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1960s Challenge (Official, June 2020)

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Re: 1960s Challenge (Official, June 2020)

#41

Post by cinephage » June 4th, 2020, 9:07 am

01. Sallah Shabati, by Ephraim Kishon (1964) 4/10

Well, this was certainly exotic to me, and I understand how the social criticism probably made sense at the time. Still, The humor failed to entertain me in any fashion, I didn't find any character I could get an interest for, and the direction is bland...

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#42

Post by sortile9io » June 4th, 2020, 9:32 am

Image

2. IL GIOVEDÌ (Risi, 1964) — Another bittersweet comedy by Risi, brilliant again, with excellent photography and packed with pop music (perhaps too much during the first half), the one-day tour through Rome and its surroundings illustrates many details of the Italian society in the sixties and, more important, the clash between the Latin disposition of the lead character (fanciful, joker, cheater, undisciplined and eager for freedom) and a modern world that rewards the opposite, where even children are savvier than him and seems to be controlled by Germans, Swiss, young women and business men who impose their values of work, order and money. 8/10

Plus...Show
1. TINTIN ET LE MYSTÈRE DE LA TOISON D'OR (Vierne, 1961) — 7/10
Last edited by sortile9io on June 5th, 2020, 7:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#43

Post by sol » June 4th, 2020, 11:30 am

@Lilarcor - which arbiter do you want us to use for your stats? The film that I saw below is listed as 1961 on IMDb, but 1962 on iCM and Letterboxd.

Journey to the Challenge PlanetShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967)
2. Strangers When We Meet (1960)
3. Who's Minding the Store? (1963)
4. Who's Minding the Mint? (1967)
5. Ride the High Country (1962)
6. Dr. Terror's House of Horrors (1965)

7. Journey to the Seventh Planet (1962)

Image

Predating Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris, this mystery thriller has an uncannily similar premise as a group of astronauts discover that an intelligent being on Uranus is accessing their memories and driving hallucinations. This is not nearly as effective as Solaris with the showy special effects distracting from the premise; the being narrating his evil plans also takes away from the inherent mystery. Generally speaking though, this is surprisingly well done.
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#44

Post by AB537 » June 4th, 2020, 12:43 pm

2. The Party (Blake Edwards, 1968) 7/10
3. Hanyo - The Housemaid (Kim Ki-young, 1960) 8/10
4. All Night Long (Basil Dearden, 1962) 7/10

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#45

Post by flavo5000 » June 4th, 2020, 12:57 pm

sol wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 11:30 am
@Lilarcor - which arbiter do you want us to use for your stats? The film that I saw below is listed as 1961 on IMDb, but 1962 on iCM and Letterboxd.
IMDB lists an initial US release of December 1961 but then also lists March 1962 for US. Elsewhere in the page it also references Danish special effects being replaced in a previous version due to poor quality. I'd speculate that the December 1961 screening was some kind of limited release/test screening after which the effects were reworked and the movie was released wide in 1962 (which is what most sources other than IMDB list as the actual release year). Pure speculation though since I can't find anything that states explicitly what exactly this Dec. 1961 release was.
Journey to the Challenge PlanetShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967)
2. Strangers When We Meet (1960)
3. Who's Minding the Store? (1963)
4. Who's Minding the Mint? (1967)
5. Ride the High Country (1962)
6. Dr. Terror's House of Horrors (1965)

7. Journey to the Seventh Planet (1962)

Image

Predating Andrei Tarkovsky's Solaris, this mystery thriller has an uncannily similar premise as a group of astronauts discover that an intelligent being on Uranus is accessing their memories and driving hallucinations. This is not nearly as effective as Solaris with the showy special effects distracting from the premise; the being narrating his evil plans also takes away from the inherent mystery. Generally speaking though, this is surprisingly well done.
According to the trivia on IMDB, apparently when it was released it was noted for being strikingly similar to the actual novel of Solaris which had just come out the year before. So you aren't the only one to notice the similarities between the two. :)
And for my two cents, I thought it was a pretty solid flick personally.

