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China, Hong Kong & Taiwan Challenge (Official, June 2020)

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peeptoad
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Re: China, Hong Kong & Taiwan Challenge (Official, June 2020)

#81

Post by peeptoad » June 7th, 2020, 12:44 pm

2. Xie zhou (1982) Curse of Evil 7 Hong Kong
看过Show
1. Cui hua du jiang tou (1975) The Magic Curse 6 Hong Kong

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#82

Post by flavo5000 » June 7th, 2020, 1:14 pm

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11. Flight of the Red Balloon (Hsiao-Hsien Hou, 2007) [Taiwan]
Hsiao-hsien Hou making a riff on The Red Balloon seems as inevitable as the seasons. Honestly I prefer to just watch the original.

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12. Shan zhong zhuan qi a.k.a. Legend of the Mountain (King Hu, 1979) [Taiwan/Hong Kong]
This was an interesting, weird and eerie story of mysticism and the supernatural from King Hu. It felt very similar to Raining on the Mountain (which it was apparently filmed back to back with). It did feel a little too long at 3 hours and 15 minutes though.

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13. Zhan lang a.k.a. Wolf Warrior (Jing Wu, 2015) [China]
Meh. This one just seemed like the Chinese equivalent of a Michael Bay movie...shallow plot with some forced sentimentality peppered with jingoism and big action set pieces. And like Michael Bay, other than some cool action sequences, there's not really much to recommend here. At least unlike Michael Bay, there wasn't an over-reliance on CGI resulting in some solid practical effects.

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14a. Chunyi: Legend of Kung Fu (Su Shijin, 2006) [China] 37 min.
14b. Big Fish & Chinese Flowering Crabapple (Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun, 2004) [China] 9 min.
14c. Ouran a.k.a. Accidentally (John Woo, 1968) [Hong Kong] 11 min.
14d. Hua yang de nian hua (Kar-Wai Wong, 2000) [Hong Kong/China] 3 min.
Chunyi is apparently a show that showcases a kind of hybrid of kung fu-like dance and pantomime operatic storytelling. This first short is basically a doc featuring most of the show with some interviews at the end about it. Big Fish & Chinese Flowering Crabapple is the short film (on the blu-ray) made as a predecessor to the feature film Big Fish & Begonia and features some beautiful animation. I'll need to watch the full-length movie as well. Ouran is a very early student film from John Woo. Had a weird ending and wasn't really that good. Hua yang de nian hua was an interesting experimental short from Kar-Wai featuring clips from classic Chinese films set to music.
SpoilerShow
1. Fang Shiyu yu Hong Xiguan a.k.a. Heroes Two (Cheh Chang, 1974) [Hong Kong]
2. Dung che sai duk a.k.a. Ashes of Time (Kar-Wai Wong, 1994)[Hong Hong/Taiwan]
3. Gu a.k.a. Bewitched (Chih-Hung Kuei, 1981) [Hong Kong]
4. Lung men bei chi a.k.a. Bruce's Deadly Fingers (Joseph Kong, 1976) [Hong Kong]
5. Geung si a.k.a. Rigor Mortis (Juno Mak, 2013) [Hong Kong]
6. Sai yau gei: Yut gwong bou haap a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey Part One: Pandora's Box (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong/China]
7. Sai yau gei: Sin leui kei yun a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
8. Wong Fei Hung III: Si wong jaang ba a.k.a. Once Upon A Time In China III (Hark Tsui, 1992) [Hong Kong]
9. Dong fu ren a.k.a. The Arch (Shu Shuen Tong, 1968) [Hong Kong]
10. Miao jie gu shi a.k.a. Mean Street Story (Andrew Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
11. Flight of the Red Balloon (Hsiao-Hsien Hou, 2007) [Taiwan]
12. Shan zhong zhuan qi a.k.a. Legend of the Mountain (King Hu, 1979) [Taiwan/Hong Kong]
13. Zhan lang a.k.a. Wolf Warrior (Jing Wu, 2015) [China]
14a. Chunyi: Legend of Kung Fu (Su Shijin, 2006) [China]
14b. Big Fish & Chinese Flowering Crabapple (Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun, 2004) [China]
14c. Ouran a.k.a. Accidentally (John Woo, 1968) [Hong Kong]
14d. Hua yang de nian hua (Kar-Wai Wong, 2000) [Hong Kong/China]

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#83

Post by sol » June 7th, 2020, 3:50 pm

Five Fingers of ChallengesShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967) Hong Kong
2. God of Gamblers (1989) Hong Kong
3. All for the Winner (1990) Hong Kong
4. Magnificent Butcher (1979) Hong Kong

5. Five Fingers of Death (1972) Hong Kong

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The plot here is shaky and is weighed down by a dull romance. It is also a third of the way in before we see training in the coveted "iron fist". The "iron fist" move in action though is fun though with some cool glowing red palm special effects. The alarm/siren music works really well too (lifted by Quentin Tarantino for Kill Bill). The film has a pretty high amount of blood-letting too, especially from the eyes, plus someone is thrown through a tree.
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#84

Post by Onderhond » June 7th, 2020, 10:25 pm

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03. 3.0* - Winner Takes All [Chak Wong Ji Wong] by Jing Wong (1982)

It didn't take long before Jing Wong came into his own. His first film might've been relatively serious and well-constructed, a lot of that was thrown overboard in Winner Takes All, and replaced by the cheer silliness that would come to define Wong's brand. The result is a full-blown comedy with some martial arts thrown in for good measure.

The beginning is still somewhat straight-faced, but when Pak-Cheung Chan appears and enters a rather hilarious Mah-jong game to the death, there's no doubt that you shouldn't take this film too seriously. It's the kind of over-the-top stupidity that would help to launch Stephen Chow's career a decade later.

The acting isn't all that great and some of the effects are pretty cheap, but they're never gratuitous. The soundtrack is pretty cheesy too, but is used to good comedic effect. If you don't like Hong Kong comedy, it's probably best to avoid this film, but Jing Wong fans (or those who can tolerate his films) will have a blast with this one.

