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Official Indian Subcontinent Challenge - March 2020

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Lonewolf2003
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Re: Official Indian Subcontinent Challenge - March 2020

#81

Post by Lonewolf2003 » March 12th, 2020, 1:34 pm

3. 3 Idiots (2009, Rajkumar Hirani) India: 4.8 - Okay, it got its heart at the right place with a nice anticapitalist message about following your passion and there are a few good jokes. But it's overly melodramatic and cliched. For every step forward it takes three steps back again.
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1. Duvidha (1973, Mani Kaul) India: 7.0
2. Awaara [The Vagabond] (1951, Raj Kapoor) India: 5.8

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#82

Post by sol » March 12th, 2020, 3:14 pm

The World's Fastest IndianShow
1. Duvidha (1973) India
2. Saroja (2000) Sri Lanka
3. 3 Idiots (2009) India

4. Red Door (1997) India

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The premise certain comes with some promise here, but this is no Belly of an Architect in which a character's obsession with certain body parts has a debilitating effect. In fact, our protagonist's metal limbs delusion only comes into conversation on occasion with far more time dedicated to his curiosity over his chauffeur's complex love life. This mostly feels like a random and disorganised collection of memories and vignettes.
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#83

Post by Lonewolf2003 » March 12th, 2020, 3:20 pm

Question: I was planning on watching Baahubali: The Beginning for this challenge. On Netflix (the Dutch one) there are three versions; a Tegalog, Hindi and Englisch version. The first two are about the same length, the last one 20 minutes shorter. Which version should I watch?

(Yes I know there is also another thread for these kind of questions, but thought this question has the most change of being answered here now.)

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#84

Post by Traveller » March 12th, 2020, 5:10 pm

15. Baahubali: The Beginning (2015, India) - 2/10
Gotta agree with flavo5000. While some of the battle scenes were so over the top that they turned out to be entertaining, the rest was just plain stupid and embarrassingly bad. Won’t bother with the follow-up.
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July Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#85

Post by 72aicm » March 12th, 2020, 9:29 pm

33. Akaler Sandhane (1981, India)
34. Seemabaddha (1971, India)
SpoilerShow

1. Pukar (1939, India)
2. Chemmeen (1965, India)
3. Samskara (1970, India)
4. Dakhal (1982, India)
5. Prem Sanyas (1925, India)
6. Sagar Sangamey (1959, India)
7. Anuradha (1960, India)
8. Mahanagar (1963, India)
9. Shorts:
Raja Harishchandra (1913, India) 17min
I Am Twenty (1967, India) 19min
Figures of Thought (1990, India) 33min
10. Charachar (1994, India)
11. Lal Darja (1997, India)
12. Jago hua savera (1959, Pakistan)
13. Bagh Bahadur (1989, India)
14. Achhut Kanya (1936, India)
15. Amma Ariyan (1986, India)
16. Jhanak Jhanak Payal Baaje (1955, India)
17. Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1969, India)
18. Kabuliwala (1957, India)
19. Mondo Meyer Upakhyan (2002, India)
20. Adaminte Makan Abu (2011, India)
21. Antaheen (2009, India)
22. Chidambaram (1985, India)
23. Kathapurushan (1996, India)
24. Rabindranath Tagore (1961, India)
25. Ghatashraddha (1977, India)
26. Village Rockstars (2017, India)
27. Dweepa (2003, India)
28. An Indian Day (1968, India)
29. Damul (1985, India)
30. Shwaas (2004, India)
31. Nirmalyam (1973, India)
32. Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (1987, India)
33. Akaler Sandhane (1981, India)
34. Seemabaddha (1971, India)

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#86

Post by maxwelldeux » March 12th, 2020, 9:35 pm

Lonewolf2003 wrote:
March 12th, 2020, 3:20 pm
Question: I was planning on watching Baahubali: The Beginning for this challenge. On Netflix (the Dutch one) there are three versions; a Tegalog, Hindi and Englisch version. The first two are about the same length, the last one 20 minutes shorter. Which version should I watch?

(Yes I know there is also another thread for these kind of questions, but thought this question has the most change of being answered here now.)
Based on the comments in this challenge so far, I'd advise going with the shortest possible one. :lol:

What are the runtimes on the versions? Maybe flavo5000 or Traveller can weigh in with their thoughts...

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#87

Post by flavo5000 » March 12th, 2020, 10:10 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
March 12th, 2020, 9:35 pm
Lonewolf2003 wrote:
March 12th, 2020, 3:20 pm
Question: I was planning on watching Baahubali: The Beginning for this challenge. On Netflix (the Dutch one) there are three versions; a Tegalog, Hindi and Englisch version. The first two are about the same length, the last one 20 minutes shorter. Which version should I watch?

(Yes I know there is also another thread for these kind of questions, but thought this question has the most change of being answered here now.)
Based on the comments in this challenge so far, I'd advise going with the shortest possible one. :lol:

What are the runtimes on the versions? Maybe flavo5000 or Traveller can weigh in with their thoughts...
The one I watched was 2h 40m. It was the original Hindi version. But yea, watch the shortest possible... Or just not at all?

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#88

Post by Mario Gaborović » March 12th, 2020, 10:21 pm

I personally don't consider film as watched unless I've seen the longest version possible.

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#89

Post by flavo5000 » March 12th, 2020, 10:29 pm

Image
20. Village Rockstars (India, 2017)
While I appreciated that this character piece about a girl growing up and wanting to start a band in a small northern Indian village feels fresh and simple in comparison to the bloated extravagant Bollywood epics, it is also VERY slow-paced with little in the way of story beyond a girl who wants more than what tradition dictates. Still it was a nice change of pace.

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21. Kahaani (India, 2012)
Man... almost... You almost made this a good movie, Bollywood. There are certainly good things about it. The central story of a pregnant woman traveling to an unfamiliar city looking for her missing husband but finding nothing but mysterious dead ends is a solid plot and Vidya Balan is actually very good in the lead in a very charming and naturalistic performance uncharacteristic of Bollywood's usual over-emotive, melodrama. The movie is also refreshingly free of out-of-place, tone-destroying musical numbers. So what's the problem? Well, I see two primary issues: 1) The ending rubbed me the wrong way and turned into exactly the kind of movie I didn't want it to. 2) The directing was terrible and jittery, reminiscent of the MTV-style editing that's so prevalent in stuff like the Saw movies. It's like the director didn't have the confidence in the material to just leave it alone and let it play out on its own. Still, you can certainly do much worse as far as Indian movies go.

