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The Official African American/Blaxploitation Challenge (february 2020)

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allisoncm
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Re: The Official African American/Blaxploitation Challenge (february 2020)

#161

Post by allisoncm » February 19th, 2020, 5:51 pm

SpoilerShow
1. Lackawanna Blues (2005) 7/10 Great cast.
2. Boys on the Side (1995) 8/10 Whoopi Goldberg is a central character in this, representing what it’s like to be a black and lesbian woman.
3. Race (2016) 7/10 Jesse Owens goes to pre-war Germany in 1936 and faces discrimination there and in the USA despite his record-breaking accomplishments.
4. Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) 2020 Directed by Cathy Yan 5/10 Jurnee Smollett-Bell plays Black Canary, an African American woman that still faces discrimination despite her singing talent. Luckily, she has ultra cool moves and awesome outfits to silence any naysayers.
5. Poetic Justice (1993) [bonus:Singleton] 8/10 Janet Jackson plays an African American poet and hairdresser. The film is filled with appearances from important African Americans such as Tupac Shakur, Regina King, and Maya Angelou. A beautiful piece marred by the fact that Singleton, Angelou, and Shakur are no longer with us.
6. The Photograph (2020) 8/10
7. Sidewalk Stories (1989) 6/10
8. Lone Star (1995) REWATCH 8/10 (First rating 7/10) Several prominent characters are African American.

allisoncm
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#162

Post by allisoncm » February 19th, 2020, 5:52 pm

From what I've seen from Watchmen (just a couple of episodes), it looks like it would fit.

psychotronicbeatnik
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#163

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 19th, 2020, 6:24 pm

56. The Glass Shield (1994 / Charles Burnett) 9+/10 {109 m.} [Bonus: Burnett]
57. Shaft (1971 / Gordon Parks) 8+/10 {100 m.} [Bonus: Roundtree]
58. In the Heat of the Night (1967 / Norman Jewison) 10/10 {110 m.} [Bonus: Poitier]
59. Lilies of the Field (1963 / Ralph Nelson) 8+/10 {94 m.}
60-64. O.J.: Made in America (2016 / Ezra Edelman) FTV 9+/10 {467 m.}

I've now completed the Bonus Challenge and bested my previous high score.

Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }
17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}
21. Three the Hard Way (1974 / Gordon Parks Jr.) 7/10 {89 m.} [Bonus: Williamson]
22. How To Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass; aka: Baadasssss! (2003 / Mario Van Peebles) FTV 8+/10 {109 m.}
23. How To Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It) (2005 / Joe Angio) FTV 8/10 {85 m.}
24. Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004 / Kevin Rodney Sullivan) FTV 7/10 {106 m.}
25. Creed II (2018 / Steven Caple Jr.) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.}
26. Fruitvale Station (2013 / Ryan Coogler) FTV 9+/10 {85 m.} [Bonus: Spencer]
27. Kings (2017 / Deniz Gamze Erguven) FTV 7/10 {86 m.}
28. Pariah (2011 / Dee Rees) 8+/10 {86 m.} [Bonus: Rees]
29. Chris Rock: Bring the Pain (1996 / Keith Truesdell) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
30. Bessie (2015 / Dee Rees) FTV 8+/10 {115 m.}
31. Sparkle (2012 / Salim Akil) FTV 7/10 {116 m.} [Bonus: Mara Brock Akil – writer & producer]
32. Standing in the Shadows of Motown (2002 / Paul Justman) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
33. The Hate U Give (2018 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 9/10 {133 m.}
34. The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
35. Glory (1989 / Edward Zwick) 8/10 {122 m.} [Bonus: Washington]
36-39. Shorter TV {244 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 13-14; S2, Ep. 1-4 (1972) FTV 7+/10 {152 min. }
b. Good Times: S2, Ep. 4 (1974) FTV 7/10 {26 min. }
c. The Boondocks: S1, Ep. 1-3 (2005) FTV 7+/10 {66 min. }
40. Barbershop: The Next Cut (2016 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {111 m.}
41. Dolemite (1975 / D’Urville Martin) 7+/10 {90 m.} [Bonus: Moore]
42. Sleight (2016 / J.D. Dillard) FTV 7+/10 {89 m.}
43. Soul Men (2008 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {100 m.}
44. Canal Street (2018 / Rhyan LaMarr) FTV 5/10 {89 m.}
45. Hellbound Train (1930 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
46. The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
47-51. When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts and an Epilogue (2006-2007 / Spike Lee) FTV 8+/10 {363 m.} [Bonus: Lee]
52. Shorter Films {60 min. total}
a. The Films of Oscar Micheaux (2016) FTV 7/10 {9 min. }
b. Verdict Not Guilty (1933 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6+/10 {9 m.}
c. Heaven-Bound Traveler (1935 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6/10 {15 m.}
d. An Introduction: Pioneers of African American Cinema (2016) FTV 7/10 {7 min. }
e. Commandment Keeper Church, Beaufort South Carolina, May 1940 (1940) FTV 7/10 {16 min. }
f. Zora Neale Hurston: Fieldwork Footage (1928) FTV 7/10 {4 min. }
53. The Bronze Buckaroo (1939 / Richard C. Kahn) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
54. The Jackie Robinson Story (1950 / Alfred E. Green) FTV 7/10 {77 m.} [Bonus: Ruby Dee]
55. Eleven P.M. (1928 / Richard Maurice) FTV 9/10 {67 m.}

56. The Glass Shield (1994 / Charles Burnett) 9+/10 {109 m.} [Bonus: Burnett]
57. Shaft (1971 / Gordon Parks) 8+/10 {100 m.} [Bonus: Roundtree]
58. In the Heat of the Night (1967 / Norman Jewison) 10/10 {110 m.} [Bonus: Poitier]
59. Lilies of the Field (1963 / Ralph Nelson) 8+/10 {94 m.}
60-64. O.J.: Made in America (2016 / Ezra Edelman) FTV 9+/10 {467 m.}

Views: 64 / FTV’s: 48 / {5592 m.}

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albajos
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#164

Post by albajos » February 19th, 2020, 9:52 pm

Well, the Watchmen comic does not fit the challenge. Can't speak for things I haven't seen, so I can't fight Birds of Prey, Watchmen series or such. I just have to trust you and hope you have a conscience.

The goal is to learn something. What stereotypes were Hollywood to happy to repeat over and over and over again. What plights have they actally had, and still do. It's a challenge after all, the point is not to see easily digestive movies, that will not challenge you about this theme.

And since it seems I have to accept Bad Boys 2, you can add The Blind Side as well. At least that one deserve a place here 1000 times more than BB2.

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#165

Post by blocho » February 20th, 2020, 4:29 am

The Watchmen series is not an adaptation of the comic. It's a sequel to it. And having finished watching it, I think it definitely fits this challenge.

5-13. Watchmen (2019)
There's so much going on in this series that it's hard to know where to begin. So I'll just offer some scattershot thoughts without spoiling anything substantial about the plot.
- First, this was just immensely satisfying to watch. A very propulsive story that mixed mystery perfectly with excitement. Strong acting throughout. Very interesting characters. A deep appreciation for history, both real and alternative. Just the right amount of gonzo weirdness. And a solid dose of humor.
- The series begins with the Tulsa massacre of 1921, and white supremacy and the toll of racial trauma are constant themes. Given that genuine history is mixed here with alternative history, this could have easily gone wrong by making an actual historical atrocity background to silly what-ifs (Redfordations!). Somehow, it all blends perfectly.
- Tim Blake Nelson is one of the surest bets in acting. He makes everything he is in better.
- I really liked how, especially after the first few episodes, each episode was dedicated to exploring the background of a character while still advancing the narrative in the "present."
- What a great soundtrack. The score itself is very solid, but the suite of previously recorded material was also excellent, a great mix of classic tunes ranging from Rhapsody in Blue to the Barcarolle from Hoffman with covers of more contemporary numbers like I Am the Walrus and Life on Mars.
- I'm probably going to add this to my miniseries list.
Last edited by blocho on March 1st, 2020, 10:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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sol
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#166

Post by sol » February 20th, 2020, 12:37 pm

albajos wrote:
February 19th, 2020, 9:52 pm
The goal is to learn something. What stereotypes were Hollywood to happy to repeat over and over and over again. What plights have they actally had, and still do. It's a challenge after all, the point is not to see easily digestive movies, that will not challenge you about this theme.

