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Unofficial 2021 Black History Month Challenge

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Unofficial 2021 Black History Month Challenge

#1

Post by maxwelldeux »

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February is Black History Month in the USA. So what better time to celebrate Black film artists?

What Exactly Is African-American Cinema?
The category “African American Cinema” presents important conceptual challenges for scholars, critics, and moviegoers. Before laying out those challenges, though, it is important to note that African American cinema is often thought of as part of American cinema, while at the same time, African American cinema is also often thought of as part of a global black diasporic cinema. Consequently, other articles in this bibliography that focus on elements of American cinema include entries relevant to research on African American cinema, and many articles on non-US cinemas—for example, African Cinema, British Cinema, Cuban Cinema, and Transnational and Diasporic Cinemas—include entries relevant to researching topics in “black cinema.” Now back to the conceptual challenges African American cinema presents: To clarify these challenges, think about three prepositions: by, of, for. Does African American cinema mean films made by African Americans? If so, who are the key figures in the making: director, writer, performers, producers, financiers? Does it matter if the finance comes from Hollywood or independent sources? If a researcher is interested in “by,” then the articles on Authorship and Auteur Theory and on the black directors Charles Burnett, Spike Lee, and Oscar Micheaux, and actor- director Sidney Poitier, may be of interest. Does African American cinema mean films of—films that depict—African Americans? If so, must such depictions make an African American a central figure? Must that figure be “positive” or “realistic” or, indeed, performed by an actor who would self-identify as African American or black? If a researcher is interested in “of,” see also The Birth of a Nation, The Jazz Singer, King Kong, and more general categories like blackface, blaxploitation, Exploitation Film, Pop, Blues, and Jazz in Films, Race and Cinema, and African American Stars. Does African American cinema mean films that seem to be for African Americans—films that aim to address or appeal to African American moviegoers or films that, by whatever measures (say, box office success or critical approbation by black critics), succeed with African American audiences? If a researcher is interested in “for,” see also Exhibition and Distribution and also entries on various genres and modes of filmmaking. Underlying many of the critical and scholarly studies of African American cinema are additional questions of—and passionate arguments about—how politics, activism, social connections and commitments, aesthetics, pleasure, entertainment, art, and commerce interrelate with one another—and how they should interrelate with one another. This article does not favor one position in these debates over another, but aims to present a range of positions in the scholarship on African American cinema.

- source
How Will This Challenge Be Judged?

In short, it won't. I'll update the OP with scores of anyone who wants to play. But if you think the film, in some way, celebrates a Black film artist, feel free to include it. This is not intended to be competitive, just a way to encourage people to dive into this area of cinema and have an outlet to discuss it. The main motivation for this challenge is that the wife and I have been planning to dive into the Black Film Canon this month and wanted to invite others to join.

Rules:
- Challenge runs February 2021, local time
- Each feature film (over 40 minutes) counts as one entry.
- 80 minutes of short films or miniseries/TV episodes counts as one entry.


Rank Participant Count
1 maxwelldeux 43
2 adwest 22
3 ororama 4
3 sol 4
5 Lilarcor 2
Last edited by maxwelldeux on March 1st, 2021, 11:03 pm, edited 7 times in total.
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#2

Post by maxwelldeux »

1. Like Cotton Twines (2016) 6/10

Kicking off the month with an entry from Ghanaian film director Leila Djansi. This is the story of a young woman from Ghana who, after her father committed a murder, was sold into sexual slavery to the local "shrine" to atone for her father's sins, and the volunteer American teacher who tried to save her. Ostensibly a very personal story, this was a fascinating look into local customs in Ghana and the divided opinions therein. Much more successful as a look into culture than as a piece of cinema (it was fairly conventionally shot otherwise), the story drove the piece. Certainly depressing as all hell, it did offer relief and hope. Really nice way to start the month.
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#3

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014) 5/10
This is a loose remake of Boyz 'n' tha Hood set in modern day Chicago. It's pretty obvious that a lot of love went into this and that it's intensely personal for the writer/director/star William L. Gibson. Good story, good messaging, and some really nice poetry in there. But as an ultra low-budget affair, it suffers from technical issues, not the least of which is bad acting and sub-optimal dialogue. Tons of respect for what it was trying to say, but not the best execution thereof.
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#4

Post by flavo5000 »

People can always double up on this one with the Run the Director Challenge and celebrate some excellent black filmmakers like Spike Lee, Ruby Dee, John Singleton, the Hughes Brothers, Ava Duvernay, Oscar Micheaux, Sidney Poitier, Melvin (and his son Mario) Van Peebles and lots of others.
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#5

Post by maxwelldeux »

flavo5000 wrote: February 3rd, 2021, 3:49 pm People can always double up on this one with the Run the Director Challenge and celebrate some excellent black filmmakers like Spike Lee, Ruby Dee, John Singleton, the Hughes Brothers, Ava Duvernay, Oscar Micheaux, Sidney Poitier, Melvin (and his son Mario) Van Peebles and lots of others.
Agreed - I was planning on doing that myself this month. :cheers:
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#6

Post by ororama »

