gallery walls with rich, supersaturated colours throughout. He is also a director unafraid to try something different, and from his borderline experimental Spalding Gray monologue films, to shooting films on iPhones, to breaking the fourth and having actors/actresses play themselves - all of his daringness to be different is super-fun to watch. Before this month, I had seen almost everything that Soderbergh had directed to date. I decided to use this month to fill in two of the very few gaps (and I think I only have two left now) as well as to rewatch one of my favourite films of recent years.
Have you also seen both seasons of The Knick which he directed every episode of? I've heard good things about that one.
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#133

Post by flavo5000 »

John Singleton

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John Singleton was a prominent black filmmaker who burst onto the scene with Boyz in the Hood in 1991 which set a benchmark for the gritty urban drama with a look at the realities that young black men faced growing up in ghettos. Singleton would return to this desire to show the multi-faceted lives of the black experience beyond the stereotypical depictions of thuggish gang bangers that so many action and exploitations had shown in the ‘70s and ‘80s. With Poetic Justice, he showcased Tupac Shakur as a proxy for the young black man as sensitive poet, showing that despite a tough exterior, he was capable of beauty and warmth. By the 2010s, he had started to focus his attention more in the world of prestige television, directing episodes from several series that showcased the black experience such as Empire, American Crime Story and Snowfall. Singleton unfortunately passed away unexpectedly in 2019 but has left a body of work that is something to be proud of.

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73. Higher Learning (1995)
Higher Learning follows a group of college freshmen as they attempt to discover their place in the world, navigating social, class and race issues that culminates in a horrific tragedy that will affect them and their outlook on society going forward. Higher Learning is an engaging film that could’ve done with tightening its focus and narrative a little. Some of the characters are focused on quite a bit early on but fade into the background later in the film like Kristy Swanson’s character who lives through an attempted rape and becomes an advocate for change. This plotline sort of falls by the wayside once the shooting starts in what is really the central conflict of the film between Michael Rappaport, a lost outsider who is ripe for the picking by a group of neo-nazis, and Omar Epps, a student on a track scholarship struggling with his finances and trying to find his voice under the harsh tutelage of his teacher, played by Laurence Fishburn. Both students’ pent-up angst leads to an explosive climax that takes the form of a Charles Starkweather-esque school shooting. There are very powerful moments in this film that come across very effectively. Unfortunately, it is also hampered with the aforementioned extraneous subplots and trying to be too large in scope. Some of the characters also come across more as caricatures than real people like the campus cops and their continuous crazy racist over-reactions. Still Singleton creates a statement that is at times quite powerful and something other filmmakers only aspire to.

74. Baby Boy (2001)
Baby Boy is the story of a Jody, a young black man played by Tyrese Gibson who is in a kind of state of arrested development, still living with his mom despite already fathering a child from one girl and starting to put the moves on another. This film is less about an overarching narrative and more about slice-of-life vignettes that flow from one to the next. This lack of focus is something of a hindrance to the film though as I could never really get a grasp of what it was trying to say. The tone also feels uneven with it randomly going from comedy (like the scenes with Ving Rhames graphically having sex with his mom in the next room) to character-based drama to romance to crime thriller (featuring Snoop Dogg in an uncharacteristically more serious role). There are still strong moments here and there but it’s just too scattered to be considered a great film.

75. 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)
Singleton takes the reins of this early Fast & Furious franchise effort and finds it in something of a transition period between the street racing shenanigans of the first one and the more over-the-top crime caper antics that the later films have evolved into. In some ways, this film sows the seeds of what is to come by adding some over-the-top stunts and building up some team camaraderie between Walker and newcomer to the series Tyrese. I think it almost needed Vin Diesel to be out of the picture temporarily to introduce some of these side characters that would crop up later. Tonally it’s interesting that this one makes a sharp left turn into buddy (ex?)cop-like territory with Walker and Tyrese as the ersatz Gibson/Glover pairing. Overall it’s not a great movie with bad dialogue and a plot that stretches believability at times, but it seems like this one has gotten a bad rap over the years in the pantheon of Fast and/or Furious films. I think it just had an issue with sidestepping expectations at the time with the lack of Diesel and the de-emphasis on street-racing.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

Run #20: Andy Warhol
70. Blue Movie (1969)
71. Beauty #2 (1965)
72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)

Run #21: John Singleton
73. Higher Learning (1995)
74. Baby Boy (2001)
75. 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)
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#134

Post by jdidaco »

(Screenshots from 'Idylle à la plage' & 'Sedução da Carne'),

Henri Storck

19. Pour vos beaux yeux (For Your Beautiful Eyes, Henri Storck, 1929) 7.5/10 (RV) (7 min), Idylle à la plage (Romance on the Beach, Henri Storck, 1931) 9/10 (23 min), L'île de Pâques (Easter Island, Henri Storck & John Fernhout, 1934) 7.5/10 (23 min), La fenêtre ouverte (The Open Window, Henri Storck, 1952) 7.5/10 (18 min), Les Dieux du feu (Henri Storck, 1961) 8/10 (10 min) (Total: 81 min)
20. Rubens (Henri Storck & Paul Haesaerts, 1948) 8/10
21. Herman Teirlinck (Henri Storck, 1953) 7.5/10

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Júlio Bressane

22. Amor Louco/Crazy Love (Júlio Bressane, 1971) 8/10
23. Educação Sentimental (Sentimental Education, Júlio Bressane, 2013) 9/10
24. Sedução da Carne (Seduction of the Flesh, Júlio Bressane, 2018) 7/10

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Spoiler
Johan van der Keuken

1. Dagboek (Diary, Johan van der Keuken, 1972) 9/10
2. De nieuwe ijstijd (The New Ice Age, Johan van der Keuken, 1974-79) 9/10
3. De tijd (Time, Johan van der Keuken, 1983) 8/10

R. Bruce Elder

4. She Is Away (R. Bruce Elder, 1976) 7.5/10 (13 min), Permutations and Combinations (R. Bruce Elder, 1976) 7/10 (7 min), Sweet Love Remembered (R. Bruce Elder, 1980) 7.5/10 (12 min), 1857 (Fool's Gold) (R. Bruce Elder, 1981) 8.5/10 (25 min), Work in Progress from Consolations (Love Is an Art of Time) (R. Bruce Elder, 1988) 7/10 (23 min) (Total: 80 min)
5. Lamentations a Monument for the Dead World (R. Bruce Elder, 1985) 9/10
6. Et Resurrectus Est (R. Bruce Elder, 1994) 8.5/10

Teo Hernandez

7. Corps Aboli (Teo Hernandez, 1978) 9/10 (16 min), Tables d'hiver (Teo Hernandez, 1979) 9/10 (29 min), Gong (Teo Hernandez, 1981) 9.5/10 (39 min) (Total: 84 min)
8. Cristaux (Teo Hernandez, 1978) 10/10
9. Lacrima Christi (Teo Hernandez, 1980) 9.5/10

Boris Lehman

10. Magnum Begynasium Bruxellense (Boris Lehman, 1978) 8.5/10
11. Couple, regards, positions (Boris Lehman & Nadine Wandel, 1983) 8/10
12. À la recherche du lieu de ma naissance (Looking for My Birthplace, Boris Lehman, 1990) 8/10

Richard Myers

13. Deathstyles (Richard Myers, 1971) 9/10
14. Floor Show (Richard Myers, 1978) 9/10
15. Jungle Girl (Richard Myers, 1984) 8/10

Amit Dutta

16. Sonchidi (The Golden Bird, Amit Dutta, 2011) 7/10
17. Saatvin Sair (The Seventh Walk, Amit Dutta, 2013) 9/10
18. Agyat Shilpi (The Unknown Craftsman, Amit Dutta, 2017) 8.5/10
Last edited by jdidaco on February 11th, 2021, 5:12 am, edited 2 times in total.
AB537
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#135

Post by AB537 »

Director #3: Eric Rohmer (#80 on TSPDT)

7. Le signe du Lion - The Sign of Leo (filmed 1959, released 1962) 7/10 ... #ddf
8. Die Marquise von O... - The Marquise of O (1976) 7.5/10
9. Les nuits de la pleine lune - Full Moon in Paris (1984) 6.5/10
10. Quatre aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle - Four Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle (1987) 7/10

I've sporadically watched several Rohmer films in the last few years, with generally good results, but an imminent departure from Mubi prompted me to watch his readily available (in Canada) work for this challenge. All of these were definitely worth watching, but I find Rohmer's films difficult to evaluate in the immediate aftermath, so unusually for me the ratings above are fairly provisional. In my experience Rohmer's better films stick with me more than those from other directors, so it will be interesting to see what stands out from this group later on.

Also, it looks like Francois Truffaut (#23) is not crossed out on the group challenge list.
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#136

Post by flavo5000 »

Masters of Horror Presents: Tom Holland

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Tom Holland’s horror credentials loom larger in the community, having directed both the original Fright Night and the original Child’s Play Before that he also wrote several well-regarded horror flicks like The Beast Within and Psycho II and seems to have a genuine love for the genre (although he’s also done a few things outside horror as well like the Whoopi Goldberg action comedy Fatal Beauty). Since the ‘90s, his work has been more in the world of TV and video, directing several episodes of Tales from the Crypt as well as the Stephen King adaptations The Langoliers and Thinner. Holland’s films often feature mild comedy elements but are still predominantly more-straightforward horror. Interestingly he actually started out as an actor under Lee Strasberg at the Actor’s Studio, the famous acting school known for producing several actors in the ‘50s and ‘60s who pioneered the method acting approach like Marlon Brando and Paul Newman, and still occasionally pops up to act in smaller parts in films like Hatchet II and The Stand. While Holland isn’t the most prolific of directors (he also runs his own production company Dead Rabbit Films as well), his impact on the horror genre is massive, birthing two of the biggest horror classics of the ‘80s.

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76. Tom Holland's Twisted Tales (2014)
Twisted Tales is essentially an anthology stitched together from webisodes of a Fear Net series of the same name into a 2.5 hour feature and has segments ranging from 8 to 30 minutes (although The Pizza Guy segment is closer to 50 since it was released in two parts). Like most anthologies, this one is a mixed bag. Some of the segments are just terrible with poor effects, super predictable storylines and bad acting. Some are actually pretty decent. Holland is able to use his clout to net a few folks that normally have no business in something this low budget like Ray Wise, who makes the most of having to act against a green screen most of the time with two really bad actors beside him, Angela Bettis and Danielle Harris (who Holland had acted with previously in the aforementioned Hatchet II), but by and large the cast is mostly amateurs. Each segment is introduced by Holland himself although Holland really isn’t terribly intimidating to fill-in the horror host role. Overall the cheapness of the whole production really puts a damper on what could’ve been something interesting.