And since it seems I have to accept Bad Boys 2, you can add The Blind Side as well. At least that one deserve a place here 1000 times more than BB2.
Okay, I'll think about it. I don't mind excluding films that challenge hosts find unsuitable for the challenge parameters. And I don't think I "need" the extra point that including The Blind Side would bring. But I may change my mind if it looks like one point will make the difference between me beating flavo or hitting the magic 36 mark or something like that. :pinch:
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#167

Post by sol » February 20th, 2020, 12:40 pm

Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)

26. Tales from the Hood (1995)

Image

Unlike most classic horror anthologies, all the episodes are written and directed by the same duo here, which creates a consistent tone and ample narrative flow, and the fourth tale superbly segues into the wraparound tale. Each of the episodes comes with stinging social commentary and/or satire too, dealing with everything from racist cops to ghetto child abuse to racist politicians to black-on-black crime. And Clarence Williams III is delightful.
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sol
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#168

Post by sol » February 20th, 2020, 3:42 pm

Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)
26. Tales from the Hood (1995)

27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)

Image

Not a household name like MLK, it is curious to hear civil rights leader Powell's tale here, and as the documentary starts by praising his achievements, it initially seems strange how forgotten he now is. As the film progresses though, mounting controversies are revealed, from Powell pledging bad cheques to a campaign to slander MLK's name, who he saw as a rival rather than a comrade. Was he an egotist or someone genuinely interested in civil rights?
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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psychotronicbeatnik
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#169

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 20th, 2020, 4:57 pm

I haven't seen the new Watchmen series but this New Yorker article makes a good case for its inclusion here and creates a dynamic picture that significantly adds to my desire to see it.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019 ... s-watchmen

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#170

Post by blocho » February 20th, 2020, 5:04 pm

sol wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 3:42 pm
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)

Image

Not a household name like MLK, it is curious to hear civil rights leader Powell's tale here, and as the documentary starts by praising his achievements, it initially seems strange how forgotten he now is. As the film progresses though, mounting controversies are revealed, from Powell pledging bad cheques to a campaign to slander MLK's name, who he saw as a rival rather than a comrade. Was he an egotist or someone genuinely interested in civil rights?
We have an entire avenue named after him here in New York. But you're right that avenues and government office buildings aside, he's not a well-remembered figure outside of Harlem. I think that partially has to do with the whiff of corruption that surrounded him, an unfortunate reminder of the corruption of some successors in Harlem politics like Charlie Rangel.

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flavo5000
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#171

Post by flavo5000 » February 20th, 2020, 5:18 pm

Image
22. Purple Rain (1984)
Man, talk about a movie of extremes. The acting and story is about as bad as the music and on-stage performances are amazing. One of my biggest regrets is not getting to see Prince in concert before he died...

Image
23. W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro (2018)
Here's a decent but not hilarious stand-up special from a comedian/CNN correspondent with a big emphasis on race and politics. A good 20 minutes or so is taken up with Trump in particular which means this special probably won't age very well, but for now it was still marginally funny if a little obvious at times.

Image
24. Sounder (!972)
This one wasn't actually what I expected. Based on what I knew, I thought it would be more along the lines of movies like Old Yeller and The Yearling with an emphasis on the boy and and his dog, but it's really a very quiet, laid back movie of a black boy traveling to meet his father in jail and how the family of sharecroppers lives without their primary breadwinner around. If you go into it expecting the focus to not be on the plot but more around small character moments, it's a quite nice film at times.

Image
25. Bone (1972)
This was an unexpected pleasure to watch. I really had a lot of fun with it. What starts as a racially charged Funny Games-type home invasion premise takes a couple of interesting turns in the story that take it in unexpected directions that really ends up with almost the total opposite result of Funny Games. The movie is bitingly satirical at times and Yaphet Kotto is pretty great in the titular role as a kind of agent of chaos. I read an interview with Yaphet Kotto in an issue of Weng's Chop (great 'zine if anyone's into obscure cult cinema), and he actually holds this movie as his favorite role over his long career. I can definitely see why. Bone is a pretty multi-dimensional character that really rails against and subverts the type of angry, violent black man roles that were so prevalent in the '70s. I think this one written and directed by cult director Larry Cohen (Q The Winged Serpent, It's Alive, God Told Me To) is a hidden gem worth checking out.

Image
26. Harlem Nights (1989)
This movie should've been so much better than it was. The cast is super-stacked with Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy, Redd Foxx, Della Reese, Danny Aiello and a bunch of other great actors, so it should've been a slam dunk. Instead, it's rambling and the tone is all over the place. The story is just kind of a mess involving guys running an underground casino bumping heads with the mob, corrupt cops and sassy bordello madams. It doesn't know if it wants to be a silly comedy, a gritty crime flick, a drama about the bonds of surrogate family, political corruption thriller or what else, so it just kinda throws them all in a blender with no rhyme or reason.

Image
27. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003) BONUS: Charles Burnett
Charles Burnett directs this pretty interesting doc on Nat Turner, the mysterious slave that led a brutal rebellion against slave owners in antebellum south resulting in the death of over 50 white men, women and children. With Burnett behind the camera, the reenactments are of a higher caliber both in the directing and acting than many documentaries of this type. The subject matter is an interesting one to offer conjecture on just because at the end of the day, we really don't know a whole lot about Nat Turner at the end of the day. This does end up as a bit of a detriment to the doc because basically it gets repetitive with everyone essentially continuing to reference the one written document that covered Nat Turner in detail, his confessions that were dictated while he was imprisoned waiting to be executed. But even with those, there is a lot of speculation as to how much of it was actually said by him and how much was artistic license or just made up altogether by the reporter as a grab for fame or prestige.
Dolemite is my name and f--kin up motherf--kers is my gameShow
1. Chi-Raq (Spike Lee, 2015)
2. Mr. Mean (Fred Williamson, 1977)
3. Harriet (Kasi Lemmons, 2019)
4. Shaft's Big Score! (1972)
5. Shaft in Africa (1973)
6. South Central S1E5-7 (1994)
7. Hallelujah (1929)
8. Uptown Saturday Night (1974)
9. Dolemite Is My Name (2019)
10. Cleopatra Jones (1973)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. The Human Tornado (1976)
13. Scream Blacula Scream (1973)
14. Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
15. A Raisin in the Sun (1961)
16. Don't Play Us Cheap (1973)
17. Blackenstein (1973)
18. Beyond the Lights (2014)
19. Get on Up (2014)
20. A Soldier's Story (!984)
21. Dave Chappelle: The Age of Spin: Dave Chappelle Live at the Hollywood Palladium (2017)
22. Purple Rain (1984)
23. W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro (2018)
24. Sounder (!972)
25. Bone (1972)
26. Harlem Nights (1989)
27. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003)

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#172

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 20th, 2020, 5:48 pm

65. Johnson Family Vacation (2004 / Christopher Erskin) FTV 6+/10 {97 m.}
66. The Real Great Debaters (2008 / Brad Osborne) FTV 7/10 {74 m.}



R.I.P. Ja’net DuBois. I'll definitely be watching some more Good Times in her honor and I've already got the great theme from The Jeffersons floating through my head - she co-wrote and sang that one, and now she be 'Movin' on up..." :rip:


Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }
17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}
21. Three the Hard Way (1974 / Gordon Parks Jr.) 7/10 {89 m.} [Bonus: Williamson]
22. How To Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass; aka: Baadasssss! (2003 / Mario Van Peebles) FTV 8+/10 {109 m.}
23. How To Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It) (2005 / Joe Angio) FTV 8/10 {85 m.}
24. Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004 / Kevin Rodney Sullivan) FTV 7/10 {106 m.}
25. Creed II (2018 / Steven Caple Jr.) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.}
26. Fruitvale Station (2013 / Ryan Coogler) FTV 9+/10 {85 m.} [Bonus: Spencer]
27. Kings (2017 / Deniz Gamze Erguven) FTV 7/10 {86 m.}
28. Pariah (2011 / Dee Rees) 8+/10 {86 m.} [Bonus: Rees]
29. Chris Rock: Bring the Pain (1996 / Keith Truesdell) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
30. Bessie (2015 / Dee Rees) FTV 8+/10 {115 m.}
31. Sparkle (2012 / Salim Akil) FTV 7/10 {116 m.} [Bonus: Mara Brock Akil – writer & producer]
32. Standing in the Shadows of Motown (2002 / Paul Justman) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
33. The Hate U Give (2018 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 9/10 {133 m.}
34. The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
35. Glory (1989 / Edward Zwick) 8/10 {122 m.} [Bonus: Washington]
36-39. Shorter TV {244 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 13-14; S2, Ep. 1-4 (1972) FTV 7+/10 {152 min. }
b. Good Times: S2, Ep. 4 (1974) FTV 7/10 {26 min. }
c. The Boondocks: S1, Ep. 1-3 (2005) FTV 7+/10 {66 min. }
40. Barbershop: The Next Cut (2016 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {111 m.}
41. Dolemite (1975 / D’Urville Martin) 7+/10 {90 m.} [Bonus: Moore]
42. Sleight (2016 / J.D. Dillard) FTV 7+/10 {89 m.}
43. Soul Men (2008 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {100 m.}
44. Canal Street (2018 / Rhyan LaMarr) FTV 5/10 {89 m.}
45. Hellbound Train (1930 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
46. The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
47-51. When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts and an Epilogue (2006-2007 / Spike Lee) FTV 8+/10 {363 m.} [Bonus: Lee]
52. Shorter Films {60 min. total}
a. The Films of Oscar Micheaux (2016) FTV 7/10 {9 min. }
b. Verdict Not Guilty (1933 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6+/10 {9 m.}
c. Heaven-Bound Traveler (1935 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6/10 {15 m.}
d. An Introduction: Pioneers of African American Cinema (2016) FTV 7/10 {7 min. }
e. Commandment Keeper Church, Beaufort South Carolina, May 1940 (1940) FTV 7/10 {16 min. }
f. Zora Neale Hurston: Fieldwork Footage (1928) FTV 7/10 {4 min. }
53. The Bronze Buckaroo (1939 / Richard C. Kahn) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
54. The Jackie Robinson Story (1950 / Alfred E. Green) FTV 7/10 {77 m.} [Bonus: Ruby Dee]
55. Eleven P.M. (1928 / Richard Maurice) FTV 9/10 {67 m.}
56. The Glass Shield (1994 / Charles Burnett) 9+/10 {109 m.} [Bonus: Burnett]
57. Shaft (1971 / Gordon Parks) 8+/10 {100 m.} [Bonus: Roundtree]
58. In the Heat of the Night (1967 / Norman Jewison) 10/10 {110 m.} [Bonus: Poitier]
59. Lilies of the Field (1963 / Ralph Nelson) 8+/10 {94 m.}
60-64. O.J.: Made in America (2016 / Ezra Edelman) FTV 9+/10 {467 m.}

65. Johnson Family Vacation (2004 / Christopher Erskin) FTV 6+/10 {97 m.}
66. The Real Great Debaters (2008 / Brad Osborne) FTV 7/10 {74 m.}



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albajos
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Location: Norway
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#173

Post by albajos » February 20th, 2020, 7:27 pm

5/15 another birthday!

Sidney Poitier
(February 20, 1927, Miami (age 93, today))

Image

Born in Miami, but raised in The Bahamas as his family is from there. He eventually left Bahamas at 16 and moved to New York where he North American Negro Theatre. After some extra work and minor roles he finally hit big after 8 years. The movie was The Blackboard Jngle, the year was 1955, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Poitier became overnight the one to portray black men in a white world. The Defiant Ones, In the Heat of the Night and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, which is all classics, have this theme. He got a lot of Golden Globe nominations in this period, while the academy were more reluctant. But with Lilies of the Field (1963) he won both awards. And the thus becoming the first african american to win an award for a leading performance. In the Golden Globes, which is a younger award he was the first African American to win anything across all categories.

He did win a BAFTA for The Defiant Ones though, which is then the first major one he won. In the later years he has gotten Lifetime achievement awards from basically anybody that have an award like that.

Even if he's not British he did recieve a honorary knighthood from Queen Elizabeth as early as 1974.

In 1972 he started directing and did 9 in total. Most of them are comedies often with Bill Cosby and Richard Pryor. And sometimes he showed up in them as well.

As half Bahamian, half American he spent his older years in diplomatics. Serving as an ambassador for Bahamas in Japan from 1997 to 2007.
I decided in my life that I would do nothing that did not reflect positively on my father's life.
Top movies to watch for this challenge: (all doubles)
In the Heat of the Night (1967)
No Way Out (1950)
Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967)

(I have to excuse some of the sentences here. I probably should have rewritten them, they seem like a foreigner wrote them (which I did :P ), but the head is not in it's usual place this month. - I'll try to post the stats and catch up on several of these presentations tomorrow though)

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#174

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » February 21st, 2020, 12:23 am

(Screenshots from 'Buck and the Preacher' and 'Gregory Porter: Don't Forget Your Music')

Image

06. 'No Way Out' / 1950, Joseph L. Mankiewicz / 8.5 or 9/10
07. 'For Love of Ivy' / 1968, Daniel Mann / 6.5/10
08. 'Carter's Army' / 1970, George McCowan / 5/10
09. 'Buck and the Preacher' / 1972, Sidney Poitier, Joseph Sargent / 7/10
10. 'Gregory Porter: Don't Forget Your Music' / 2016, Alfred George Bailey / 7.5 or 8/10
(https://londonjazznews.com/2017/01/22/f ... our-music/)

Image
That's all, folks!

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#175

Post by sol » February 21st, 2020, 12:13 pm

blocho wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 5:04 pm
sol wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 3:42 pm
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)

Image

Not a household name like MLK, it is curious to hear civil rights leader Powell's tale here, and as the documentary starts by praising his achievements, it initially seems strange how forgotten he now is. As the film progresses though, mounting controversies are revealed, from Powell pledging bad cheques to a campaign to slander MLK's name, who he saw as a rival rather than a comrade. Was he an egotist or someone genuinely interested in civil rights?
We have an entire avenue named after him here in New York. But you're right that avenues and government office buildings aside, he's not a well-remembered figure outside of Harlem. I think that partially has to do with the whiff of corruption that surrounded him, an unfortunate reminder of the corruption of some successors in Harlem politics like Charlie Rangel.
Well, as a non-US citizen, I had only ever heard Powell's name mentioned in passing and knew pretty much nothing about him other than that he was a reverend (and somehow involved in civil rights) before sitting down to watch the film. I found the documentary to be a very educational experience and one that tried to probe under his skin, as opposed to the documentary that I ended up following it with...
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#176

Post by sol » February 21st, 2020, 12:13 pm

Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)
26. Tales from the Hood (1995)
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)

28. King: A Filmed Record (1970)

Image

Archive footage of Martin Luther King is edited together in this documentary. Getting to watch and listen to his "I have a dream speech" in its entirety is a rousing experience and the film has other strong bits in its final hour as MLK's words are heard over archive footage of White Power rallies and soldiers fighting in Vietnam. The film tends to drifts into monotony though with no voice-over narration and very few title cards to hold everything together.
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#177

Post by flavo5000 » February 21st, 2020, 2:38 pm

sol wrote:
February 20th, 2020, 12:40 pm
Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)

26. Tales from the Hood (1995)

Image

Unlike most classic horror anthologies, all the episodes are written and directed by the same duo here, which creates a consistent tone and ample narrative flow, and the fourth tale superbly segues into the wraparound tale. Each of the episodes comes with stinging social commentary and/or satire too, dealing with everything from racist cops to ghetto child abuse to racist politicians to black-on-black crime. And Clarence Williams III is delightful.
I unabashedly love this movie. Avoid the sequel though... It's just not that good.