I had heard discussion of the practice during the Hollywood studio era of casting black actors in small parts that could be easily cut out for showings in the south (probably by Donald Bogle on TCM several years ago). Orchestra Wives is the first movie that I have seen since where I have realized that this probably happened. The Nicholas Brothers sing the song that the band has just played and then dance near the end of the movie. It is the best performance in the movie, but easy to cut out without any effect on the story, ironically giving some audiences less for their money because of the virulence of racism in the region.
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#7

Post by sol »

I won't be able to beat max in this, but at least I can beat adwest (until she chimes in). :run:

1. Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (1968)

Image

This is a conceptually interesting project, full of creative cutting (sometimes we see two or three screens at once) as well as meta discussion like never being able to know whether somebody is acting or being themselves in a documentary. I found this a bit uneven though; everything feels all-over-the-place while certain bits and pieces (the crew interacting with a homeless man near the end) felt odd. Did like the idea of reshooting something endlessly though.
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#8

Post by maxwelldeux »

sol wrote: February 4th, 2021, 12:24 pm I won't be able to beat max in this, but at least I can beat adwest (until she chimes in). :run:

1. Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (1968)

This is a conceptually interesting project, full of creative cutting (sometimes we see two or three screens at once) as well as meta discussion like never being able to know whether somebody is acting or being themselves in a documentary. I found this a bit uneven though; everything feels all-over-the-place while certain bits and pieces (the crew interacting with a homeless man near the end) felt odd. Did like the idea of reshooting something endlessly though.
I watched that in Doc month, and tend to agree - it seemed to keep getting more and more meta and quickly got lost on me. I didn't mind it... but I didn't get it.

And welcome! :cheers:
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#9

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013) 6/10
I was looking for Hollywood Shuffle on my streaming platforms to no avail, but did stumble across this fun Robert Townsend film. Basketball coach gets the star player to join his team, but the player has a high-maintenance mom. A college wants to recruit the kid and bribes the coach with a nice contract, but need the mom to sign off on this. Blah blah blah, coach falls in love with mom, drama, end. Conventional for sure, but a reasonably engaging film and just nice to see normal drama play out with a Black cast and interesting to see reactions to stereotypes. If you like basketball and/or romance, it's worth a watch.

4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019) 6/10
A pretty conventional talking-heads doc, this is all about difficulties young Black girls face in school, the systems that don't help them, the reactions to them, and tons of context to help people interpret behavior and appreciate them. I generally consider myself pretty in-tune with a lot of these issues, but I learned a ton from this doc about systemic problems and how I can change my behavior to be better. Very interesting subject material.

On a side note, an interesting/sad fact is that the four films I've watched so far for this challenge have a total of 8 checks. And I'm 4 of those. In fact, Like Cotton Twines is the only one I didn't have to import to ICM. :folded:
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#10

Post by ororama »

1. Stormy Weather (1943) * 78 min.

Bill Robinson and Lena Horne were strong in the lead roles, she sang several songs very well but he should have been given more opportunities to dance, although his drum number was outstanding. The highlights for me were the Nicholas Brothers, doing a dance routine at the end that was probably the best I have seen from them, Cab Calloway, great as always, and Fats Waller. The surprise for me was how lavish the night club production numbers were, since I was expecting less from a movie with a built in box office limitation.

*First time viewing.
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#11

Post by sol »

Spoiler
1. Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (1968)
2. Blackkklansman (2018) REVISION
3. Inside Man (2006) REVISION
4. Oldboy (2013)

Image Image Image

I had already seen most of Spike Lee's narrative movies, but with an unwatched Oldboy remake in my collection and with Blackkklansman being a key subject of an upcoming forum podcast, this seemed like a good month for a first-time-view and rewatch respectively. I also decided to throw Inside Man into the ring for a rewatch. Why? Well, Oldboy had always sounded like Spike Lee's least typical film to date, and I recalled Inside Man being a pretty unusual joint too, so here we are.

The interesting thing about Inside Man is how well it actually sits alongside other Lee joints with its look at racism. It's actual not against blacks this time, but rather the police characters come under fire for racially profiling bank suspects as Arabs etc., while the whole Christopher Plummer subplot involving benefitting off racism without revealing too much. The film felt a bit long to me on rewatch, beefed up by exploring Denzel as a character despite being a complete dullard (it's Plummer, Foster and Owen who we want to know more about) but I liked it all the same. Blackkklansman was also equally powerful upon revision. The ending is awesome and still hits quite hard even with Trump no longer in office.

As for Oldboy, I don't know, it really is an odd outlier in Lee's filmography. No real racism themes or bombastic political messages. I assume Lee was just a massive fan of the original and didn't want anyone else to remake it (Van Sant's reasoning for redoing Psycho). I also read that the studio chopped off over half an hour of character building, which may have been interesting. The film as it is feels leaner and less energetic than the original. Less haunting ending too (Lee foreshadows things too much). It's been a good couple of years since I have seen the Korean original though, so I was at least able to enter the remake relatively fresh - i.e. I wasn't comparing and contrasting every small detail. It's a slickly made thriller, but a bit weird for a Spike Lee joint.