77. The Stranger Within (1990)
This TV movie from Holland begins with a single mother having her 3-year-old son abducted from a grocery store when she wanders off to argue with a feeble old employee about cereal. Jump forward 16 years. She’s now with a new beau and seems to JUST be getting her life together when out of the blue a young man claiming to be her long-lost son shows up at her doorstep. Surely nothing sinister is going on here, right? The production values here scream early ‘90s TV but Holland makes the most of it. The film starts out very slow and at times even feels like it may end up as a cheesy Lifetime movie. Fortunately the thriller/horror elements creep into the third act leading to a marginally decent climax. The movie in general feels like one of Holland’s weaker films though.

78. Two-Fisted Tales (1992)
Two-Fisted Tales has a bit of an interesting history. It was originally conceived as a TV pilot spin-off of Tales from the Crypt using stories inspired by (but not necessarily directly adapted from) non-horror EC Comics tales. The feature length pilot was composed of three stories: “Showdown” by Richard Donner about a gunslinger in the wild west whose past catches up with him, “King of the Road” directed by Tom Holland starring Brad Pitt about a young, upstart hotrodder who keeps taunting a former hotrodder now family man into challenging him in a drag race, and “Yellow” directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Eric Douglas as the cowardly son of military general Michael Douglas who shames his father one time too many. This pilot also featured wraparound segments by a crazy, ex-military guy played by William Sadler. When the series didn’t get picked up the segments were separated and aired as episodes of Tales from the Crypt itself sans the William Sadler wrap-arounds. While I can see why the pilot didn’t take off like it’s sister series, they are still solid segments that do capture a different facet of the EC Comics ethos. “Yellow” is certainly the best of the three with the most starpower from the father/son Douglas pairing as well as roles from Lance Henrickson and Dan Ackroyd. ”Showdown” is nicely done by Donner if a little predictable and has the feel of a Twilight Zone episode. “King of the Road” is the least like Tales from the Crypt with no supernatural element and no twist ending. Instead it’s more of a throwback to juvenile delinquent hotrod pictures from the ‘50s and ‘60s. It does have that sweet Warren Zevon soundtrack too. If you have already seen all of these and don’t want to revisit them, this feature probably isn’t worth checking out just to see the William Sadler sections, but honestly, I love Tales from the Crypt and had no trouble watching these again.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

Run #20: Andy Warhol
70. Blue Movie (1969)
71. Beauty #2 (1965)
72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)

Run #21: John Singleton
73. Higher Learning (1995)
74. Baby Boy (2001)
75. 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)

Run #22: Tom Holland
76. Tom Holland's Twisted Tales (2014)
77. The Stranger Within (1990)
78. Two-Fisted Tales (1992)
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#137

Post by AssonFire »

Ridley Scott
1. 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992) 5/10
2. White Squall (1996) 4/10
3. Black Hawk Down (2001) 6/10
4. Black Rain (1989) 6/10
5. Boy and Bicycle (1962 / Ridley Scott) 4/10
Hovis: Boy on the Bike (1973 / Ridley Scott) 6/10
Roxy Music: Avalon (1982 / Ridley Scott) 6/10
Chanel No. 5: The Swimming Pool (1979 / Ridley Scott) 5/10
Chanel No. 5: L'invitation au rêve/Le jardin (1982 / Ridley Scott) 6/10
Chanel No. 5: Monuments (1986 / Ridley Scott) 5/10
Chanel No. 5: La Star (1990 / Ridley Scott) 7/10
Thunder Perfect Mind (2010 / Ridley Scott) 4/10
The Journey (2019 / Ridley Scott) 4/10
Hennessy X.O: The Seven Worlds (2019 / Ridley Scott) 6/10
The French as Seen By...: Les Gaulois (1988 / Werner Herzog) 4/10
La Boheme (2009 / Werner Herzog) 6/10
Ode to the Dawn of Man (2011 / Werner Herzog) 6/10

Werner Herzog
5. Signs of Life (1968) 6/10 #DDF
6. Scream of Stone (1991) 5/10
7. Gesualdo: Death for Five Voices (1995) 5/10
8. Christ and Demons in New Spain (1999) 5/10
9. The White Diamond (2004) 7/10
10. Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2010) 7/10

27 minutes carried forwards.
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maxwelldeux
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#138

Post by maxwelldeux »

1. Malcom X (1992, Spike Lee)
2. He Got Game (1998, Spike Lee)
3. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013, Spike Lee)

I have a tremendous amount of respect for Spike Lee. I don't love everything he does, but I'm interested in just about everything he does.

Finally bit the bullet on Malcolm X. Although maybe too long, this was a great portrayal of X as more than the violent evil Black man my education growing up would have me believe. He Got Game, was a tremendous effort, largely for the production; while I'm glad Ray Allen decided to pursue a basketball career rather than acting full time, this was a subtle and imrpessive film. Mike Tyson was probably less of a directorial effort for Lee than other films, but interesting at how it handled Tyson; Tyson himself even called out Lee on multiple occasions, which provided a fun interplay.

Overall, I love the point of view Lee brings to his work and how he views the world through the lens of a Black man in America dealing with everything that comes with that title. Though the stories are diverse, the point of view is enlightening, and I'm glad I'm diving deeper into his filmography.
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#139

Post by sol »

flavo5000 wrote: February 10th, 2021, 3:55 pm
sol wrote: February 10th, 2021, 1:33 pmBefore this month, I had seen almost everything that Soderbergh had directed to date. I decided to use this month to fill in two of the very few gaps (and I think I only have two left now) as well as to rewatch one of my favourite films of recent years.
Have you also seen both seasons of The Knick which he directed every episode of? I've heard good things about that one.
Oops, nope, I was talking about Soderbergh's feature film output (I think I just have Che and The Girlfriend Experience in my blind). I haven't seen any episodes of The Knick, but I have likewise only heard great things about it.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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Lonewolf2003
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#140

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

sol wrote: February 11th, 2021, 8:11 am
flavo5000 wrote: February 10th, 2021, 3:55 pm
sol wrote: February 10th, 2021, 1:33 pmBefore this month, I had seen almost everything that Soderbergh had directed to date. I decided to use this month to fill in two of the very few gaps (and I think I only have two left now) as well as to rewatch one of my favourite films of recent years.
Have you also seen both seasons of The Knick which he directed every episode of? I've heard good things about that one.
Oops, nope, I was talking about Soderbergh's feature film output (I think I just have Che and The Girlfriend Experience in my blind). I haven't seen any episodes of The Knick, but I have likewise only heard great things about it.
The Knick is imo the best thing Soderbergh has done. So def would recom checking it out.
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#141

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

AB537 wrote: February 11th, 2021, 3:15 am Director #3: Eric Rohmer (#80 on TSPDT)

7. Le signe du Lion - The Sign of Leo (filmed 1959, released 1962) 7/10 ... #ddf
8. Die Marquise von O... - The Marquise of O (1976) 7.5/10
9. Les nuits de la pleine lune - Full Moon in Paris (1984) 6.5/10
10. Quatre aventures de Reinette et Mirabelle - Four Adventures of Reinette and Mirabelle (1987) 7/10

I've sporadically watched several Rohmer films in the last few years, with generally good results, but an imminent departure from Mubi prompted me to watch his readily available (in Canada) work for this challenge. All of these were definitely worth watching, but I find Rohmer's films difficult to evaluate in the immediate aftermath, so unusually for me the ratings above are fairly provisional. In my experience Rohmer's better films stick with me more than those from other directors, so it will be interesting to see what stands out from this group later on.

Also, it looks like Francois Truffaut (#23) is not crossed out on the group challenge list.
Thanks. Fixed it.
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#142

Post by blocho »

John Guillermin

4. Four Days (1951)
5. Operation Diplomat (1953)
6. The Crowded Day (1954)
7. Thunderstorm (1956)
8. Town on Trial (1957)
9. Never Let Go (1960)
10. Guns at Batasi (1964)

Guillermin was an RAF vet who became entranced with the movies and ascended quickly upward through the ranks of British filmmakers in the postwar period. After nearly 20 productive years in Britain, he moved to Hollywood, where he became better known for a tremendous temper and an eclectic collection of movies highlighted by big-budget efforts such as Death on the Nile, The Towering Inferno, and King Kong. Death on the Nile was a childhood favorite of mine, though I haven't seen it in years and wonder whether it still stands up.

I've been meaning to watch some Guillermin movies ever since sol, Adam, and some of the other podcast people started talking him up several months ago ahead of their episode with Mary Guillermin. I only meant to watch three movies, but I kept going. Guillermin wasn't a flashy director. What comes through from most of this set (apart from the earliest, completed when he was only 26) is a consistently high degree of craftsmanship. Guillermin knew how to shoot and edit to give his stories pace and excitement. His movies look highly polished. Stylistically, one of his hallmarks was the use of overhead shots and quick, short zooms to add tension. You might never notice such tactics because he used them subtly and sparingly. The only consistent theme to emerge is a concern with how women are mistreated by men, which is a plot element in four of these seven movies. I'm not sure whether this was intentional on his part or he was just working with the material handed to him.

Four Days
Amateurish in most ways. A ridiculous melodrama with overheated dialogue. Entirely forgettable.

Operation Diplomat
This is more like it. A kidnapping thriller with more than a few plot holes (incompetent police are a recurring story element for Guillermin) that's built like a race car. Very fast, a little all over the place, consistently exciting.

The Crowded Day
A movie about a group of young professional women, all housed together. I suppose this was a subgenre of sorts (reminds me of Stage Door). In this case, the women are employees of a fancy London department store, and their workplace becomes a setting to illuminate their personal lives. Melodrama with a few comedic touches ensue. The movie is too short to do justice to any more than two of the half dozen plot lines that emerge. Still, it's a decent movie, and one of the narratives (involving premarital pregnancy and suicide) was shockingly risque at the time, I'm sure.
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Thunderstorm
A misfire. The filmmaking is fine, but the story of a beautiful woman who arrives in a new town and unintentionally incites jealousy and tension is too cliched.