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#178

Post by sol » February 21st, 2020, 3:10 pm

flavo5000 wrote:
February 21st, 2020, 2:38 pm
I unabashedly love this movie. Avoid the sequel though... It's just not that good.
I was surprised by how much I warmed to the film too. Anthology horror films usually aren't quite my thing, but Tales from the Hood really nailed it. And no, I wasn't looking to watch this sequel this month, but we'll see how desperate I get to outperform you in this Challenge. :huh:

(nah, I have plenty of other stuff lined up to watch to remain competitive with you, just not endless free time)
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#179

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 21st, 2020, 10:15 pm

67. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (1967 / Stanley Kramer) 8/10 {108 m.}
68. Get Out (2017 / Jordan Peele) 8+/10 {104 m.}
69. Claudine (1974 / John Berry) 8+/10 {92 m.}

Happy Birthday Mr. Poitier! :party:

I had not planned to rewatch Guess Who's Coming to Dinner again this year but I wanted to celebrate Sidney Poitier's birthday and that was the best choice I had at hand. My feelings about this one go up and down - sometimes it really hooks me and sometimes it doesn't. I realize that part of the hook is probably nostalgic as I watched this on TV with my family a lot as a kid, and there's much about it that I genuinely enjoy and appreciate, but it also seems like the whitest movie I have seen this month. Since the last time I watched this two years ago for this challenge, I have also seen Get Out a couple of times and it was just irresistible to me not to pair them together since Get Out has always felt at least a bit reactionary against GWCTD. I was not disappointed - it's a fun pairing.

Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }
17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}
21. Three the Hard Way (1974 / Gordon Parks Jr.) 7/10 {89 m.} [Bonus: Williamson]
22. How To Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass; aka: Baadasssss! (2003 / Mario Van Peebles) FTV 8+/10 {109 m.}
23. How To Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It) (2005 / Joe Angio) FTV 8/10 {85 m.}
24. Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004 / Kevin Rodney Sullivan) FTV 7/10 {106 m.}
25. Creed II (2018 / Steven Caple Jr.) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.}
26. Fruitvale Station (2013 / Ryan Coogler) FTV 9+/10 {85 m.} [Bonus: Spencer]
27. Kings (2017 / Deniz Gamze Erguven) FTV 7/10 {86 m.}
28. Pariah (2011 / Dee Rees) 8+/10 {86 m.} [Bonus: Rees]
29. Chris Rock: Bring the Pain (1996 / Keith Truesdell) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
30. Bessie (2015 / Dee Rees) FTV 8+/10 {115 m.}
31. Sparkle (2012 / Salim Akil) FTV 7/10 {116 m.} [Bonus: Mara Brock Akil – writer & producer]
32. Standing in the Shadows of Motown (2002 / Paul Justman) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
33. The Hate U Give (2018 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 9/10 {133 m.}
34. The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
35. Glory (1989 / Edward Zwick) 8/10 {122 m.} [Bonus: Washington]
36-39. Shorter TV {244 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 13-14; S2, Ep. 1-4 (1972) FTV 7+/10 {152 min. }
b. Good Times: S2, Ep. 4 (1974) FTV 7/10 {26 min. }
c. The Boondocks: S1, Ep. 1-3 (2005) FTV 7+/10 {66 min. }
40. Barbershop: The Next Cut (2016 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {111 m.}
41. Dolemite (1975 / D’Urville Martin) 7+/10 {90 m.} [Bonus: Moore]
42. Sleight (2016 / J.D. Dillard) FTV 7+/10 {89 m.}
43. Soul Men (2008 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {100 m.}
44. Canal Street (2018 / Rhyan LaMarr) FTV 5/10 {89 m.}
45. Hellbound Train (1930 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
46. The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
47-51. When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts and an Epilogue (2006-2007 / Spike Lee) FTV 8+/10 {363 m.} [Bonus: Lee]
52. Shorter Films {60 min. total}
a. The Films of Oscar Micheaux (2016) FTV 7/10 {9 min. }
b. Verdict Not Guilty (1933 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6+/10 {9 m.}
c. Heaven-Bound Traveler (1935 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6/10 {15 m.}
d. An Introduction: Pioneers of African American Cinema (2016) FTV 7/10 {7 min. }
e. Commandment Keeper Church, Beaufort South Carolina, May 1940 (1940) FTV 7/10 {16 min. }
f. Zora Neale Hurston: Fieldwork Footage (1928) FTV 7/10 {4 min. }
53. The Bronze Buckaroo (1939 / Richard C. Kahn) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
54. The Jackie Robinson Story (1950 / Alfred E. Green) FTV 7/10 {77 m.} [Bonus: Ruby Dee]
55. Eleven P.M. (1928 / Richard Maurice) FTV 9/10 {67 m.}
56. The Glass Shield (1994 / Charles Burnett) 9+/10 {109 m.} [Bonus: Burnett]
57. Shaft (1971 / Gordon Parks) 8+/10 {100 m.} [Bonus: Roundtree]
58. In the Heat of the Night (1967 / Norman Jewison) 10/10 {110 m.} [Bonus: Poitier]
59. Lilies of the Field (1963 / Ralph Nelson) 8+/10 {94 m.}
60-64. O.J.: Made in America (2016 / Ezra Edelman) FTV 9+/10 {467 m.}
65. Johnson Family Vacation (2004 / Christopher Erskin) FTV 6+/10 {97 m.}
66. The Real Great Debaters (2008 / Brad Osborne) FTV 7/10 {74 m.}

67. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (1967 / Stanley Kramer) 8/10 {108 m.}
68. Get Out (2017 / Jordan Peele) 8+/10 {104 m.}
69. Claudine (1974 / John Berry) 8+/10 {92 m.}

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#180

Post by maxwelldeux » February 22nd, 2020, 12:22 am

New Jim Crow FTWShow
1. Lavell Crawford: Can a Brother Get Some Love? (2011)
2. Bad Boys II (2003)
3. Birthright (1939) Bonus: Oscar Micheaux
4. The Jackie Robinson Story (1950) Bonus: Ruby Dee
5. Dolemite (1975) Bonus: Rudy Ray Moore
6. 16 Shots (2019)
7. Murder on a Sunday Morning (2001) Best Doc Feature [win]
8. Ali (2001)
9. Who Killed Malcolm X? Marked Man (2020)
10. Leslie Jones: Time Machine (2020)
11. Who Killed Malcolm X? Straight Man in a Crooked Game (2020)
12. Dave Chappelle: Equanimity (2017)
13-16. Who Killed Malcolm X? episodes 3-6 (2020)

Finished the mini-series the other night. This was really eye-opening and fascinating overall - I knew very little about Malcolm X prior to this month (and I what I did know was heavily prejudiced by the American educational system), but after watching Ali this month, I wanted to know more about X. And this docuseries did a nice job at not just looking into the mystery of who killed him (i.e., not all the people convicted of it), but went heavily into the context surrounding him, his relationship with the Nation of Islam, and motives of his murder. And unlike most docuseries like this, it came up with an answer.