It's like discovering AmericaShow
01. 3.0* - Monster Hunt [Zhuo Yao Ji] by Raman Hui (2015)
02. 2.5* - Troublesome Night 6 [Yam Yeung Lo 6: Hung Chow Hon] by Herman Yau (1999)

The timing of this challenge is a bit of a bummer though. My months turned out rather Japanese-themed because reasons so won't be submitting too many films. This is my 99th Jing Wong film btw, number 100 won't be too far off either.
Last edited by Onderhond on June 8th, 2020, 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#85

Post by mjf314 » June 8th, 2020, 1:10 am

SpoilerShow
1. Burning Ice (2017, China) episode 2
2. Burning Ice (2017, China) episode 3
3. Burning Ice (2017, China) episode 4
4. Burning Ice (2017, China) episode 5
5. Paths of the Soul (2015, China)

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#86

Post by jdidaco » June 8th, 2020, 1:16 am

(Screenshots from 'Long men jin jian' & 'Ni na bian ji dian'),

(Side Challenge 2: "A woman or women in action" - image #2 (Cheng Pei-pei in action (l) ))

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5. Yu tang chun (The Story of Sue San, King Hu, 1964) 8/10 (Hong Kong)
6. Bian cheng san xia (The Magnificent Trio, Chang Cheh, 1966) 7.5/10 (Hong Kong) (Side Challenge 1: The pick master - ororama)
7. Long men jin jian (The Golden Sword, Lo Wei, 1969) 7.5/10 (Hong Kong)
8. Ni na bian ji dian (What Time Is It There?, Tsai Ming-liang, 2001) 9/10 (Taiwan) (RV)

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SpoilerShow
1. Wutai jiemei (Two Stage Sisters, Xie Jin, 1964) 8.5/10 (China)
2. Tian xia di yi jian (The Fastest Sword, Pan Lei, 1968) 8/10 (Taiwan/Hong Kong)
3. Yi dai jian wang (The Swordsman of All Swordsmen, Joseph Kuo, 1968) 7.5/10 (Taiwan)
4. Du zhan (Drug War, Johnnie To, 2012) 8/10 (Hong Kong/China)

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#87

Post by Mario Gaborović » June 8th, 2020, 1:20 am

05. Ba wang bie ji (1993) - China

SpoilerShow
01. Shen wei san meng long (1980) - Hong Kong
02. Proposition (2012) + Tricycle Thief (2014) + Death of a Parrot (2015) + The Identity of the Portuguese Egg Tart (2015) + The Great Debt (2016) + CaCa: I Want Cat to Say Yes (2017) + O Cravo (2017) + Desireland, Multiverse (2020) - Macao
03. Ying hung boon sik (1986) - Hong Kong
04. Guizi lai le (2000) - China

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#88

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » June 8th, 2020, 4:24 am

FTV:4:The Untold Story (1993).Hong Kong. 6.

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Working from a recipe loosely based on the real August 4th 1985 Eight Immortals Restaurant murders, the screenplay by Kam-Fai Law and Wing-Kin Lau grinds the Horror of True Crime with the wacky bad-taste Comedy of CAT III, as Hang tries to hide the evidence, by serving it up to unsuspecting souls. Poking at body parts that appear at shore to get clues out of them, the writers play the mystery out on a jarring sea-saw, at one moment being on the grime cover-up by Hang, (played by a great, rough Anthony Wong )then at the next, going to the cops dropping foul gags on each other, and never finding a moment to smoothly blend them together.

Cooking up the same flavor as the script, co-director/ (with Herman Yau) co-star Danny Lee visualise the brilliant squashy sound effects with a washed out, saturated appearance, which the directors decay with panning shots running the outpouring of blood across Hang’s murky world. Boiling a grubby Horror atmosphere when round Hang, the directors stumble and take it all off the boil with a wacky, brightly coloured splash for the police investigation, where cheeky sound effects and lingering camera shots at the fit ladies cook up a saucy comedic CAT III mood.

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#89

Post by cinephage » June 8th, 2020, 8:30 am

03. Parking / Ting che, by Mong-Hong Chung (2008) 7,5/10 - Taiwan

Quite good, somewhat close to a chinese after hours
SpoilerShow
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Already seen (02)Show
01. The River / He liu, by Tsai Ming-Liang (1997) Taiwan
02. Mo jong yuen So Hak Yee / King of Beggars, by Gordon Chan (1992) 7,5/10 - Hong Kong

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#90

Post by sol » June 8th, 2020, 8:30 am

The Super Infra-ChallengeShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967) Hong Kong
2. God of Gamblers (1989) Hong Kong
3. All for the Winner (1990) Hong Kong
4. Magnificent Butcher (1979) Hong Kong
5. Five Fingers of Death (1972) Hong Kong

6. The Super Infra-man (1975) Hong Kong

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Imagine The Beastie Boy's Intergalactic video clip played straight and that is a lot what Infra-Man is like. The costumes are wildly imaginative; same goes for the sets full of flashing lights. The film also achieves quite a few cool effects simply through nifty editing with items and actors appearing and disappearing, while the ray zaps and explosions are so deliberately over-the-top that is easy to get absorbed in the pure energy that went into this.