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#46

Post by sol » June 4th, 2020, 1:09 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 12:57 pm
And for my two cents, I thought it was a pretty solid flick personally.
Oh yeah - agreed totally, despite the occasional bit of character stupidity (scientist unthinkingly sticking his hand inside a force-field). :lol: No idea why it is rated so low on IMDb...
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#47

Post by Lilarcor » June 4th, 2020, 3:07 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 12:57 pm
sol wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 11:30 am
@Lilarcor - which arbiter do you want us to use for your stats? The film that I saw below is listed as 1961 on IMDb, but 1962 on iCM and Letterboxd.
IMDB lists an initial US release of December 1961 but then also lists March 1962 for US. Elsewhere in the page it also references Danish special effects being replaced in a previous version due to poor quality. I'd speculate that the December 1961 screening was some kind of limited release/test screening after which the effects were reworked and the movie was released wide in 1962 (which is what most sources other than IMDB list as the actual release year). Pure speculation though since I can't find anything that states explicitly what exactly this Dec. 1961 release was.
Yes, this is plausible. It is often the case for lesser known films that imdb puts emphasis on the earliest screening when several release dates/years are given on imdb and when it does not say what kind of screening it was. 1962 is likely the wide release and I'll count that for this challenge, as the earlier date might not even be the cut that is available to see today.

As for my process I see what year you have used, check with imdb (as I check the country of production there anyway) and see if those match. If they do not I'll ask if there's a reason why you have a different year. Most often imdb is weird and the user or other databases are more "correct" in terms of when it was actually seen, I think.

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#48

Post by flavo5000 » June 4th, 2020, 3:21 pm

Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 3:07 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 12:57 pm
sol wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 11:30 am
@Lilarcor - which arbiter do you want us to use for your stats? The film that I saw below is listed as 1961 on IMDb, but 1962 on iCM and Letterboxd.
IMDB lists an initial US release of December 1961 but then also lists March 1962 for US. Elsewhere in the page it also references Danish special effects being replaced in a previous version due to poor quality. I'd speculate that the December 1961 screening was some kind of limited release/test screening after which the effects were reworked and the movie was released wide in 1962 (which is what most sources other than IMDB list as the actual release year). Pure speculation though since I can't find anything that states explicitly what exactly this Dec. 1961 release was.
Yes, this is plausible. It is often the case for lesser known films that imdb puts emphasis on the earliest screening when several release dates/years are given on imdb and when it does not say what kind of screening it was. 1962 is likely the wide release and I'll count that for this challenge, as the earlier date might not even be the cut that is available to see today.

As for my process I see what year you have used, check with imdb (as I check the country of production there anyway) and see if those match. If they do not I'll ask if there's a reason why you have a different year. Most often imdb is weird and the user or other databases are more "correct" in terms of when it was actually seen, I think.
I've got another somewhat kinda sorta related question. So what about films that were filmed and completed during the '60s but for whatever reason never widely screened and then later re-cut with new footage (sometimes resulting in a completely different picture). I know this sounds oddly specific, but I've come across quite a few films like this. For example, Al Adamson (who did this kind of thing a lot actually) filmed the Bon-esque spy thriller The Fakers in 1967. The distributors didn't think it was marketable, so they never released it. 3 years later, Adamson shot a bunch of new footage with bikers and re-used some of the original footage from The Fakers to create the film Hell's Bloody Devils which was then released in 1970.

If I watched the original The Fakers cut, would that count for this challenge since it was completed in 1967? Or is a 1970 movie despite the entire tone and genre change for the actual released version?

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#49

Post by sol » June 4th, 2020, 3:37 pm

Yo Challenge BoShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967)
2. Strangers When We Meet (1960)
3. Who's Minding the Store? (1963)
4. Who's Minding the Mint? (1967)
5. Ride the High Country (1962)
6. Dr. Terror's House of Horrors (1965)
7. Journey to the Seventh Planet (1962)

8. Yôjinbô (1961) REVISION

Image

With gushing winds and characters often wandering through dust clouds, Kurosawa brings something mystical here and the short musical bursts work well. It is as a comedy that the film is most effective though, with Toshiro Mifune slyly smiling while eavesdropping on the feuding families, enjoying playing puppet-master, while quipping "it'll hurt". Tatsuya Nakadai is also excellent, though the film could do with more Nakadai/Mifune interplay.
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#50

Post by Lilarcor » June 4th, 2020, 4:17 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 3:21 pm
Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 3:07 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 12:57 pm

IMDB lists an initial US release of December 1961 but then also lists March 1962 for US. Elsewhere in the page it also references Danish special effects being replaced in a previous version due to poor quality. I'd speculate that the December 1961 screening was some kind of limited release/test screening after which the effects were reworked and the movie was released wide in 1962 (which is what most sources other than IMDB list as the actual release year). Pure speculation though since I can't find anything that states explicitly what exactly this Dec. 1961 release was.
Yes, this is plausible. It is often the case for lesser known films that imdb puts emphasis on the earliest screening when several release dates/years are given on imdb and when it does not say what kind of screening it was. 1962 is likely the wide release and I'll count that for this challenge, as the earlier date might not even be the cut that is available to see today.

