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500<400 (Nominations Sep 22nd)
Polls: Benelux (Results), 1944 awards (Sep 23rd), 1964 (Sep 28th), Knockout competition (Round 1)
Challenges: Silent Era, 21st Century, Japan
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Japan Challenge (Official, September 2019)

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hurluberlu
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Re: Japan Challenge (Official, September 2019)

#41

Post by hurluberlu » September 2nd, 2019, 7:09 pm

1. Ikigami (Tomoyuki Takimoto, 2008) 6
2. Rainy Dog / Gokudô kuroshakai (Takashi Miike, 1997) 7

my Banzai!!! side challenge trackingShow

Remember if you want to participate to the challenge (rules in the OP), you may share your progress (but not reveal your guesses for the OP stills until final posting). Whether you shared your progress or not, please shout when you have completed everything and post your guesses and watches accordingly.

The below is just my own progress.

Done:
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike: Rainy Dog

Open:
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô (1)
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP (3)
- Watch four films from four different decades (4)
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still (1)
- Watch a film in theater (1)
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#42

Post by DareDaniel » September 2nd, 2019, 8:03 pm

Onderhond wrote:
August 28th, 2019, 9:23 pm
Image

https://www.onderhond.com/toplist/heisei

My Top 205 from the Heisei era, for those who want some more recent Japanese recommends. Some true underseen gems in there. Films like The Clone Returns Home, Woman of Water or Mirrored Mind should appeal to people here I think.

I've seen most of the films in that list. It's great!
Ken Ninomya (The Limit of Sleeping Beauty) is a talent to follow. I've been checking almost daily for english subtitles for his new movie Chiwawa.
It was pretty cool to see Love On Sunday on the list, such an hidden gem. :wub:

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#43

Post by 72allinncallme » September 2nd, 2019, 9:00 pm

6. Akarui mirai / Bright Future (2002)
7. Kimi ga wakamono nara / If You Were Young: Rage (1970)
8. Sono otoko, kyôbô ni tsuki / Violent Cop (1989)
9. Nippon konchûki / The Insect Woman (1963)
SpoilerShow
1. Jôen / The Affair (Yoshishige Yoshida, 1967)
2. Mata au hi made / Till We Meet Again (Tadashi Imai, 1950)
3. Chikamatsu monogatari / The Crucified Lovers (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1954)
4. Miyamoto Musashi / Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto (Hiroshi Inagaki, 1954)
5. Ukigumo / Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse 1955)
6. Akarui mirai / Bright Future (2002)
7. Kimi ga wakamono nara / If You Were Young: Rage (1970)
8. Sono otoko, kyôbô ni tsuki / Violent Cop (1989)
9. Nippon konchûki / The Insect Woman (1963)

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#44

Post by Ritesh » September 2nd, 2019, 9:50 pm

4. Zatoichi and the Chess Expert (1965)
5. Zatoichi's Vengeance (1966)
6. Zatoichi: The Blind Swordsman's Pilgrimage (1966)

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#45

Post by AB537 » September 2nd, 2019, 9:51 pm

2. Otona no miru ehon - Umarete wa mita keredo - I Was Born, But ... (Yasujiro Ozu, 1932) 6/10

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#46

Post by Onderhond » September 2nd, 2019, 10:14 pm

DareDaniel wrote:
September 2nd, 2019, 8:03 pm
Ken Ninomya (The Limit of Sleeping Beauty) is a talent to follow. I've been checking almost daily for english subtitles for his new movie Chiwawa.
You and me both. Best film I've seen in years :)
DareDaniel wrote:
September 2nd, 2019, 8:03 pm
It was pretty cool to see Love On Sunday on the list, such an hidden gem. :wub:
I feel Hiroki is quite well-known as a director, but many of his films are very hard to come by. I watched it at a small Japanese film fest in Amsterdam (Dejima) back in the day, with Hiroki himself attending. It's Only Talk is also a superb film (saw that one at IFFR). Sadly DVD/BR releases with EN subs of his films are extremely rare.