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#181

Post by sol » February 22nd, 2020, 6:02 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 12:22 am
13-16. Who Killed Malcolm X? episodes 3-6 (2020)

Finished the mini-series the other night. This was really eye-opening and fascinating overall - I knew very little about Malcolm X prior to this month
Wow, my first thought was "surely max must have seen Malcolm X, the Spike Lee movie" but apparently you haven't. I know realise that the runtime might seem daunting, but it is a great film, very insightful and easily one of Spike Lee's four or five best films for me out of the 13 that I have seen.
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#182

Post by sol » February 22nd, 2020, 6:03 am

Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)
26. Tales from the Hood (1995)
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)
28. King: A Filmed Record (1970)

29. The Great White Hope (1970)

Image

Inspired by the experiences of African American boxer Jack Johnson, this sports drama stars James Earl Jones as a prizefighter forced to confront racism as he makes it big in the boxing world with a Caucasian girlfriend. If thematically dense, the film is a little hard to digest - very heavy on dialogue and featuring more scenes of characters talking than interacting or even boxing. Jones gives it his best in the lead role though and simply oozes charisma.
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#183

Post by maxwelldeux » February 22nd, 2020, 8:02 am

sol wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 6:02 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 12:22 am
13-16. Who Killed Malcolm X? episodes 3-6 (2020)

Finished the mini-series the other night. This was really eye-opening and fascinating overall - I knew very little about Malcolm X prior to this month
Wow, my first thought was "surely max must have seen Malcolm X, the Spike Lee movie" but apparently you haven't. I know realise that the runtime might seem daunting, but it is a great film, very insightful and easily one of Spike Lee's four or five best films for me out of the 13 that I have seen.
Yeah, it's a very weird hole stemming from a weirdly specific bias I have, which comes from being raised as a nice conservative Catholic boy. MLK advocated non-violence, while Malcolm X advocated violence; so MLK was discussed a lot, while Malcolm X was mentioned in passing, at best. Spike Lee was an out-of-touch Black director who made esoteric Black films for Black audiences and was really annoying at NY Knicks games. Denzel was awesome and made great films, but they were typically more difficult films. So a super long film starring an actor who makes difficult films about a subject who advocated violence directed by an annoying guy who makes esoteric Black films wasn't appealing.

I certainly don't believe any of that now - but it explains a lot about where I spent far too much of my life. (Incidentally a major part of the reason I've argued to include Bad Boys I/II in this challenge is because those films were hugely influential in breaking me out of these and related biases.)

At this point, the main reason I haven't seen "Malcolm X" is because it's about Malcolm X - but after learning so much this month, I REALLY want to watch it.

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#184

Post by maxwelldeux » February 22nd, 2020, 8:22 am

sol wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 6:03 am
Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)
26. Tales from the Hood (1995)
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)
28. King: A Filmed Record (1970)

29. The Great White Hope (1970)

Image

Inspired by the experiences of African American boxer Jack Johnson, this sports drama stars James Earl Jones as a prizefighter forced to confront racism as he makes it big in the boxing world with a Caucasian girlfriend. If thematically dense, the film is a little hard to digest - very heavy on dialogue and featuring more scenes of characters talking than interacting or even boxing. Jones gives it his best in the lead role though and simply oozes charisma.
JEJ was awesome in that film for sure (watched it the last time this challenge was held). From my readings on Jack Johnson, the story is a lot more nuanced and complex than the film - like the vitriol towards him as a Black man was WAY more intense than the film let on... but he was also a brash asshole who deliberately antagonized White people despite advice to mellow out. The law they prosecuted him under wasn't an "aw shucks I don't like it, but it's the law" thing, it's a "let's invent a new legal theory because fuck THIS Black guy" thing.

I would love to see a "grittier" modern remake of that film with a harsh and realistic take on Jack Johnson.

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#185

Post by sol » February 22nd, 2020, 9:00 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 8:22 am
I would love to see a "grittier" modern remake of that film with a harsh and realistic take on Jack Johnson.
Same, I guess. JEJ's magnetic performance aside, The Great White Hope did pretty little for me, though some of that might be due to my own disinterest in boxing and knowing practically nothing about the real Johnson before sitting down to watch it.
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#186

Post by jdidaco » February 22nd, 2020, 11:58 am

(Screenshots from 'Top of the Heap' & 'Bush Mama'),

"I heard a voice. It kept saying get out of this machine...get out of this machine." (St. John)

Image

21. J.T. (Robert M. Young, 1969) 8/10
22. Right On! (Herbert Danska, 1970) 9/10
23. Top of the Heap (Christopher St. John, 1972) 9.5/10 (l)
24. The Spook Who Sat by the Door (Ivan Dixon, 1973) 8/10
25. Wattstax (Mel Stuart, 1973) 9/10
26. Shoot It Black, Shoot It Blue (Dennis McGuire, 1974) 8/10
27. Darktown Strutters (William Witney, 1975) 6/10
28. Brotherhood of Death (Bill Berry, 1976) 7/10
29. Bush Mama (Haile Gerima, 1979) 9.5/10 (l)
30. Downtown 81 (Edo Bertoglio, 1981/2000) 8/10

Image

SpoilerShow
1. Bone (Larry Cohen, 1972) 8/10
2. Lord Shango (Ray Marsh, 1975) 6.5/10
3. Mahogany (Berry Gordy & Tony Richardson, 1975) 6.5/10
4. A Different Image (Alile Sharon Larkin, 1982) 8/10
5. Hollywood Shuffle (Robert Townsend, 1987) 7.5/10
6. Black Is... Black Ain't (Marlon Riggs, 1994) 8.5/10
7. Baadasssss Cinema (Isaac Julien, 2002) 7.5/10
8. BlacKkKlansman (Spike Lee, 2018) 7.5/10
9-10. I Am Somebody (Madeline Anderson, 1970) 8/10 (30 min), Medea (Ben Caldwell, 1973) 8/10 (7 min), The Kitchen (Alile Sharon Larkin, 1975) 6.5/10 (7 min), Diary of an African Nun (Julie Dash, 1977) 9/10 (14 min), Rain (Melvonna Ballenger, 1978) 7/10 (16 min), The Pocketbook (Billy Woodberry, 1980) 7.5/10 (12 min), Dark Exodus (Iverson White, 1985) 7/10 (28 min), Hair Love (Matthew A. Cherry & Everett Downing Jr. & Bruce W. Smith, 2019) 7/10 (7 min) (Total: 121 min)
11. Trick Baby (Larry Yust, 1972) 8/10
12. Amazing Grace (Sydney Pollack & Alan Elliott, 1972/2018) 9/10
13. Lady Cocoa (Matt Cimber, 1975) 7/10
14. Emma Mae (Jamaa Fanaka, 1976) 9/10
15. Sidewalk Stories (Charles Lane, 1989) 8/10
16. Def by Temptation (James Bond III, 1990) 6/10
17. Tales from the Hood (Rusty Cundieff, 1995) 8/10
18. Compensation (Zeinabu irene Davis, 1999) 8/10
19. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (Charles Burnett, 2003) 9.5/10
20. Us (Jordan Peele, 2019) 7.5/10

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#187

Post by flavo5000 » February 22nd, 2020, 1:11 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 8:02 am
sol wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 6:02 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 22nd, 2020, 12:22 am
13-16. Who Killed Malcolm X? episodes 3-6 (2020)

Finished the mini-series the other night. This was really eye-opening and fascinating overall - I knew very little about Malcolm X prior to this month
Wow, my first thought was "surely max must have seen Malcolm X, the Spike Lee movie" but apparently you haven't. I know realise that the runtime might seem daunting, but it is a great film, very insightful and easily one of Spike Lee's four or five best films for me out of the 13 that I have seen.
Yeah, it's a very weird hole stemming from a weirdly specific bias I have, which comes from being raised as a nice conservative Catholic boy. MLK advocated non-violence, while Malcolm X advocated violence; so MLK was discussed a lot, while Malcolm X was mentioned in passing, at best. Spike Lee was an out-of-touch Black director who made esoteric Black films for Black audiences and was really annoying at NY Knicks games. Denzel was awesome and made great films, but they were typically more difficult films. So a super long film starring an actor who makes difficult films about a subject who advocated violence directed by an annoying guy who makes esoteric Black films wasn't appealing.

