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The Official African American/Blaxploitation Challenge (february 2020)

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sol
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Re: The Official African American/Blaxplotation Challenge (february 2020)

#41

Post by sol » February 3rd, 2020, 2:56 pm

albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 1:26 pm
And since if it's Oscar season, try to keep those white saviour titles to a minimum. :p
I haven't seen The Blind Side. Yet. It's the next film that I have lined up to watch for the Academy Awards challenge though. Am I allowed to include it if I think that it delves deep enough into the African American experience? I have no idea if it will, but somebody who has seen the film might know...
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#42

Post by blueboybob » February 3rd, 2020, 4:45 pm

5. Imitation of Life (1934)

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#43

Post by blocho » February 3rd, 2020, 6:20 pm

1. Driving Miss Daisy (1989)
Thoroughly mediocre. I know this movie has been attacked a lot by cultural critics over the past 30 years, but I thought I would add my two cents, in spoilers:
SpoilerShow
I'd like to think the ending of this movie is a carefully balanced exploration of the failure of two people to overcome racial/gender/class boundaries. I'd like to think that the filmmakers wanted to show how the gestures towards friendship were false. I'd like to think this was the intention of the filmmakers when they showed Daisy's last-second non-invitation to Hoke to attend the MLK speech, when they showed that Daisy called Hoke her best friend only in the incipient grasp of dementia, when they showed that Daisy's son clearly knew nothing about Hoke's family life despite employing him for 25 years, and when they showed that Hoke only visited Daisy in the nursing home because he was still on Daisy's son's payroll. But I don't think that was their intention at all. I think the filmmakers saw this as a triumphant story. And if they did, that's both sad and troubling.

2. Coffy (1973)
There's some feminism and anti-drug sentiment here, but this is a movie primarily about breasts.

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#44

Post by blueboybob » February 3rd, 2020, 7:35 pm

6. 21 Bridges (2019)

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#45

Post by albajos » February 3rd, 2020, 10:29 pm

blocho wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 6:20 pm
2. Coffy (1973)
There's some feminism and anti-drug sentiment here, but this is a movie primarily about breasts.
Well, I saw Bucktown today where Pam Grier plays the typical helpless one, so at least we need movies like Coffy and Foxy Brown to show that you don't need to be passive. I would think she enjoyed it much more as well.

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#46

Post by albajos » February 3rd, 2020, 10:46 pm

11. The Wiz (1978) USA 185 checks [double]
Blax. In may ways I enjoy this one more than the white one. But there are so much weird. But looking at Return to Oz etc, Oz is supposed to be weird.
12. Top Ten Things I Love/Hate About The Hood (2006) USA color=#008000]not on imdb[/color]
Blax. Detroit-based no budget production comapny CornerBoy Films. I can't even find the year in the credits. Directed by Lee van Martin II
13. Bucktown (1975) USA 54 checks [Bonus:Stars: Williamson]
Blax. Williamson comes home to bury his brother and unveil a whole plot involving the cops and the rest of the community.

Saw Mean Johnny Barrows (1976), but wont count it. It might be exploitation, but it's not blaxploitation. Director Fred Williamson is the only black actor in the credits. You might hope it had a message about Vietnam veterans, but it just become a mob - hit man story. That ending is a laugh though.
Also saw the Richard Pryor vehicle Which Way Is Up? (1977). You hope it work on the subplot about union workers and how he ended together with the Latin Americans, but it just becomes a comedy about infidelity that enjoy using the derogatory terms way too much.