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22. Guide (India, 1965)
This was a pretty good one. I seem to be on a streak of watchable Indian movies which is a nice change of pace. In some ways this story of an ex-con who through a series of misunderstandings attains a kind of spiritual awakening, helping those around him, reminds me of the recent International Film Oscar Nominee Corpus Christi. While it has some of the same problems of unnecessary musical numbers in a couple of places and feels about 30 minutes too long, it's a touching movie in places with an excellent ending.
SpoilerShow
1. Mahanagar a.k.a. The Big City (India, 1963)
2. Kapurush a.k.a. The Coward (India, 1965)
3. Ghost Stories (India, 2020)
4. My Name Is Khan (India, 2010)
5. Mughal-E-Azam (1960)
6. Fakira (1976)
7. Gangs of Wasseypur Part 1 (2012)
8. Gangs of Wasseypur Part 2 (2012)
9. Ghare-Baire a.k.a. The Home and the World (1984)
10. James Bond 777 (1971)
11. Khuda Gawah (1992)
12. Agneepath (2012)
13. Baabarr (2009)
14. Bahubali: The Beginning (2015)
15. Dhoom:2 (2006)
16. Zhigrana (2015)
17. King Uncle (India, 1993)
18. Zinda Laash a.k.a. Dracula in Pakistan (Pakistan, 1967)
19. Don (India, 1978)
20. Village Rockstars (India, 2017)
21. Kahaani (India, 2012)
22. Guide (India, 1965)

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#90

Post by OldAle1 » March 12th, 2020, 11:50 pm

All films from INDIA unless o/w noted.
Carefully Curry-ated CinemaShow
1. Talaash (Reema Kagti, 2012)
2.Prem Sanyas / The Light of Asia (Franz Osten/Himanshu Rai, 1925)
3. Shiraz (Franz Osten, 1928)
4. Acchut Kanya / Untouchable Girl (Franz Osten, 1936)
5. 3 Idiots (Rajkumar Hirani, 2009)
6. Devdas (P.C. Barua, 1936)

Second sound version and first in Hindi (filmed previously the year before in Bengali by the same director) of this hoary old chestnut, a romance novel dating to 1900, which has now been done around 20 times according to Wiki. It's a fairly typical sad melodrama - typical it seems to me in almost any culture - about a couple of star-crossed lovers, wrong status/caste, etc, and their tragic lives as Devdas, the high-caste young man, enters of life of dissipation and gradual oncoming despair after both his family and that of Parvati, the lower-caste young woman reject their marriage. While trite in some ways, I can see the potential for a good film here, but sadly this isn't it, mostly due to the very wooden and amateur acting from nearly all parts; I saw another 1936 film earlier this month that is vastly better, so I think the technology was up to snuff in at least some of the Indian film industry by this point, but this film for whatever reason feels like something made at the very dawn of sound, with actors declaiming like they are on stage rather than film acting, and long lapses in the soundtrack. The music's OK and it's watchable overall but just barely.

7. Enthiran / Robot (S. Shankar, 2010)

Image

One of the brief comments on the icm listing says "instant cult movie" and I couldn't agree more. Totally goofy and wild sci-fi-action film - with loads of songs and dances of course, courtesy (thankfully) of A.R. Rahman - about scientist Vaseegeran (Rajnikanth) who builds a very human-like robot, nicknamed "Chitti" (also Rajnikanth) that is better than humans at just about everything...except of course that it has no emotions. But eventually the evil Dr. Bohra (Danny Denzongpa), Vaseegeran's mentor and rival, who wants to make robots to sell to military contracts, gets involved and through various machinations helps to make Chitti more human -- and able to desire Vaseegeran's beautiful fiancee (Aishwarya Rai), as well as able to break whichever one of Asimov's robotics laws covers not harming humans. Outlandish action scenes with heavy CGI usage that ranges from terrible (the fire rescue scene) to very good (most of the rest of the film thankfully). This does get a little wearing at times at 3 hours or so but I found it totally fun, my kind of silly escapism. Rai is mostly here just to be beautiful - but the film is pretty self-aware and has fun with this and other elements, like the two idiot helpers the scientist employs; Rajnikanth is absolutely amazing though in his dual role, especially as the robot who seems a cross between Yun-Fat Chow and Buster Keaton in his combination of coolness and acrobatics. Badass. Probably the best primarily action-oriented Bollywood film I've seen up to this point, and I've now seen three films with A.R. Rahman scores and liked the music in all of them - that definitely helps a lot.

8. Baazi / High Stakes (Guru Dutt, 1951)

Hindi musical-noir? You bet! This is the third Dutt film I've seen and I loved the other two so was very much looking forward to this, his first film as director. Well, it's good but it's not quite on the level of Kaagaz Ke Phool or especially Pyaasa, and I think a good part of that has to do with the lack of Dutt as lead actor here. Dev Anand, one of India's biggest stars for decades, is no mean actor but he doesn't for me have the director's charisma and intensity or sense of tragedy. At any rate, Anand plays Madan, a young man struggling to get ahead and lost in gambling debts, who enters the easy life that masks a world of crime, murder, etc, when he takes a position with a gambling syndicate run by a (literally) shadowed mastermind. He has to do this to take care of his sister who has TB (ah, the melodrama), and along the way he meets a beautiful young doctor and of course romance blossoms. This all works fairly well, with I suppose enough songs to please the mainstream audience but enough downbeat noir elements for fans of the director - and film noir generally - such as myself. There's a surprise reveal for a main character that probably won't surprise most people, and while at times this does go more into the typical Hindi melodrama areas, the ending could be straight out of a Hollywood crime film from the period. Overall very solid if nowhere near great.