As for my process I see what year you have used, check with imdb (as I check the country of production there anyway) and see if those match. If they do not I'll ask if there's a reason why you have a different year. Most often imdb is weird and the user or other databases are more "correct" in terms of when it was actually seen, I think.
I've got another somewhat kinda sorta related question. So what about films that were filmed and completed during the '60s but for whatever reason never widely screened and then later re-cut with new footage (sometimes resulting in a completely different picture). I know this sounds oddly specific, but I've come across quite a few films like this. For example, Al Adamson (who did this kind of thing a lot actually) filmed the Bon-esque spy thriller The Fakers in 1967. The distributors didn't think it was marketable, so they never released it. 3 years later, Adamson shot a bunch of new footage with bikers and re-used some of the original footage from The Fakers to create the film Hell's Bloody Devils which was then released in 1970.

If I watched the original The Fakers cut, would that count for this challenge since it was completed in 1967? Or is a 1970 movie despite the entire tone and genre change for the actual released version?
Very good question, and imdb is not consistent on this (such as with all the banned East German films from the 1960s that were first shown publically in 1990, yet have 60s "release dates").

Think we'll have to go with a case by case basis. I want to say though that if the film was finished and ready to be released in the 1960s yet didn't for some reason, it should count as a 1960s film if you are watching that original cut. Especially if that cut also was marketed as a film that was from the 1960s once that cut was released. Perhaps I am making things more complicated than they have to be, but I am not a huge fan of using imdb as a holy grail due to its inconsistensies.

I am not 100% clear with what you mean by watching the original cut - is this a version without the added scenes shot later? If so, I'd count it as a film for this challenge. And in that case it should perhaps be added on imdb as a separate film, but imdb hasn't really strived to be an archival database.

I'll appreciate others chiming in on this as well.

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#51

Post by flavo5000 » June 4th, 2020, 5:35 pm

Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 4:17 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 3:21 pm
Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 3:07 pm
Yes, this is plausible. It is often the case for lesser known films that imdb puts emphasis on the earliest screening when several release dates/years are given on imdb and when it does not say what kind of screening it was. 1962 is likely the wide release and I'll count that for this challenge, as the earlier date might not even be the cut that is available to see today.

As for my process I see what year you have used, check with imdb (as I check the country of production there anyway) and see if those match. If they do not I'll ask if there's a reason why you have a different year. Most often imdb is weird and the user or other databases are more "correct" in terms of when it was actually seen, I think.
I've got another somewhat kinda sorta related question. So what about films that were filmed and completed during the '60s but for whatever reason never widely screened and then later re-cut with new footage (sometimes resulting in a completely different picture). I know this sounds oddly specific, but I've come across quite a few films like this. For example, Al Adamson (who did this kind of thing a lot actually) filmed the Bon-esque spy thriller The Fakers in 1967. The distributors didn't think it was marketable, so they never released it. 3 years later, Adamson shot a bunch of new footage with bikers and re-used some of the original footage from The Fakers to create the film Hell's Bloody Devils which was then released in 1970.

If I watched the original The Fakers cut, would that count for this challenge since it was completed in 1967? Or is a 1970 movie despite the entire tone and genre change for the actual released version?
Very good question, and imdb is not consistent on this (such as with all the banned East German films from the 1960s that were first shown publically in 1990, yet have 60s "release dates").

Think we'll have to go with a case by case basis. I want to say though that if the film was finished and ready to be released in the 1960s yet didn't for some reason, it should count as a 1960s film if you are watching that original cut. Especially if that cut also was marketed as a film that was from the 1960s once that cut was released. Perhaps I am making things more complicated than they have to be, but I am not a huge fan of using imdb as a holy grail due to its inconsistensies.

I am not 100% clear with what you mean by watching the original cut - is this a version without the added scenes shot later? If so, I'd count it as a film for this challenge. And in that case it should perhaps be added on imdb as a separate film, but imdb hasn't really strived to be an archival database.

I'll appreciate others chiming in on this as well.
Right. So as a point of reference, both The Fakers and Hell's Bloody Devils are included as separate films in the recently released Al Adamson box set. In the liner notes, it actually lists The Fakers as from 1967 while Hell's Bloody Devils lists 1970.