:woot: BONUS CHALLENGE #1 - this film was previously picked by Lonewolf2003! ---- :woot: BONUS CHALLENGE #2 - see above
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#91

Post by flavo5000 » June 8th, 2020, 1:05 pm

Image
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]
This is the second highest grossing animated film of all time in China? It was ok and the animation quality was better than some other Chinese animated films I've seen but the story is both very basic and very convoluted at the same time. Essentially a swapped-at-birth tale but steeped in obtuse Chinese folklore, this isn't the easiest movie to follow for most western audiences I'd imagine.
SpoilerShow
1. Fang Shiyu yu Hong Xiguan a.k.a. Heroes Two (Cheh Chang, 1974) [Hong Kong]
2. Dung che sai duk a.k.a. Ashes of Time (Kar-Wai Wong, 1994)[Hong Hong/Taiwan]
3. Gu a.k.a. Bewitched (Chih-Hung Kuei, 1981) [Hong Kong]
4. Lung men bei chi a.k.a. Bruce's Deadly Fingers (Joseph Kong, 1976) [Hong Kong]
5. Geung si a.k.a. Rigor Mortis (Juno Mak, 2013) [Hong Kong]
6. Sai yau gei: Yut gwong bou haap a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey Part One: Pandora's Box (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong/China]
7. Sai yau gei: Sin leui kei yun a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
8. Wong Fei Hung III: Si wong jaang ba a.k.a. Once Upon A Time In China III (Hark Tsui, 1992) [Hong Kong]
9. Dong fu ren a.k.a. The Arch (Shu Shuen Tong, 1968) [Hong Kong]
10. Miao jie gu shi a.k.a. Mean Street Story (Andrew Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
11. Flight of the Red Balloon (Hsiao-Hsien Hou, 2007) [Taiwan]
12. Shan zhong zhuan qi a.k.a. Legend of the Mountain (King Hu, 1979) [Taiwan/Hong Kong]
13. Zhan lang a.k.a. Wolf Warrior (Jing Wu, 2015) [China]
14a. Chunyi: Legend of Kung Fu (Su Shijin, 2006) [China]
14b. Big Fish & Chinese Flowering Crabapple (Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun, 2004) [China]
14c. Ouran a.k.a. Accidentally (John Woo, 1968) [Hong Kong]
14d. Hua yang de nian hua (Kar-Wai Wong, 2000) [Hong Kong/China]
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]

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#92

Post by Onderhond » June 8th, 2020, 1:12 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 1:05 pm
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]
This is the second highest grossing animated film of all time in China? It was ok and the animation quality was better than some other Chinese animated films I've seen but the story is both very basic and very convoluted at the same time. Essentially a swapped-at-birth tale but steeped in obtuse Chinese folklore, this isn't the easiest movie to follow for most western audiences I'd imagine.
Did you see Big Fish & Begonia? So much better than Ne Zha. I also didn't get the hype.

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#93

Post by sol » June 8th, 2020, 2:08 pm

Fight Back to ChallengeShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967) Hong Kong
2. God of Gamblers (1989) Hong Kong
3. All for the Winner (1990) Hong Kong
4. Magnificent Butcher (1979) Hong Kong
5. Five Fingers of Death (1972) Hong Kong
6. The Super Infra-man (1975) Hong Kong

7. Fight Back to School (1991) Hong Kong

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The stakes are so low in this 21 Jump Streetesque film that it forgets about its McGuffin for long stretches to focus on Chow failing to cheat and finding maths hard. Some of this is very funny, particularly Chow and Gabriel Wong jumping back and forth in synchrony on their chairs. Man-Tat Ng is hilarious too, pretending to be Chow's father. It is the choreography that is really great here though: Chow kicking his enemies when strung up by his wrists, etc.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#94

Post by Lonewolf2003 » June 8th, 2020, 2:15 pm

4. Fei long zhan [The Dragon Missile] (1976, Meng Hua Ho) Hong Kong: 6.5 - Sima Jun has to get a medicine for his sick lord, of course some there are other capers wanting that medicine too. Luckily for Sima he's the master of the Dragon Missiles, which basically are razorsharp boomerang with dragonhead at the top that magically finds opponents and chops their heads or limbs off. Made as a cash in after the success of The Flying Guillotine this belongs to the bloodier martial arts movies, although honestly the amount of blood spatter is very mild. The biggest problem this has is the absence of a clear hero to root for. Sima, the protagonist, works for a corrupt lord and contrary to usual he doesn't get a redemption arc, so he isn't the hero of this story. There also are six mercenary sent of Sima to steal the medicine from him, so they are even more evil and make Sima slightly less evil. On top of that there are an old friend of Sima and the daughter of the killed herbalist who are of the righteous kind, but they barely register as characters. Because this movie doesn't waste a lot of time on things like character development. Plus side of this is that it moves at a brisk pace and there is a lot of action in its 80min running time and that action is enjoyable.
5. Jian hua yan yu Jiang Nan [To Kill with Intrigue] (1977, Wei Lo) Hong Kong : 4.8 - Not very intriguing at all unfortunately, this waste a lot of time on a incomprehensible, melodramatic romance plot. It stars an unrecognizable young Jackie Chan, who Wei Lo doesn't know to utilize correctly in a role which ask for a more broodier performer. Who the movie does use right is Feng Hsu, who steals every fight scene she's in. And there are some decent wuxia fights in this, keeping it from being a complete waste of time.
6. She hao ba bu [Snake and Crane Arts of Shaolin] (1978, Chi-Hwa Chen) Hong Kong/Taiwan: 7.0 - Another movie starring Jackie Chan in a still serious role as the protagonist. But this one was a decent martial arts movie with a nice diverse bunch of characters and some good fights.
7. Long quan [Dragon Fist] (1979,Wei Lo) Hong Kong/Taiwan: 6.8 -At the start of this movie Jackie Chan's master gets murdered with Chan immediately swearing he will avenge his master. So far it's all very standard martial arts plot. What sets this one apart from the rest is that in time it took Chan to catch up with the murderer, the murderer has redeemed himself and became a righteous master. This sets Jackie Chan into an angry whirlwind about his revenge quest, which the real criminal villain use to trick him into teaming up with them. Of course during all this there characters trading punches and kicks to enjoy. But it is the almost revisionist take on the classic martial arts revenge plot which makes this an interesting watch.

SpoilerShow
1. Liu lang di qiu [The Wandering Earth] (2019, Frant Gwo) China: 4.5
2. Zhong guo chao ren [Super Inframan] (1975, Shan Hua) Hong Kong: 7.8
3. Shen da [Spiritual Boxer] (1975, Chia-Liang Liu) Hong Kong: 7.8

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#95

Post by Onderhond » June 8th, 2020, 5:01 pm

Image

04. 3.0* - The Magnificent Trio [Bian Cheng San Xia] by Cheh Chang (1966)

Not quite Chang's first film, but this is the oldest one that is easily accessible to his fans. It's not hard to see why, as The Magnificent Trio is a perfect blueprint for the following 20 years of Shaw Bros martial arts cinema and thus a film with some historic significance. But it's also just a pretty decent film regardless.