They call me Mister Tibbs!Show
01. Petey Wheatstraw (1977) USA 1 official list 104 checks [Bonus:Moore]
02. The Mack (1973) USA 2 official lists 415 checks
03. Uptown Saturday Night (1974) USA 415 checks [Bonus:Poitier]
04. Willie Dynamite (1974) USA 1 official list 101 checks
05. Dolemite (1975) USA 2 official lists 540 checks
06. The Guy from Harlem (1977) USA 61 checks
07. Coffy (1973) USA 2 official lists 1 556 checks [Bonus:Grier]
08. Truck Turner (1974) USA 163 checks
09. The Greatest (1977) UK | USA 25 checks
10. Lady Sings the Blues (1972) USA 185 checks [double]
11. The Wiz (1978) USA 185 checks [double]
12. Top Ten Things I Love/Hate About The Hood (2006) USA color=#008000]not on imdb[/color]
13. Bucktown (1975) USA 54 checks [Bonus:Stars: Williamson]

!seen 13
Last edited by albajos on February 4th, 2020, 12:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#47

Post by maxwelldeux » February 4th, 2020, 12:43 am

sol wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 2:56 pm
albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 1:26 pm
And since if it's Oscar season, try to keep those white saviour titles to a minimum. :p
I haven't seen The Blind Side. Yet. It's the next film that I have lined up to watch for the Academy Awards challenge though. Am I allowed to include it if I think that it delves deep enough into the African American experience? I have no idea if it will, but somebody who has seen the film might know...
Perhaps I am more liberal than most on what to include, but based on the story (I'm decently familiar with the story, though I haven't seen the film itself) it would certainly count.

I'm going to broaden my explanation a bit to include a response to your question about Slender Thread, too...

My reasons are twofold: 1. Context matters, and 2. Representation matters. Even if the major themes explored in the film aren't about race, even if the subtext of the film isn't about race, the context in which the film was made and the lens through which you view it does. Like, The Blind Side is barely a local news story if the rich White lady adopts a poor White football player. The fact that he's Black and she's White is interesting regardless of how it's handled in the film - even if they don't overtly discuss race, the mother/son dynamic is central, and can provide an example of how to relate to one another (or not). Similarly, simply seeing Black people represented on screen in major roles with complexity is important, and helps normalize that very image - especially during the civil rights movement, that image is critical to advancing the cultural status quo to the point where we aren't shocked by people of color in positions of power and influence.

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#48

Post by allisoncm » February 4th, 2020, 7:02 am

1. Lackawanna Blues (2005) 7/10 Great cast.

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#49

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » February 4th, 2020, 7:23 am

Hi albajos and thanks for hosting.

Is this challenge just dedicated to the black experience in the USA or are films from across the Americas eligible?
That's all, folks!

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#50

Post by sebby » February 4th, 2020, 7:56 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 12:43 am
sol wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 2:56 pm
albajos wrote:
January 31st, 2020, 1:26 pm
And since if it's Oscar season, try to keep those white saviour titles to a minimum. :p
I haven't seen The Blind Side. Yet. It's the next film that I have lined up to watch for the Academy Awards challenge though. Am I allowed to include it if I think that it delves deep enough into the African American experience? I have no idea if it will, but somebody who has seen the film might know...
Perhaps I am more liberal than most on what to include, but based on the story (I'm decently familiar with the story, though I haven't seen the film itself) it would certainly count.

I'm going to broaden my explanation a bit to include a response to your question about Slender Thread, too...

My reasons are twofold: 1. Context matters, and 2. Representation matters. Even if the major themes explored in the film aren't about race, even if the subtext of the film isn't about race, the context in which the film was made and the lens through which you view it does. Like, The Blind Side is barely a local news story if the rich White lady adopts a poor White football player. The fact that he's Black and she's White is interesting regardless of how it's handled in the film - even if they don't overtly discuss race, the mother/son dynamic is central, and can provide an example of how to relate to one another (or not). Similarly, simply seeing Black people represented on screen in major roles with complexity is important, and helps normalize that very image - especially during the civil rights movement, that image is critical to advancing the cultural status quo to the point where we aren't shocked by people of color in positions of power and influence.
My rule of thumb for this challenge is "Could this movie ever be on a list of Black Film of a certain year, decade, or historically. I think Blind Side is a no. There are enough challenges for movies like that. What I would hope a challenge like this would center around is legit Black Film. Blind Side was written and directed by a white dude and is principally about a white woman. For me, anyway, doesn't pass the smell test.