Town on Trial
A murder mystery in a small English town, with John Mills as the flinty, at time brutal police superintendent. The mystery itself is a bit rote though still interesting (we quickly realize there are only three suspects, and there's no real way to figure out which one is responsible until the very end), and I wish the movie had delved deeper into the theme indicated in the title -- the conflict between Mills' character and the entire town and the question of the town's collective responsibility for the murder and its aftermath.
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Never Let Go
A very good thriller that's a borderline pick for my 500<400 list. Richard Todd is a mediocre salesman who sets out on a destructive path when his new car is stolen. It leads him eventually to a sneering, maniacal Peter Sellers. There's also a local biker gang, a woman in peril, and more incompetent cops. The movie's main achievement, though, is to use the plot contrivances to illuminate the protagonist's self-concept and inner turmoil. Sellers; scene-chewing villain easily captures most of the attention, but Todd is also excellent.
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Guns at Batasi
Another borderline 500<400 candidate. Richard Attenborough is a martinet sergeant major at a British army base in an unnamed post-colonial African country. When a rebellion breaks out against the government, British policy is to not get involved, but Attenborough and his sergeants' mess get caught in the middle. As with Never Let Go, a thriller plot becomes a means of exploring more serious themes, in this case about race, empire, loyalty, and militarism. As with Town on Trial, I wish the movie had explored those themes a little more deeply.
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Now I'm going to go listen to that podcast episode about Guillermin.
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St. Gloede
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#143

Post by St. Gloede »

Great write-ups on John Guillermin, and agree completely on Never Let Go and Guns at Batasi. Let us know if anything else comes to your mind in the podcast thread.

The one we'll probably disagree a little on his Thunderstorm, which was quite the hit for us. I wrote about why it worked for me, and some interesting similarities to Rapture here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=5084
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#144

Post by Obgeoff »

Director #14 - Leo McCarey
Previous Experience:
5 features, 1 @ 9, 2 @ 8, 2 @ 7

49. Love Affair (1939, McCarey) 7
50. Going My Way (1944, McCarey) 7
51. The Bells of St. Mary's (1945, McCarey) 6

Director #15 - Peter Weir
Previous Experience:
7 features, 2 @ 8, 4 @ 7, 1 @ 6

52. The Cars That Ate Paris (1974, Weir) 6
53. Gallipoli (1981, Weir) 8
54. The Year of Living Dangerously (1982, Weir) 6

Director #16 - Clint Eastwood
Previous Experience:
18 features, 1 @ 9, 5 @ 8, 8 @ 7, 4 @ 6

55. Letters from Iwo Jima (2006, Eastwood) 7
56. Play Misty for Me (1971, Eastwood) 6
57. American Sniper (2014, Eastwood) 7

Director #17 - Jonathan Demme
Previous Experience:
5 features, 1 @ 9, 1 @ 8, 3 @ 7

58. Stop Making Sense (1984, Demme) 7
59. Melvin and Howard (1980, Demme) 7
60. Something Wild (1986, Demme) 7
Spoiler
Director #1 - David Lean
1. Oliver Twist (1948, Lean) 8
2. Summertime (1955, Lean) 8
3. Ryan's Daughter (1970, Lean) 7
4. A Passage to India (1984, Lean) 7

Director #2 - Joseph L. Mankiewicz
5. A Letter to Three Wives (1949, Mankiewicz) 8
6. Julius Caesar (1953, Mankiewicz) 8
7. Cleopatra (1963, Mankiewicz) 7
8. Sleuth (1972, Mankiewicz) 7

Director #3 - Abel Ferrara
9. Ms .45 (1981, Ferrara) 8
10. The Addiction (1995, Ferrara) 6
11. New Rose Hotel (1998, Ferrara) 7

Director #4 - John Milius
12. Big Wednesday (1978, Milius) 6
13. Conan the Barbarian (1982, Milius) 6
14. Red Dawn (1984, Milius) 2

Director #5 - Blake Edwards
15. Days of Wine and Roses (1962, Edwards) 8
16. The Pink Panther (1963, Edwards) 6
17. Victor Victoria (1982, Edwards) 7

Director #6 - King Vidor
18. Hallelujah (1929, Vidor) 8
19. The Champ (1931, Vidor) 7
20. Our Daily Bread (1934, Vidor) 8
21. War and Peace (1956, Vidor) 7

Director #7 - Frank Borzage
22. A Farewell to Arms (1932, Borzage) 7
23. Man's Castle (1933, Borzage) 7
24. The Mortal Storm (1940, Borzage) 9

Director #8 - Henry King
25. State Fair (1933, King) 6
26. Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938, King ) 7
27. The Song of Bernadette (1943, King) 7
28. Twelve O'Clock High (1949, King) 8

Director #9 - Samuel Fuller
29. Park Row (1952, Fuller) 8
30. House of Bamboo (1955, Fuller) 7
31. Underworld, U.S.A. (1961, Fuller) 7
32. White Dog (1982, Fuller) 8

Director #10 - Louis Feuillade
33. Fantomas - A l'ombre de la guillotine (1913, Feuillade) 7
34. Juve contre Fantomas (1913, Feuillade) 8
35. Le mort qui tue (1913, Feuillade) 7
36. Fantomas contre Fantomas (1914, Feuillade) 7
37. Le faux magistrat (1914, Feuillade) 7

Director #11 - Victor Sjöström
38. Terje Vigen (1917, Sjöström) 9
39. Ingeborg Holm (1913, Sjöström) 8
40. Berg-Ejvind och hans hustru (1918, Sjöström) 7
41. He Who Gets Slapped (1924, Sjöström) 7

Director #12 - Tim Burton
42. Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985, Burton) 6
43. Beetle Juice (1988, Burton) 5
44. Sleepy Hollow (1999, Burton) 6
45. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005, Burton) 7

Director #13 - John Huston
short - San Pietro (1945, Huston) 7 [32m]
46. Let There Be Light (1946/1980, Huston) 8
47. The Red Badge of Courage (1951, Huston) 6
48. Prizzi's Honor (1985, Huston) 7

Director #14 - Leo McCarey
49. Love Affair (1939, McCarey) 7
50. Going My Way (1944, McCarey) 7
51. The Bells of St. Mary's (1945, McCarey) 6

Director #15 - Peter Weir
52. The Cars That Ate Paris (1974, Weir) 6
53. Gallipoli (1981, Weir) 8
54. The Year of Living Dangerously (1982, Weir) 6

Director #16 - Clint Eastwood
55. Letters from Iwo Jima (2006, Eastwood) 7
56. Play Misty for Me (1971, Eastwood) 6
57. American Sniper (2014, Eastwood) 7

Director #17 - Jonathan Demme
58. Stop Making Sense (1984, Demme) 7
59. Melvin and Howard (1980, Demme) 7
60. Something Wild (1986, Demme) 7
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#145

Post by St. Gloede »

Rita Azevedo Gomes

Image

Rita Azevedo Gomes is a Portuguese arthouse director who despite working since the beginning of the 90s only broke through on the international stage in 2012 with A Woman's Revenge. I discovered her through A Portuguese Woman, which has already soaked up a lot of acclaim at festivals around the world - but not quite managed to enter the popular cinephile mainstream. Still, with growing visibility I think Rita Azevedo Gomes will become a name of clear note in the coming years.


6. A portuguesa / A Portuguese Woman (2018, Rita Azevedo Gomes)

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A Portuguese Woman is a visually lavish film on the ever-fascinating borderline between minimalism and excess. Almost every scene is composed in a singular, long take - peering into a setting, be it a war camp, a sick bed, a peace meeting - it is almost as if large paintings have come to life and we see the action that take place within them.

Our titular character is no ordinary Portuguese woman, but the new wife of a German duke, resigned alone in her castle as her husband wages endless war. The motifs depicted, span from love to cruelty - from intimate and serene - capturing the dullness of waiting - to darker themes and brutality. However, the atmosphere and acting is almost always given with a degree of "innocence", or perhaps we should say "simplicity".

The lighting adds to this. Faces are brightly lit, and the scenes are shot from a far - without close-ups - setting up details big and small - while breathing life into the frames. There is a simplicity in action and emotion reminiscent of Rohmer - as we get long scenes of dialogue and recitals of poetry. 8.5/10

This was my first film by Rita Azevedo Gomes, and it became immediately clear that she could be one of the most exciting auteurs working today. I had to see more.



7. A Vingança de Uma Mulher / A Woman's Revenge (2012, Rita Azevedo Gomes)

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Feeling more like theater than paintings, A Woman's Revenge is another visually stylized experience that plays with the medium and mixes in a lot of dark humour. Artifice and play become one here, as clearly fake stages, and a Don Juan-like dandy meets a woman scorned - and through dialogue and flashback learns of her elaborate and self-destructive revenge.

There are clear lines in artistic expression between these 2010s features by Gomes, and you can see the contours of a  distict voice - though here clearly building on and taking inspiration from Portugal's perhaps best known director - Manoel de Oliveira (who Gomes has listed as a key inspiration). 

A Woman's Revenge is not as instantly impressive as A Portuguese Woman, and the main portion of the film is set in a single room with dialogue that may at times feel a little drawn out - but it is still a deeply clever film - that has a lot of fun with the world it has set up. 7.5-8/10


8. O Som da Terra a Tremer (1990, Rita Azevedo Gomes)

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O Som da Terra a Tremer gives Gomes a very fitting but uneven beginning, with the occasional glimpse of brilliance. Once again I can see elements of de Oliveira, and though this low-key arthouse film stumbles a lot and struggles to inspire awe in its dusty, small rooms - we still enjoy long scenes of dialogue, play on composition, and a lot of the elements she would bring along on her future endeavers. 5/10


9. Frágil Como o Mundo / Fragile as the World (2001, Rita Azevedo Gomes)

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Fragile as the World is a visually stunning and muted tale of young love, with obscured obstacles and a tragic ending. If you enjoy almost magical minimalism, with elements of symbolism coupled with striking black and white photography, this film is for you. It starts of genuinely great, with a portrait of the lovers family - and the idea that their love is impossible.