9. Talvar / Guilty (Meghna Gulzar, 2015)

Apparently based on a true case from 2008, this police procedural involving a double murder is a damning portrait of India's criminal justice system, from top to bottom. A young woman is murdered in her room in the family's apartment, and shortly afterwards the man who is an initial suspect, their servant, is discovered dead by the same means (blow to the head and then throat cut) on the roof of the same building, outside his own apartment. The initial "investigation" by the local police is obviously totally incompetent, and the cop at the head of it is presented as full of his own hypocritical conservative views which lead him to believe that it was, in fact, an honor killing by the parents themselves over something between the servant and daughter; when this investigation is judged to be poorly run (and is getting too much bad press in the media), the CID - I presume India's equivalent of the FBI - steps in, with an investigation led by a celebrated detective, Ashwin Kumar (Irrfan Khan, really excellent here) who is undergoing his own crisis in his marriage and is under continuous strain. And this isn't enough as new information - and new political/social concerns - continue to pile up until a messy, unfortunate and deeply dissatisfying (in terms of the narrative, not the film itself) conclusion. This is one of the best recent police procedurals I've seen, and with it's very limited (and largely appropriate) use of songs I think it would be an ideal film from the Bollywood-phobic who want to see what Indian film can do when it plays by more western rules - though as some reviews have pointed out, many of the actions of the cops on all levels do seem a bit strange given the overt moralizing that we see - which isn't present in such an overt way in western justice systems anymore.

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#91

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » March 13th, 2020, 12:23 am

(Screenshots from 'Kashmir Ki Kali' and 'Rangeela')

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09. 'Seema' / 1955, Amiya Chakrabarty / 7.5/10 / India
10. 'Mem Sahib' / 1956, R.C. Talwar / 7.5 or 8/10 / India
11. 'Kashmir Ki Kali' / 1964, Shakti Samanta / 9/10 / India
12. 'Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro' / 1983, Kundan Shah / 7/10 / India
13. 'Rangeela' / 1995, Ram Gopal Varma / 8.5/10 / India
14. 'Talaash' / 2012, Reema Kagti / 7.5/10 / India

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That's all, folks!

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#92

Post by Mario Gaborović » March 13th, 2020, 12:43 pm

14. The Red Phallus (2018) - Bhutan
15. Aparajito (1956) - India
16. 3 Idiots (2009) - India

SpoilerShow
1. Salaam Bombay! (1988) - India
2. Subarnarekha (1965) - India
3. I am Twenty (1967) + On the Move (1970) + Little Terrorist (2004) - India
4. Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham... (2001) - India
5. Hum Aapke Hain Koun...! (1994) - India
6. Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995) - India
7. Kal Ho Naa Ho (2003) - India
8. Seto Surya (2016) - Nepal
9. Black Friday (2004) - India
10. Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India (2001) - India
11. Dangal (2016) - India
12. Waar (2013) - Pakistan
13. Pura Handa Kaluwara (1997) - Sri Lanka

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#93

Post by sol » March 13th, 2020, 1:32 pm

The World's Fastest IndianShow
1. Duvidha (1973) India
2. Saroja (2000) Sri Lanka
3. 3 Idiots (2009) India
4. Red Door (1997) India

5. Light of Asia (1925) India

Image

This silent is technically well done, with reaction shots and changes in shot distance/length well handled. As a narrative though, the film leaves a bit to be desired. The early scenes are the best, pseudo-documentary in approach as we get a travelogue of India and its important places. As it drifts into one of the locals telling the story of Buddha though, things become less engaging despite some spectacular animal action (and anti-animal violence stuff).
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#94

Post by Mario Gaborović » March 13th, 2020, 1:36 pm

It's March 13 and why there's no statistical updates yet??

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#95

Post by OldAle1 » March 13th, 2020, 2:05 pm

All films from INDIA unless o/w noted.
Carefully Curry-ated CinemaShow
1. Talaash (Reema Kagti, 2012)
2.Prem Sanyas / The Light of Asia (Franz Osten/Himanshu Rai, 1925)
3. Shiraz (Franz Osten, 1928)
4. Acchut Kanya / Untouchable Girl (Franz Osten, 1936)
5. 3 Idiots (Rajkumar Hirani, 2009)
6. Devdas (P.C. Barua, 1936)
7. Enthiran / Robot (S. Shankar, 2010)
8. Baazi / High Stakes (Guru Dutt, 1951)
9. Talvar / Guilty (Meghna Gulzar, 2015)
10. Do Bigha Zamin / Two Acres of Land (Bimal Roy, 1953)

While it's the Bengali cinema of Satyajit Ray and, to a lesser extent, Ritwik Ghatak that has made the grade in the western arthouse circles for most of the past 65 years, it's obvious from this film and many others that Hindi cinema was operating in the same sphere at times, and on the same level if this terrific film is any indication. This is my first Roy film and I've yet to see much of the neo-realist influenced drama apart from the two names I just mentioned, so I wasn't sure what to expect but... it really does have much of the same bleakness and desperation - but always with at least a hint of the positive - of something like early De Sica. In this case we have not a bicycle but a rickshaw, a rickshaw drawn by a poor farmer who has gone to Kolkota to earn the money he needs to pay off the rich landowner who's going to take his farmer and build a factory on it, and the film chronicles the moments of seeming good fortune interspersed with the many more scenes of despair and bad news as the man and his young son (working as a shoe shine boy, then a pickpocket) both struggle against insurmountable odds, while his wife back home scrapes by and tries to care for his dying father. Bleak but beautifully told, with relatively restrained music by Salil Choudhury; I guess in some ways this feels a bit over-familiar, and just a little more melodramatic in the end than I think it needs to be, but these aren't major issues.

11. Nagarik / The Citizen (Ritwik Ghatak, 1952)
12. Ajantrik / Pathetic Fallacy (Ritwik Ghatak, 1958)
13. Meghe Dhaka Tara / The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)

I saw Ghatak's Subarnarekha in 2015 and was pretty knocked out by it, but haven't gotten back around to his work since - now's the opportunity to hit at least his better-known other films, which as it turns out have much in common but also plenty of significant differences from each other.

Nagarik, Ghatak's second feature, feels in may ways, after watching all three of these films, like a dry-run for Meghe Dhaka Tara with a very similar family situation at the heart of the film. A family that was of some means has come down in the world in migrating to Kokota just after the partitioning of India, living now in a big but rather ruinous house in what seems to be a lower-middle-class neighborhood, a situation which touches the resigned, wistful mother and bitter father and two adult children in very different ways. Throughout the film son Ramu, a college graduate, continues to try getting jobs that are beneath him -- but still unattainable, while daugther Seeta can only really hope for marriage to Sagar (a distant relative I think .. subs weren't always clear) who has come to room with them but who also can't make ends meet. This has a very noir-like and claustrophobic feel for the most part, a vision of a city and a people and family on the edge, and if it offers a moment of hope at the end as the characters walk out in the rain towards a new life in an even lower-class situation, it's hard to share their optimism.