(copied from the Run the Director thread)
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#12

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019) 6/10
Some funny enough moments, but I didn't connect with this one all that much. I will say, though, that he is one of the best comedians at working a microphone like a dick.

6. Guess Who (2005) 5/10
This... didn't need to exist. Take what is already a problematic film (Guess Who's Coming to Dinner), remove any attempts at substance, reverse the races, and dial the sexism all the way up to 11. There were a few LOL moments in there, and it's always nice to see Bernie Mac, but not good.

7. Kiss the Girls (1997) 6/10
Nothing particularly "great" about this film, but it's a solid action-thriller featuring one of my favorite characters from literature, Alex Cross. Based on James Patterson's novel, this is about a particularly heinous and clever serial killer who is abducting, holding hostage, and raping women of particular talents. Alex Cross gets involved when his niece is taken for her violin talent. Tons of fun. This could have been the start of a great film series, but Morgan Freeman was too old to sustain the role over many years.

8. Malcolm X (1992) 8/10
Finally got around to watching this one, and of course it's awesome. I appreciated how well it stayed true to the life of X, enough so that I wish I had watched this before the docuseries "Who Killed Malcolm X?" Powerful film, and wonderful to watch Denzel acting the shit out of it.
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#13

Post by maxwelldeux »

ororama wrote: February 8th, 2021, 12:58 pm 1. Stormy Weather (1943) * 78 min.

Bill Robinson and Lena Horne were strong in the lead roles, she sang several songs very well but he should have been given more opportunities to dance, although his drum number was outstanding. The highlights for me were the Nicholas Brothers, doing a dance routine at the end that was probably the best I have seen from them, Cab Calloway, great as always, and Fats Waller. The surprise for me was how lavish the night club production numbers were, since I was expecting less from a movie with a built in box office limitation.

*First time viewing.
I haven't looked closely at the BFI Musicals list, and had no idea this even existed. I'm definitely interested in this one now - thanks for posting! :cheers:
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#14

Post by maxwelldeux »

sol wrote: February 8th, 2021, 2:57 pm
Spoiler
1. Symbiopsychotaxiplasm: Take One (1968)
2. Blackkklansman (2018) REVISION
3. Inside Man (2006) REVISION
4. Oldboy (2013)

I had already seen most of Spike Lee's narrative movies, but with an unwatched Oldboy remake in my collection and with Blackkklansman being a key subject of an upcoming forum podcast, this seemed like a good month for a first-time-view and rewatch respectively. I also decided to throw Inside Man into the ring for a rewatch. Why? Well, Oldboy had always sounded like Spike Lee's least typical film to date, and I recalled Inside Man being a pretty unusual joint too, so here we are.

The interesting thing about Inside Man is how well it actually sits alongside other Lee joints with its look at racism. It's actual not against blacks this time, but rather the police characters come under fire for racially profiling bank suspects as Arabs etc., while the whole Christopher Plummer subplot involving benefitting off racism without revealing too much. The film felt a bit long to me on rewatch, beefed up by exploring Denzel as a character despite being a complete dullard (it's Plummer, Foster and Owen who we want to know more about) but I liked it all the same. Blackkklansman was also equally powerful upon revision. The ending is awesome and still hits quite hard even with Trump no longer in office.

As for Oldboy, I don't know, it really is an odd outlier in Lee's filmography. No real racism themes or bombastic political messages. I assume Lee was just a massive fan of the original and didn't want anyone else to remake it (Van Sant's reasoning for redoing Psycho). I also read that the studio chopped off over half an hour of character building, which may have been interesting. The film as it is feels leaner and less energetic than the original. Less haunting ending too (Lee foreshadows things too much). It's been a good couple of years since I have seen the Korean original though, so I was at least able to enter the remake relatively fresh - i.e. I wasn't comparing and contrasting every small detail. It's a slickly made thriller, but a bit weird for a Spike Lee joint.

(copied from the Run the Director thread)
Blackklansman is awesome - I really liked that film. The archival footage that ended the film was powerful has hell.

Inside Man is weird for me - I have actually seen that at least twice, but had zero clue who directed it until after my most recent viewing. I actually said to myself, "This movie is amazing - who directed it?" only to find out it was Spike Lee (which made some sense in retrospect, though I want to rewatch it again with that knowledge). The social commentary in that one was comparatively muted, but did make some good points. Love that one.

And I was only very vaguely aware there was a remake of Oldboy, and zero clue Lee did it. Whoa. :circle:
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#15

Post by 3eyes »

Do you know the 1963 movie Gone are the Days (AKA Purlie Victorious):
It's based on a play by Ossie Davis and stars him and Ruby Dee. Satire from the last days of Jim Crow.

Edit: Just finished watching Leadbelly (1976), a Huddie Ledbetter biopic, on Criterion - watched it in pieces. Music exhilarating, story wrenching. I remember listening to the Alan Lomax Leadbelly Memorial LP in the early 60s. .
:run: STILL the Gaffer!
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#16

Post by maxwelldeux »

I was not aware of that... that's fascinating! I've seen far too little with OD/RD.
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#17

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995) 6/10
This is a generous 6/10 for me... I get why it's on the Black Film Canon list. It's a commercially successful film starring four Black women and featuring the struggles they face as Black women. But it's not really a great film. A few nice moments, but pretty "man" focused without the discussion of who they are without men. Glad I watched it, but won't return to it.