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#51

Post by albajos » February 4th, 2020, 11:45 am

RogerTheMovieManiac88 wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 7:23 am
Is this challenge just dedicated to the black experience in the USA or are films from across the Americas eligible?
I would allow Canada as well, the industry is so intertwined between the two. But just those two.

sebby wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 7:56 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 12:43 am
sol wrote:
February 3rd, 2020, 2:56 pm
1. Context matters, and 2. Representation matters. Even if the major themes explored in the film aren't about race, even if the subtext of the film isn't about race, the context in which the film was made and the lens through which you view it does.
I think Blind Side is a no.
It's wriiten and directed by a Caucasian, based on a book by another Caucasian. This author usually write about sports. Not the people, just the sports.

And this is what this is about, an (extremely) rich Caucasian woman doing the right thing. And he was adopted, so we don't see anything of his former life at all, if I remember correctly. His race didn't really matter, but his talent did.

There were 3 producers on the movie, on was african american; Broderick Johnson, and he has made no other movies that focuses on black life either.

I have seen it, and I would say no.

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#52

Post by sol » February 4th, 2020, 1:09 pm

That's okay. Just finished watching The Blind Side and while I think that I could mount a case for its eligibility (it's equally about the teen and Bullock; we do meet his fellow black neighbours; Bullock confronts her friends' racism, etc), I agree that it does not comfortably align with the intent of this Challenge, so I am fine with leaving it off. As mentioned already, I had this lined up to watch for the Academy Awards Challenge rather than this one specifically (only two more films until a Silver on AA Best Picture nominees!) and I think I can make it up to the Magic 36 without falling back on questionably eligible films like this one.
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#53

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » February 4th, 2020, 2:28 pm

albajos wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 11:45 am
RogerTheMovieManiac88 wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 7:23 am
Is this challenge just dedicated to the black experience in the USA or are films from across the Americas eligible?
I would allow Canada as well, the industry is so intertwined between the two. But just those two.
OK, thanks for the response.
That's all, folks!

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#54

Post by sol » February 4th, 2020, 3:45 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)

6. Watermelon Man (1970)

Image

I thought this was a very funny film, playing on both negative and positive racial stereotypes and full of amusing quips ("I'm Spanish!") but also charged with a lot of topical anger just beneath the surface. At close to 100 minutes, the film runs a tad long, dwelling a bit too much on him trying to become white again and not quite enough on him embracing the new identity. The whiteface makeup is also unconvincing, but this is pretty solid overall.
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#55

Post by blueboybob » February 4th, 2020, 8:00 pm

7. Waves (2019)
8. This One's for the Ladies (2018)

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#56

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 4th, 2020, 11:06 pm

5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }

Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]

5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }

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#57

Post by allisoncm » February 4th, 2020, 11:13 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Lackawanna Blues (2005) 7/10 Great cast.
2. Boys on the Side (1995) 8/10 Whoopi Goldberg is a central character in this, representing what it’s like to be a black and lesbian woman.

Also saw The Oath starring Tiffany Haddish. Race didn't play a very large part into her role, so I will not necessarily be counting it for this challenge.