Ajantrik is the closest thing to a comedy that I've seen so far in Ghatak and indeed the first half to two-thirds is at times a pretty light-hearted affair, the story of a rural taxi driver, Bimal (a great Kali Bannerjee) and his one true love, his broken-down decades-old car which he has named Jagaddal. Rosenbaum in his review compares this to Jacques Tati in terms of the ways in which the sounds of the car evoke the character and mood of the film, as Hulot's car does in Les vacances de Monsieur Hulot, though he admits he doesn't know if Ghatak had seen the Tati film. He certainly hadn't seen Dariush Mehrjui's Gaav because it wasn't made for another decade, but that's the film that this reminded me of the most, in being a film about a man essentially in love with something non-human - a car or a cow, it doesn't matter in a sense, the love is all one way though the man in both films seems deluded into thinking otherwise. Jagaddal has served Bimal well for 15 years since the death of his mother - it seems the man has never been able to develop any other significant relationships - and the film shows us how Bimal copes with Jagaddal's advancing age and decrepitude, much as he must have coped with his mother's illness. This presents a very different character than I've seen in Indian cinema of this period, a man of existential loneliness, angry at the world but without the family support - even if tenuous as it seems to be in most Ghatak films - though as I said, it's also a pretty amusing film at times early on. And it makes some excellent use of sound - not just in terms of the car sounds but wind and road and the noise of the village and town, something Ghatak focuses on more than most filmmakers; these are films that I really wish I could see AND hear under better conditions than I have available to me.

Meghe Dhaka Tara is as I mentioned in the first paragraph, similar broadly to Nagarik in it's focus on a family unit and their struggles against poverty, and like that film there's a feeling that they have come down in the world, though it's not as specifically stated and the family lives in a rural environment outside of the big city. Here we have an ailing father who spouts poetry, a mother worried mostly about her sons, and children Mantu - stolid but perhaps not terribly ambitious or bright; Gita, vain and mostly interested in finding a husband; Shankar, a starry-eyed dreamer who wants to be a singer but mostly just wastes time; and Nita, the main protagonist, a bright student who defends Shankar from insults but who takes on all the burdens of the family herself when it becomes increasingly necessary. She's also in love with Sanat, another student who wants to marry her but turns away when she has to leave her studies and go to work.

It's all a pretty familiar story at this point even for someone who's seen as little Indian cinema as I have, but what makes this special is everything else - the acting, especially by Supriya Choudhury as Nita; the constant whipsawing between joy (most evident in Shankar's magical, longing songs) and gloom - rarely has a film made such expert use of that much-hated element, melodrama; the use of light and natural sound combine to create a really powerful sense of a world as it is, in flux and with no determined future, and a family that one can't rely on but can't abandon or hate either. I don't know if it's a tribute to the film's greatness or what, but being closer to the foolish lazy dreamer Shankar I nevertheless felt an enormous kinship with Nita throughout. I wish I had been smarter and looked at the copy I had first, which isn't that good - I'd forgotten that Criterion put this out recently. I suspect another viewing with better subs, picture and especially sound will improve this even above the sublime level I'd already put it on. Easily the best film of this challenge so far for me.

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#96

Post by Traveller » March 13th, 2020, 4:46 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
March 12th, 2020, 10:10 pm
maxwelldeux wrote:
March 12th, 2020, 9:35 pm
Lonewolf2003 wrote:
March 12th, 2020, 3:20 pm
Question: I was planning on watching Baahubali: The Beginning for this challenge. On Netflix (the Dutch one) there are three versions; a Tegalog, Hindi and Englisch version. The first two are about the same length, the last one 20 minutes shorter. Which version should I watch?

(Yes I know there is also another thread for these kind of questions, but thought this question has the most change of being answered here now.)
Based on the comments in this challenge so far, I'd advise going with the shortest possible one. :lol:

What are the runtimes on the versions? Maybe flavo5000 or Traveller can weigh in with their thoughts...
The one I watched was 2h 40m. It was the original Hindi version. But yea, watch the shortest possible... Or just not at all?
Same for mine. The reason I didn't comment was I don't know what the shorter version is missing - and that there even was shorter version at all. :D

16. Rabindranath Tagore (1961, India) - 7/10
ICM
July Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#97

Post by maxwelldeux » March 13th, 2020, 6:44 pm

Mario Gaborović wrote:
March 13th, 2020, 1:36 pm
It's March 13 and why there's no statistical updates yet??
Relatively low volume, laziness, and other things on my mind. I'll do a halfway update this weekend.

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#98

Post by 72aicm » March 13th, 2020, 9:26 pm

35. Marupakkam (1990, India)
36. Khamosh Pani: Silent Waters (2003, Pakistan)
SpoilerShow
1. Pukar (1939, India)
2. Chemmeen (1965, India)
3. Samskara (1970, India)
4. Dakhal (1982, India)
5. Prem Sanyas (1925, India)
6. Sagar Sangamey (1959, India)
7. Anuradha (1960, India)
8. Mahanagar (1963, India)
9. Shorts:
Raja Harishchandra (1913, India) 17min
I Am Twenty (1967, India) 19min
Figures of Thought (1990, India) 33min
10. Charachar (1994, India)
11. Lal Darja (1997, India)
12. Jago hua savera (1959, Pakistan)
13. Bagh Bahadur (1989, India)
14. Achhut Kanya (1936, India)
15. Amma Ariyan (1986, India)
16. Jhanak Jhanak Payal Baaje (1955, India)
17. Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1969, India)
18. Kabuliwala (1957, India)
19. Mondo Meyer Upakhyan (2002, India)
20. Adaminte Makan Abu (2011, India)
21. Antaheen (2009, India)
22. Chidambaram (1985, India)
23. Kathapurushan (1996, India)
24. Rabindranath Tagore (1961, India)
25. Ghatashraddha (1977, India)
26. Village Rockstars (2017, India)
27. Dweepa (2003, India)
28. An Indian Day (1968, India)
29. Damul (1985, India)
30. Shwaas (2004, India)
31. Nirmalyam (1973, India)
32. Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (1987, India)
33. Akaler Sandhane (1981, India)
34. Seemabaddha (1971, India)
35. Marupakkam (1990, India)
36. Khamosh Pani: Silent Waters (2003, Pakistan)

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#99

Post by flavo5000 » March 14th, 2020, 12:53 pm

Man, after this trio of depressing movies, honestly a goofy Bollywood movie is sounding pretty good...