However - it does struggle slightly to keep momentum with its limited exposition/dialogue - and while the poetical elements work - the tale seems a little too simple and the ending not quite earned to the degree that it has the punch I would have liked.  7/10.
Spoiler
Jean-Daniel Pollet

1. Le sang (1971, Jean-Daniel Pollett) 9/10 (l) (l)
2. L'ordre (1973, Jean-Daniel Pollett) 7.5/10
3. Jour après jour / Day After Day (2006, Jean-Paul Fargier, Jean-Daniel Pollet) 8.5/10
4. Le maître du temps / The Master of Time (1971, Jean-Daniel Pollet) 4.5/10
5. La ligne de mire / Line of Sight (1960,  Jean-Daniel Pollet) 3/10

Rita Azevedo Gomes

6. A portuguesa / A Portuguese Woman (2018, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 8.5/10
7. A Vingança de Uma Mulher / A Woman's Revenge (2012, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 7.5-8/10
8. O Som da Terra a Tremer (1990, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 5/10
9. Frágil Como o Mundo / Fragile as the World (2001, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 7/10
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#146

Post by jeroeno »

36. The Man Who Envied Women (Yvonne Rainer, 1985)
37. Privilege (Yvonne Rainer, 1990)
38. Journeys from Berlin/1971 (Yvonne Rainer, 1980)

Hand Film (Yvonne Rainer, 1966) (7 min)
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DudeLanez
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#147

Post by DudeLanez »

Masaki Kobayashi

20. Mittsu no ai (Three Loves, 1954) 9/10
21. Izumi (The Spring, 1956) 8/10
22. Kuroi kawa (Black River, 1957) 8/10
23. Shokutaku no nai ie (The Empty Table, 1985) 9/10

Image
Tatsuya Nakadai in Shokutaku no nai ie (1985)
Run the Director
Kenji Mizoguchi
1. Genroku Chûshingura (The 47 Ronin, 1941) 7/10
2. Miyamoto Musashi (1944) 5/10
3. Uwasa no onna (The Woman of Rumour, 1954) 7/10
4. Saikaku ichidai onna (The Life of Oharu, 1952) 8/10
5. Yôkihi (Princess Yang Kwei-fei, 1955) 7/10

Herbert Achternbusch
6. Das Andechser Gefühl (1974) 7/10 #DDF
7. Die Atlantikschwimmer (1976) 6/10
8. Bierkampf (1977) 6/10
9. Das Gespenst (1982) 6/10
10. Heilt Hitler! (1986) 6/10

Nuri Bilge Ceylan
11. Kasaba (The Town, 1997) 7/10 #DDF
12. Mayis Sikintisi (Clouds of May, 1999) 7/10
13. Iklimler (Climates, 2006) 7/10

Edgar Reitz
14. Mahlzeiten (Table for Love, 1967) 7/10 #DDF
15. Cardillac (1969) 7/10
16. Der Schneider von Ulm (The Tailor from Ulm, 1979) 6/10

René Clair
17. Sous les toits de Paris (Under the Roofs of Paris, 1930) 7/10
18. Le million (The Million, 1931) 7/10
19. À nous la liberté (Freedom for Us, 1931) 6/10

Masaki Kobayashi
20. Mittsu no ai (Three Loves, 1954) 9/10
21. Izumi (The Spring, 1956) 8/10
22. Kuroi kawa (Black River, 1957) 8/10
23. Shokutaku no nai ie (The Empty Table, 1985) 9/10
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Lu-Chin
Posts: 117
Joined: November 18th, 2020, 3:58 pm
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#148

Post by Lu-Chin »

Spoiler
Arturo Ripstein
1. El castillo de la pureza (1973) 8/10
2. Profundo carmesí (1996) 8/10
3. El imperio de la fortuna (1986) 7/10

Chantal Akerman
4. Hôtel Monterey (1973) 5/10
5. News from Home (1977) 6/10
6. D'Est (1993) (1993) 6/10

Paul Verhoeven
7. De vierde man (1983) 6/10
8. Turks fruit (1973) 8/10
9. Zwartboek (2006) 8/10

Emilio Fernández
10. Víctimas del pecado (1951) 6/10
11. Enamorada (1946) 7/10
12. Pueblerina (1949) 5/10

Dardenne brothers
13. The Promise (1996) 8/10
14. The Kid with a Bike (2011) 8/10
15. Young Ahmed (2019) 8/10

Jean-Luc Godard
16. Numéro deux (1975) 4/10
17. Film socialisme (2010) 5/10
18. Je vous salue, Marie (1985) 6/10
19. Notre musique (2004) 7/10
20. Le livre d'image (2018) 7/10

Alfred Hitchcock
21. To Catch a Thief (1955) 7/10
22. Marnie (1964) 8/10
23. Spellbound (1945) 6/10

Dziga Vertov
24. Entuziazm (Simfoniya Donbassa) (1930) 7/10
25. The Sixth Part of the World (1926) 6/10
26. Three Songs About Lenin (1934) 6/10

Chantal Akerman
27. Je tu il elle (1974) 6/10
28. Toute une nuit (1982) 6/10
29. Nuit et jour (1991) 8/10

Michael Snow
30. To Lavoisier, Who Died in the Reign of Terror (1991) 2/10
31. Wavelength (1967) 3/10
32. Back and Forth (1969) 5/10

Stan Brakhage
33. Anticipation of the Night (1958) 5/10
34. The Text of Light (1974) 4/10
35. 23rd Psalm Branch: Part I (1967) 7/10 33 min.
23rd Psalm Branch: Part II (1978) 5/10 31 min.
Star Garden (1974) 5/10 22 min.

Deborah Stratman
36. O'er the Land (2009) 7/10
37. The BLVD (1999) 6/10
38. From Hetty to Nancy (1997) 4/10

Bruce Baillie
39. Quixote (1965) 5/10
40. Quick Billy (1971) 6/10
41. On Sundays (1961) 4/10 26 min
Mass for the Dakota Sioux (1964) 4/10 20 min
To Parsifal (1963) 4/10 15 min
Castro Street (1966) 5/10 10 min
Valentin de las Sierras (1971) 6/10 10 min.

Jonas Mekas
42. In Between (1978) 6/10
43. The Brig (1964) 7/10
44. Out-Takes from the Life of a Happy Man (2012) 8/10

Matthew Barney
45. Cremaster 1 (1996) 5/10
46. Cremaster 2 (1999) 6/10
47. Cremaster 4 (1995) 4/10
48. Cremaster 5 (1997) 4/10

James Benning
49. After Warhol (2011) 5/10
50. Natural History (2014) 5/10
51. Casting a Glance (2007) 6/10
Ken Jacobs
52. Seeking the Monkey King (2011) 7/10
53. Celestial Subway Lines/Salvaging Noise (2005) 5/10
54. Blonde Cobra (1963) 2/10 33 min
Little Stabs at Happiness (1960) 3/10 15 min
Capitalism: Child Labor (2006) 5/10 14 min
The Georgetown Loop (1996) 4/10 11 min
Window (1964) 3/10 9 min

Dardenne brothers
55. Le fils (2002) 7/10
56. Rosetta (1999) 7/10
57. La fille inconnue (2016) 6/10

Leopoldo Torre Nilsson
58. La mano en la trampa (1961) 7/10
59. El pibe Cabeza (1975) 6/10
60. Boquitas pintadas (1974) 7/10

Paul Verhoeven
61. Soldier of Orange (1977) 8/10
62. Flesh+Blood (1985) 6/10
63. Tricked (2012) 6/10
Obgeoff
Posts: 603
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#149

Post by Obgeoff »

Director #18 - Clarence Brown
Previous Experience:
1 feature @ 8

61. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 7
62. National Velvet (1944, Brown) 6
63. The Yearling (1946, Brown) 6
64. Intruder in the Dust (1949, Brown) 8

Director #19 - Peter Jackson
Previous Experience:
8 features, 2 @ 9, 2 @ 8, 1 @ 7, 1 @ 4, 1 @ 3, 1 @ 2

65. Meet the Feebles (1989, Jackson) 9
66. Forgotten Silver (1995, Botes/Jackson) 8
67. King Kong (2005, Jackson) 7
Spoiler
Director #1 - David Lean
1. Oliver Twist (1948, Lean) 8
2. Summertime (1955, Lean) 8
3. Ryan's Daughter (1970, Lean) 7
4. A Passage to India (1984, Lean) 7

Director #2 - Joseph L. Mankiewicz
5. A Letter to Three Wives (1949, Mankiewicz) 8
6. Julius Caesar (1953, Mankiewicz) 8
7. Cleopatra (1963, Mankiewicz) 7
8. Sleuth (1972, Mankiewicz) 7

Director #3 - Abel Ferrara
9. Ms .45 (1981, Ferrara) 8
10. The Addiction (1995, Ferrara) 6
11. New Rose Hotel (1998, Ferrara) 7

Director #4 - John Milius
12. Big Wednesday (1978, Milius) 6
13. Conan the Barbarian (1982, Milius) 6
14. Red Dawn (1984, Milius) 2

Director #5 - Blake Edwards
15. Days of Wine and Roses (1962, Edwards) 8
16. The Pink Panther (1963, Edwards) 6
17. Victor Victoria (1982, Edwards) 7

Director #6 - King Vidor
18. Hallelujah (1929, Vidor) 8
19. The Champ (1931, Vidor) 7
20. Our Daily Bread (1934, Vidor) 8
21. War and Peace (1956, Vidor) 7

Director #7 - Frank Borzage
22. A Farewell to Arms (1932, Borzage) 7
23. Man's Castle (1933, Borzage) 7
24. The Mortal Storm (1940, Borzage) 9

Director #8 - Henry King
25. State Fair (1933, King) 6
26. Alexander's Ragtime Band (1938, King ) 7
27. The Song of Bernadette (1943, King) 7
28. Twelve O'Clock High (1949, King) 8

Director #9 - Samuel Fuller
29. Park Row (1952, Fuller) 8
30. House of Bamboo (1955, Fuller) 7
31. Underworld, U.S.A. (1961, Fuller) 7
32. White Dog (1982, Fuller) 8

Director #10 - Louis Feuillade
33. Fantomas - A l'ombre de la guillotine (1913, Feuillade) 7
34. Juve contre Fantomas (1913, Feuillade) 8
35. Le mort qui tue (1913, Feuillade) 7
36. Fantomas contre Fantomas (1914, Feuillade) 7
37. Le faux magistrat (1914, Feuillade) 7

Director #11 - Victor Sjöström
38. Terje Vigen (1917, Sjöström) 9
39. Ingeborg Holm (1913, Sjöström) 8
40. Berg-Ejvind och hans hustru (1918, Sjöström) 7
41. He Who Gets Slapped (1924, Sjöström) 7

Director #12 - Tim Burton
42. Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985, Burton) 6
43. Beetle Juice (1988, Burton) 5
44. Sleepy Hollow (1999, Burton) 6
45. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005, Burton) 7

Director #13 - John Huston
short - San Pietro (1945, Huston) 7 [32m]
46. Let There Be Light (1946/1980, Huston) 8
47. The Red Badge of Courage (1951, Huston) 6
48. Prizzi's Honor (1985, Huston) 7