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#58

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 4th, 2020, 11:16 pm

sol wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 3:45 pm
SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)

6. Watermelon Man (1970)

Image

I thought this was a very funny film, playing on both negative and positive racial stereotypes and full of amusing quips ("I'm Spanish!") but also charged with a lot of topical anger just beneath the surface. At close to 100 minutes, the film runs a tad long, dwelling a bit too much on him trying to become white again and not quite enough on him embracing the new identity. The whiteface makeup is also unconvincing, but this is pretty solid overall.
I've loved this film since catching it on TV as a kid. I've always assumed the make-up was meant to be unconvincing - enhancing the comedy aspects and also perhaps pointing out the ridiculousness of black-face performers. It's a BONUS film BTW - for Peebles - the director. :cheers:

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#59

Post by sol » February 4th, 2020, 11:37 pm

psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 11:16 pm
sol wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 3:45 pm
6. Watermelon Man (1970)

Image

I thought this was a very funny film, playing on both negative and positive racial stereotypes and full of amusing quips ("I'm Spanish!") but also charged with a lot of topical anger just beneath the surface. At close to 100 minutes, the film runs a tad long, dwelling a bit too much on him trying to become white again and not quite enough on him embracing the new identity. The whiteface makeup is also unconvincing, but this is pretty solid overall.
I've loved this film since catching it on TV as a kid. I've always assumed the make-up was meant to be unconvincing - enhancing the comedy aspects and also perhaps pointing out the ridiculousness of black-face performers.
Oh, cool. I added the film to my 500<400 ballot, and if it's on yours too, maybe it stands a chance of making the top 1000 this year. :)

I had been interested in seeing Watermelon Man for quite some time (15 years?), ever since a period in my life when I was running through the BAFTA nominees and the plot summary intrigued me upon hearing of this title. The film was pretty great too, or at least outside of the makeup, but that's an interesting point that you make; I saw another reviewer criticise the lead actor for not talking more like a white man too, but yep, the unconvincing makeup and vocal performance probably makes sense if it was intended as part of the satire. Here's to hoping that others here also check out the film!
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#60

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 5th, 2020, 1:58 am

sol wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 11:37 pm
psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 11:16 pm
sol wrote:
February 4th, 2020, 3:45 pm
6. Watermelon Man (1970)

Image

I thought this was a very funny film, playing on both negative and positive racial stereotypes and full of amusing quips ("I'm Spanish!") but also charged with a lot of topical anger just beneath the surface. At close to 100 minutes, the film runs a tad long, dwelling a bit too much on him trying to become white again and not quite enough on him embracing the new identity. The whiteface makeup is also unconvincing, but this is pretty solid overall.
I've loved this film since catching it on TV as a kid. I've always assumed the make-up was meant to be unconvincing - enhancing the comedy aspects and also perhaps pointing out the ridiculousness of black-face performers.
Oh, cool. I added the film to my 500<400 ballot, and if it's on yours too, maybe it stands a chance of making the top 1000 this year. :)

I had been interested in seeing Watermelon Man for quite some time (15 years?), ever since a period in my life when I was running through the BAFTA nominees and the plot summary intrigued me upon hearing of this title. The film was pretty great too, or at least outside of the makeup, but that's an interesting point that you make; I saw another reviewer criticise the lead actor for not talking more like a white man too, but yep, the unconvincing makeup and vocal performance probably makes sense if it was intended as part of the satire. Here's to hoping that others here also check out the film!
I just added it to my 500<400 list also.

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#61

Post by vortexsurfer » February 5th, 2020, 8:46 am

3. Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017)

SpoilerShow
1. Dolemite (D'Urville Martin, 1975) [bonus:Rudy Ray Moore]
2. Life (Ted Demme, 1999)
3. Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017)

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#62

Post by sol » February 5th, 2020, 9:37 am

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)

7. Change of Mind (1969)

Image

Along similar lines to Watermelon Man, a Caucasian district attorney faces bigotry when his brain is transplanted into the body an African American here. The DA is not racist though and does not try to change back, which gives greater focus his personal identity dilemma or "how can you look so different without being different?" as his mother questions. The film is well photographed too, though the descent into courtroom drama disappoints.
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#63

Post by sol » February 5th, 2020, 2:38 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)