10. He Got Game (1998) 7/10
This was fascinating. Denzel and Rosario aside, the acting was not great. But the access was incredible, and it successfully tells the story of a perspective of student athletes, especially poor ones, that doesn't get portrayed all that often. A great look into family dynamics and college basketball recruiting.

11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973) 7/10
It was scary how relevant this film is today in America. It's almost 50 years later, and tons of the issues raised here are still pressing in the 2020s. A Black man becomes the CIA's first Black agent, only to go train his Chicago Black community on the tactics of guerilla warfare to use against the US. Really cool and ahead of its time. The DVD even alleges the government helped suppress the film for YEARS before it got a restoration.

12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013) 7/10
Tyson talking about himself. It seemed as though it was a pretty honest look, through his eyes, at himself. He did not have a lot of respect for his first wife, which I get. What I was most interested in was the telling of his rape trial/conviction, but he claimed he didn't do it and refused to elaborate. I hated that at for an immediate reaction, he had been relatively honest and contrite over some pretty terrible things (e.g., stabbings, assaults, even groping), so I want to at least hear him out on that front. Otherwise, it was a fun and funny but sobering look at his life's journey. Lot's of stuff I didn't know. Certainly not for anyone not interested in Tyson, but enjoyable enough.
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#18

Post by ororama »

2. I Think I Love My Wife (2007) * 94 min.

I Think I Love My Wife, Chris Rock's remake of Éric Rohmer's Love in the Afternoon/Chloe in the Afternoon, starts off on the wrong foot by blaming Richard and Brenda's (Chris Rock and Gina Torres) marital problems on her loss of interest in sex, while Rohmer gradually showed us that Frédéric didn't know who he was, the young businessman of the present or the free-spirited hippie that he may have been a few years before. Kerry Washington gives a very good performance as the object of his temptation, Nikki, but her cool, calculating party girl is ultimately less tempting than the truly free-spirited Chloé. The screenplay is probably too faithful to the original, with some updates for time/place that work well and some that don't, but most jokes fall flat (when the best jokes are about Viagra, you know that you have comedy failure). Steve Buscemi is as always great in a small part as Richard's co-worker/friend, a philanderer who tells Richard early on that he's making a mistake because Richard, unlike him, cannot be happy cheating on his wife. Of course, if Richard had listened to this advice, or just had sex with Nikki immediately (since he lacked the moral sense that limited Frédéric's actions), the movie would have been very short.
Spoiler
1. Stormy Weather (1943) * 78 min.
*First time viewing.
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#19

Post by maxwelldeux »

A little surprised that got remade. But interesting nonetheless.
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#20

Post by adwest »

I am terribly late in posting most of these but going back to 2/1...here's what I've watched with just a short note on how I felt about it.

1. Like Cotton Twines 2016 (7/10) - the topic was very interesting. The cinematography and the story were so-so. Still worth seeing for understanding this particular issue of religious slavery and a little bit FGM.

2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago 2011 (5/10) - I wanted this to be better. It could have been but the writer and director probably had very little training in how to write an engaging screenplay and less on how to make a film so it was just all very flat which is a shame because I think it probably comes out of real experiences that are incredibly interesting and important to share.

3. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools 2019 (7/10) - Based on a book that I want to read soon and hope has more detail. I think the topic of the school to prison pipeline is incredibly important for people to understand and that it's happening to girls too--not just boys. The documentary is also pretty well done as far as filming and story telling so I gave it a decent rating. However, they didn't go super in-depth to the stories of some of the girls' support systems and seemed to only highlight kids who they managed to pull back from falling through the cracks and ending up in worse situations so it feels like I'm missing half the story. What about the girl who got kicked out of class and when she ran away no one ever went looking for her so she ended up taking a bus downtown and got picked up by a pimp? Or the girl who had so many school violations that she got kicked out so she joined a gang and ended up in prison? or the girl who got pregnant and just couldn't stand going to a place that treated her like crap when she was already exhausted? So yeah, there are negative outcomes that happen but they didn't interview any of those girls. Maybe that's good cause poverty porn is a thing and it's exploitative too. So I'm a little torn about this one. Maybe I'll just read the book and hope there more detail there.

4. Malcolm X 1992 (7/10) - definitely a little longer than probably completely necessary but I was pretty engaged throughout and I finally feel like I know a little bit about Malcolm X so it was totally worth the watch.

5. Waiting to Exhale 1995 (6/10) - this only has so high a rating because Max so aptly pointed out that it was an important fill for black female exposure because it was so commercially successful and had a popular soundtrack. I will also say it had good cinematography. Those things aside I hated it. Until the very very very last second it was all about "oh my life is so horrible because I can't find a good man". The story and dialogue were meh and I didn't really get the female companionship and connection I was hoping to see--there was very little chemistry between the main female cast members.