And really, IMDB isn't even consistent on how it handles Al Adamson recuts. For example, this same kind of thing happened with the movie Blood of Ghastly Horror. Originally it was completed as the crime drama Echo of Terror in 1964. Shortly after the distributor didn't like it and wanted it jazzed up, so Adamson shot some new scenes adding a horror/sci-fi element to it and released it as Psycho-A-Go-Go. Apparently they still didn't like it and it never got released. A couple years later it was pulled off the shelf and colorized for release on TV, again with even more new scenes including zombies being shot for it and it being heavily re-edited barely to the point of recognition and renamed The Fiend with an Electronic Brain (or Man with a Synthetic Brain depending on the market). Apparently it then got edited down for TV removing some violence. Adamson, ever the entrepreneur, then shot even more new violence scenes and released it theatrically as Blood of Ghastly Horror. So across all these shenanigans, IMDB basically has an entry for Psycho A-Go-Go (never actually released) and Blood of Ghastly Horror (which was released theatrically) but not Echo of Terror (just like Psycho A go Go never released) or Fiend with an Electronic Brain (which was actually released, airing on television).

So yea, IMDB is really sketchy with these kinds of grindhouse films that were re-cut/re-edited a billion times. Other examples of this include Adamson's Nurse Sherri/Doctor Dracula, Jack Hill/Corman's Blood Bath/Track of the Vampire/Portrait of Terror and Jess Franco's Demoniac/Exorcism and Black Masses/Exorcisms among a bunch of others.

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#52

Post by maxwelldeux » June 4th, 2020, 6:08 pm

Pot + No HaircutsShow
1. The Italian Job (1969)
2. The Party (1968)
3. In the Heat of the Night (1967, USA)
4. Asterix and Cleopatra (1968, France)
Boring and awful.

5. Rosemary's Baby (1968, USA)
Didn't hold up as much as it could have for me.

6. Come Drink with Me (1966, Hong Kong)
Actually pretty enjoyable and fun!

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#53

Post by jdidaco » June 4th, 2020, 6:27 pm

The Ricotta twist!!!, my favorite 60s twist (and there are several I love), a most perfect intro to this challenge. Thank you Lilarcor for hosting it!

(Screenshots from 'The Uncle' & 'Die Russen kommen'),

ImageImage

1. Kirmes (The Fair, Wolfgang Staudte, 1960) 9.5/10
2. I delfini (The Dauphins, Francesco Maselli, 1960) 9/10
3. During One Night (Sidney J. Furie, 1960) 8/10
4. La donna dei faraoni (The Pharaohs' Woman, Viktor Tourjansky, 1960) 8/10
5. The Chapman Report (George Cukor, 1962) 7/10
6. Wutai jiemei (Two Stage Sisters, Xie Jin, 1964) 8.5/10
7. The Uncle (Desmond Davis, 1965) 8.5/10
8. Two for the Road (Stanley Donen, 1967) 8.5/10 (RV)
9. Die Russen kommen (The Russians Are Coming, Heiner Carow, 1968) 9.5/10
10. Tian xia di yi jian (The Fastest Sword, Pan Lei, 1968) 8/10
11. Yi dai jian wang (The Swordsman of All Swordsmen, Joseph Kuo, 1968) 7.5/10
12. La caduta degli dei (Götterdämmerung) (The Damned, Luchino Visconti, 1969) 8/10 (RV)

Image

As for the Bonus challenge, i have three films left to see from the official competition. Have to track one of them, but i think I can manage it. Hope to include them on the next batches.

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#54

Post by Lilarcor » June 4th, 2020, 7:20 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 5:35 pm
Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 4:17 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 3:21 pm


I've got another somewhat kinda sorta related question. So what about films that were filmed and completed during the '60s but for whatever reason never widely screened and then later re-cut with new footage (sometimes resulting in a completely different picture). I know this sounds oddly specific, but I've come across quite a few films like this. For example, Al Adamson (who did this kind of thing a lot actually) filmed the Bon-esque spy thriller The Fakers in 1967. The distributors didn't think it was marketable, so they never released it. 3 years later, Adamson shot a bunch of new footage with bikers and re-used some of the original footage from The Fakers to create the film Hell's Bloody Devils which was then released in 1970.

If I watched the original The Fakers cut, would that count for this challenge since it was completed in 1967? Or is a 1970 movie despite the entire tone and genre change for the actual released version?
Very good question, and imdb is not consistent on this (such as with all the banned East German films from the 1960s that were first shown publically in 1990, yet have 60s "release dates").

Think we'll have to go with a case by case basis. I want to say though that if the film was finished and ready to be released in the 1960s yet didn't for some reason, it should count as a 1960s film if you are watching that original cut. Especially if that cut also was marketed as a film that was from the 1960s once that cut was released. Perhaps I am making things more complicated than they have to be, but I am not a huge fan of using imdb as a holy grail due to its inconsistensies.