Do you have a list of your own DareDaniel? I'd love to take a peak at your Japanese favorites, I sure could use some extra tips :)

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#47

Post by cinephage » September 2nd, 2019, 11:20 pm

01. Seisaku no tsuma, by Yasuzô Masumura (1965) 7,5/10

Quite extreme at times, but on the whole a very sad drama and depiction of how outcast have to deal with society in Japan.

02. Rurôni Kenshin: Meiji kenkaku roman tan, by Keishi Ohtomo (2012) 7,5/10

A lot of fun, many spectacular action scenes, and the movie feels a lot like adapted manga. Still it was quite enjoyable.

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#48

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » September 2nd, 2019, 11:50 pm

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FTV:3:Bullet Train (1975) 9

Chugging along for over 2 and a half hours (!) co-writer/(with Ryunosuke Ono and Sunao Sakagami) director Jun'ya Sato & cinematographer Masahiko Iimura impressively keep everything on track by cranking Disaster Movie explosions with a Thriller atmosphere, via quick-draw zoom-ins on the staff at the Bullet Train headquarters sweating over figuring out where the bomb is,whilst darting whip-pans drive along to the failed attempts by the police to catch the terrorists red handed. Backed by the delightfully odd J-Funk score from
Hachiro Aoyama, Sato and Iimura match the tension away from the platform with excellent filming inside a real Bullet Train, running down the carriages towards the panicking passengers,and stepping off to wide-shots capturing day turning into night on the deepening crisis.

One of the staples of the genre, the screenplay by Ono/ Sakagami and Sato bring the pre-Speed threat that a bomb will go off if the train dips below 80mph to home in lively Melodrama thumbnail sketches of the passengers opening up about the lives they led before getting aboard, that are contrasted with brooding flashbacks centred around Okita losing everything, to the point he joins some political radicals and becomes a terrorist. Igniting the ticking time bomb,Ken Takakura gives a great performance as terrorist Okita,whose straight-lace manner allows Takakura to bring a grit in tense phone-call exchanges with Shin'ichi Chiba’s great turn as the anxious Aoki, who negotiates to keep the Bullet Train on track.

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#49

Post by allisoncm » September 3rd, 2019, 3:22 am

1. Madamu to nyôbô/The Neighbor’s Wife and Mine (1931) 6/10 Criterion Channel

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#50

Post by maxwelldeux » September 3rd, 2019, 4:16 am

1. Battle Royale (2000k Kinji Fukasaku)
Word of warning: don't watch the English dub that's available on Amazon Prime (US). I'm sure that affected my interest, but while I thought was one of the better dystopian teen films (a genre I dislike) and certainly had a lot of cool violence and manipulation, the backstories of the characters just rang a little hollow to me, with too many characters for me to invest in. A solid and enjoyable watch if you want to see teenagers killing each other on an island, but not more than that.

Bonus Challenge Tracking (score = 1):Show
Completed:
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still (1)
The characters see it - we don't.Show
Image
In Progress:

Not started:
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP (0/3)
- Watch four films from four different decades (0/4)
- Guess 4 films from the OP Poster. Stills are numeroted from 1 to 18 from left to right and top to Bottom. (4)
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike (1)
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô (1)
- Watch a film in theater (1)
Last edited by maxwelldeux on September 3rd, 2019, 7:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#51

Post by jeroeno » September 3rd, 2019, 4:51 am

03. Typhoon Club (Shinji Sômai, 1985)

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#52

Post by St. Gloede » September 3rd, 2019, 7:06 am

1. Akutarô-den: Warui hoshi no shita demo / Stories of Bastards: Born Under a Bad Star (1965, Seijun Suzuki) 5/10
2. Kagerô-za / Heat Shimmer Theater (1981, Seijun Suzuki) 7.5/10
3. Nihon rettô / The Japanese Archipeligo (1965, Kei Kumai) 3/10

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#53

Post by sol » September 3rd, 2019, 10:51 am

I am Godzilla! You are Japan!Show
1. Godzilla (1954)
2. Cure (1997)

3. R100 (2013)

Image

The title here is a play on the R18+ rating classification in countries like Australia and Japan, with the content apparently is so shocking that "no one under 100 will be admitted". The perversities are actually rather tame and hardly graphic. The vast majority of the movie works though with cool ripple special effects, intelligent fourth wall breaking and some commentary on the difficulties of maintaining boundaries and rules in any relationship.