I certainly don't believe any of that now - but it explains a lot about where I spent far too much of my life. (Incidentally a major part of the reason I've argued to include Bad Boys I/II in this challenge is because those films were hugely influential in breaking me out of these and related biases.)

At this point, the main reason I haven't seen "Malcolm X" is because it's about Malcolm X - but after learning so much this month, I REALLY want to watch it.
It really is a very good movie. It's one I had put off for a long time too (mostly due to how long it was), but I was glad I finally sat down and watched it a year or two ago. Denzel is really great in it (of course) and the movie rarely falls into the trappings of the dull predictable biopic you often see with these kinds of movies.

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#188

Post by flavo5000 » February 22nd, 2020, 1:22 pm

Image
28. What's Love Got to Do with It (1993)
In a lot of ways this is a pretty by-the-numbers biopic but with a focus on Tina Turner's struggles to escape from Ike's abusiveness nature. The performances from Fishburne and Bassett are what really elevate it though. They both embody their roles really well and received well-deserved Oscars for both of them.

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29. Slam (1998)
Saul Williams plays a conflicted young black man who lives in the ghetto and is forced to sell drugs to make a living but aspires to something better via his electric poetry. When he's arrested on possession charges, he has to face his future in prison and decide where he wants to take his life. This was pretty good and both Saul Williams and his romantic and inspirational foil Sonja Sohn were quite good and at their best during the actual poetry readings. The movie does fall into acting school scream-y melodrama in a couple places though, keeping it from being great.

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30. Michael Che Matters (2016)
Michael Che, co-anchor of Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update, offers up a stand-up special peppered with dated Black Lives Matter and Trump political humor as well as funnier stuff involving sex toys, Christianity and other things. Overall a bit of a mixed bag but intermittently funny. Honestly he's at his best doing crowd work. Maybe he should do a special like Todd Barry's that's just all crowd work?
Dolemite is my name and f--kin up motherf--kers is my gameShow
1. Chi-Raq (Spike Lee, 2015)
2. Mr. Mean (Fred Williamson, 1977)
3. Harriet (Kasi Lemmons, 2019)
4. Shaft's Big Score! (1972)
5. Shaft in Africa (1973)
6. South Central S1E5-7 (1994)
7. Hallelujah (1929)
8. Uptown Saturday Night (1974)
9. Dolemite Is My Name (2019)
10. Cleopatra Jones (1973)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. The Human Tornado (1976)
13. Scream Blacula Scream (1973)
14. Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
15. A Raisin in the Sun (1961)
16. Don't Play Us Cheap (1973)
17. Blackenstein (1973)
18. Beyond the Lights (2014)
19. Get on Up (2014)
20. A Soldier's Story (!984)
21. Dave Chappelle: The Age of Spin: Dave Chappelle Live at the Hollywood Palladium (2017)
22. Purple Rain (1984)
23. W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro (2018)
24. Sounder (!972)
25. Bone (1972)
26. Harlem Nights (1989)
27. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003)
28. What's Love Got to Do with It (1993)
29. Slam (1998)
30. Michael Che Matters (2016)

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#189

Post by OldAle1 » February 22nd, 2020, 5:21 pm

Black Dynamite Panther Fist!Show
1. The Black Gestapo (Lee Frost, 1975)
2. Darktown Strutters (William Witney, 1975)
3. Willie Dynamite (Gilbert Moses, 1974)

I don't know about anybody else, but I look for specific elements when it comes to many genres - particularly fairly small and contained genres like blaxploitation. Got to have some funky music, got to have some cool threads, got to have at least one decent car chase or foot chase (preferably both); in the more serious films I also want to see some real exploration of the morality of drug dealing and pimping, and I always like to see some sticking it to the Man. Willie Dynamite has just about all of these things, and in one area - the wardrobe - it's absolutely top-notch. I'd have to look at 1974 overall but if there's a film with better costume design from this year I definitely want to be pointed towards it - and I'm hardly a costume fetishist. But jeez, this is just full of weird and cool suits of every color, fur-lined (or maybe fake fur or wool sometimes - not always easy to tell) capes, mini-skirts and high heeled boots in every color of the rainbow, etc. Best pimp threads ever.

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Pretty cool cars too and a good if not exceptional soundtrack - and at least a small helping of all those other elements. And that's enough to make it worth watching IMO, though the overall plot - top pimp Willie (Roscoe Orman) brought successively lower and lower over the course of the film by the cops, by the IRS, by his competitors, and by his own hubris, isn't anything you haven't seen before if you've seen a bit of the genre. There are some other interesting elements - the interactions with the two main cops, one white and one black, and the very ending - simultaneously more realistic and more hopeful than most of the rest of the film would lead you to expect. Not top-drawer but overall above average for sure.

4. Black Dynamite (Scott Sanders, 2009) (re-watch)

3rd or 4th viewing. This gets better every time; like most of the best parodies, this does have some value even if you're not that familiar with what's being parodied - when I first saw this new I was in that category of viewer. But now after probably 60 or more blaxplo films seen it's even better and the specific references to films like the one I saw just before it, to The Mack and Truck Turner, are funnier than ever, and star/co-writer Michael Jai White's combination of Jim Brown and JIm Kelly (with maybe a small touch of Fred Williamson, at least in the mustache) and co-writer Byron Minns' Bullhorn, a dead-on imitation of Rudy Ray Moore, help to make this one of my all-time favorites in this category. Spinal Tap is probably the only film at all comparable that I might - just might - like more. I do wish they had done more with Salli Richardson-Whitfield's Gloria - the film is missing the tough Pam Grier female lead and she's the closest thing to it, and just doesn't get any real standout scenes - but with the limitations of budget and everything else it's no surprise - if you listen to the commentary it's clear that they wanted better female-led kung-fu action among other things, but it wasn't in the cards, and alas there never was a live-action sequel; I still haven't watched the animated TV series, probably should get to that sometime. If I have a single highlight it's probably the diner-set scene where Black Dynamite explains the origin of Anaconda Malt Liquor and why it's being so aggressively marketed to black men - a plot point that comes out of a number of conspiracy-minded blaxplo films like Darktown Strutters; this reminds me of the Holy Grail sketch where Sir Bedevere is explaining how you can spot a witch, only it goes much farther in the extreme silliness and convolutions of the arguments.

5. Gordon's War (Ossie Davis, 1973)

A more serious, action-crime oriented film than most, this has something of the gritty feel of Across 110th Street and for the use of New York locations and the feel for the streets of Harlem at the time it's worth a look. But the story of Vietnam vet Paul Winfield returning to find his wife dead from the Evils of Smack and declaring all-out war on the dealers, pushers and pimps, recruiting three of his Nam buddies, is pretty old-hat. Maybe it wasn't at the time but I suspect even in '73 this didn't impress much - it remains a pretty obscure film. Decent funky soundtrack, some good action sequences, but the later parts of the film where we suddenly discover that, gasp, it's The Man behind all the black dealers and pimps and He's the guy they have to actually take out, and particularly the last scene, feel pretty tacked-on, either to increase the running time to an acceptable 90 minutes or to make sure that the audience wouldn't come away thinking the problems are all just in the black community and in fact caused by black bad guys. Grace Jones has a small role - her first. Ehh, pretty average overall.