Image
23. Ganashatru a.k.a. An Enemy of the People (India, 1989)
While not the strongest Ray with it being quite slow moving, especially early on, the message of science vs greed, religion and stupidity it delivers it still depressingly resonant today.

Image
24. 36 Chowringhee Lane (India, 1981)
This one focuses on a sub-culture that really isn't touched on much in cinema, that of the Anglo-Indian and in particular a rather sad story of an older lady whose niece moves away leaving her alone in her apartment in Calcutta until a young couple moves in next door. Unfortunately, sincerity is in short supply in these times... This just bummed me out. Recommended for people who enjoy watching sad older ladies get a glimmer of hope only to see it squashed.

Image
25. A Death in the Gunj (India, 2016)
Well, here's a soul-crushing drama about a young guy searching for meaning in his life after a series of crappy life events leaves him mixed up inside. He goes on a family trip to a cabin in the woods where he's forced to face his demons, leading to an inevitably grim outcome that was telegraphed from the beginning. This was actually a quite good character study with some nice subtle acting and a solid script that conveys Shutu's inner struggle effectively without being overly obvious with it. It's also shot quite well in a more naturalistic style suited to the material. Not what I expected but certainly recommended for anyone looking for a change of pace from the bombast of the Bollywood machine.
SpoilerShow
1. Mahanagar a.k.a. The Big City (India, 1963)
2. Kapurush a.k.a. The Coward (India, 1965)
3. Ghost Stories (India, 2020)
4. My Name Is Khan (India, 2010)
5. Mughal-E-Azam (1960)
6. Fakira (1976)
7. Gangs of Wasseypur Part 1 (2012)
8. Gangs of Wasseypur Part 2 (2012)
9. Ghare-Baire a.k.a. The Home and the World (1984)
10. James Bond 777 (1971)
11. Khuda Gawah (1992)
12. Agneepath (2012)
13. Baabarr (2009)
14. Bahubali: The Beginning (2015)
15. Dhoom:2 (2006)
16. Zhigrana (2015)
17. King Uncle (India, 1993)
18. Zinda Laash a.k.a. Dracula in Pakistan (Pakistan, 1967)
19. Don (India, 1978)
20. Village Rockstars (India, 2017)
21. Kahaani (India, 2012)
22. Guide (India, 1965)
23. Ganashatru a.k.a. An Enemy of the People (1989)
24. 36 Chowringhee Lane (1981)
25. A Death in the Gunj (2016)

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#100

Post by Traveller » March 14th, 2020, 5:21 pm

17. The Coward (1965, India) - 7/10
18. The Holy Man (1965, India) - 7/10
ICM
July Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#101

Post by 72aicm » March 14th, 2020, 7:42 pm

37. Rekava (1956, Sri Lanka)
38. Thani Thatuwen Piyambanna (2002, Sri Lanka)
39. Sulanga Enu Pinisa (2005, Sri Lanka)
40. Lalsalu (2001, Bangladesh)
41. Phörpa (1999, Bhutan)
SpoilerShow

1. Pukar (1939, India)
2. Chemmeen (1965, India)
3. Samskara (1970, India)
4. Dakhal (1982, India)
5. Prem Sanyas (1925, India)
6. Sagar Sangamey (1959, India)
7. Anuradha (1960, India)
8. Mahanagar (1963, India)
9. Shorts:
Raja Harishchandra (1913, India) 17min
I Am Twenty (1967, India) 19min
Figures of Thought (1990, India) 33min
10. Charachar (1994, India)
11. Lal Darja (1997, India)
12. Jago hua savera (1959, Pakistan)
13. Bagh Bahadur (1989, India)
14. Achhut Kanya (1936, India)
15. Amma Ariyan (1986, India)
16. Jhanak Jhanak Payal Baaje (1955, India)
17. Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1969, India)
18. Kabuliwala (1957, India)
19. Mondo Meyer Upakhyan (2002, India)
20. Adaminte Makan Abu (2011, India)
21. Antaheen (2009, India)
22. Chidambaram (1985, India)
23. Kathapurushan (1996, India)
24. Rabindranath Tagore (1961, India)
25. Ghatashraddha (1977, India)
26. Village Rockstars (2017, India)
27. Dweepa (2003, India)
28. An Indian Day (1968, India)
29. Damul (1985, India)
30. Shwaas (2004, India)
31. Nirmalyam (1973, India)
32. Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (1987, India)
33. Akaler Sandhane (1981, India)
34. Seemabaddha (1971, India)
35. Marupakkam (1990, India)
36. Khamosh Pani: Silent Waters (2003, Pakistan)
37. Rekava (1956, Sri Lanka)
38. Thani Thatuwen Piyambanna (2002, Sri Lanka)
39. Sulanga Enu Pinisa (2005, Sri Lanka)
40. Lalsalu (2001, Bangladesh)
41. Phörpa (1999, Bhutan)

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#102

Post by Mario Gaborović » March 14th, 2020, 9:50 pm

17. Apur Sansar (1959) - India
18. Lalsalu (2001) - Bangladesh
19. Stop Genocide (1971) + Agami (1984) + Murgi Keno Mutant (2011) + The Last SMS (2017) - Bangladesh

SpoilerShow
1. Salaam Bombay! (1988) - India
2. Subarnarekha (1965) - India
3. I am Twenty (1967) + On the Move (1970) + Little Terrorist (2004) - India
4. Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham... (2001) - India
5. Hum Aapke Hain Koun...! (1994) - India
6. Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995) - India
7. Kal Ho Naa Ho (2003) - India
8. Seto Surya (2016) - Nepal
9. Black Friday (2004) - India
10. Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India (2001) - India
11. Dangal (2016) - India
12. Waar (2013) - Pakistan
13. Pura Handa Kaluwara (1997) - Sri Lanka
14. The Red Phallus (2018) - Bhutan
15. Aparajito (1956) - India
16. 3 Idiots (2009) - India

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RogerTheMovieManiac88
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#103

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » March 15th, 2020, 1:12 am

(Screenshot/poster from 'Sakshi' and 'Nachom-ia Kumpasar')

Image

15. 'Passport' / 1961, Pramod Chakravorty / 6.5/10 / India
16. 'Sakshi' / 1967, Bapu / 9/10 / India
17. 'Majboor' / 1974, Ravi Tandon / 8/10 / India
18. 'Kalaakaar' / 1983, P. Sambasiva Rao / 4.5 or 5/10 / India
19. 'Ek Chadar Maili Si' / 1986, Sukhwant Dhadda / 7.5/10 / India
20. 'Nachom-ia Kumpasar' / 2015, Bardroy Barretto / 7.5 or 8/10 / India

Image
That's all, folks!