8. Pootie Tang (2001)

Image

This madcap blaxploitation tribute is full of energetic performances, deliberately garish colours and kooky scene transitions, and it is initially engaging with how absolutely WTF it is, the title character whacking others with his belt and so on. The premise tires quite quickly though and fun as Robert Vaughn is as a chief villain, neither him nor his evil company are developed beyond plot function, and even at less than 80 minutes, this feels very long.
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#64

Post by albajos » February 5th, 2020, 7:37 pm

02/15 of the trading cards:

Fred Williamson
(Frederick Robert Williamson - March 5, 1938, Indiana (age 81))

Image

Almost opposite of Washingtoms's career we have Fred "Hammer" Williamson. He has been quite content doing mostly B-movies. Many of yjiose were blaxploitation in the 70s, He did start out with M*A*S*'H in 1970 as his first movie role though (a couple appearance on TV before that, f. ex in Syar Trek). And with his big stature ge often get to play military or police in more mainstream movies. There is no secret that Tarantino likes Blaxploitation, so he's most succesful movie is as one of the survivors in From Dusk Till Dawn.

He used to play football, and got the nickname Hammer because of that. He also have black belt in Kenpo, Shotokan Karate, and Tae-Kwon-Do.
'There's only two things that I demand of my scripts, and they're the same things my audiences demand. First, I have to get the girl. And second, I have to win all the fights. We don't need suspense. With those two ingredients, the picture is assured of being a hit.
When the blaxploitation era came to a close he started to do more italian produced B-movies, like the original Inglorious Bastards Quel maledetto treno blindato from 1978. And continued to do so throughout the 80s. He actually start a production company himself based in Italy. He has also directed 20 movies since 1975, most of them, if not all, should fit this challenge.

Top movies to watch for this challenge:
The Black Bounty Hunter (this is an aka title)
Black Caesar
The Legend of Black Charley (also an aka title) (also in picture above)
two of these are westerns, the last one of course the black version of Little Caesar
Last edited by albajos on February 5th, 2020, 7:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#65

Post by hurluberlu » February 5th, 2020, 7:43 pm

2. Mandingo (Richard Fleischer, 1975) 5
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#66

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 5th, 2020, 11:22 pm

17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}


Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }

17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}


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#67

Post by jdidaco » February 6th, 2020, 5:53 am

Thanks for hosting!

(Gifs/screenshot from 'Mahogany', 'Hollywood Shuffle' & 'Diary of an African Nun'),

Image

1. Bone (Larry Cohen, 1972) 8/10
2. Lord Shango (Ray Marsh, 1975) 6.5/10
3. Mahogany (Berry Gordy & Tony Richardson, 1975) 6.5/10
4. A Different Image (Alile Sharon Larkin, 1982) 8/10
5. Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987) 7.5/10
6. Black Is... Black Ain't (Marlon Riggs, 1994) 8.5/10
7. Baadasssss Cinema (Isaac Julien, 2002) 7.5/10
8. BlacKkKlansman (Spike Lee, 2018) 7.5/10

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A collection of shorts,

9-10. I Am Somebody (Madeline Anderson, 1970) 8/10 (30 min), Medea (Ben Caldwell, 1973) 8/10 (7 min), The Kitchen (Alile Sharon Larkin, 1975) 6.5/10 (7 min), Diary of an African Nun (Julie Dash, 1977) 9/10 (14 min), Rain (Melvonna Ballenger, 1978) 7/10 (16 min), The Pocketbook (Billy Woodberry, 1980) 7.5/10 (12 min), Dark Exodus (Iverson White, 1985) 7/10 (28 min), Hair Love (Matthew A. Cherry & Everett Downing Jr. & Bruce W. Smith, 2019) 7/10 (7 min) (Total: 121 min)

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jeroeno
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#68

Post by jeroeno » February 6th, 2020, 6:28 am

03. Love & Basketball (2000)

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#69

Post by albajos » February 6th, 2020, 10:03 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 1st, 2020, 7:57 pm
Bonus challenge question: If you hit multiple people (e.g., Malcolm X could count for Denzel or Spike), do you get multiple points, or do you pick one?
You pick one. Obvious one would be Washington since he has fewer eligible movies