I am not 100% clear with what you mean by watching the original cut - is this a version without the added scenes shot later? If so, I'd count it as a film for this challenge. And in that case it should perhaps be added on imdb as a separate film, but imdb hasn't really strived to be an archival database.

I'll appreciate others chiming in on this as well.
Right. So as a point of reference, both The Fakers and Hell's Bloody Devils are included as separate films in the recently released Al Adamson box set. In the liner notes, it actually lists The Fakers as from 1967 while Hell's Bloody Devils lists 1970.

And really, IMDB isn't even consistent on how it handles Al Adamson recuts. For example, this same kind of thing happened with the movie Blood of Ghastly Horror. Originally it was completed as the crime drama Echo of Terror in 1964. Shortly after the distributor didn't like it and wanted it jazzed up, so Adamson shot some new scenes adding a horror/sci-fi element to it and released it as Psycho-A-Go-Go. Apparently they still didn't like it and it never got released. A couple years later it was pulled off the shelf and colorized for release on TV, again with even more new scenes including zombies being shot for it and it being heavily re-edited barely to the point of recognition and renamed The Fiend with an Electronic Brain (or Man with a Synthetic Brain depending on the market). Apparently it then got edited down for TV removing some violence. Adamson, ever the entrepreneur, then shot even more new violence scenes and released it theatrically as Blood of Ghastly Horror. So across all these shenanigans, IMDB basically has an entry for Psycho A-Go-Go (never actually released) and Blood of Ghastly Horror (which was released theatrically) but not Echo of Terror (just like Psycho A go Go never released) or Fiend with an Electronic Brain (which was actually released, airing on television).

So yea, IMDB is really sketchy with these kinds of grindhouse films that were re-cut/re-edited a billion times. Other examples of this include Adamson's Nurse Sherri/Doctor Dracula, Jack Hill/Corman's Blood Bath/Track of the Vampire/Portrait of Terror and Jess Franco's Demoniac/Exorcism and Black Masses/Exorcisms among a bunch of others.
Thanks for the explanation. What makes it easier to me is that they change the title of the film projects over time. So it looks fairly straightforward to both find out what is made when, and when you are watching a film version that was a 1960s film. Watching The Fakers would count for the challenge because it was a film from 1967 that can be watch as such today. And if the 1964 version of Echo of Terror is available somewhere it counts as a 1964 film (and later cuts for later years in the 1960s). It's not necessary that the film is Echo of Terror (1964) on imdb, if it's clear that the film exists and can be watched as such. imdb does not have everything so I won't limit films for the challenge to what is there. Unfortunate that grindhouse is treated so poorly over there.

@jdidaco: Thank you! (l) Happy to see your interest in the bonus challenge, and as always happy to see your screenshots - always makes me hungry to explore.

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#55

Post by sortile9io » June 4th, 2020, 7:23 pm

Image

3. ABUELO MADE IN SPAIN (Lazaga, 1969) — Next instalment in the series of moralising comedies starring popular old actor Martínez Soria, this time he plays a provincial, rough and old-fashioned patriarch ready to restore at any cost the traditional order in the families of his three daughters, led astray by the modern life in the city, criticism is not so abundant as usual while technical skills are more elaborate. 6/10

Plus…Show
1. TINTIN ET LE MYSTÈRE DE LA TOISON D'OR (Vierne, 1961) — 7/10
2. IL GIOVEDÌ (Risi, 1964) — 8/10
Last edited by sortile9io on June 5th, 2020, 7:59 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#56

Post by Lilarcor » June 4th, 2020, 8:56 pm

2. Le bonheur / Happiness (Agnès Varda, 1965) 8/10

Almost perfection (which is, I guess, how the male protagonist / antagonist feels about how things went here).

SpoilerShow
1. Blowup (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1966) 8/10
2. Le bonheur / Happiness (Agnès Varda, 1965) 8/10

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#57

Post by Lilarcor » June 4th, 2020, 9:38 pm

After 62 watches:

Image

Counting Journey to the Seventh Planet as a 1962 release.

Country stats:
22 - USA
11 - UK
6 - Italy
4 - France
4 - Hong Kong
3 - Japan
2 - Spain
2 - Taiwan
2 - West Germany
1 - China
1 - East Germany
1 - India
1 - Israel
1 - South Korea
1 - Sweden

Lovely to see more countries represented!