Like other early Chang films, the direction is surprisingly solid. It's probably a mix of the inability to quickly skip through yet to be established genre clichés and the lack of pressure to deliver multiple films per year, but these older films often feel more finished and detailed than the 70s and early 80s ones.

That sounds great, but it also means the pacing is a bit slower and the martial arts scenes aren't that elaborate yet, which is kind of the reason why I like the Shaw Bros martial arts catalogue. It's the classic contradiction between good cinema and good genre cinema. That said, Chang films will still find plenty to like here.

It's like discovering AmericaShow
01. 3.0* - Monster Hunt [Zhuo Yao Ji] by Raman Hui (2015)
02. 2.5* - Troublesome Night 6 [Yam Yeung Lo 6: Hung Chow Hon] by Herman Yau (1999)
03. 3.0* - Winner Takes All [Chak Wong Ji Wong] by Jing Wong (1982)
Last edited by Onderhond on June 8th, 2020, 7:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#96

Post by Onderhond » June 8th, 2020, 6:59 pm

Image

06. 2.0* - The Owl Vs Bombo [Mao Tou Ying Yu Xiao Fei Xiang] by Sammo Kam-Bo Hung (1984)

A lesser-known Sammo Hung feature. Hung directs and leads, but it's clearly little more than mandatory filler in order to pass the time between bigger projects. The Owl Vs Bombo is a pretty basic mix of comedy and action, with some mediocre dressing to fill in the gaps, which makes it best suited for completists.

When Hung actually takes his time to focus on the comedy and action, the film is pretty decent. A pretty silly but fun moment with a cherry is pretty hilarious and the end fight isn't too shabby either, but these moments only make up a small part of the film. They almost feel like leftover scenes from a better feature.

In between these scenes there's a lot of animosity and shouting that amounts to very little. The plot isn't very interesting, performances are rather weak and the soundtrack is terribly cheesy. At least the fun moments are spread quite evenly, so you never have to go too long without something interesting happening, but a good film this is not.

It's like discovering AmericaShow
01. 3.0* - Monster Hunt [Zhuo Yao Ji] by Raman Hui (2015)
02. 2.5* - Troublesome Night 6 [Yam Yeung Lo 6: Hung Chow Hon] by Herman Yau (1999)
03. 3.0* - Winner Takes All [Chak Wong Ji Wong] by Jing Wong (1982)
04. 3.0* - The Magnificent Trio [Bian Cheng San Xia] by Cheh Chang (1966)
05. 3.5* - Giant Fish [Da Yu] by Yue Yin (2020)

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#97

Post by flavo5000 » June 8th, 2020, 10:01 pm

Onderhond wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 1:12 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 1:05 pm
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]
This is the second highest grossing animated film of all time in China? It was ok and the animation quality was better than some other Chinese animated films I've seen but the story is both very basic and very convoluted at the same time. Essentially a swapped-at-birth tale but steeped in obtuse Chinese folklore, this isn't the easiest movie to follow for most western audiences I'd imagine.
Did you see Big Fish & Begonia? So much better than Ne Zha. I also didn't get the hype.
Not yet. It's on my backlog to watch this month though. And I did just watch the short film it was based on a couple days ago (referenced in my previous post to Ne Zha) which I thought had some very beautiful animation. Looking forward to it.

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#98

Post by wasabi » June 8th, 2020, 10:24 pm

2. Xin Niang/The Bride(2009, China)
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2137352/
A film about humanity. There was no professional actors in this film. I liked it little more than Blind Shaft, less than Blind Mountain. I can share the file if anyone is interested in seeing it.
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SpoilerShow
1. A Lingering Face/Fei Chang Xia Ri (2000)
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0257664/

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#99

Post by wasabi » June 8th, 2020, 10:27 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 10:01 pm
Onderhond wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 1:12 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 1:05 pm
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]
This is the second highest grossing animated film of all time in China? It was ok and the animation quality was better than some other Chinese animated films I've seen but the story is both very basic and very convoluted at the same time. Essentially a swapped-at-birth tale but steeped in obtuse Chinese folklore, this isn't the easiest movie to follow for most western audiences I'd imagine.
Did you see Big Fish & Begonia? So much better than Ne Zha. I also didn't get the hype.
Not yet. It's on my backlog to watch this month though. And I did just watch the short film it was based on a couple days ago (referenced in my previous post to Ne Zha) which I thought had some very beautiful animation. Looking forward to it.
There's another Ne Zha which I liked more than 2019 one. Maybe the second highest one is the Ne Zha from 1979?
https://movie.douban.com/subject/1307315/

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#100

Post by RBG » June 8th, 2020, 10:30 pm

oooh i can do this challenge i already watched two

1. am zin 2/running out of time 2 - johnnie to (2001) hk just as entertaining as the original, which i would say is a special skill of johnnie to
2. kong zhong xiao jie/air hostess - wen yi (1959) hk grace chang and remarkable color blocking made this a lot of fun

Image

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icm + ltbxd

NO GODS NO MASTERS

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#101

Post by blueboybob » June 8th, 2020, 11:54 pm

18. [China] Nanjing! Nanjing! (2009)
19. [China] Yi He Yuan (2006)
20. [Tawain] Yi dai jian wang (1968)

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#102

Post by wasabi » June 9th, 2020, 2:38 am

3-9. The Romance of Tiger and Rose EP 1 -- EP 7 (2020, China) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12299432/
This drama is quite popular in China right now. The setting was interesting: a scriptwriter travel into a support role of the script she wrote and developed a romance with the main character. It's getting boring since EP 5, I don't think I'm gonna finish it.
SpoilerShow
1. A Lingering Face/Fei Chang Xia Ri (2000) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0257664/
2. 2. Xin Niang/The Bride(2009, China) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2137352/

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#103

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » June 9th, 2020, 4:15 am

FTV:5:Dumplings (2004). Hong Kong. 8.