Added to my 500<400 ballot. :thumbsup:
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#54

Post by Onderhond » September 3rd, 2019, 11:38 am

sol wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 10:51 am
3. R100 (2013)

The title here is a play on the R18+ rating classification in countries like Australia and Japan, with the content apparently is so shocking that "no one under 100 will be admitted". The perversities are actually rather tame and hardly graphic. The vast majority of the movie works though with cool ripple special effects, intelligent fourth wall breaking and some commentary on the difficulties of maintaining boundaries and rules in any relationship.

Added to my 500<400 ballot. :thumbsup:
So … did you think the director in the film looked like Seijun Suzuki too? :D

Such a shame Matsumoto hasn't made anything since, one of the most promising Japanese directors of the past 10 years.

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#55

Post by flavo5000 » September 3rd, 2019, 12:09 pm

Onderhond wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 11:38 am
sol wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 10:51 am
3. R100 (2013)

The title here is a play on the R18+ rating classification in countries like Australia and Japan, with the content apparently is so shocking that "no one under 100 will be admitted". The perversities are actually rather tame and hardly graphic. The vast majority of the movie works though with cool ripple special effects, intelligent fourth wall breaking and some commentary on the difficulties of maintaining boundaries and rules in any relationship.

Added to my 500<400 ballot. :thumbsup:
So … did you think the director in the film looked like Seijun Suzuki too? :D

Such a shame Matsumoto hasn't made anything since, one of the most promising Japanese directors of the past 10 years.
I watched Symbol earlier this year and found it to be delightfully ridiculous to the point that I'm hoping to check out at least R100 and Big Man Japan this month.

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#56

Post by St. Gloede » September 3rd, 2019, 12:23 pm

Love Symbol. I should definitely try to catch up on more of his films this month!

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#57

Post by sol » September 3rd, 2019, 1:28 pm

Onderhond wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 11:38 am
sol wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 10:51 am
3. R100 (2013)

The title here is a play on the R18+ rating classification in countries like Australia and Japan, with the content apparently is so shocking that "no one under 100 will be admitted". The perversities are actually rather tame and hardly graphic. The vast majority of the movie works though with cool ripple special effects, intelligent fourth wall breaking and some commentary on the difficulties of maintaining boundaries and rules in any relationship.

Added to my 500<400 ballot. :thumbsup:
So … did you think the director in the film looked like Seijun Suzuki too? :D

Such a shame Matsumoto hasn't made anything since, one of the most promising Japanese directors of the past 10 years.
Now that you mention it, yes - the resemblance is uncanny.

R100 is the only film that I have seen from Matsumoto, but Big Man Japan looks absolutely rad.
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#58

Post by sol » September 3rd, 2019, 1:33 pm

I am Godzilla! You are Japan!Show
1. Godzilla (1954)
2. Cure (1997)
3. R100 (2013)

4. My Neighbors the Yamadas (1999)

Image

This Isao Takahata comedy is based on a panel comic strip and it shows, consisting of a series of loosely connected vignettes. The most fascinating character in the clan - a precocious daughter who insists that her family got lost (rather than her being lost; as above) - also oddly gets the least screen time. And yet, this is a thoroughly charming motion picture with a lovely water colours animation style, amusing homespun wisdom and a magical end.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#59

Post by flavo5000 » September 3rd, 2019, 1:37 pm

sol wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 1:28 pm
Onderhond wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 11:38 am
sol wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 10:51 am
3. R100 (2013)

The title here is a play on the R18+ rating classification in countries like Australia and Japan, with the content apparently is so shocking that "no one under 100 will be admitted". The perversities are actually rather tame and hardly graphic. The vast majority of the movie works though with cool ripple special effects, intelligent fourth wall breaking and some commentary on the difficulties of maintaining boundaries and rules in any relationship.