Counting Marquis de Sade's Justine as West German. Liechenstein is noted first on imdb, but looks like that's for copyright reasons.
Counting Journey to the Seventh Planet as a US production. Not sure why Denmark is noted as the first country of production on imdb, as both production companies are US-based. But weirdly lots of Danish people involved!

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#58

Post by AB537 » June 5th, 2020, 2:48 am

5. Two Weeks in Another Town (Vincente Minnelli, 1962) 7/10 ... Kind of feels like a respectable, but not entirely successful, attempt to create an American version of La Dolce Vita

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#59

Post by Mochard » June 5th, 2020, 3:26 am

4. Le révélateur (1968) - 4/10 - 281 Checks - 3 Official Lists - 7/10 Average Rating

A 4-year-old child is the element from and around which the action develops, and brings sentiments and emotions to light. The French word révélateur" describes the prodedure to develop or "reveal" film negatives.

Image

Twist and Shout - 4Show
1. Manos: The Hands of Fate (1966) - 1/10 - 2329 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 1.9/10 Average Rating
2. The Queen (1968) - 6/10 - 83 Checks - 1 Official List - 7.3/10 Average Rating
3. Käre John (1964) - 6/10 - 62 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 6.5/10 Average Rating
4. Le révélateur (1968) - 281 Checks - 3 Official Lists - 7/10 Average Rating

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#60

Post by sortile9io » June 5th, 2020, 6:45 am

Image

4. THE CREATION OF THE HUMANOIDS (Barry, 1962) — Weird classic science fiction, it poses several interesting questions central to robotics and transhumanism (look of robots, violent opposition of ultra-conservative groups, use of emotions like fear, pain, greed or hatred, love between robots and humans, identity, memory, human improvement, immortality, etc.) but a very basic use of cinematic techniques makes it look more like an old radio drama accompanied by pictures of talking heads and static actors that recite philosophical thoughts while standing in cheap gloomy stages (I don't know if due to a boring artistic choice, low budget or limited directorial skills), sometimes laughable anyway, if you're in the right mood. 4/10

Plus…Show
1. TINTIN ET LE MYSTÈRE DE LA TOISON D'OR (Vierne, 1961) — 7/10
2. IL GIOVEDÌ (Risi, 1964) — 8/10
3. ABUELO MADE IN SPAIN (Lazaga, 1969) — 6/10

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#61

Post by cinephage » June 5th, 2020, 8:45 am

02. Le Diable et les 10 commandements, by Julien Duvivier (1962) 7/10

A film with short stories based on the ten commandments. What's nice is that, given Duvivier's prestige at the time, anybody who was somebody at that time had to play a small part, from Michel Simon to Alain Delon or Danielle Darrieux...
From the swinging sixties (01)Show
01. Sallah Shabati, by Ephraim Kishon (1964) 4/10

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#62

Post by peeptoad » June 5th, 2020, 11:30 am

5. Kiss Me Quick! (1964) 4
6. Dog Star Man (1964) 8
sixties seenShow
*rewatch
1. Mosura (1961) Mothra 6*
2. Rapture (1965) 8
3. Lady in a Cage (1964) 8
4. Blonde Köder für den Mörder (1969) Death Knocks Twice 7+

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#63

Post by flavo5000 » June 5th, 2020, 12:55 pm

Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 9:38 pm

Counting Journey to the Seventh Planet as a US production. Not sure why Denmark is noted as the first country of production on imdb, as both production companies are US-based. But weirdly lots of Danish people involved!
It's because it was actually filmed in Denmark at a Danish film studio. Much of the crew was Danish as well as even some of the cast. Most of the effects were also done by a Danish effects studio (although according to IMDB some were deemed sub-par and re-done by a US effects company). It definitely seems to be a Denmark-US co-production even if a US company were the ones ponying up the dough.

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#64

Post by flavo5000 » June 5th, 2020, 2:03 pm

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8. Orgy at Lil's Place (1963)
Surprisingly good cinematography on this early sexploitation flick.