Director #14 - Leo McCarey
49. Love Affair (1939, McCarey) 7
50. Going My Way (1944, McCarey) 7
51. The Bells of St. Mary's (1945, McCarey) 6

Director #15 - Peter Weir
52. The Cars That Ate Paris (1974, Weir) 6
53. Gallipoli (1981, Weir) 8
54. The Year of Living Dangerously (1982, Weir) 6

Director #16 - Clint Eastwood
55. Letters from Iwo Jima (2006, Eastwood) 7
56. Play Misty for Me (1971, Eastwood) 6
57. American Sniper (2014, Eastwood) 7

Director #17 - Jonathan Demme
58. Stop Making Sense (1984, Demme) 7
59. Melvin and Howard (1980, Demme) 7
60. Something Wild (1986, Demme) 7

Director #18 - Clarence Brown
61. Anna Christie (1930, Brown) 7
62. National Velvet (1944, Brown) 6
63. The Yearling (1946, Brown) 6
64. Intruder in the Dust (1949, Brown) 8

Director #19 - Peter Jackson
65. Meet the Feebles (1989, Jackson) 9
66. Forgotten Silver (1995, Botes/Jackson) 8
67. King Kong (2005, Jackson) 7
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
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#150

Post by flavo5000 »

Gutter Trash Maestros Presents: The Lost Films of the Polonia Brothers

Image

The Polonia Brothers made terrible films (and Mark still continues to after his brother John’s unexpected passing in 2008). I wanted to go ahead and get that out of the way first to let you know this isn’t going to be some kind of “hidden gems” type of profile. But here’s the thing. They aren’t boring either, and if you’ve watched a lot of shot-on-video extremely low budget horror, that’s actually a pretty big compliment. Over the years, Mark has dug out old Polonia Brothers work, cleaned them up and released them, and I’ve sought to watch through several of those here. They definitely have a few common throughlines in many of these early films. The brothers often starred in the movies themselves. They used very limited locations and were obviously done with next to no budget. They used quite a few different kinds of practical effects, showing a certain level of creativity despite the low budget, not unlike like-minded SOV brothers-in-arms like Time Ritter. Even their earliest movies were also pretty competently shot and edited for what they were with at least a basic understanding of composition and blocking that quite a few of these megacheap affairs often lack. Honestly I can watch these easier than a bad turgid period drama any day.

ImageImageImageImageImage

79. Church of the Damned (Mark & John Polonia, 1985) #DFF
While Splatter Farm is often credited with being the Polonia Brothers’ calling card to the world, Church of the Damned was actually their first feature they made although it wasn’t widely seen until re-released by Sub Rosa Studios over two decades later. They were only 15 years old when they shot it and were apparently heavily influenced by the SOV flick released that same year Blood Cult. Both films feature police trying to track down the perpetrators of a mysterious string of ritualistic murders. In Church of the Damned’s instance, it’s good ol’ fashioned Satanists instead of some weird made-up cult like Blood Cult. Anyway, even this early career, the sheer variety of gore effects on display, however low-rent, is actually pretty impressive with disembowelment, limb hacking and a particularly icky looking face peeling. Another thing that’s actually a pleasant surprise with all these early Polonia Bros. movies (other than of course the awesome mustaches) is that the brothers are actually pretty decent actors, particularly given their ages. That doesn’t apply to the whole cast, but I mean, you gotta make do with what you have, you know?

80. Bad Magic (Mark & John Polonia, 1998)
This is the only one of this bunch that wasn’t technically “lost” but actually released on VHS in 1998. I’m including because it’s one of the more batshit insane Polonia Brothers movies that people seem to be completely unaware of. Basically what we have here is the Polonias doing their riff on blacksploitation in a delightfully awful voodoo revenge story. Much of the trademark scrappy lo-fi aesthetic of other Polonia films are present here but in service of recreating the gritty streets of New York City in their local Pennsylvania suburban neighborhood with their usual cast of random friends and family who don’t look remotely like pimps and drug addicts. This one gets a big recommendation for schlock SOV fans.

81. Death Reel (Mark Polonia, 1985)
So this one may be the earliest shot Polonia Brothers work. It’s essentially a collection of their old Super 8 shorts stitched together with a wraparound 30 years later by Mark and is exactly the kind of lo-fi shenanigans you would expect of horror shorts made by young teenagers. Basically if you go into it with the mindset of watching some cheesy decently done home movies with lots of mega cheap special effects, you might have some fun with it.

82. Channel 13 (Mark Polonia, 2015)
Channel 13 has a similar setup to Death Reel. Basically Mark Polonia had found some old tapes containing short films he and his brother shot back in the ‘80s but never finished and decided to stitch them together into an anthology. It’s got some really fun stuff in it too. I personally enjoyed the killer scarecrow one the most. It just had some hilarious dialogue and leaps of logic in it that I found really entertaining.

83. Nightmare Vacation (Mark Polonia, 2017)
In the intro to Nightmare Vacation Mark says that he thinks this is probably the last of the lost Polonia films. When he was compiling Channel 13, he kept coming across random footage that didn’t seem connected to any of the stories in that film. Eventually he came across a tape with considerably more footage on it that tells the story Nightmare Vacation became. Most, if not all, the sound was lost on it so he went back and recorded a narration and added SFX to make it more of a narrative. This time a killer stalks victims at the beach, and the end result is more fun Polonia nonsense. Overall, while these films may lack the… um...well, polish isn’t the right word...slightly higher budgets? Of Polonia “classics” like Feeders, they’re still pretty entertaining to watch just due to the can-do spirit the brothers embraced.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

Run #20: Andy Warhol
70. Blue Movie (1969)
71. Beauty #2 (1965)
72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)

Run #21: John Singleton
73. Higher Learning (1995)
74. Baby Boy (2001)
75. 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)

Run #22: Tom Holland
76. Tom Holland's Twisted Tales (2014)
77. The Stranger Within (1990)
78. Two-Fisted Tales (1992)

Run #23: Mark Polonia
79. Church of the Damned (1985)
80. Bad Magic (1998)
81. Death Reel (1985)
82. Channel 13 (2015)
83. Nightmare Vacation (2017)
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Lonewolf2003
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#151

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

Director 2: John Landis

History: 9 movies, avg. rating: 6.2

John Landis is part of a bunch of American directors, who started in the 70s and were clearly influenced by the genre movies they loved during their childhoods. Joe Dante is another one that first comes to my mind of that bunch. Unlike most of his peers Landis didn't go to film school or college, but dropped out of high school, got a job in a studio and worked his way up through various jobs. This love for genre movies shows through in his movies. Most famously in An American Werewolf in London, which is probably the epitome of his fusion of comedy and genre. But also in his more popular comedies you can still spot the occasional references. Next to starring in his films himself, Landis trademark is giving other directors cameos in his movies. Landis isn't the showiest of directors. But his movies are all decently paced, at times funny, making for movies that pass the time okay on a lazy afternoon.

5. Schlock [The Banana Monster] (1973, John Landis): 6.0 #DDF - Landis first film and it shows; it's a very cheap spoof on the classic monster movies. Like most of these very low-budget self-made first films the acting and plot are very subpar, but the movie is saved by the clear enthusiasm that went into it. Not in the least by Landis who plays the titular monster himself. The funniest scenes are when Schlock just kind of jokes around with people, f.e. when he goes to a screening from Blob, these scenes have a nice improvised feel. Despite the very low budget the ape suit made by Rick Baker, for whom this was his first credited movie, is very convincing.

6. Into the Night (1985, John Landis): 6.2 - Jeff Goldblum is a normal guy who suffers from insomnia. On one of his sleepless nights he runs into Michelle Pfeiffer at the airport parking lot, who is running from some goons trying to kill her. The rest of the night Goldblum spent with Pfeiffer trying to get her somewhere safe, so he can go home again. With most of the running time during this one night, this is another entry in that 80s subgenre of one bad night movie, like After Hours or Miracle Mile. Goldlum and Pfeiffer both are likable and have nice chemistry together, it's leisurely paced, making the movie pretty watchable. But there is a sense of urgency and suspense lacking for this movie to really make a lasting impact. David Bowie has a very funny little supporting role. But most fun of all is to play a game of spot the director in this, see of you can spot all 17 of them!

7. Coming to America (1988, John Landis) rewatch: ? > 7.0 - Coming to America is one of those movies I saw countless time on a taped VHS during my childhood. While it's far from the hilarious and cool movie I thought it to be than, it still is a very fun and amusing movie with Eddie Murphy in one his best roles.

8. Innocent Blood (1992, John Landis): 6.8 - This most closely resembles An American Werewolf in its combination of horror-comedy. Anne Parillaud is a vampire, after she doesn't finish her last victim, a mob boss, he turns into a vampire himself, so Parillaud with initially relucant help from an undercover cop sets out to set things right again. Again it's a decently paced with a nice mix of comedy and horror to make for a very watchable movie. But it suffers from a lack of focus. The movie starts with some monologues from Parillaud about her method of chosing her victims, but this is lost quickly and the movie becomes less and less interesting in her. Instead in the second half Landis seems more interested in the idea of "mobster as vampires". Robert Loggia steals the movie as the mob boss, chewing every scene he is in.

9. Trading Places (1983, John Landis): 6.8 - Although I didn't laugh out loudly a lot, this still made for an amusing watch.
Run director, run, the wolf is coming to get you!
1. The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift [The Fast and the Furious 3] (2006, Justin Lin): 7.0
2. Fast & Furious [Fast & Furious 4] (2009, Justin Lin) rewatch: 3.5 > 6.2
3. Fast Five [The Fast and the Furious 5] (2011, Justin Lin) rewatch: 6.5 > 7.2
4. Fast & Furious 6 [Fast 6] (2013, Justin Lin): 7.0
Last edited by Lonewolf2003 on February 12th, 2021, 5:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
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#152

Post by flavo5000 »

flavo5000 wrote: February 12th, 2021, 5:43 pm
Gutter Trash Maestros Presents: The Lost Films of the Polonia Brothers

Image

The Polonia Brothers made terrible films (and Mark still continues to after his brother John’s unexpected passing in 2008). I wanted to go ahead and get that out of the way first to let you know this isn’t going to be some kind of “hidden gems” type of profile. But here’s the thing. They aren’t boring either, and if you’ve watched a lot of shot-on-video extremely low budget horror, that’s actually a pretty big compliment. Over the years, Mark has dug out old Polonia Brothers work, cleaned them up and released them, and I’ve sought to watch through several of those here. They definitely have a few common throughlines in many of these early films. The brothers often starred in the movies themselves. They used very limited locations and were obviously done with next to no budget. They used quite a few different kinds of practical effects, showing a certain level of creativity despite the low budget, not unlike like-minded SOV brothers-in-arms like Time Ritter. Even their earliest movies were also pretty competently shot and edited for what they were with at least a basic understanding of composition and blocking that quite a few of these megacheap affairs often lack. Honestly I can watch these easier than a bad turgid period drama any day.