Side Challenge 1: hurluberlu.


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Filling up a short story originally from the anthology film Three... Extremes (2004),director Fruit Chan & cinematographer Christopher Doyle drop the dumplings in exquisite, lush stylisation, heating Mei’s kitchen (which was a small real location, with no air condition) in greens and crisp whites, growing the youthful impression Mrs. Li gets when visiting to dine.
Slicing open a slice of the old CAT III sticky shocks, Chan and Doyle crunch the warmth of Mei’s (played by a wonderfully relaxed Bai Ling) location with gloriously grotesque close-ups on the slippery dumplings, made with an unsettling slurping sound design, finished off in icky close-ups on the mouths of the rich gauging themselves.

Whilst the suddenness of the ending gives a glimpse to the short origins, the screenplay by Pik Wah Lee otherwise steams up a sharp allegorical Horror of the rich middle class feasting on the young, with the hope that all they desire will continue to be served up to them. Keeping the knife away from simply presenting her as bad, Lee unravels the complexities in Mrs. Li (played by a great,brittle Miriam Chin Wah Yeung) dying to gain a youthful appearance, with cracking dialogue peeling away at the secluded sides of Li and Mei,as they eat up a fresh bowl of dumplings.

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#104

Post by Onderhond » June 9th, 2020, 7:25 am

Image

07. 2.0* - Youth [Fang Hua] by Xiaogang Feng (2017)

A pretty disappointing film from Feng, which oddly mimics the kind of cinema he helped China to move away from some 20 years ago. Youth reminded me of a film Yimou Zhang could have made during the 90s, only without the natural grace and visual splendor that made Zhang's films stand out.

Youth follows Xiaoping, a young country bumpkin joining a military dance troupe in the hope of finding some respect and appreciation. It doesn't take long before the bullying starts though and when the war erupts she is sent to a frontline hospital to tend to the wounded soldiers. Unfazed, she accepts her destiny and becomes an overnight hero.

Visually I expected more from Feng. The film doesn't look bad, but there are few memorable moments, even though it's clear the budget wasn't lacking. Actors do a decent job, but there are no stand-out performances. It's the score that is by far the weakest element though. It's loud and saccharine, leaving a bitter aftertaste. While not terrible, Youth simple isn't good enough for a director like Feng.

It's like discovering AmericaShow
01. 3.0* - Monster Hunt [Zhuo Yao Ji] by Raman Hui (2015)
02. 2.5* - Troublesome Night 6 [Yam Yeung Lo 6: Hung Chow Hon] by Herman Yau (1999)
03. 3.0* - Winner Takes All [Chak Wong Ji Wong] by Jing Wong (1982)
04. 3.0* - The Magnificent Trio [Bian Cheng San Xia] by Cheh Chang (1966)
05. 3.5* - Giant Fish [Da Yu] by Yue Yin (2020)
06. 2.0* - The Owl Vs Bombo [Mao Tou Ying Yu Xiao Fei Xiang] by Sammo Kam-Bo Hung (1984)

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#105

Post by Lonewolf2003 » June 9th, 2020, 12:42 pm

8. Kwai tsan tseh [Wheels on Meals] (1984, Sammo Kam-Bo Hung) Hong Kong: 7.8 - Fun and very entertaining action-comedy starring Jackie Chan, Biao Yuen and Sammo Hung, the last one sporting a ridiculous perm, set in gorgeous Barcelona. The three have amazing chemistry together, which makes this a pleasure to watch. The end fight between Jackie Chan and Benny "The Jet" Urquidez is worth the watch alone.
SpoilerShow
1. Liu lang di qiu [The Wandering Earth] (2019, Frant Gwo) China: 4.5
2. Zhong guo chao ren [Super Inframan] (1975, Shan Hua) Hong Kong: 7.8
3. Shen da [Spiritual Boxer] (1975, Chia-Liang Liu) Hong Kong: 7.8
4. Fei long zhan [The Dragon Missile] (1976, Meng Hua Ho) Hong Kong: 6.5
5. Jian hua yan yu Jiang Nan [To Kill with Intrigue] (1977, Wei Lo) Hong Kong : 4.8
6. She hao ba bu [Snake and Crane Arts of Shaolin] (1978, Chi-Hwa Chen) Hong Kong/Taiwan: 7.0
7. Long quan [Dragon Fist] (1979,Wei Lo) Hong Kong/Taiwan: 6.8

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#106

Post by flavo5000 » June 9th, 2020, 12:45 pm

Image
16. Gwai wik a.k.a. Re-Cycle (Pang Brothers, 2006) [Hong Kong]
Re-cycle showcases the visual inventiveness of the Pang Brothers unfettered to a certain extent. The effects aren't quite where they need to be in places, but what starts as a fairly conventional Asian horror flick about a writer who wants to experience the supernatural evolves into a much stranger and imaginative dreamworld quest. Unfortunately the saccharin and heavy-handed ending leaves a bad taste in the mouth, but until then the movie was still quite interesting to watch.