6. The Spook Who Sat by the Door 1973 (6/10) - sort of weird but very interesting too. I can see why the CIA and FBI would have wanted to suppress it. I think maybe this film is exactly what white people in this country are afraid will happen and I got to be honest, it might if things don't change and it would serve us all right. #BlackLivesMatter
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#21

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013) 8/10
Jesus Christ. This was pretty powerful. Based on the true story of a Black man who was handcuffed by police, completely unarmed, lying face down, and shot in the back by a police officer. Seeing the person and circumstances of his death is emotional and raw. It's a sadly tired story, but a true one, and one we need to work as a society to prevent from happening. Wow. Best film I've seen so far this month.

14. Super Fly (1972) 5/10
Music in this is phenomenal, but the film isn't. Some cool aspects to it, but there's just too much filler to up the runtime without advancing the plot. Worth seeing for its iconic status, but not overly recommended.

15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m) 7/10
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
W. Kamau Bell is really good at letting people who know shit talk, and letting himself stay silent. This season, he interviews a wide array of people, often, but not always, focusing on the Black experience in America. Best episode was about the systemic structures that entrench our institutional white supremacy. I always learn from his show.
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#22

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994) 6/10

Not my favorite Spike Lee, but OK. Semi-autobiographical, it was fun to see a bit more of his personal side, even cooler that his siblings helped write the script. I didn't quite get the connections with the characters, so the emotional impact was a little stunted for me. Nice enough, especially in how you got to feel the neighborhood/community, but not great.
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#23

Post by blocho »

maxwelldeux wrote: February 13th, 2021, 5:47 am
Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994) 6/10

Not my favorite Spike Lee, but OK. Semi-autobiographical, it was fun to see a bit more of his personal side, even cooler that his siblings helped write the script. I didn't quite get the connections with the characters, so the emotional impact was a little stunted for me. Nice enough, especially in how you got to feel the neighborhood/community, but not great.
I went to elementary school with Zelda Harris, one of the child actors in this movie. Never seen it, though.
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#24

Post by maxwelldeux »

blocho wrote: February 13th, 2021, 7:37 am
maxwelldeux wrote: February 13th, 2021, 5:47 am
Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994) 6/10

Not my favorite Spike Lee, but OK. Semi-autobiographical, it was fun to see a bit more of his personal side, even cooler that his siblings helped write the script. I didn't quite get the connections with the characters, so the emotional impact was a little stunted for me. Nice enough, especially in how you got to feel the neighborhood/community, but not great.
I went to elementary school with Zelda Harris, one of the child actors in this movie. Never seen it, though.
That's awesome! She was the highlight of this film for me. I also watched her in He Got Game, though she had a much more minor role there. She's good.
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#25

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994)
20. TNT Jackson (1974) 4/10
The martial arts prep on this seemed to be "go get high and watch a single kung fu flick at random." Honestly, I think the film would have been better served having the stunt double take the lead, as nothing worked. Blaxploitation at its core.

21. Stormy Weather (1943) 7/10
ororama watched it, so I had to. Great to see so many of the Black performers of the era getting an opportunity to show off their craft on screen - some nice numbers in there! It was also a tad problematic, though - like the scene where some of the lighter-skinned folks put on blackface for a minstrel show. Interesting overall, but complex reactions.

22. The Blood of Jesus (1941) 4/10
I tried, but the oppressive religious blatherings and high-minded morality don't work in any era.

23. Love & Basketball (2000) 8/10
This was pretty awesome. A great romantic sports film, which is a weird thing to say, but totally enjoyable for anyone. Two kids grow up next door to each other and both love basketball, including a playful rivalry. As they grow and mature, we see them fall in love and deal with life and love and basketball. Super sweet and heartfelt, this was a great watch on V-Day.

24. She's Gotta Have It (1986) 7/10
A soft 7/10 for me, I like the styling of Lee's debut more than the content, but it was nice to see a woman being the dominant one in the relationship and keeping her suitors at an emotional arms-length. Some complex emotions you don't often get to see on film, it also raises some questions about romantic roles.
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#26

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994)
20. TNT Jackson (1974)
21. Stormy Weather (1943)
22. The Blood of Jesus (1941)
23. Love & Basketball (2000)
24. She's Gotta Have It (1986)
25. Judas and the Black Messiah (2021) 8/10
This was pretty powerful. This is a biographical drama about Bill O'Neal infiltrating the Black Panthers in the late 1960s and how he got close to and eventually helped take down Fred Hampton, the leader of the movement. Although ostensibly about the undercover operations of the FBI and how they were STAUNCHLY (i.e., racistly) against the Black Panthers and everything they stand for, it was also, by extension, a biography of Fred Hampton himself and his views and the reasoning thereof. Lots of great historical information in here, and I learned a ton from this, as they stayed pretty true to the facts. Intense as well, including a hell of a build up to the final scene, which was filmed on the 50th anniversary of the day it actually happened. Well worth a watch, and definitely recommended. Currently streaming on HBO Max for about a month longer, then will go to theaters for a while.