ImageImageImageImageImage

79. Church of the Damned (Mark & John Polonia, 1985) #DFF
While Splatter Farm is often credited with being the Polonia Brothers’ calling card to the world, Church of the Damned was actually their first feature they made although it wasn’t widely seen until re-released by Sub Rosa Studios over two decades later. They were only 15 years old when they shot it and were apparently heavily influenced by the SOV flick released that same year Blood Cult. Both films feature police trying to track down the perpetrators of a mysterious string of ritualistic murders. In Church of the Damned’s instance, it’s good ol’ fashioned Satanists instead of some weird made-up cult like Blood Cult. Anyway, even this early career, the sheer variety of gore effects on display, however low-rent, is actually pretty impressive with disembowelment, limb hacking and a particularly icky looking face peeling. Another thing that’s actually a pleasant surprise with all these early Polonia Bros. movies (other than of course the awesome mustaches) is that the brothers are actually pretty decent actors, particularly given their ages. That doesn’t apply to the whole cast, but I mean, you gotta make do with what you have, you know?

80. Bad Magic (Mark & John Polonia, 1998)
This is the only one of this bunch that wasn’t technically “lost” but actually released on VHS in 1998. I’m including because it’s one of the more batshit insane Polonia Brothers movies that people seem to be completely unaware of. Basically what we have here is the Polonias doing their riff on blacksploitation in a delightfully awful voodoo revenge story. Much of the trademark scrappy lo-fi aesthetic of other Polonia films are present here but in service of recreating the gritty streets of New York City in their local Pennsylvania suburban neighborhood with their usual cast of random friends and family who don’t look remotely like pimps and drug addicts. This one gets a big recommendation for schlock SOV fans.

81. Death Reel (Mark Polonia, 1985)
So this one may be the earliest shot Polonia Brothers work. It’s essentially a collection of their old Super 8 shorts stitched together with a wraparound 30 years later by Mark and is exactly the kind of lo-fi shenanigans you would expect of horror shorts made by young teenagers. Basically if you go into it with the mindset of watching some cheesy decently done home movies with lots of mega cheap special effects, you might have some fun with it.

82. Channel 13 (Mark Polonia, 2015)
Channel 13 has a similar setup to Death Reel. Basically Mark Polonia had found some old tapes containing short films he and his brother shot back in the ‘80s but never finished and decided to stitch them together into an anthology. It’s got some really fun stuff in it too. I personally enjoyed the killer scarecrow one the most. It just had some hilarious dialogue and leaps of logic in it that I found really entertaining.

83. Nightmare Vacation (Mark Polonia, 2017)
In the intro to Nightmare Vacation Mark says that he thinks this is probably the last of the lost Polonia films. When he was compiling Channel 13, he kept coming across random footage that didn’t seem connected to any of the stories in that film. Eventually he came across a tape with considerably more footage on it that tells the story Nightmare Vacation became. Most, if not all, the sound was lost on it so he went back and recorded a narration and added SFX to make it more of a narrative. This time a killer stalks victims at the beach, and the end result is more fun Polonia nonsense. Overall, while these films may lack the… um...well, polish isn’t the right word...slightly higher budgets? Of Polonia “classics” like Feeders, they’re still pretty entertaining to watch just due to the can-do spirit the brothers embraced.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

Run #20: Andy Warhol
70. Blue Movie (1969)
71. Beauty #2 (1965)
72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)

Run #21: John Singleton
73. Higher Learning (1995)
74. Baby Boy (2001)
75. 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)

Run #22: Tom Holland
76. Tom Holland's Twisted Tales (2014)
77. The Stranger Within (1990)
78. Two-Fisted Tales (1992)

Run #23: Mark Polonia
79. Church of the Damned (1985)
80. Bad Magic (1998)
81. Death Reel (1985)
82. Channel 13 (2015)
83. Nightmare Vacation (2017)
Btw, for the purposes of tracking in the challenge, Mark Polonia is considered to have directed or co-directed all of these (John basically did too but isn't credited on some of them).
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Lonewolf2003
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#153

Post by Lonewolf2003 »

flavo5000 wrote: February 12th, 2021, 5:46 pm
flavo5000 wrote: February 12th, 2021, 5:43 pm
Gutter Trash Maestros Presents: The Lost Films of the Polonia Brothers


The Polonia Brothers made terrible films (and Mark still continues to after his brother John’s unexpected passing in 2008). I wanted to go ahead and get that out of the way first to let you know this isn’t going to be some kind of “hidden gems” type of profile. But here’s the thing. They aren’t boring either, and if you’ve watched a lot of shot-on-video extremely low budget horror, that’s actually a pretty big compliment. Over the years, Mark has dug out old Polonia Brothers work, cleaned them up and released them, and I’ve sought to watch through several of those here. They definitely have a few common throughlines in many of these early films. The brothers often starred in the movies themselves. They used very limited locations and were obviously done with next to no budget. They used quite a few different kinds of practical effects, showing a certain level of creativity despite the low budget, not unlike like-minded SOV brothers-in-arms like Time Ritter. Even their earliest movies were also pretty competently shot and edited for what they were with at least a basic understanding of composition and blocking that quite a few of these megacheap affairs often lack. Honestly I can watch these easier than a bad turgid period drama any day.

Btw, for the purposes of tracking in the challenge, Mark Polonia is considered to have directed or co-directed all of these (John basically did too but isn't credited on some of them).
Shall I just put them down and track them as the Polonia Brothers?
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St. Gloede
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Posts: 12072
Joined: May 6th, 2011, 6:00 am
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#154

Post by St. Gloede »

Alain Cavalier

Image

Alain Cavalier may have had one of the oddest careers of any moderately famous or popular film directors - moving from instant mainstream acceptance - despite financial failure - to celebrated arthouse cinema - to niche, experimental and personal essays.

In this set of 4 I get to taste all 3.


10. Irène (2009, Alain Cavalier)

Image

In this personal essay, an aging Cavalier, opens the film next to the body of his mother - as his mind goes to the death of his first wife - and the diaries he kept. Shooting things big and small - but mostly small - we literally see him tumble and fall - with camera in hand - for then to show his injuries - camera still in hand as he looks at his old face in the mirror.

He wonders just how much of his thoughts his wife knew, and reflects on her sadness - their lives - his film - La chamade, with Catherine Deneuve - partially inspired by them (in it Deneuve has an affair, but this is never addressed). He remembers how his wife contributed dialogue - how a conversation was exactly theirs - as past and present lives on in memories. 7/10


11. L'insoumis / The Unvanquished (1964, Alain Cavalier)

Image

Delivering up Alain Delon's first-ever flop is quite the feat, and while the current print is butchered - seems the only way to see it is the TVRip on youtube - I do struggle to see just why it went so badly. Could it have been taking on the topic of the war in Algeria, and fronting political issues? Perhaps, but Delon's apolitical deserter with a sense of morality hardly strikes offensive blows in any direction.

If anything, perhaps it is a little outdated - essentially bringing a war-time black and white noir to the forefront in 1964, with a somewhat stripped back scope - and relying largely on potentially unrequited romance and heavy tension - but this is also what makes L'insoumis such an interesting viewing.

Frankly, I had not expected to see anything this good, even borderline great, from Cavalier this early. It always struck me he did his competent, quality films - suffered a personal tragedy - and went on to create something far more personal - but I think L'insoumis showcases that greatness was always in his reach. If anything - it may already be here in this film - with it's low-key TV proportions likely hiding a cropped work of far more beauty - and here I'll give it the benefit of the doubt.

While elements are certainly underdeveloped, it worked with the films restrained style - centring instead on Delon's character, the enigma/presence he creates and giving him enough roughness, amorality, softness and sentimentality to shine as a tragic character. Meanwhile the heat, the paranoia and suspense flare-up, even when no one is doing the chase. A strong, dynamic second feature giving a clear showcase that Cavalier could be a force to be reckoned with. 7.5/10


12. Un étrange voyage (1981,  Alain Cavalier)

Image

Plot: After the sudden disappearance of his mother, a man and his daughter walk the railroad tracks from the countryside to Paris in hope of discovering her body.

It is so rare, especially in this part of Cavalier's career to see a very concise and clear plot - especially one that stands out with a unique concept. The Strange Journey follows two other films of wayward journeys/relationships on the edge of arthouse cinema, namely Fill 'er Up with Super and Martin and Leo, as well as his ingenious and experimental This Answering Service Takes No Messages - all in the aftermath of his wife's accidental death.

Dealing directly with death - and casting his own daughter - may just be a way to deal with the pain - and as it stands this is certainly a strong film, with a slightly different air and atmosphere than you'd expect - and finding, rather than lingering on the loss of the mother/grandmother, a stronger bond between father and daughter.

This said, as it was continuing, it became clearer and clearer that it was not quite capable of bringing out either raw emotions, or a true atmosphere of melancholia. The elements of the daughters' eating disorder, spurred on by her rejection of society and fear of joining it - coupled with barely touched upon politics feel slim. There were also so many chances to either go further in setting up emotions - or lack there of in the atmosphere - but it went in neither direction - almost feeling a little neutral - with a passive sense of melancholy.
It is a very good work, and thoroughly enjoyable - but it is lacking the added punch to really set it up for greatness. This may, in part, be because the emotions were still too raw for Cavalier himself. 7.5/10


13. Le Filmeur / Filmman (2005, Alain Cavalier)

Image

Alain Cavalier truly has film on his mind, even as his career in mainstream and even arthouse cinema dwindled he kept filming everyday life - yes, even after the support motor dies, leaving almost the entire film with a backdrop of the camera fan. And yes, it with this small, old amateur camera that Cavalier uses as a video diary for a decade (possibly more/less) giving us a clear, intimate picture of loves and fears.