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#70

Post by flavo5000 » February 6th, 2020, 1:20 pm

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1. Chi-Raq (Spike Lee, 2015) BONUS:Spike Lee
Man, this has got to be one of Spike Lee's weirdest joints. A kinetic modern adaptation of the ancient Greek play Lysistrata, it involves the women of Chicago banding together to withhold sex from their men until they agree to end gang violence ("No Peace. No Pussy."). It's a loud, brash mess of a movie that still somehow works despite itself.

I also watched The Blackboard Jungle but decided not to include it for similar reasons to why The Blind Side was excluded. While it does feature an early major supporting role by Sidney Poitier as a misunderstood student, misaligned at least in part, it does focus much more on Glen Ford in a white savior type of role as his teacher who encourages him to do better and help bring the students together.
Last edited by flavo5000 on February 8th, 2020, 1:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#71

Post by sol » February 6th, 2020, 3:09 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)

9. House Party (1990)

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Having risen to fame as a rap duo, the best scenes here are the ones in which Kid 'n Play rap in a manner that constantly feels spontaneous and real, and their rap battle is a highlight. Outside of the music though, this is average at best. It oft feels like the movie is trying to be a crazy all-night comedy a la Thom Eberhardt's The Night Before, but nothing that insane happens, while Kid's father and bully's search for him seems to just come and go.
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#72

Post by allisoncm » February 6th, 2020, 7:43 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Lackawanna Blues (2005) 7/10 Great cast.
2. Boys on the Side (1995) 8/10 Whoopi Goldberg is a central character in this, representing what it’s like to be a black and lesbian woman.
3. Race (2016) 7/10 Jesse Owens goes to pre-war Germany in 1936 and faces discrimination there and in the USA despite his record-breaking accomplishments.

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#73

Post by sol » February 7th, 2020, 3:21 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)

10. House Party 2 (1991)

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Circumstances lead to the protagonists of House Party once again having to throw a party on the sly, this time a pajama-themed fundraising event. The titular party oddly does not even occur until the final third of the movie as the filmmakers try to throw tired messages about true love and the benefits of studying in the mix. The first two thirds benefit from some great supporting performances though - most notably jive-talking white rapper Kamron.
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#74

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 7th, 2020, 8:53 pm

21. Three the Hard Way (1974 / Gordon Parks Jr.) 7/10 {89 m.} [Bonus: Williamson]
22. How To Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass; aka: Baadasssss! (2003 / Mario Van Peebles) FTV 8+/10 {109 m.}
23. How To Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It) (2005 / Joe Angio) FTV 8/10 {85 m.}
24. Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004 / Kevin Rodney Sullivan) FTV 7/10 {106 m.}
25. Creed II (2018 / Steven Caple Jr.) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.}

Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }
17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}

21. Three the Hard Way (1974 / Gordon Parks Jr.) 7/10 {89 m.} [Bonus: Williamson]
22. How To Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass; aka: Baadasssss! (2003 / Mario Van Peebles) FTV 8+/10 {109 m.}
23. How To Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It) (2005 / Joe Angio) FTV 8/10 {85 m.}
24. Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004 / Kevin Rodney Sullivan) FTV 7/10 {106 m.}
25. Creed II (2018 / Steven Caple Jr.) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.}


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#75

Post by albajos » February 7th, 2020, 9:34 pm

14. Amazing Grace (1974) USA 9 checks
AfAm. Black man runs for major, but are controlled by white shady politicans. The neighbors (the leads), saves the day. It's a comedy, but many jokes are ruined by that Grace do not pronounce the words properly. As you do when without teeth.