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sol
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#104

Post by sol » March 15th, 2020, 4:29 am

The World's Fastest IndianShow
1. Duvidha (1973) India
2. Saroja (2000) Sri Lanka
3. 3 Idiots (2009) India
4. Red Door (1997) India
5. Light of Asia (1925) India

6. Kaliya Mardan (1919) India

Image

This often feels like a random collection of skits strung together, but Mandakini Phalke (a girl playing a boy) is so charming that this is a difficult film to dismiss. Her energy is absolutely endless and includes such stunts as parachuting into a couple's bedroom at night to play a prank on a bearded man. The creature effects are also pretty decent for their age, plus the film avoids relying on title cards, but as a narrative this is pretty much a mess.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
Image Image Image

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#105

Post by OldAle1 » March 15th, 2020, 4:29 pm

All films from INDIA unless o/w noted.
Carefully Curry-ated CinemaShow
1. Talaash (Reema Kagti, 2012)
2.Prem Sanyas / The Light of Asia (Franz Osten/Himanshu Rai, 1925)
3. Shiraz (Franz Osten, 1928)
4. Acchut Kanya / Untouchable Girl (Franz Osten, 1936)
5. 3 Idiots (Rajkumar Hirani, 2009)
6. Devdas (P.C. Barua, 1936)
7. Enthiran / Robot (S. Shankar, 2010)
8. Baazi / High Stakes (Guru Dutt, 1951)
9. Talvar / Guilty (Meghna Gulzar, 2015)
10. Do Bigha Zamin / Two Acres of Land (Bimal Roy, 1953)
11. Nagarik / The Citizen (Ritwik Ghatak, 1952)
12. Ajantrik / Pathetic Fallacy (Ritwik Ghatak, 1958)
13. Meghe Dhaka Tara / The Cloud-Capped Star (Ritwik Ghatak, 1960)
14. Taare Zameen Par / Like Stars on Earth (Aamir Khan/Amole Gupta, 2007)

Given how 3 Idiots presents Aamir Khan as sort of a teacher-savior-spiritual-guru also, I wonder if he grew up wanting to be a teacher, had parent as teachers, etc? Anyway, this film like that one is high on the IMDb list and the IMDb Indian films list, and like 3 Idiots it's a ridiculously overlong piece of sentimental tripe filled with largely uninteresting songs and a message that boils down to "be yourself". I didn't find this nearly as terrible, in part because the whole theme of dyslexia is handled with reasonable sensitivity - after the first third of the film that is where it seems like the poor 8-year-old kid Ishaan, who can't seem to do anything, is destined for bullying and torture culminating perhaps in suicide. Jeez this is depressing and irritating at first, though it should be said that it's mostly the stereotypical "I want my son to be smart and to become a doctor or engineer" father who exemplifies the worst and most obvious elements of the characterizations here. But once Magical Art Teacher Aamir Khan enters the scene after Ishaan has been shunted off to boarding school, everything turns around. Almost immediately: there's a hilariously awful scene where Khan as to show Mean Dad a box with Chinese lettering and ask him to read it to demonstrate what Ishaan is going through, and the Dad INSTANTLY gets it. It's frustrating to me - I find Khan very charismatic as an actor and he has a decent range, and he contributes the best (or at least most memorable) musical number here as well, but all these damn mawkish inspirational films involving teachers or sports (Dangal and Lagaan most noticeably) really showcase a lot of what I don't like about Bollywood. Well OK I liked Lagaan a fair bit but 1 out of 4 of his most famous films isn't a good batting average, or whatever the cricket equivalent of that is.

15. Andhadhum / The Blind Melody (Sriram Raghavan, 2018)

Fairly inventive Bollywood thriller about a blind pianist who stumbles into a murder/possible robbery scene but can't say anything about it to the cops for reasons best left unstated here - I could spoiler this but since the first big reveal comes after just a few minutes and changes the whole film, I won't bother. Suffice it to say that this becomes increasingly unbelievable and goofy - it is called a "black comedy" by some and I suppose that works, though I didn't find it very funny in most respects and it seemed very calculated throughout - but if one is not too addicted to their crime thrillers being "realistic", I think it's pretty fun overall. A fair bit of music - mostly in the first hour - but then our protagonist is a musician so in this case it makes some sense, and the melodramatic elements are muted here. Reminiscent of plenty of dark-yet-funny crime films from the last 30 years, ranging from Tarantino to quite a few South Korean examples, this does nevertheless stake it's own ground and it's refreshing coming from India, at least given what I've seen so far.

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#106

Post by jeroeno » March 15th, 2020, 5:00 pm

09. Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (India, 1987)
10. Khayal Gatha (India, 1989)

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#107

Post by Traveller » March 15th, 2020, 5:12 pm

19. Distant Thunder (1973, India) - 7/10
ICM
July Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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72aicm
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#108

Post by 72aicm » March 15th, 2020, 7:55 pm

42. Gamperaliya (1963, Sri Lanka)
43. Himalaya - l'enfance d'un chef (1999, Nepal)
44. Matir moina (2002, Bangladesh)
SpoilerShow

1. Pukar (1939, India)
2. Chemmeen (1965, India)
3. Samskara (1970, India)
4. Dakhal (1982, India)
5. Prem Sanyas (1925, India)
6. Sagar Sangamey (1959, India)
7. Anuradha (1960, India)
8. Mahanagar (1963, India)
9. Shorts:
Raja Harishchandra (1913, India) 17min
I Am Twenty (1967, India) 19min
Figures of Thought (1990, India) 33min
10. Charachar (1994, India)
11. Lal Darja (1997, India)
12. Jago hua savera (1959, Pakistan)
13. Bagh Bahadur (1989, India)
14. Achhut Kanya (1936, India)
15. Amma Ariyan (1986, India)
16. Jhanak Jhanak Payal Baaje (1955, India)
17. Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1969, India)
18. Kabuliwala (1957, India)
19. Mondo Meyer Upakhyan (2002, India)
20. Adaminte Makan Abu (2011, India)
21. Antaheen (2009, India)
22. Chidambaram (1985, India)
23. Kathapurushan (1996, India)
24. Rabindranath Tagore (1961, India)
25. Ghatashraddha (1977, India)
26. Village Rockstars (2017, India)
27. Dweepa (2003, India)
28. An Indian Day (1968, India)
29. Damul (1985, India)
30. Shwaas (2004, India)
31. Nirmalyam (1973, India)
32. Halodhia Choraye Baodhan Khai (1987, India)
33. Akaler Sandhane (1981, India)
34. Seemabaddha (1971, India)
35. Marupakkam (1990, India)
36. Khamosh Pani: Silent Waters (2003, Pakistan)
37. Rekava (1956, Sri Lanka)
38. Thani Thatuwen Piyambanna (2002, Sri Lanka)
39. Sulanga Enu Pinisa (2005, Sri Lanka)
40. Lalsalu (2001, Bangladesh)
41. Phörpa (1999, Bhutan)
42. Gamperaliya (1963, Sri Lanka)
43. Himalaya - l'enfance d'un chef (1999, Nepal)
44. Matir moina (2002, Bangladesh)