26. Candy (2017) 5/10
This is a film. Some of the IMDB comments are that it's a "hood film" and, while I don't like the term, they're not wrong. It's about 4 women in the Houston projects who deal drugs and run a big game, then try to cash in on one final huge score. It's nice to women in the leading roles in a film like this, but pretty much nothing about the film was better than "OK." Also, weirdly, this had a HELL of a bass track, so much so that I had to turn off the bass because it was shaking the room my wife was in, even though I could barely hear the dialogue.
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#27

Post by Lilarcor »

Thank you for starting the challenge, maxwelldeux!

1. Small Axe: Lovers Rock (Steve McQueen, 2020) 6/10
2. Small Axe: Red, White and Blue (Steve McQueen, 2020) 8/10

I was more taken by both the performances and story / social dilemma in Red, White and Blue (John Boyega is truly a star), but there's no doubt that Lovers Rock has at least one magical, special moment of communal joy that (hopefully and likely) will leave its mark on film history. Made me very emotional. In any case highly recommended, the first film is also worth watching.


Oh, and I watched an alternate version of Something Good tonight which has been found in a tiny village in Norway (reminder to check your lofts!):

The "original":
https://vimeo.com/305144396

Alternate version:
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#28

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994)
20. TNT Jackson (1974)
21. Stormy Weather (1943)
22. The Blood of Jesus (1941)
23. Love & Basketball (2000)
24. She's Gotta Have It (1986)
25. Judas and the Black Messiah (2021)
26. Candy (2017)
27. Portrait of Jason (1967)
This was profoundly sad. It's an interview with Jason, who is a gay Black man living in San Francisco. He talk about his life and then starts drinking and opening up more. He talks about the casual racism he experiences on the regular and how he's almost like a toy to some of the rich people he works for. But he says it all with the attitude of "it is what it is". Fascinating look into that time and his experience.

28. Their Eyes Were Watching God (2005)
A young woman in a small Black town at the start of the 20th century. She gets married off for a traditional life, but she doesn't want it. She leaves her husband for another man. When he dies, she runs off with a much younger man. And that begins the first true romance of her life, where she felt she could be herself. And holy hell did the romance kick in there. It was a sweet if unconventional romance, the highlight of which was probably the sexiest make out scene I've ever seen. Oprah remarked in the intro that if a woman can get kissed like that, she'll be happy woman. Truth. And yes, it does take Halle Berry to convincingly play both a 17yo and a 38yo.

29. House Party (1990)
This was mostly substance free and fun. It was kinda cool to see Kid n Play do their thing, as they were just a bit before my time. Rapping and dancing were cool, and reasonably light funny humor. And a fun if interesting take on the buffoon white cops who keep harassing people in the Black neighborhood.
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#29

Post by maxwelldeux »

Lilarcor wrote: February 20th, 2021, 12:55 am Thank you for starting the challenge, maxwelldeux!

1. Small Axe: Lovers Rock (Steve McQueen, 2020) 6/10
2. Small Axe: Red, White and Blue (Steve McQueen, 2020) 8/10

I was more taken by both the performances and story / social dilemma in Red, White and Blue (John Boyega is truly a star), but there's no doubt that Lovers Rock has at least one magical, special moment of communal joy that (hopefully and likely) will leave its mark on film history. Made me very emotional. In any case highly recommended, the first film is also worth watching.
Welcome! And very interesting - I hadn't heard of that series before. Thanks for sharing!
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#30

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994)
20. TNT Jackson (1974)
21. Stormy Weather (1943)
22. The Blood of Jesus (1941)
23. Love & Basketball (2000)
24. She's Gotta Have It (1986)
25. Judas and the Black Messiah (2021)
26. Candy (2017)
27. Portrait of Jason (1967)
28. Their Eyes Were Watching God (2005)
29. House Party (1990)
30. Pariah (2011) 7/10
This was a hard one to watch. This is about a young Black lesbian woman coming to terms with herself and eventually coming out to her family. Aside from the main character, everyone else in the film was pretty unlikable. That said, they were unlikable for a reason - it was a great piece of writing and told a rich and interesting story of the perspective of one person. Interesting, just tough.

31. Clemency (2019) 8/10
This was hard to watch for an entirely different reason - it was profoundly sad and emotional. Alfre Woodard stars as the warden of a death row prison, and all the years of putting people to death has started to weigh on her. Her next charge might be legitimately innocent. And young. And with a family. But sentenced to death. She puts on an acting clinic, as does Aldis Hoge in his role as the sentenced. Fantastic film and deserving of its Sundance win.

32. Medicine for Melancholy (2008) 4/10
The way it was shot and colored was interesting, and the day in the life of San Francisco was also a nice aspect to this. But everything about its minimalist plot was really off-putting. Not to sound too "get off my lawn", but if this is a look at modern dating, it's horrifyingly awful. They didn't talk. And he was super creepy at the beginning. Take a fucking hint. Go home. She gave you a fake name and refused to engage in any sort of conversation. After that, they spent a day together mostly not talking. I can do that with my wife, but I need some sort of conversation to keep me even remotely engaged. And they had none.
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#31

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994)
20. TNT Jackson (1974)
21. Stormy Weather (1943)
22. The Blood of Jesus (1941)
23. Love & Basketball (2000)
24. She's Gotta Have It (1986)
25. Judas and the Black Messiah (2021)
26. Candy (2017)
27. Portrait of Jason (1967)
28. Their Eyes Were Watching God (2005)
29. House Party (1990)
30. Pariah (2011)
31. Clemency (2019)
32. Medicine for Melancholy (2008)
33. The Old Guard (2020) 7/10
Directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood, flavo turned me onto this film in the RtD thread, so I gave it a shot. Though I'm not normally a fan of fantasy/action, this had the right amount of fantasy for me - one fantastical element in an otherwise "normal" world. A few immortals try and do good in the world. But just as they discover a new one, they're being hunted by a pharma company for their lifesaving properties. Actually, pretty fun. Good solid well-choreographed action without too many quick cuts. Nice death scenes and solid pacing. A ton of fun, actually.