They call me Mister Tibbs!Show
01. Petey Wheatstraw (1977) USA 1 official list 104 checks [Bonus:Moore]
02. The Mack (1973) USA 2 official lists 415 checks
03. Uptown Saturday Night (1974) USA 415 checks [Bonus:Poitier]
04. Willie Dynamite (1974) USA 1 official list 101 checks
05. Dolemite (1975) USA 2 official lists 540 checks
06. The Guy from Harlem (1977) USA 61 checks
07. Coffy (1973) USA 2 official lists 1 556 checks [Bonus:Grier]
08. Truck Turner (1974) USA 163 checks
09. The Greatest (1977) UK | USA 25 checks
10. Lady Sings the Blues (1972) USA 185 checks [double]
11. The Wiz (1978) USA 185 checks [double]
12. Top Ten Things I Love/Hate About The Hood (2006) USA color=#008000]not on imdb[/color]
13. Bucktown (1975) USA 54 checks [Bonus:Stars: Williamson]
14. Amazing Grace (1974) USA 9 checks [Bonus:Stars: Williamson]

!seen 14


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#77

Post by albajos » February 7th, 2020, 11:12 pm

03/15 of the trading cards:

Dee Rees
(Diandrea Rees - February 7, 1977, Tennesse (age 43 - Today! :party: ))

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Dee Rees is the youngest of the 15. celebrating her 43th birthday today. She started out in 2005 and have done 5 features, 4 shorts and some TV episodes so far
She was the first african american woman to be nominated for Oscar in the screenplay category for Mudbound. Nominated for directing and writing Bessie at the Emmys.

Black Film Critics Circle Awards: Won twice for Screenplay (Pariah and Mudbound), and once for director (Pariah), and as a regular at festivals these movies have won too many awards to count.

Studied at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, and Spike Lee was her professor and mentor. Dee Rees went on to work under Spike Lee on his films Inside Man (2006) and When the Levees Broke (2006).

Pariah is semi-biographical, so just watch that to know more.

Top movies to watch for this challenge:
Pariah
Bessie
Mudbound (double)

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#78

Post by blocho » February 8th, 2020, 2:27 am

3. Cooley High (1975)
It's possible to look at the past 45 years and see plenty of movies that seem similar to Cooley High, but I can't think of a single movie from before 1975 that was anything like it. It's a typical teen movie in most ways, except most teen movies are about white kids in the suburbs. Cooley High is about black kids in the city, and like most teen movies, it's at its worst when devoted to showing wild antics (like the car chase) and its best when devoted to showing relationships and revealing character. It also has a soundtrack of classic Motown hits, something it shares with ...

4. Nothing But a Man (1964)
... which was made in the year in which Cooley High is set. This is a perfect slice of American naturalism, buoyed by a tremendous lead performance by Ivan Dixon. There's not a false note in the whole movie, which is extraordinary given how many cliched topics are involved in the story. I'm adding it to my 500<400 list.

Also, in a random side note that probably interests no one but me, Nothing But a Man was eventually novelized by the great hardboiled writer Jim Thompson. Bizarre.

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#79

Post by 3eyes » February 8th, 2020, 3:00 am

3. Brother John (71)
Little-known Sidney Poitier film (22d check) which I'd never heard of, but found fascinating. Mysterious stranger returns to Alabama hometown....
On Criterion channel.

SpoilerShow
1. The people vs O.J. Simpson (16) - Ep 1 - From the ashes of tragedy
2. The people vs O.J. Simpson (16) - Ep 1 - The run of his life
3. Brother John (71)
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#80

Post by sol » February 8th, 2020, 3:22 am

SpoilerShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)

11. Poetic Justice (1993)

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The hate-to-love character trajectory is pretty obvious and predictable here and there is a lot of repetitive shouting and arguing to sit through before the film rather abruptly ends. The performances are really spot-on though, with both Tupac Shakur and Janet Jackson providing very three dimensional turns. The film also has a nifty opening that parodies Woody Allen's Manhattan, while an interrupted family barbecue is a real highlight.
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