Image
17. Tai gik Cheung Sam Fung a.k.a. Tai Chi Master (Woo-Ping Yuen, 1993) [Hong Kong]
Jet Li stars in a story about childhood friends who take divergent paths in life in the wake of expulsion from a temple where they'd live their lives up to that point. Jet Li takes the the path of peace and becomes the founder of the tai chi discipline while his friend ends up as a military commander that puts them at odds with one another. Woo-Ping delivers a solid and well choreographed wire-fu wuxia with the likes of Jet Li and Michelle Yeoh putting on a good show with some great fight scenes. All in all an enjoyable flick for fans of Woo-Ping's work.
SpoilerShow
1. Fang Shiyu yu Hong Xiguan a.k.a. Heroes Two (Cheh Chang, 1974) [Hong Kong]
2. Dung che sai duk a.k.a. Ashes of Time (Kar-Wai Wong, 1994)[Hong Hong/Taiwan]
3. Gu a.k.a. Bewitched (Chih-Hung Kuei, 1981) [Hong Kong]
4. Lung men bei chi a.k.a. Bruce's Deadly Fingers (Joseph Kong, 1976) [Hong Kong]
5. Geung si a.k.a. Rigor Mortis (Juno Mak, 2013) [Hong Kong]
6. Sai yau gei: Yut gwong bou haap a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey Part One: Pandora's Box (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong/China]
7. Sai yau gei: Sin leui kei yun a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
8. Wong Fei Hung III: Si wong jaang ba a.k.a. Once Upon A Time In China III (Hark Tsui, 1992) [Hong Kong]
9. Dong fu ren a.k.a. The Arch (Shu Shuen Tong, 1968) [Hong Kong]
10. Miao jie gu shi a.k.a. Mean Street Story (Andrew Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
11. Flight of the Red Balloon (Hsiao-Hsien Hou, 2007) [Taiwan]
12. Shan zhong zhuan qi a.k.a. Legend of the Mountain (King Hu, 1979) [Taiwan/Hong Kong]
13. Zhan lang a.k.a. Wolf Warrior (Jing Wu, 2015) [China]
14a. Chunyi: Legend of Kung Fu (Su Shijin, 2006) [China]
14b. Big Fish & Chinese Flowering Crabapple (Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun, 2004) [China]
14c. Ouran a.k.a. Accidentally (John Woo, 1968) [Hong Kong]
14d. Hua yang de nian hua (Kar-Wai Wong, 2000) [Hong Kong/China]
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]
16. Gwai wik a.k.a. Re-Cycle (Pang Brothers, 2006) [Hong Kong]
17. Tai gik Cheung Sam Fung a.k.a. Tai Chi Master (Woo-Ping Yuen, 1993) [Hong Kong]

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#107

Post by flavo5000 » June 9th, 2020, 12:46 pm

wasabi wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 10:27 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 10:01 pm
Onderhond wrote:
June 8th, 2020, 1:12 pm

Did you see Big Fish & Begonia? So much better than Ne Zha. I also didn't get the hype.
Not yet. It's on my backlog to watch this month though. And I did just watch the short film it was based on a couple days ago (referenced in my previous post to Ne Zha) which I thought had some very beautiful animation. Looking forward to it.
There's another Ne Zha which I liked more than 2019 one. Maybe the second highest one is the Ne Zha from 1979?
https://movie.douban.com/subject/1307315/
I would agree the '79 version is better. It was certainly more coherent. Although I wasn't a fan of the art in it to be honest.

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#108

Post by maxwelldeux » June 9th, 2020, 6:19 pm

A Region Escaping the NewsShow
1. Come Drink with Me (1966, HK)
2. Operation Red Sea (2018, China)
3. The Assassin (2015, Taiwan)
Gorgeous, but holy crap was that slow. Would have been better if the fight scenes were more intricate.

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#109

Post by Onderhond » June 9th, 2020, 9:47 pm

Image

08. 3.5* - Heroes Shed No Tears [Ying Xiong Wu Lei] by Yuen Chor (1980)

A very fine epic by Yuen Chor. There are some moments of genuine beauty here, making this one of Chor's best films. At the same time the film isn't entirely without fault, which keeps it from becoming and all-time Shaw Bros best. But Shaw Bros fans owe it to themselves to seek this one out.

Like many of Chor's best films, Heroes Shed No Tears has strong fantasy elements. Not so much in the plot or characters, it's the setting that feels very fantastical. Moody lighting, beautiful sets and plenty of smoke make for an extremely atmospheric film. The fitting score also adds to the film.

The action is solid, but nothing you haven't seen before. My main critique is that the film's a bit too long. Some scenes are extremely talkative and the plot/characters aren't that interesting to warrant so much dialogue. Some tighter editing would've helped, but in the end Chor's amazing direction prevails.

It's like discovering AmericaShow
01. 3.0* - Monster Hunt [Zhuo Yao Ji] by Raman Hui (2015)
02. 2.5* - Troublesome Night 6 [Yam Yeung Lo 6: Hung Chow Hon] by Herman Yau (1999)
03. 3.0* - Winner Takes All [Chak Wong Ji Wong] by Jing Wong (1982)
04. 3.0* - The Magnificent Trio [Bian Cheng San Xia] by Cheh Chang (1966)
05. 3.5* - Giant Fish [Da Yu] by Yue Yin (2020)
06. 2.0* - The Owl Vs Bombo [Mao Tou Ying Yu Xiao Fei Xiang] by Sammo Kam-Bo Hung (1984)
07. 2.0* - Youth [Fang Hua] by Xiaogang Feng (2017)

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#110

Post by St. Gloede » June 9th, 2020, 11:06 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Nanjing! Nanjing! / The City of Life and Death (2009, Chuan Lu) [China] 7/10
2. Ban jin ba liang / The Private Eyes (1976, Michael Hui) [Hong Kong] 5/10
3. Shijie / The World (2004, Zhangke Jia) 8.5/10 [China]
4. Tian mi mi / Comrades: Almost a Love Story (1996, Peter Chan) [Hong Kong] 6/10
5. Siu Lam juk kau / Shaolin Soccer (2001, Sthephen Chow) [Hong Kong] 5.5/10
6. Wong Fei Hung / Once Upon a Time in China (1991, Hark Tsui) [Hong Kong] 5/10
7. Xiao Bi de gu shi / Growing Up (1983, Kun Hao Chen) [Taiwan] 8/10
8. Tui shou / Pushing Hands (1991, Ang Lee) [Taiwan] 6/10
9. All the Corners of the World (1989, Ming-liang Tsai) [Taiwan] 7/10
10. Lixaing de ganqing xian / Li-hsiang's Heart Line (1991, Ming-liang Tsai) [Taiwan] 6/10
11. Gei wo yi ge jia / Give Me a Home (1991, Ming-Liang Tsai) [Taiwan] 7/10
12. Liang Shan Bo yu Zhu Ying Tai / The Love Eterne (1963, Han Hsiang Li) [Hong Kong] 5/10
13. Jin bi hui huang / Fujian Blues (2007, Robin Shouming Weng) [China] 7/10

Ha, surprise surprise. Beat my goal already. Might as well adjust it up to 20 then.