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9. The Black Cat (1966)
Deliriously unhinged. Also surprisingly graphic death scene for mid '60s.
SpoilerShow
1. La mano de un hombre muerto a.k.a. The Sadistic Baron Von Klaus (1962)
2. Dinosaurus! (1960)
3. Captain Clegg a.k.a. Night Creatures (1962)
4. All the Sins of Sodom (1968)
5. Akibiyori a.k.a. Late Autumn (1960)
6. Marquis de Sade: Justine (1969)
7. Kipling's Women (1961)
8. Orgy at Lil's Place (1963)
9. The Black Cat (1966)

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#65

Post by frbrown » June 5th, 2020, 2:07 pm

1. Offbeat (1961)

British heist movie, works as a precursor to "City on Fire" and "Reservoir Dogs"

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#66

Post by Obgeoff » June 5th, 2020, 2:14 pm

1. The Jungle Book (1967, Reitherman) 7
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#67

Post by maxwelldeux » June 5th, 2020, 5:59 pm

Pot + No HaircutsShow
1. The Italian Job (1969)
2. The Party (1968)
3. In the Heat of the Night (1967, USA)
4. Asterix and Cleopatra (1968, France)
5. Rosemary's Baby (1968, USA)
6. Come Drink with Me (1966, Hong Kong)
7. Hud (1963, USA)
Meant to watch this last month, but held off as it actually fit more challenges this month. Solid western-drama, Newman nails the character of Hud. But everyone else seems clunky and sanitized and I didn't end up connecting with the film.

8. Promises… Promises! (1963, USA)
There are exactly two reasons to watch this film, and not even those reasons made it an overall enjoyable experience.

9. The Trip (1967, USA)
Fun LSD imagery and pretty to look at, but weird and not really my thing.

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#68

Post by sortile9io » June 5th, 2020, 6:06 pm

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5. GAAV (Mehrjui, 1969) — Very good, it shows the absurd, pathetic and sinister sides in madness while demonstrating how talent can make great cinema with little resources (limited budget, basic locations, plot that can be summarised in a few words, etc.), I enjoyed in particular the subtle soundtrack, the different views of the hamlet and the black and white night photography. 7/10

Plus…Show
1. TINTIN ET LE MYSTÈRE DE LA TOISON D'OR (Vierne, 1961) — 7/10
2. IL GIOVEDÌ (Risi, 1964) — 8/10
3. ABUELO MADE IN SPAIN (Lazaga, 1969) — 6/10
4. THE CREATION OF THE HUMANOIDS (Barry, 1962) — 4/10

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#69

Post by sortile9io » June 5th, 2020, 6:12 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 5:59 pm
8. Promises… Promises! (1963, USA)
There are exactly two reasons to watch this film, and not even those reasons made it an overall enjoyable experience.
You should watch this instead, many more reasons and much more convincing, I suspect.

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#70

Post by blueboybob » June 5th, 2020, 6:58 pm

2. Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962)

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#71

Post by Lilarcor » June 5th, 2020, 9:14 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 5th, 2020, 12:55 pm
Lilarcor wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 9:38 pm

Counting Journey to the Seventh Planet as a US production. Not sure why Denmark is noted as the first country of production on imdb, as both production companies are US-based. But weirdly lots of Danish people involved!
It's because it was actually filmed in Denmark at a Danish film studio. Much of the crew was Danish as well as even some of the cast. Most of the effects were also done by a Danish effects studio (although according to IMDB some were deemed sub-par and re-done by a US effects company). It definitely seems to be a Denmark-US co-production even if a US company were the ones ponying up the dough.
Thanks for the additional info! Definitely not a clear-cut case then, more of a 50/50 situation I guess. However I'll stick with USA for this film if it's not too objectionable.

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#72

Post by Lilarcor » June 5th, 2020, 9:28 pm

After 77 watches, flavo5000 and maxwelldeux help give 1963 a little needed push, and Iran joins the list of countries thanks to sortile9io!

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Country stats:
33 - USA
12 - UK
6 - France
6 - Italy
4 - Hong Kong
3 - Japan
2 - Spain
2 - Taiwan
2 - West Germany
1 - China
1 - East Germany
1 - India
1 - Iran
1 - Israel
1 - South Korea
1 - Sweden

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#73

Post by Obgeoff » June 5th, 2020, 9:49 pm

2. The Shop on Main Street (1965, Kadár/Klos) 8
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#74

Post by Mochard » June 6th, 2020, 3:07 am

5. Heaven and Earth Magic (1962) - 4/10 - 355 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 5.3/10 Average Rating

A sequence of surreal cutout animation imagery, largely without a discernible narrative.