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#109

Post by jdidaco » March 15th, 2020, 10:02 pm

Thank your for hosting, max!

(Screenshots from 'Jago Hua Savera' & 'Towers of Silence'),

Image

1. Jago Hua Savera (The Day Shall Dawn, A.J. Kardar, 1959) 9/10 (Bangladesh)
2. Shakespeare-Wallah (James Ivory, 1965) 8/10 (India)
3. Golu hadawatha (Silence of the Heart, Lester James Peries, 1969) 8/10 (Sri Lanka)
4. Samskara (Funeral Rites, Pattabhi Rama Reddy, 1970) 10/10 (India)
5. Jukti, Takko Aar Gappo (Reason, Debate and a Story, Ritwik Ghatak, 1974) 8/10 (India)
6. Towers of Silence (Jamil Dehlavi, 1975) 8/10 (Pakistan)
7. Bambaru Avith (The Wasps Are Here, Darmasena Pathiraja 1977) 9/10 (Sri Lanka)
8. The Blood of Hussain (Jamil Dehlavi, 1980) 8.5/10 (Pakistan)
9. Bagh Bahadur (The Tiger Dancer, Buddhadev Dasgupta, 1989) 8.5/10 (India)
10. Uttara (The Wrestlers, Buddhadev Dasgupta, 2000) 8/10 (India)

Image

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#110

Post by frbrown » March 16th, 2020, 12:27 am

jdidaco wrote:
March 15th, 2020, 10:02 pm
(Screenshots from 'Jago Hua Savera' & 'Towers of Silence'),

Image
Quite a screenshot!

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#111

Post by blocho » March 16th, 2020, 3:20 am

2. Machan (2008, Sri Lanka)
Thanks to max-scl for recommending this. A mash-up of illegal immigration drama and sports comedy, and if that sounds unorthodox, then this is definitely not a typical sports or immigration movie. And that turns out to be a very good thing. A bunch of Sri Lankans want to leave their country for better opportunities in Europe. Despairing of doing so through legal means, they eventually fall on the ruse of finagling an invitation to a handball tournament in Germany, even though none of them know what handball is. It's a ridiculous concept, of course. And then I found out it's actually a true story.

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#112

Post by Mario Gaborović » March 16th, 2020, 9:50 am

20. Emeehun (2017)* - Maldives + The Inner Eye (1972) + Bala (1976) - India
21. Rang De Basanti (2006) - India
22. Kittonkhola (2000) - Bangladesh

SpoilerShow
1. Salaam Bombay! (1988) - India
2. Subarnarekha (1965) - India
3. I am Twenty (1967) + On the Move (1970) + Little Terrorist (2004) - India
4. Kabhi Khushi Kabhie Gham... (2001) - India
5. Hum Aapke Hain Koun...! (1994) - India
6. Dilwale Dulhania Le Jayenge (1995) - India
7. Kal Ho Naa Ho (2003) - India
8. Seto Surya (2016) - Nepal
9. Black Friday (2004) - India
10. Lagaan: Once Upon a Time in India (2001) - India
11. Dangal (2016) - India
12. Waar (2013) - Pakistan
13. Pura Handa Kaluwara (1997) - Sri Lanka
14. The Red Phallus (2018) - Bhutan
15. Aparajito (1956) - India
16. 3 Idiots (2009) - India
17. Apur Sansar (1959) - India
18. Lalsalu (2001) - Bangladesh
19. Stop Genocide (1971) + Agami (1984) + Murgi Keno Mutant (2011) + The Last SMS (2017) - Bangladesh

* not on IMDb

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#113

Post by Lonewolf2003 » March 16th, 2020, 4:39 pm

4. Baahubali: The Beginning (2015, S.S. Rajamouli) India: 5.5
5. Baahubali 2: The Conclusion (2017, S.S. Rajamouli) India: 5.8 -It's easy to get caught up in the epic scale of these movies, making large parts an nice mind-numbing entertaining distraction. All the bombastic over-the-top hero celebrations does at times get close to self-parody. Unfortunately the epic journey the hero (of the main story line) undertakes is not linked to any character development (maybe this is a difference between Indian and Western storytelling, I have seen too few Indian movies to answer that question.); The hero starts the first movie and ends as a superhuman. That's why the second movie and second part of the first one, which focus on the flashback, are slightly better. The typical power scheming and epic wars in that are more interesting. (I watched the Tegalog version for the first one, and the Hindi version for the second)

SpoilerShow
1. Duvidha (1973, Mani Kaul) India: 7.0
2. Awaara [The Vagabond] (1951, Raj Kapoor) India: 5.8
3. 3 Idiots (2009, Rajkumar Hirani) India: 4.8
Last edited by Lonewolf2003 on March 16th, 2020, 4:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#114

Post by Traveller » March 16th, 2020, 4:41 pm

20. The Vicious Circle (1981, India) - 4/10
ICM
July Challenge: Image
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#115

Post by flavo5000 » March 16th, 2020, 5:18 pm

Image
26. Raja Harishchandra (1913)
Like sol said about Kaliya Mardan, this feels like more a collection of random scenes with a very loose plot that a full-blown movie. Given it's the very first Indian feature film that's not surprising though. It does have some neat Melies-esque effects though for anyone interested. The version on youtube has a ten-minute making of video at the beginning as well that's kind of interesting since we really don't have much of this kind of thing from this time period in general.