34. Mo' Better Blues (1990) 6/10
LIke the coloring and music in Spike Lee's ode to jazz, but I just couldn't quite get into it beyond an appreciation for the aesthetics.

35. The Learning Tree (1969) 6/10
Maybe a generous rating, this was a slice of life in the 1920s in Kansas, and the relations between the races. Pretty heavy-handed with it's moralizing, it nonetheless paints an interesting picture of life at the time. A great way to take a look at systemic racism in an obvious way.

36. Middle of Nowhere (2012) 4/10
I don't like the genre of "I make predictably and avoidably bad decisions and now I suffer the consequences so please sympathize with me" films. So your spouse, who was sentenced to 8 years in prison for running guns, who was doing obvious shady shit during the entirety of your marriage, and who doesn't think he can commit to you or behave himself in prison, actively tries to talk you out of staying with him. So the obvious choice is to drop out of med school and give up your entire life to coddle him while he's locked up. Oh no! Did that go poorly? Poor consequences. :down:
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#32

Post by adwest »

Better late than never...
7. The United Shades of America - Season 5 (10/10)
I have learned so much from this show. Recommend highly.

8. Crooklyn 1994 (7/10)
I liked this more than Max and the girl was a phenomenal actor. Definitely the best character.

9. Love & Basketball 2000 (8/10)
I love this movie.

10. Stormy Weather 1943 (6/10)
I liked that an attempt was made during this time period to highlight amazing black entertainers. But, it almost felt exploitive and from certain reviews and recollections of cast members, the director was racist. That came through.

11. She's Gotta Have It 1986 (5/10)
No story, no likey.

12. Black and Tan 1929 (8/10)
Now this is black entertainment and some pretty impressive film tricks.

13. Judas and the Black Messiah 2021 (7/10)
Worth watching.

14. Portrait of Jason 1967 (6/10)
My Portrait of Jason Image

15. Their Eyes Were Watching God 2005 (8/10)
This is rare. I liked the film more than the book. And it's very sexy.

16. Pariah 2011 (9/10)
Dialogue. Story. Empathetic, realistic characters (not very likable as Max pointed out, but that's not a requirement for a good story. most people aren't very likable). Check. Check. Check. This is how you make a story come to life.

17. House Party 1990 (5/10)
I'm sure I would have liked this movie when I was in high school. Seems to take police violence and power a little lightly though.

18. Clemency 2019 (7/10)
Incredible acting. Love me some Alfre Woodard. Image

19. Medicine for Melancholy 2008 (6/10)
Day in the life story which aren't my favorite. The filmmaker wanted to make a film about gentrification that would resonate but he didn't and that's a bummer.

20. Middle of Nowhere 2012 (7/10)
I liked this more than Max who thought the premise was stupid. Stupid or not, it's realistic because lots of women give up their lives and dreams for men.

21. Mo' Better Blues 1990 (6/10)
Liked the jazz element but most of the characters were totally unempathetic.

22. Hollywood Shuffle 1987 (8/10)
I thought this was just going to be silly but there was important social commentary and it was amazing. I loved it.
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#33

Post by blocho »

Cool portraits, Ads! If you like Alfre Woodard, have you seen Passion Fish?
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#34

Post by adwest »

blocho wrote: February 25th, 2021, 4:06 am Cool portraits, Ads! If you like Alfre Woodard, have you seen Passion Fish?
She's been in quite a few of the movies I've watched this month and she's fantastic. I have not seen Passion Fish so I'll have to check it out.
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#35

Post by ororama »

3. The Loving Story (2011) * 77 min.

This one is personal for me. When the U.S. Supreme Court decided Loving v. Virginia, I was decades away from thinking about marrying, and my wife was months away from being born. However, our much later marriage was illegal in three states including Virginia prior to this decision, and illegal in Maryland prior to the U.S. Supreme Court taking this case, which caused Maryland to repeal its anti-miscegenation law. It appears that our marriage would have been illegal in at least 10 other states at some points in time according to wikipedia (it is difficult to be certain because of the variations in racial definitions and my wife's mixed ethnicity).

Our older son jokingly calls me a race traitor from time to time, but I've never told him about a co-worker who essentially said the same to me, although without the actual term "race traitor," which I doubt he knew in English.