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#190

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 22nd, 2020, 8:56 pm

70-75. Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954-1965 (1987) FTV 8+/10 {342 m.}

Afro SeenShow
1.Blackenstein (1973 / William A. Levey) FTV 7/10 {87 m.}
2.Blacula (1972 / William Crain) 8/10 {93 m.}
3.Scream Blacula Scream (1973 / Bob Kelljan) 8/10 {96 m.} [Bonus: Grier]
4. Ten Minutes To Live (1932 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 8+/10 {58 m.} [Bonus: Micheaux]
5. House Party (1990 / Reginald Hudlin) 8+/10 {100 m.}
6. Soul Plane (2004 / Jessy Terrero) 8/10 {86 m.}
7. Baby Boy (2001 / John Singleton) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.} [Bonus: Singleton]
8. Boyz n the Hood (1991 / John Singleton) 8+/10 {112 m.}
9. Sorry To Bother You (2018 / Boots Riley) FTV 8+/10 {112 m.}
10. Little (2019 / Tina Gordon) FTV 5/10 {109 m.}
11-16. Shorter TV {364 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 7-12 (1972) FTV 8-/10 {156 min. }
b. Good Times: S1, Ep. 9-13; S2, Ep. 1-3 (1974) FTV 8/10 {208 min. }
17. The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968 / Melvin Van Peebles) 9/10 {87 m.} [Bonus: Van Peebles]
18. Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song (1971 / Melvin Van Peebles) 8+/10 {97 m.}
19. Barbershop (2002 / Tim Story) FTV 8+/10 {102 m.}
20. Black Belt Jones (1974 / Robert Clouse) 7/10 {85 m.}
21. Three the Hard Way (1974 / Gordon Parks Jr.) 7/10 {89 m.} [Bonus: Williamson]
22. How To Get the Man’s Foot Outta Your Ass; aka: Baadasssss! (2003 / Mario Van Peebles) FTV 8+/10 {109 m.}
23. How To Eat Your Watermelon in White Company (and Enjoy It) (2005 / Joe Angio) FTV 8/10 {85 m.}
24. Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004 / Kevin Rodney Sullivan) FTV 7/10 {106 m.}
25. Creed II (2018 / Steven Caple Jr.) FTV 7+/10 {130 m.}
26. Fruitvale Station (2013 / Ryan Coogler) FTV 9+/10 {85 m.} [Bonus: Spencer]
27. Kings (2017 / Deniz Gamze Erguven) FTV 7/10 {86 m.}
28. Pariah (2011 / Dee Rees) 8+/10 {86 m.} [Bonus: Rees]
29. Chris Rock: Bring the Pain (1996 / Keith Truesdell) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
30. Bessie (2015 / Dee Rees) FTV 8+/10 {115 m.}
31. Sparkle (2012 / Salim Akil) FTV 7/10 {116 m.} [Bonus: Mara Brock Akil – writer & producer]
32. Standing in the Shadows of Motown (2002 / Paul Justman) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
33. The Hate U Give (2018 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 9/10 {133 m.}
34. The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013 / George Tillman Jr.) FTV 8+/10 {108 m.}
35. Glory (1989 / Edward Zwick) 8/10 {122 m.} [Bonus: Washington]
36-39. Shorter TV {244 min. total}
a. Sanford and Son: S1, Ep. 13-14; S2, Ep. 1-4 (1972) FTV 7+/10 {152 min. }
b. Good Times: S2, Ep. 4 (1974) FTV 7/10 {26 min. }
c. The Boondocks: S1, Ep. 1-3 (2005) FTV 7+/10 {66 min. }
40. Barbershop: The Next Cut (2016 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {111 m.}
41. Dolemite (1975 / D’Urville Martin) 7+/10 {90 m.} [Bonus: Moore]
42. Sleight (2016 / J.D. Dillard) FTV 7+/10 {89 m.}
43. Soul Men (2008 / Malcolm D. Lee) FTV 7-/10 {100 m.}
44. Canal Street (2018 / Rhyan LaMarr) FTV 5/10 {89 m.}
45. Hellbound Train (1930 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
46. The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920 / Oscar Micheaux) FTV 7+/10 {60 m.}
47-51. When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts and an Epilogue (2006-2007 / Spike Lee) FTV 8+/10 {363 m.} [Bonus: Lee]
52. Shorter Films {60 min. total}
a. The Films of Oscar Micheaux (2016) FTV 7/10 {9 min. }
b. Verdict Not Guilty (1933 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6+/10 {9 m.}
c. Heaven-Bound Traveler (1935 / Eloyce & James Gist) FTV 6/10 {15 m.}
d. An Introduction: Pioneers of African American Cinema (2016) FTV 7/10 {7 min. }
e. Commandment Keeper Church, Beaufort South Carolina, May 1940 (1940) FTV 7/10 {16 min. }
f. Zora Neale Hurston: Fieldwork Footage (1928) FTV 7/10 {4 min. }
53. The Bronze Buckaroo (1939 / Richard C. Kahn) FTV 7+/10 {58 m.}
54. The Jackie Robinson Story (1950 / Alfred E. Green) FTV 7/10 {77 m.} [Bonus: Ruby Dee]
55. Eleven P.M. (1928 / Richard Maurice) FTV 9/10 {67 m.}
56. The Glass Shield (1994 / Charles Burnett) 9+/10 {109 m.} [Bonus: Burnett]
57. Shaft (1971 / Gordon Parks) 8+/10 {100 m.} [Bonus: Roundtree]
58. In the Heat of the Night (1967 / Norman Jewison) 10/10 {110 m.} [Bonus: Poitier]
59. Lilies of the Field (1963 / Ralph Nelson) 8+/10 {94 m.}
60-64. O.J.: Made in America (2016 / Ezra Edelman) FTV 9+/10 {467 m.}
65. Johnson Family Vacation (2004 / Christopher Erskin) FTV 6+/10 {97 m.}
66. The Real Great Debaters (2008 / Brad Osborne) FTV 7/10 {74 m.}
67. Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner (1967 / Stanley Kramer) 8/10 {108 m.}
68. Get Out (2017 / Jordan Peele) 8+/10 {104 m.}
69. Claudine (1974 / John Berry) 8+/10 {92 m.}

70-75. Eyes on the Prize: America’s Civil Rights Years 1954-1965 (1987) FTV 8+/10 {342 m.}


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sol
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#191

Post by sol » February 23rd, 2020, 1:44 am

Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)
26. Tales from the Hood (1995)
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)
28. King: A Filmed Record (1970)
29. The Great White Hope (1970)

30. When We Were Kings (1996)

Image

The central fight here is well filmed, intercut with interviews and ample commentary to explain the significance of everything to non-boxing savants. In fact, the passion that all concerned have when describing the fight is arguably more interesting than the match itself. We also get to see just how boisterous and cocky Ali was and there are fleeting moments dedicated to his politics, which I would have liked to have seen further explored.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#192

Post by jeroeno » February 23rd, 2020, 7:47 am

08. A Fall from Grace (2020)
09. John Henry (2020)
10. Creed II (2018)
11. Waiting to Exhale (1995)

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sol
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#193

Post by sol » February 23rd, 2020, 8:51 am

Doing the Right ThingShow
1. Native Son (1986)
2. Just Mercy (2019)
3. Dear White People (2014)
4. Death at a Funeral (2010)
5. Def by Temptation (1990)
6. Watermelon Man (1970)
7. Change of Mind (1969)
8. Pootie Tang (2001)
9. House Party (1990)
10. House Party 2 (1991)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. Peeples (2013)
13. Stigma (1972)
14. Keanu (2016)
15. Little (2019)
16. Coffy (1973)
17. Classified X (1998)
18. The Brothers (2001)
19. Undefeated (2011)
20. The Equalizer (2014)
21. For Love of Ivy (1968)
22. Porgy and Bess (1959)
23. Within Our Gates (1920)
24. Universal Remote (2007)
25. The Black Gestapo (1975)
26. Tales from the Hood (1995)
27. Adam Clayton Powell (1989)
28. King: A Filmed Record (1970)
29. The Great White Hope (1970)
30. When We Were Kings (1996)

31. Roman J. Israel, Esq. (2017)

Image

If not half as atmospheric as Nightcrawler, Dan Gilroy once again takes a memorable swipe at humanity here with another outsider protagonist, though a social misfit with autistic tendencies this time, and Denzel Washington sublimely sinks into the role. The film's first half is a little slapdash, trying to be a lot of things at once, but it finds its way halfway in, and the final third is particularly powerful with paranoia-ridden scenes and eerie echoes.
Former IMDb message boards user // iCM | IMDb | Letterboxd | My top 750 films // Long live the new flesh!
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#194

Post by ororama » February 23rd, 2020, 2:09 pm

2. Black Is... Black Ain't (1994) * 88 min.
3. Hollywood Shuffle (1987) * 81 min.

SpoilerShow
1. Ol' King Cotton (1930) * 11 min.
A Rhapsody in Black and Blue (1932) * 10 min.
Black and Tan (1929) 19 min.
A Bundle of Blues (1933) * 9 min.
Symphony in Black: A Rhapsody of Negro Life (1935) * 10 min.
Ain't Misbehavin' (1941) * 3 min.