Over this decade, we see his father weakened and die - for then his mother to deteriorate - we see his and his spouse's cancer scares, and operations. We see quick reflections on life and his journeys to festivals to show his films - but all usually composed of short shots simply establishing the mood - little spots of knowledge/context - while his moments of fear, love and mundanity gets full exposure. A great personal work, filled with humanity and soft humour in the face of life. 8/10
Spoiler
Jean-Daniel Pollet

1. Le sang (1971, Jean-Daniel Pollett) 9/10 (l) (l)
2. L'ordre (1973, Jean-Daniel Pollett) 7.5/10
3. Jour après jour / Day After Day (2006, Jean-Paul Fargier, Jean-Daniel Pollet) 8.5/10
4. Le maître du temps / The Master of Time (1971, Jean-Daniel Pollet) 4.5/10
5. La ligne de mire / Line of Sight (1960,  Jean-Daniel Pollet) 3/10

Rita Azevedo Gomes

6. A portuguesa / A Portuguese Woman (2018, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 8.5/10
7. A Vingança de Uma Mulher / A Woman's Revenge (2012, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 7.5-8/10
8. O Som da Terra a Tremer (1990, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 5/10
9. Frágil Como o Mundo / Fragile as the World (2001, Rita Azevedo Gomes) 7/10
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#155

Post by flavo5000 »

Lonewolf2003 wrote: February 12th, 2021, 5:49 pm
flavo5000 wrote: February 12th, 2021, 5:46 pm
flavo5000 wrote: February 12th, 2021, 5:43 pm
Gutter Trash Maestros Presents: The Lost Films of the Polonia Brothers


The Polonia Brothers made terrible films (and Mark still continues to after his brother John’s unexpected passing in 2008). I wanted to go ahead and get that out of the way first to let you know this isn’t going to be some kind of “hidden gems” type of profile. But here’s the thing. They aren’t boring either, and if you’ve watched a lot of shot-on-video extremely low budget horror, that’s actually a pretty big compliment. Over the years, Mark has dug out old Polonia Brothers work, cleaned them up and released them, and I’ve sought to watch through several of those here. They definitely have a few common throughlines in many of these early films. The brothers often starred in the movies themselves. They used very limited locations and were obviously done with next to no budget. They used quite a few different kinds of practical effects, showing a certain level of creativity despite the low budget, not unlike like-minded SOV brothers-in-arms like Time Ritter. Even their earliest movies were also pretty competently shot and edited for what they were with at least a basic understanding of composition and blocking that quite a few of these megacheap affairs often lack. Honestly I can watch these easier than a bad turgid period drama any day.

Btw, for the purposes of tracking in the challenge, Mark Polonia is considered to have directed or co-directed all of these (John basically did too but isn't credited on some of them).
Shall I just put them down and track them as the Polonia Brothers?
I don't think it really matters too much. I doubt anyone else will be watching films from these guys this month since the low-rated challenge isn't going on at the same time like the last challenge. :lol:
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flavo5000
Posts: 4132
Joined: July 10th, 2014, 6:00 am
Location: Arkansas, USA
Contact:

#156

Post by flavo5000 »

Edgar G. Ulmer

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Edgar G. Ulmer is considered by those with taste as one of the true masters of the B-movie. His poverty row films produced in the ‘30s through ‘50s showed a strong vision, a keen eye and a firm grasp of economy of storytelling to create tight, lean classics of genre filmmaking including his excellent made-on-the-cheap film noir Detour and the nasty, delirious horror film The Black Cat (which introduced the first pairing of horror legends Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff on screen together). Ulmer started out as an assistant under legendary German expressionist director F.W. Murnau and worked with him on many of Murnau’s classic films. In fact, Ulmer was brought to America to aid Murnau in filming Sunrise after which Ulmer set out on his own. Ulmer established early on his penchant for applying those German expressionist influences into creating visually engaging films drenched in shadow and cast with sinister characters of dubious moral fiber. While not all of Ulmer’s films were of a high caliber, some coming across more as director-for-hire work than others, even in his lesser films there can usually be found a spark of that skill showcased so well in his best work. Despite the recent release of his film Detour by prestige label Criterion, Ulmer is still a criminally underrated director deserving of more acclaim.

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84. The Naked Dawn (1955)
The Naked Dawn tells the story of a simple farmer and his wife whose lives are thrown into a spiral of betrayal and greed when a bandit recruits the farmer to help him get to town and unload some recently ill-gotten gains. As the farmer’s morality begins to degrade, events begin to unspool threatening to have their lives come crashing down around them. Ulmer once again makes the most of what is likely a very limited budget with this nicely done technicolor moral tale. If you can get past Arthur Kennedy cast as a Mexican, you’ll see he does a hell of a job here as the bandit Santiago. Apparently this used to be on They Shoot Pictures’ top 1000. It’s a shame that it has fallen off. It’s certainly better than some of the films I’ve seen on the list.

85. The Wife of Monte Cristo (1946)
Here we have a sequel to the Alexandre Dumas novel Count of Monte Cristo where the titular count is out for revenge against those who imprisoned him. But since he is still being sought after, his countess wife dresses as him with a mask under the guise of “The Avenger” to lure the authorities off his scent. This one had a lot of fun swashbuckling potential with Ulmer’s great shadowy visuals and his economical sense of narrative. My main issue with it is that the movie sets up the wife to really be the hero of the picture (I mean, it’s the title of the movie), but at the last minute she turns into a generic damsel in distress. Pretty standard Hollywood chauvinism so it isn’t surprising. That doesn’t mean it isn’t disappointing. Still, I think fans of these sorts of adventure films will find enough to be entertained with here.

86. Murder Is My Beat (1955)
This one is one of Ulmer’s film noir efforts. While it isn’t as good as Detour (although not much is), it’s still a solid flick that has some odd changes in narrative thrust in a couple places. It starts with a murder and the detective tasked with bringing in the woman being held responsible for it. When he catches up to her, he starts to suspect that she may not have actually committed the crime and gives her a week to track down a lead that could reveal the real killer. All that is pretty standard setup for a noir, complete with the romance subplot of the detective falling for this woman leading him on this possible wild goose chase. Except about ⅔ of the way through the picture, she’s gone and another detective steps in to bring him in but ends up making basically the same deal the other detective made the woman but on a shorter timeline. Now this other detective is the main character basically despite barely seeing him in the picture up until this point. The movie also dumps a lot of exposition in close to the end of the third act almost as if it got caught up in a series of interrogation scenes and forgot to actually pepper the narrative with leads. Many of Ulmer’s films are like this where they come close to being really great, but something happens on the way that derails them.

87a. Goodbye, Mr. Germ (1940)
87b. Another to Conquer (1941)
87c. Turbosupercharger: Master of the Skies (1943)
87d. Diagnostic Procedures in Tuberculosis (1940)
87e. Turbosupercharger: Flight Operation (1943)
87f. Let My People Live (1939)
87g. Cloud in the Sky (1940)
So one facet of Ulmer I haven’t touched on at all is his industrial film work. Like many B-directors of the ‘40s and ‘50s, Ulmer completed a series of films intended to educate rather than entertain. Oddly enough five out of seven of these are about tuberculosis treatment. I can’t find anything in Ulmer’s biography that would indicate he had a personal interest in tuberculosis awareness, but nevertheless, he did a bunch of them. Diagnostic Procedures in Tuberculosis was even produced specifically for medical associations as a teaching and never intended for public consumption. Amusingly Ulmer credits himself with a PhD on this one because the producers were concerned the information wouldn’t be taken seriously if not presented by someone with credentials. In general, these are not terribly interesting and pretty straightforward educational material. Perhaps the one that would garner the most entertainment if you are into the campy side of these industrial films is Goodbye Mr Germ which reminds me in tone of some of those other medical shorts like Am I Normal?, the kind that Coronet would churn out.

88. From Nine to Nine (1935)
This is frankly the worst of the bunch. Incredibly stilted and creaky, this stagebound, parlor room mystery is probably only notable for bringing silent star Ruth Rowland out of retirement, and she genuinely is quite good for what she’s asked to do. Unfortunately, there just isn’t much here. The picture is incredibly talky without saying much of anything (although it does work in an amusing line of dialogue here and there) with a pretty middling plot that’s more yawn-inducing than anything else. Sadly also not present is Ulmer’s usual visual panache. The whole film just looks very flat and dull as if shot on a weekend in one take (which it very well could have been for all I know). Just avoid this one, Ulmer fan or not.

89. The Man from Planet X (1951)
Going from one of his worst to one of his best, The Man from Planet X is a very good early ‘man from Mars’ type sci-fi picture with an excellent sense of atmosphere. The whole film is covered in shadows and fog, and while the sets do look on the cheap side in places, they still work to convey what’s needed. The alien spacecraft also does a solid job of sidestepping campiness with the alien itself looking genuinely a little creepy but also with the potential for empathy. In fact, it’s nice to see that even this early in the alien invasion cycle of films (and actually this might have even been one of the first) that the alien is treated with a dimension of character beyond “kill everything”. It’s actions, even when antagonistic, seem rational based on how it has been treated by the doctor seeking to study it. This is definitely one to check out for fans of Ulmer’s more well-known work.

90. The Amazing Transparent Man (1960)
To close it all out, we have one of Ulmer’s later pictures and unfortunately another dud. Very little of his German expressionist-influenced style is to be found here. The whole thing just looks very cheap and campy, but not even in a good way. The first half of this very short picture is just a lot of talky McCarthyism nonsense and the invisible man doesn’t actually “show up” until the halfway point. Even then the effects are almost non-existent so we just hear the transparent man talking and people flopping around like they’re getting attacked. I have a vague memory of seeing this on MST3K like fifteen years ago but since nothing from my memory really stands out, it’s unlikely Mike & the bots were able to get a lot out of it either. The whole thing is just dull and cut-rate. Ulmer is capable of much better.
The Nexus of Power Compels Thee
Run #1: Steven Spielberg
1. Hook (1991)
2. Something Evil (1972)
3. The BFG (2016)

Run #2: Lamberto Bava
4. Body Puzzle (1992)
5. A cena con il vampiro a.k.a. Dinner with a Vampire (1989)
6. La casa dell'orco a.k.a. Demons III: The Ogre (1989)
7. Blasterfighter (1984)
8. Le foto di Gioia a.k.a. Delirium (1987)

Run #3: Terence Fisher
9. Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962)
10. Night of the Big Heat (1967)
11. Murder By Proxy a.k.a. Blackout (1954)

Run #4: Takeshi Kitano
12. Kikujirô (1999)
13. Ano natsu, ichiban shizukana umi a.k.a. A Scene at the Sea (1991)
14. Minnâ-yatteruka! a.k.a. Getting Any? (1994)
15. Autoreiji a.k.a. Outrage (2010)

Run #5: Steven Soderbergh
16. The Laundromat (2019)
17. Haywire (2011)
18. Eros (2004)