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#111

Post by blueboybob » June 9th, 2020, 11:53 pm

21. [China] Ba bai luo han (1985)

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#112

Post by wasabi » June 10th, 2020, 12:14 am

10. (rewatch)Hu Lu Xiong Di/Calabash Brothers (1986, China)
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7046962/
Image
Image
Side Challenge 3: Find a pangolin
SpoilerShow
1. A Lingering Face/Fei Chang Xia Ri (2000) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0257664/
2. 2. Xin Niang/The Bride(2009, China) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2137352/
3-9. The Romance of Tiger and Rose EP 1 -- EP 7 (2020, China) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12299432/

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#113

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » June 10th, 2020, 2:43 am

Onderhond wrote:
June 9th, 2020, 9:47 pm
Image

08. 3.5* - Heroes Shed No Tears [Ying Xiong Wu Lei] by Yuen Chor (1980)

A very fine epic by Yuen Chor. There are some moments of genuine beauty here, making this one of Chor's best films. At the same time the film isn't entirely without fault, which keeps it from becoming and all-time Shaw Bros best. But Shaw Bros fans owe it to themselves to seek this one out.

Like many of Chor's best films, Heroes Shed No Tears has strong fantasy elements. Not so much in the plot or characters, it's the setting that feels very fantastical. Moody lighting, beautiful sets and plenty of smoke make for an extremely atmospheric film. The fitting score also adds to the film.

The action is solid, but nothing you haven't seen before. My main critique is that the film's a bit too long. Some scenes are extremely talkative and the plot/characters aren't that interesting to warrant so much dialogue. Some tighter editing would've helped, but in the end Chor's amazing direction prevails.

It's like discovering AmericaShow
01. 3.0* - Monster Hunt [Zhuo Yao Ji] by Raman Hui (2015)
02. 2.5* - Troublesome Night 6 [Yam Yeung Lo 6: Hung Chow Hon] by Herman Yau (1999)
03. 3.0* - Winner Takes All [Chak Wong Ji Wong] by Jing Wong (1982)
04. 3.0* - The Magnificent Trio [Bian Cheng San Xia] by Cheh Chang (1966)
05. 3.5* - Giant Fish [Da Yu] by Yue Yin (2020)
06. 2.0* - The Owl Vs Bombo [Mao Tou Ying Yu Xiao Fei Xiang] by Sammo Kam-Bo Hung (1984)
07. 2.0* - Youth [Fang Hua] by Xiaogang Feng (2017)
Hi Hond,I've got a DVD of John Woo's Heroes lined up for a viewing. Apart from the title, do you find them to share anything else similar?

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#114

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » June 10th, 2020, 2:52 am

Hi all,despite having seen the likes of Rush Hour etc,I've never seen a Jackie Chan film from Hong Kong (I've still not seen a Bruce Lee flick!) Having got this uncut version from eBay ages ago,I finally played it tonight.

FTV:6:Snake in the Eagle's Shadow (1978).Hong Kong.9.

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Swooping in to take the role after studio head Run Run Shaw got original choice Sheng Fu to run run from taking the lead role, Jackie Chan, (whose mouth is covered in blood in the final,after a front tooth gets kicked out on film!) displays in this early starring role a remarkable confidence in performing spectacular Kung-Fu set-pieces, with Chan and the various cackling baddies, delivering each move with a fluidity that allows the audience to cleanly see how each fighting move develops. Telling The New York Times in 1995 that “I wanted to be like a Chaplin or Buster Keaton.” Chan’s love of Silent Comedy comes across loudly in thrillingly stage training sequences, where Chan displays his physical comedy skills when keeping his reflex actions running high when getting everyday objects thrown at him.

High-kicking the movie into a family affair thanks to giving his dad Siu Tin Yuen the role as Chan delightfully tough and cheeky trainer,Woo-Ping Yuen punches up with a super-stylised directing debut,as Woo-Ping matches the “Whoosh” dubbed fighting sound effects with whooshing panning shots and razor-sharp jump-cuts to close-ups heightening the intensity of the fights. Remaining cut in the UK due to a needlessly cruel,and utterly nuts cat V Cobra fight, Woo-Ping turns that fight into a springboard to welcomed weirdness, via slithering the camera down Chan performing knock out moves like a snake,which has come out of the eagle’s shadow.

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#115

Post by Onderhond » June 10th, 2020, 7:07 am

morrison-dylan-fan wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 2:43 am
Hi Hond,I've got a DVD of John Woo's Heroes lined up for a viewing. Apart from the title, do you find them to share anything else similar?
Not that I know of, but it's been ages since I saw that Woo, so many there are some minor similarities in the plot. A very different film altogether though :)

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#116

Post by vortexsurfer » June 10th, 2020, 10:17 am

1. Cheung gong 7 hou/CJ7 (Stephen Chow, 2008) Hong Kong
2. Mei ren yu/The Mermaid (Stephen Chow, 2016) China

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#117

Post by sol » June 10th, 2020, 11:51 am

Fight Back to ChallengeShow
1. The One-Armed Swordsman (1967) Hong Kong
2. God of Gamblers (1989) Hong Kong
3. All for the Winner (1990) Hong Kong
4. Magnificent Butcher (1979) Hong Kong
5. Five Fingers of Death (1972) Hong Kong
6. The Super Infra-man (1975) Hong Kong
7. Fight Back to School (1991) Hong Kong