Image
27. Talaash (2012)
Here we have a kind neo-noir as interpreted by Bollywood starring Aamir Khan's moustache. It's not bad but the script could've used a little bit of a polish. It depends too much on random events and coincidences that stretch believe-ability. The directing is also a little overly polished for the style it's trying to evoke. Still, it's above average.

Image
28. Haunted - 3D (2011)
This on the other hand is not above average. Vikram Bhatt brings us another thoroughly mediocre horror film full of lame jump scares, cheesy effects, inappropriately tone-ruining music numbers and in a new addition, ineffective 3D. It does throw in a time travel element that on the surface appears to start to mix things up but it just devolves into many of the same tropes. At the end of the day though it's pretty similar to the director's other movies like 1920 and Raaz.

Image
29. Pizza (2012)
Pizza, the original Tamil version I watched on Prime, mostly does right what movies like Haunted and 1920 screw up. The horror sequences are genuinely suspense and use jump scares effectively. The directing is solid. The characters are actually fairly interesting, establishing a kind of marital crisis early on to escalate the stakes. While developments later on take it in an unexpected direction, I thought it mostly worked although the movie could've used a little constructive editing to tighten the narrative. Overall though, I thought this was one of the better horror movies I've seen from India lately. I haven't seen the Hindi remake from a couple years later but I've heard it doesn't compare well to this one. I may check it out sometime soon just to do a side-by-side comparison though.

Image
30. Pistolwali (1972)
Incredibly garish Indian western with a female lead involving shootouts tiger wrestling and all manner of melodramatic plot turns. Honestly I had some fun with this one even though I'm not gonna say it's a work of art.

Image
31. Satte Pe Satta (1982)
Basically this is a loose remake of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers with an Indian twist and I disliked it almost as much as the terrible, sexist, problematic original. I will say this one does try to comment a couple times on how sketchy forced marriage is but barrels ahead with the narrative anyway. I mean, I guess these kinds of movies aren't intended to be taken too seriously but even taken on its own, it's just too long and too goofy.

Image
32. 1920: Evil Returns (2012)
Sigh... just see my review above for Haunted 3D but remove the 3D and switch out the director for someone even more incompetent.
SpoilerShow
1. Mahanagar a.k.a. The Big City (India, 1963)
2. Kapurush a.k.a. The Coward (India, 1965)
3. Ghost Stories (India, 2020)
4. My Name Is Khan (India, 2010)
5. Mughal-E-Azam (1960)
6. Fakira (1976)
7. Gangs of Wasseypur Part 1 (2012)
8. Gangs of Wasseypur Part 2 (2012)
9. Ghare-Baire a.k.a. The Home and the World (1984)
10. James Bond 777 (1971)
11. Khuda Gawah (1992)
12. Agneepath (2012)
13. Baabarr (2009)
14. Bahubali: The Beginning (2015)
15. Dhoom:2 (2006)
16. Zhigrana (2015)
17. King Uncle (India, 1993)
18. Zinda Laash a.k.a. Dracula in Pakistan (Pakistan, 1967)
19. Don (India, 1978)
20. Village Rockstars (India, 2017)
21. Kahaani (India, 2012)
22. Guide (India, 1965)
23. Ganashatru a.k.a. An Enemy of the People (1989)
24. 36 Chowringhee Lane (1981)
25. A Death in the Gunj (2016)
26. Raja Harishchandra (1913)
27. Talaash (2012)
28. Haunted - 3D (2011)
29. Pizza (2012)
30. Pistolwali (1972)
31. Satte Pe Satta (1982)
32. 1920: Evil Returns (2012)
Last edited by flavo5000 on March 16th, 2020, 6:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#116

Post by hurluberlu » March 16th, 2020, 6:00 pm

5. The Emperor of the Mughals / Mughal-E-Azam (K. Asif, 1960) [India] 7-

CiNamasteShow
1. Duvidha (Mani Kaul, 1973) [India] 8
2. The Stranger / Agantuk (Satyajit Ray, 1991) [India] 7+
3. Awaara (Raj Kapoor, 1951) [India] 8
Actually good drama, well balanced with romance and entertaining, creative songs. Solid acting and directing too. A must-see for the genre.
4. The Chess Players / Shatranj Ke Khilari (Satyajit Ray, 1977) [India] 7+
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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blocho
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#117

Post by blocho » March 16th, 2020, 7:17 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
March 16th, 2020, 5:18 pm
Here we have a kind neo-noir as interpreted by Bollywood starring Aamir Khan's moustache.
I laughed out loud at this.

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cinephage
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#118

Post by cinephage » March 17th, 2020, 12:12 pm

05. City of God, by Lijo Jose Pellissery (2011) 7,5/10 - India

Pelissery is certainly one of India's best directors in activity, with Anurag Kashyap. This early crime movie has a complex storytelling, but it is quite endearing and brilliant.
Chak De ! India (04)Show
01. Drishyam, by Nishikant Kamat (2015) 7/10 - India
02. Ankur, by Shyam Benegal (1974) 7,5/10 - India
03. Happy New Year, by Farah Kahn (2014) 7/10 - India
04. Mahapurush, by Satyajit Ray (1965) 7/10 - India

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sol
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#119

Post by sol » March 17th, 2020, 2:30 pm

The World's Fastest IndianShow
1. Duvidha (1973) India
2. Saroja (2000) Sri Lanka
3. 3 Idiots (2009) India
4. Red Door (1997) India
5. Light of Asia (1925) India
6. Kaliya Mardan (1919) India

7. Salaam Bombay! (1988) India

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In the lead role, young Shafiq Syed does well here and his hopefulness in such dire circumstances is touching. Very little in the film happens narrative-wise though and the film feels rather long and drawn out at close to two hours given that the basic idea seems to be that poverty is unrelenting and never-ending for these unfortunate kids. More focus on the young prostitute or older prostitute's daughter may have helped, but good acting all round.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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RogerTheMovieManiac88
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#120

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » March 17th, 2020, 2:44 pm

(Screenshots from 'Mili' and 'Arth')

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21. 'Bandini' / 1963, Bimal Roy / 9 or 9.5/10 / India
22. 'Mili' / 1975, Hrishikesh Mukherjee / 9/10 / India
23. 'Arth' / 1982, Mahesh Bhatt / 9/10 / India
24. 'Darr' / 1993, Yash Chopra / 5.5/10 / India
25. 'Sachin: A Billion Dreams' / 2017, James Erskine / 6.5 or 7/10 / India

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That's all, folks!

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