Run #6: Hershell Gordon Lewis
19. Scum of the Earth (1963)
20. Moonshine Mountain (1964)
21. The Ecstasies of Women (1969)
22. The Year of the Yahoo! (1972)
23. She-Devils on Wheels (1968)
24. Just for the Hell of It (1968)
25. How to Make a Doll (1968)

Run #7: Rintaro
26. Harmagedon: Genma Wars (1983)
27. Kamui no ken a.k.a. Dagger of Kamui (1985)
28. Down Load: Namiamidabutsu wa ai no uta (1992)
29. Yona Yona Penguin (2009)

Run #8: Steve James
30. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson (2010)
31. Reel Paradise (2005)
32. Prefontaine (1997)

Run #9: Sidney Lumet
33. Night Falls on Manhattan (1996)
34. The Anderson Tapes (1971)
35. Daniel (1983)
36a. The Elgin Hour: Crime in the Streets (1955)
36b. The Challenge (1955)
37. Fail Safe (1964)

Run #10: Alexander Payne
38. The Passion of Martin (1991) #DDF
39. Citizen Ruth (1996)
40. Downsizing (2017)

Run #11: Larry Cohen
41. It Lives Again (1978)
42. Perfect Strangers (1984)
43. Full Moon High (1981)
44. Special Effects (1984)

Run #12: Robert Bresson
45. Quatre nuits d'un rêveur a.k.a. Four Nights of a Dreamer (1971)
46. Une femme douce a.k.a. A Gentle Woman (1969)
47. Procès de Jeanne d'Arc a.k.a. The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962)

Run #13: John Gilling
48. The Night Caller a.k.a. Blood Beast from Outer Space (1965)
49. The Mummy's Shroud (1967)
50. The Shadow of the Cat (1961)

Run #14: Yasujiro Ozu
51. Tôkyô no kôrasu a.k.a. Tokyo Chorus (1931)
52. Dekigokoro a.k.a. Passing Fancy (1933)
53. Hogaraka ni ayume a.k.a. Walk Cheerfully (1930)
54. Sono yo no tsuma a.k.a. That Night's Wife (1930)

Run #15: Roberta Findlay
55. Anyone But My Husband (1975)
56. Take Me Naked (1966) #DFF
57.Blood Sisters (1987)

Run #16: Adam Green
58. Hatchet II (2010)
59. Spiral (2007)
60. Digging Up the Marrow (2014)

Run #17: Kathryn Bigelow
61. K-19: The Widowmaker (2002)
62. The Weight of Water (2000)
63. Detroit (2017)

Run #18: Clint Eastwood
64. Changeling (2008)
65. J. Edgar (2011)
66. The 15:17 to Paris (2018)

Run #19: Noboru Iguchi
67. Deddo sushi (2012)
68. Robo-geisha (2009)
69. Gôsuto sukuwaddo a.k.a. Ghost Squad (2018)

Run #20: Andy Warhol
70. Blue Movie (1969)
71. Beauty #2 (1965)
72a. Outer and Inner Space (1966)
72b. Screen Test: Edie Sedgwick (1965)
72c. Blow Job (1963)
72d. Mario Banana I & II (1964)
72e. Screen Test: Ann Buchanan (1964)
72f. Screen Test: Nico (1966)

Run #21: John Singleton
73. Higher Learning (1995)
74. Baby Boy (2001)
75. 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)

Run #22: Tom Holland
76. Tom Holland's Twisted Tales (2014)
77. The Stranger Within (1990)
78. Two-Fisted Tales (1992)

Run #23: Mark Polonia
79. Church of the Damned (1985)
80. Bad Magic (1998)
81. Death Reel (1985)
82. Channel 13 (2015)
83. Nightmare Vacation (2017)

Run #24: Edgar G. Ulmer
84. The Naked Dawn (1955)
85. The Wife of Monte Cristo (1946)
86. Murder Is My Beat (1955)
87a. Goodbye, Mr. Germ (1940)
87b. Another to Conquer (1941)
87c. Turbosupercharger: Master of the Skies (1943)
87d. Diagnostic Procedures in Tuberculosis (1940)
87e. Turbosupercharger: Flight Operation (1943)
87f. Let My People Live (1939)
87g. Cloud in the Sky (1940)
88. From Nine to Nine (1935)
89. The Man from Planet X (1951)
90. The Amazing Transparent Man (1960)
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DudeLanez
Posts: 153
Joined: August 25th, 2020, 12:22 am
Location: Germany
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#157

Post by DudeLanez »

Helmut Käutner

24. Kitty und die Weltkonferenz (Kitty and the World Conference, 1939) 7/10 #DDF
25. Himmel ohne Sterne (Sky Without Stars, 1955) 5/10
26. Schwarzer Kies (Black Gravel, 1961) 6/10

Image
Run the Director
Kenji Mizoguchi
1. Genroku Chûshingura (The 47 Ronin, 1941) 7/10
2. Miyamoto Musashi (1944) 5/10
3. Uwasa no onna (The Woman of Rumour, 1954) 7/10
4. Saikaku ichidai onna (The Life of Oharu, 1952) 8/10
5. Yôkihi (Princess Yang Kwei-fei, 1955) 7/10

Herbert Achternbusch
6. Das Andechser Gefühl (1974) 7/10 #DDF
7. Die Atlantikschwimmer (1976) 6/10
8. Bierkampf (1977) 6/10
9. Das Gespenst (1982) 6/10
10. Heilt Hitler! (1986) 6/10

Nuri Bilge Ceylan
11. Kasaba (The Town, 1997) 7/10 #DDF
12. Mayis Sikintisi (Clouds of May, 1999) 7/10
13. Iklimler (Climates, 2006) 7/10

Edgar Reitz
14. Mahlzeiten (Table for Love, 1967) 7/10 #DDF
15. Cardillac (1969) 7/10
16. Der Schneider von Ulm (The Tailor from Ulm, 1979) 6/10

René Clair
17. Sous les toits de Paris (Under the Roofs of Paris, 1930) 7/10
18. Le million (The Million, 1931) 7/10
19. À nous la liberté (Freedom for Us, 1931) 6/10

Masaki Kobayashi
20. Mittsu no ai (Three Loves, 1954) 9/10
21. Izumi (The Spring, 1956) 8/10
22. Kuroi kawa (Black River, 1957) 8/10
23. Shokutaku no nai ie (The Empty Table, 1985) 9/10

Helmut Käutner
24. Kitty und die Weltkonferenz (Kitty and the World Conference, 1939) 7/10 #DDF
25. Himmel ohne Sterne (Sky Without Stars, 1955) 5/10
26. Schwarzer Kies (Black Gravel, 1961) 6/10
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sol
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#158

Post by sol »

Running on Directors
1. The House of 1000 Corpses (2003) Rob Zombie #DDF
2. The Devil's Rejects (2005) Rob Zombie
3. 3 From Hell (2019) Rob Zombie
4. Cop Land (1997) James Mangold
5. Logan (2017) James Mangold
6. Heavy (1995) James Mangold #DDF
7. The Roost (2005) Ti West #DDF
8. The Innkeepers (2011) Ti West
9. Trigger Man (2007) Ti West
10. Flodder (1986) Dick Maas
11. Quiz (2012) Dick Maas
12. Saint (2010) Dick Maas
13. Creep (2014) Patrick Brice #DDF
14. Creep 2 (2017) Patrick Brice
15. The Overnight (2015) Patrick Brice
16. Almost Human (2013) Joe Begos #DDF
17. The Mind's Eye (2015) Joe Begos
18. VFW (2019) Joe Begos
19. Bliss (2019) Joe Begos
20. Pod (2015) Mickey Keating
21. Darling (2015) Mickey Keating
22. Carnage Park (2016) Mickey Keating
23. Blackkklansman (2018) Spike Lee REVISION
24. Inside Man (2006) Spike Lee REVISION
25. Oldboy (2013) Spike Lee
26. Unsane (2018) Steven Soderbergh REVISION
27. Haywire (2011) Steven Soderbergh
28. The Landromat (2019) Steven Soderbergh
29. The Borrower (1991) John McNaughton
30. Wild Things (1998) John McNaughton
31. Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (1986) John McNaughton REVISION #DDF

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John McNaughton

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer was one of the first films that I saw when I was really getting into horror around twenty years ago. I had never revisited it since despite purchasing the DVD, and I had never seen anything else from John McNaughton despite having several in my collection, so with the Bonus Challenge and all, now seemed like a perfect time to rewatch Henry and give at least a couple more films from McNaughton a spin.

Henry stood up better than I expected to revision, though in truth, all that I recalled from my faded memories of the movie were the television set murder (when visiting the TV seller in the dead of night) and the general shots of the trio in their cramped apartment. Funnily enough, most of the film is much more toned down than the TV set murder. I didn't remember the fact that we never see Henry kill (we only ever see the corpses afterwards) during the first half of the film, and the toned approach suits the material very well. This is not a film that achieves shock value through blood and gore.

As for the other two McNaughton films that I saw, The Borrower almost seems the opposite of Henry in approach: the gooey special effects and gory head snatching is what stands out in a film with nearly no plot beyond the head snatching. It is a bit of a serial killer film, and likewise a film in which the killer gets away with it all, but yeah, it is more thematically than stylistically similar to Henry. Same goes for Wild Things actually, also circling around killers getting away with it (to say anything more might spoil a fresh experience). I don't really know what to say about McNaughton beyond this fascination with murder, but from serial killers, to aliens to those cunning and conniving, he certainly manages to explore humans being killed in wildly different ways.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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maxwelldeux
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#159

Post by maxwelldeux »

I'd prefer to walk them
1. Malcom X (1992, Spike Lee)
2. He Got Game (1998, Spike Lee)
3. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013, Spike Lee)
4. Crooklyn (1994, Spike Lee)

Not my favorite Spike Lee, but OK. Semi-autobiographical, it was fun to see a bit more of his personal side, even cooler that his siblings helped write the script. I didn't quite get the connections with the characters, so the emotional impact was a little stunted for me. Nice enough, especially in how you got to feel the neighborhood/community, but not great.
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jeroeno
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#160

Post by jeroeno »

39. Bamui haebyun-eoseo honja (Sang-soo Hong, 2017)
40. Gangbyeon hotel (Sang-soo Hong, 2018)
41. Domangchin yeoja (Sang-soo Hong, 2020)

42. Juan Moreira (Leonardo Favio, 1973)
43. Aniceto (Leonardo Favio, 2008)
44. Crónica de un niño solo (Leonardo Favio, 1965)
Last edited by jeroeno on February 13th, 2021, 2:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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