*First time viewing

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OldAle1
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#195

Post by OldAle1 » February 23rd, 2020, 3:06 pm

Black Dynamite Panther Fist!Show
1. The Black Gestapo (Lee Frost, 1975)
2. Darktown Strutters (William Witney, 1975)
3. Willie Dynamite (Gilbert Moses, 1974)
4. Black Dynamite (Scott Sanders, 2009) (re-watch)
5. Gordon's War (Ossie Davis, 1973)
6. Cobra nero / Black Cobra (Stelvio Massi, 1987)

By this point in his career Fred Williamson was very far from the peak he reached in the early to mid 70s when he was one of the top black stars and was starting his directing career. I don't know if it was the drying up of the blaxploitation genre, an inability or disinterest in changing his screen persona, bad luck or personal issues, but he has never gotten back to where he was early in his career and apart from a few supporting roles in better films, most of what he's done since 1977 or so has ranged from mediocre and predictable schlock to bottom-of-the-barrel crap. This is in the latter category unfortunately, a quickie shot in Italy like a lot of his work in the 80s, at a time when the Italian genre industry itself was deeply fallen on hard times. So you get a washed up American star in a washed-up low-budget industry, you're not going to get much. Williamson is Malone, the one tough Dirty Harry-type cop in the nameless city's police force who has to protect a photographer who snapped a pic of a biker/drug gang leader. One decent car chase near the end, a fair amount of pretty poorly shot gun and hand-to-hand violence, absolutely horrible dubbing (though Williamson does dub himself thankfully). And a horrible muddy transfer, at least in the copy I saw - judging from a couple of reviews and screenshots I've seen there's nothing better unfortunately. I definitely admire the Italian genre factory as much as most people, but from what I've seen they sure didn't do well with blaxploitation and this is no exception to that observation, in fact it's among the worst I've seen.

7. That Man Bolt (Henry Levin/David Lowell Rich, 1973)

Williamson in his heyday. The top review on IMDb pretty much gets this right, calling it "an odd mix of blaxploitation, martial arts, and espionage/spy thriller". The only thing I'd add is echoes of James Bond specifically - the casino sequence is low-rent Bond and the first few scenes seem to be pointing in that direction. But our man Bolt (Williamson) isn't a spy or secret agent, he's a high-priced courier, tasked in this story with taking a briefcase with $1,000,000 from Hong Kong to Mexico City, but after an attempted "change of plans" by forces unknown in Los Angeles, he decides to find out who is double-crossing him and who's behind it all, landing first in Las Vegas - where he reunites with a singer (Teresa Graves) and an old buddy casino owner, only to see both of them pay a price for associating with the man with the money. Then it's on to Hong Kong where inevitably we find a suave gangster who employs an army (well, really, not even a company) of kung-fu assassins who Bolt will eventually have to defeat. Good location work - this must have had some kind of budget because they actually shot it in LA, Vegas and HK - reasonably good action, and Williamson's cool persona works pretty well here, but the plot is simultaneously confusing and poorly stitched together, and deeply generic. All in all worth watching for fans like me but not among the top tier, that's for sure.

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#196

Post by maxwelldeux » February 23rd, 2020, 8:09 pm

sol wrote:
February 23rd, 2020, 1:44 am
30. When We Were Kings (1996)

The central fight here is well filmed, intercut with interviews and ample commentary to explain the significance of everything to non-boxing savants. In fact, the passion that all concerned have when describing the fight is arguably more interesting than the match itself. We also get to see just how boisterous and cocky Ali was and there are fleeting moments dedicated to his politics, which I would have liked to have seen further explored.
This film is actually why I didn't particularly enjoy Ali. This treated that Rumble in the Jungle fight so well that the treatment in Ali was disappointing at best.

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#197

Post by AB537 » February 24th, 2020, 3:41 am

2. If Beale Street Could Talk (Barry Jenkins, 2018) 7.5/10

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Teproc
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#198

Post by Teproc » February 24th, 2020, 12:03 pm

1. Queen & Slim (Melina Matsoukas, 2019) - 7/10

Beyoncé is all over this even though she isn't, or maybe it's the reverse and Melina Matsoukas has been the main driver in Beyoncé's style recently (as far as music videos go anyway) ? In any case, this is a sometimes awkward film, but always interesting especially thanks to Kaluuya's great performance.

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#199

Post by flavo5000 » February 24th, 2020, 1:10 pm

Image
31. Hit! (1973)
Billy Dee Williams tries his hand at the Shaft-esque action star role and acquits himself pretty well as a federal agent who sets out to take down a drug ring after his daughter ODs on heroin. The movie itself just felt too long with too many movie parts to be totally successful but one can certainly imagine George Lucas watching this and imagining a smooth and driven action guy named Lando Calrissian.

Image
32. The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920)
Another one from Oscar Micheaux, this one has a couple of plot threads going on with two light-skinned black people in a kind of 'star-crossed lovers' scenario and another black man being menaced by racists because they want his land with oil on it. Like other Micheaux films, it definitely has some interesting historical merit to it but is not a terribly interesting movie in and of itself. One of the biggest problems is that the actual climax of the movie seems to be missing with just a title card describing what happened. I don't think even if it were available that it would have been enough to redeem the whole movie, but we'll probably never know.
Dolemite is my name and f--kin up motherf--kers is my gameShow
1. Chi-Raq (Spike Lee, 2015)
2. Mr. Mean (Fred Williamson, 1977)
3. Harriet (Kasi Lemmons, 2019)
4. Shaft's Big Score! (1972)
5. Shaft in Africa (1973)
6. South Central S1E5-7 (1994)
7. Hallelujah (1929)
8. Uptown Saturday Night (1974)
9. Dolemite Is My Name (2019)
10. Cleopatra Jones (1973)
11. Poetic Justice (1993)
12. The Human Tornado (1976)
13. Scream Blacula Scream (1973)
14. Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
15. A Raisin in the Sun (1961)
16. Don't Play Us Cheap (1973)
17. Blackenstein (1973)
18. Beyond the Lights (2014)
19. Get on Up (2014)
20. A Soldier's Story (!984)
21. Dave Chappelle: The Age of Spin: Dave Chappelle Live at the Hollywood Palladium (2017)
22. Purple Rain (1984)
23. W. Kamau Bell: Private School Negro (2018)
24. Sounder (!972)
25. Bone (1972)
26. Harlem Nights (1989)
27. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003)
28. What's Love Got to Do with It (1993)
29. Slam (1998)
30. Michael Che Matters (2016)
31. Hit! (1973)
32. The Symbol of the Unconquered (1920)

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#200

Post by sebby » February 24th, 2020, 4:09 pm

07 Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) 6/10
08 Murder on a Sunday Morning (2001) 5/10
09 Undefeated (2011) 5.5/10
10 Scottsboro: An American Tragedy (2000) 5/10
11 The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) 7.5/10

Last Black Man in SF was a real treat.

SpoilerShow
01 Black Mother (2018) 6/10
02 The Learning Tree (1969) 3/10
03 Daughters of the Dust (1991) 5/10
04 Dolemite Is My Name (2019) 5/10
05 Dolemite (1975) 5/10
06 King: A Filmed Record... Montgomery to Memphis (1970) 8/10
07 Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song (1971) 6/10
08 Murder on a Sunday Morning (2001) 5/10
09 Undefeated (2011) 5.5/10
10 Scottsboro: An American Tragedy (2000) 5/10
11 The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) 7.5/10

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