Loving v. Virginia is long settled law after more than 5 decades, and the filmmakers made a historical documentary. I am sure that a Stephen Miller or a Steve King and many others would work to overturn Loving if they thought it would work and not make them (bigger) laughingstocks.
Spoiler
1. Stormy Weather (1943) * 78 min.
2. I Think I Love My Wife (2007) * 94 min.
*First time viewing.
Last edited by ororama on March 1st, 2021, 7:49 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#36

Post by ororama »

Covid-19 made my participation this month much more limited than I expected. I was infected a few weeks ago, and I have't had severe illness, but instead of quarantine becoming a time when I couldn't do much else but watch movies, as you might expect, it made me lose focus. I think I'm finally coming out of that.
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#37

Post by blocho »

ororama wrote: February 27th, 2021, 7:38 pm Covid-19 made my participation this month much more limited than I expected. I was infected a few weeks ago, and I have't had severe illness, but instead of quarantine becoming a time when I couldn't do much else but watch movies, as you might expect, it made me lose focus. I think I'm finally coming out of that.
I'm glad you're feeling better.
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#38

Post by maxwelldeux »

ororama wrote: February 27th, 2021, 7:29 pm 3. The Loving Story (2011) * 77 min.

This one is personal for me. When the U.S. Supreme Court decided Loving v. Virginia, I was decades away from thinking about marrying, and my wife was months away from being born. However, our much later marriage was illegal in three states including Virginia prior to this decision, and illegal in Maryland prior to the U.S. Supreme Court taking this case, which caused Maryland to repeal its anti-miscegenation law. It appears that our marriage would have been illegal in at least 10 other states at some points in time according to wikipedia (it is difficult to be certain because of the variations in racial definitions and my wife's mixed ethnicity).

Our older son jokingly calls me a race traitor from time to time, but I've never told him about a co-worker who essentially said the same to me, although without the actual term "race traitor," which I doubt he knew in English.

Loving v. Virginia is long settled law after more than 5 decades, and the filmmakers made a historical documentary. I am sure that a Stephen Miller or a Steve King and many others would work to overturn Loving if they thought it would work and not make them (bigger) laughingstocks.
That's definitely a personal connection. Thanks for sharing! And also glad you're coming out of the COVID fog OK.
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#39

Post by maxwelldeux »

Black Lives Matter
1. Like Cotton Twines (2016)
2. Englewood: The Growing Pains in Chicago (2014)
3. Playin' for Love (2013)
4. Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools (2019)
5. Mike Epps: Only One Mike (2019)
6. Guess Who (2005)
7. Kiss the Girls (1997)
8. Malcolm X (1992)
9. Waiting to Exhale (1995)
10. He Got Game (1998)
11. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973)
12. Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (2013)
13. Fruitvale Station (2013)
14. Super Fly (1972)
"15-18. United Shades of America, s5 (2020, 353m)
Episodes
United Shades of America: Where do We Even Start with White Supremacy? (2020, 57m)
United Shades of America: All-American Family Farms (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: Going to Public School (2020, 43m)
United Shades of America: The Gig Economy (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Time for Reparations (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Venezuelans in Florida (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: Iranian-Americans in New York (2020, 42m)
United Shades of America: The Homeless Crisis in LA (2020, 42m)
"
19. Crooklyn (1994)
20. TNT Jackson (1974)
21. Stormy Weather (1943)
22. The Blood of Jesus (1941)
23. Love & Basketball (2000)
24. She's Gotta Have It (1986)
25. Judas and the Black Messiah (2021)
26. Candy (2017)
27. Portrait of Jason (1967)
28. Their Eyes Were Watching God (2005)
29. House Party (1990)
30. Pariah (2011)
31. Clemency (2019)
32. Medicine for Melancholy (2008)
33. The Old Guard (2020)
34. Mo' Better Blues (1990)
35. The Learning Tree (1969)
36. Middle of Nowhere (2012)
37. Hollywood Shuffle (1987) 8/10
This film had absolutely no reason to be this good, but it was. Hilarious, poignant, fun.

38. Posse (1993) 5/10
Loved the idea here of making a western that focuses on Black cowboys, because, as the movie correctly noted, a huge portion of cowboys in the old American West were Black, but this has been mostly whitewashed out of Hollywood. Great premise, just not great execution. There were fun enough moments of action, but the film overall felt forced to me.

39. Timbuktu (2014) 6/10
This movie had a really good feel to it - definitely got the ambiance of the village there. But I just don't connect with religious movies.

40. The Loving Story (2011) 8/10
After I told Wife about ororama's post, she decided we were watching this documentary because it's been in our list forever. And it got me. It was a sweet romance film at its core, just told with a backdrop of pretty horrifying racism. And after the film, I read her statement about gay marriage on the 40th anniversary of the Loving conviction, and it got me. Tears. Pardon the pun (best name ever for this case), it was a very loving story.

41. Passion Fish (1992) 7/10
On blocho's rec, we watched this, too. It was a sweet slow platonic love story. Alfre Woodard was fantastic. Really liked the Louisiana feel.
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#40

Post by blocho »

maxwelldeux wrote: February 28th, 2021, 4:06 pm 41. Passion Fish (1992) 7/10
On blocho's rec, we watched this, too. It was a sweet slow platonic love story. Alfre Woodard was fantastic. Really liked the Louisiana feel.
:thumbsup:
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