8. Forbidden City Cop (1996) Hong Kong

Image

While never quite as zany and eye-popping as his bigger budgeted Shaolin Soccer and Kung Fu Hustle, this possibly the closest that any of Stephen Chow's earlier directing efforts have come to capturing the magic of that duo. Chow's anachronistic inventions are hilarious, especially his use of magnets in battles and makeshift helicopter. With a near alien autopsy in the mix too, this is a rollercoaster ride that becomes delightfully insane.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
Image Image Image

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#118

Post by flavo5000 » June 10th, 2020, 1:07 pm

Image
18. Hak se wui a.k.a. Election (Johnnie To, 2005) [Hong Kong]
You know, I've always seen Johnnie To and Takeshi Kitano as two sides of the same coin, almost as if the same filmmaker had made a particular choice in life that led to a divergent path. Both heavily feature themes of loyalty amid crime families and both are known to have a sly sense of humor at times and a penchant for punctuating moments of assumed civility with bursts of blunt, realistic violence that doesn't become overly stylized. Where their paths diverge is more in where their commercial sensibilities lie. Johnnie To has always skewed a little more mainstream serving up palatable mainstream comedy and drama with a gritty core while Kitano has often leaned more toward the arthouse, favoring minimal dialogue with characters that never seem comfortable with their lots in life. Compare Election with Sonatine, both films about escalating gang wars. But where Kitano eventually sends his characters to the beach to chill and relax for a brief respite from the blood, To continues to turn up the heat on the political infighting amongst the Triad leaders. Johnnie To does have his own "chill and relax by the water" scene but it comes late and there's much more of a specific agenda at play. Both are good films in their own right, but I can see them catering to different sensibilities at the end of the day.

Image
19. Zhong hua zhang fu a.k.a. Heroes of the East (Chia-Liang Liu, 1978) [Hong Kong]
Man, where has this movie been hiding (oh yea... at the bottom of a stack of DVDs I've had for several years...)? Much Chia-Liang Liu's 36 Chambers of Shaolin offered a crash course in Shaolin training, Heroes of the East basically plays out like a non-stop primer on Chinese vs. Japanese fighting styles. The plot is pretty simple, basically adding up to a minor culture clash misunderstanding as a Hong Kong kung fu master has a marital tiff with his Japanese ninjitsu expert wife on best fighting style who then inadvertently gets seven Japanese martial arts masters involved in a series of challenges with the Chinese master. The real reason to watch this though is the almost constant excellent fighting sequences showing off a variety of different techniques and weaponry. Highly recommended for fans of Shaw Bros. martial arts movies.
SpoilerShow
1. Fang Shiyu yu Hong Xiguan a.k.a. Heroes Two (Cheh Chang, 1974) [Hong Kong]
2. Dung che sai duk a.k.a. Ashes of Time (Kar-Wai Wong, 1994)[Hong Hong/Taiwan]
3. Gu a.k.a. Bewitched (Chih-Hung Kuei, 1981) [Hong Kong]
4. Lung men bei chi a.k.a. Bruce's Deadly Fingers (Joseph Kong, 1976) [Hong Kong]
5. Geung si a.k.a. Rigor Mortis (Juno Mak, 2013) [Hong Kong]
6. Sai yau gei: Yut gwong bou haap a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey Part One: Pandora's Box (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong/China]
7. Sai yau gei: Sin leui kei yun a.k.a. A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella (Jeffrey Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
8. Wong Fei Hung III: Si wong jaang ba a.k.a. Once Upon A Time In China III (Hark Tsui, 1992) [Hong Kong]
9. Dong fu ren a.k.a. The Arch (Shu Shuen Tong, 1968) [Hong Kong]
10. Miao jie gu shi a.k.a. Mean Street Story (Andrew Lau, 1995) [Hong Kong]
11. Flight of the Red Balloon (Hsiao-Hsien Hou, 2007) [Taiwan]
12. Shan zhong zhuan qi a.k.a. Legend of the Mountain (King Hu, 1979) [Taiwan/Hong Kong]
13. Zhan lang a.k.a. Wolf Warrior (Jing Wu, 2015) [China]
14a. Chunyi: Legend of Kung Fu (Su Shijin, 2006) [China]
14b. Big Fish & Chinese Flowering Crabapple (Liang Xuan and Zhang Chun, 2004) [China]
14c. Ouran a.k.a. Accidentally (John Woo, 1968) [Hong Kong]
14d. Hua yang de nian hua (Kar-Wai Wong, 2000) [Hong Kong/China]
15. Ne Zha zhi mo tong jiang shi a.k.a. Ne Zha (Yu Yang, 2019) [China]
16. Gwai wik a.k.a. Re-Cycle (Pang Brothers, 2006) [Hong Kong]
17. Tai gik Cheung Sam Fung a.k.a. Tai Chi Master (Woo-Ping Yuen, 1993) [Hong Kong]
18. Hak se wui a.k.a. Election (Johnnie To, 2005) [Hong Kong]
19. Zhong hua zhang fu a.k.a. Heroes of the East (Chia-Liang Liu, 1978) [Hong Kong]

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#119

Post by Onderhond » June 10th, 2020, 1:43 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 1:07 pm
You know, I've always seen Johnnie To and Takeshi Kitano as two sides of the same coin,
You draw a nice comparison, but only as directors. Kitano is way more active outside of the film business compared to To.
I like them both, for very similar reasons, though like you said, they both bring it in a different context.

As for Heroes of the East, not that big of a fan, but I prefer hand to hand combat over weapon-based martial arts.

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#120

Post by flavo5000 » June 10th, 2020, 2:40 pm

Onderhond wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 1:43 pm
flavo5000 wrote:
June 10th, 2020, 1:07 pm
You know, I've always seen Johnnie To and Takeshi Kitano as two sides of the same coin,
You draw a nice comparison, but only as directors. Kitano is way more active outside of the film business compared to To.
I like them both, for very similar reasons, though like you said, they both bring it in a different context.

As for Heroes of the East, not that big of a fan, but I prefer hand to hand combat over weapon-based martial arts.
Oh sure. I mean Kitano is kind of a renaissance man outside of directing.

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