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Twist and Shout - 5Show
1. Manos: The Hands of Fate (1966) - 1/10 - 2329 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 1.9/10 Average Rating
2. The Queen (1968) - 6/10 - 83 Checks - 1 Official List - 7.3/10 Average Rating
3. Käre John (1964) - 6/10 - 62 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 6.5/10 Average Rating
4. Le révélateur (1968) - 281 Checks - 3 Official Lists - 7/10 Average Rating
5. Heaven and Earth Magic (1962) - 4/10 - 355 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 5.3/10 Average Rating

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#75

Post by AB537 » June 6th, 2020, 4:14 am

6. Lawrence of Arabia (David Lean, 1962) 7.5/10

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#76

Post by Melvelet » June 6th, 2020, 8:03 am

4. To Kill a Mockingbird 1962 9-/10
5. Lolita 1962 8-/10
SpoilerShow
1. Masculin féminin 1966 — a.k.a. Masculine-Feminine 6/10
2. Carnival of Souls 1962 8/10
3. Charulata 1964 — a.k.a. The Lonely Wife 8-/10
4. To Kill a Mockingbird 1962 9-/10
5. Lolita 1962 8-/10

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#77

Post by sortile9io » June 6th, 2020, 8:08 am

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6. FLAMING STAR (Siegel, 1960) — It's (more than) Elvis, in a pretty good Western, with his cocky air and limited performing skills, and he turns out to be half Kiowa (!) which means trouble, not with the girls or his cowboy songs (there is only one of each) but with his white neighbours, apparently more uncivilised and racist than the fighting Indians (and they make their point). 7/10

Plus…Show
1. TINTIN ET LE MYSTÈRE DE LA TOISON D'OR (Vierne, 1961) — 7/10
2. IL GIOVEDÌ (Risi, 1964) — 8/10
3. ABUELO MADE IN SPAIN (Lazaga, 1969) — 6/10
4. THE CREATION OF THE HUMANOIDS (Barry, 1962) — 4/10
5. GAAV (Mehrjui, 1969) — 7/10
Last edited by sortile9io on June 7th, 2020, 2:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#78

Post by peeptoad » June 6th, 2020, 11:43 am

7. Marketa Lazarová (1967) 9
sixties seenShow
*rewatch
1. Mosura (1961) Mothra 6*
2. Rapture (1965) 8
3. Lady in a Cage (1964) 8
4. Blonde Köder für den Mörder (1969) Death Knocks Twice 7+
5. Kiss Me Quick! (1964) 4
6. Dog Star Man (1964) 8

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#79

Post by flavo5000 » June 6th, 2020, 1:06 pm

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10. Dong fu ren a.k.a. The Arch (1968)

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11. The Fakers a.k.a. Smashing the Crime Syndicate (1968)
So here's the first version of this film, a jaunty spy movie like Bond, The Silencers, Our Man Flint, etc. It's not a bad film actually. The opening animated titles in particular are actually a lot of fun and the movie is rarely dull which was always a problem with many of the spy ripoffs from the late '60s. Digging a little more into the circumstances behind it, apparently a big reason it was shelved was because the producer had committed suicide. I definitely need to watch Hell's Bloody Devils and see how this was butchered to make a bikersploitation film since it seems to have nothing at all to do with bikers.

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12. Il mondo di notte numero 3 a.k.a. Ecco (1963)

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13. The Forbidden (1966)
SpoilerShow
1. La mano de un hombre muerto a.k.a. The Sadistic Baron Von Klaus (1962)
2. Dinosaurus! (1960)
3. Captain Clegg a.k.a. Night Creatures (1962)
4. All the Sins of Sodom (1968)
5. Akibiyori a.k.a. Late Autumn (1960)
6. Marquis de Sade: Justine (1969)
7. Kipling's Women (1961)
8. Orgy at Lil's Place (1963)
9. The Black Cat (1966)
10. Dong fu ren a.k.a. The Arch (1968)
11. The Fakers a.k.a. Smashing the Crime Syndicate (1968)
12. Il mondo di notte numero 3 a.k.a. Ecco (1963)
13. The Forbidden (1966)

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#80

Post by Mochard » June 6th, 2020, 1:49 pm

6. The Train (1964) - 8/10 - 1223 Checks - 4 Official Lists - 7.8/10 Average Rating

In 1944, a German colonel loads a train with French art treasures to send to Germany. The Resistance must stop it without damaging the cargo.

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Twist and Shout - 6Show
1. Manos: The Hands of Fate (1966) - 1/10 - 2329 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 1.9/10 Average Rating
2. The Queen (1968) - 6/10 - 83 Checks - 1 Official List - 7.3/10 Average Rating
3. Käre John (1964) - 6/10 - 62 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 6.5/10 Average Rating
4. Le révélateur (1968) - 281 Checks - 3 Official Lists - 7/10 Average Rating
5. Heaven and Earth Magic (1962) - 4/10 - 355 Checks - 2 Official Lists - 5.3/10 Average Rating
6. The Train (1964) - 8/10 - 1223 Checks - 4 Official Lists - 7.8/10 Average Rating

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