Added to my 500<400 ballot. :thumbsup:
So … did you think the director in the film looked like Seijun Suzuki too? :D

Such a shame Matsumoto hasn't made anything since, one of the most promising Japanese directors of the past 10 years.
Now that you mention it, yes - the resemblance is uncanny.

R100 is the only film that I have seen from Matsumoto, but Big Man Japan looks absolutely rad.
Symbol is definitely worth a watch. So bizarre and funny. I screened it for my movie lunch event at work. Everybody dug it.

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#60

Post by Onderhond » September 3rd, 2019, 2:55 pm

Re: Matsumoto

I think Scabbard Samurai is his weakest film, though still very fun and amusing to watch. Big Man Japan is deadpan weird & crazy, with some hilarious creature designs. There is an underpants image that still makes me giggle just thinking about it. Symbol is my favorite one though.

For those who don't know who Matsumoto is, he's a Kitano-like character in Japan.


@sol: the TV-remote scene is one of my favorite bits.

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#61

Post by Traveller » September 3rd, 2019, 4:06 pm

09. Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972, Kenji Misumi) - 7/10
10. Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx (1972, Kenji Misumi) - 7/10
11. Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart to Hades (1972, Kenji Misumi) - 7/10

I was worried about the kid (being annoying), but far from it. All three were decent samurai flicks, with the second one being my favorite so far. Plenty of action - plenty of blood.
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#62

Post by flavo5000 » September 3rd, 2019, 6:13 pm

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6. DNA² OVA Ep. 1-3 (Jun'ichi Sakata, 1995)

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7. Death Note: L Change the World (Hideo Nakata, 2008)

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8. Poketto monsutâ: Serebî - Toki wo koeta deai a.k.a. Pokémon 4Ever (Kunihiko Yuyama, 2001)

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9. Ukigumo a.k.a. Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse, 1955)

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10. Ibun Sarutobi Sasuke a.k.a. Samurai Spy (Masahiro Shinoda, 1965)

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11. Keisatsukan a.k.a. Policeman (Tomu Uchida, 1933)

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12. Kizzu ritân a.k.a. Kids Return (Takeshi Kitano, 1996)

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13. SF Shinseiki Lensman (Yoshiaki Kawajiri, 1984)

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14a. Itsudatte my Santa OVA E1-2 (Noriyoshi Nakamura, 2005)

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14b. Akichi Asobi: Playground (Ryosuke Oshiro, 2013)
SpoilerShow
1. Anjô-ke no butôkai a.k.a. The Ball at the Anjo House (Kôzaburô Yoshimura, 1947)
2. Gurotesuku a.k.a. Grostesque (Kôji Shiraishi, 2009)
3. Baiohazâdo: Dijenerêshon a.k.a. Resident Evil: Degeneration (Makoto Kamiya, 2008)
4a. Ikebana (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1957)
4b. Ako (Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1965)
5. Urutoraman sâga a.k.a. Ultraman Saga (Hideki Oka, 2012)
6. DNA² OVA E1-3 (Jun'ichi Sakata, 1995)
7. Death Note: L Change the World (Hideo Nakata, 2008)
8. Poketto monsutâ: Serebî - Toki wo koeta deai a.k.a. Pokémon 4Ever (Kunihiko Yuyama, 2001)
9. Ukigumo a.k.a. Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse, 1955)
10. Ibun Sarutobi Sasuke a.k.a. Samurai Spy (Masahiro Shinoda, 1965)
11. Keisatsukan a.k.a. Policeman (Tomu Uchida, 1933)
12. Kizzu ritân a.k.a. Kids Return (Takeshi Kitano, 1996)
13. SF Shinseiki Lensman (Yoshiaki Kawajiri, 1984)
14a. Itsudatte my Santa OVA E1-2 (Noriyoshi Nakamura, 2005)
14b. Akichi Asobi: Playground (Ryosuke Oshiro, 2013)

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#63

Post by Onderhond » September 3rd, 2019, 6:20 pm

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01. 3.5* - Rise Up by Ryo Nakajima (2009)

A sweet, genuine and slightly dramatized story about two boys and a girl starting a somewhat unlikely friendship. Nakajima is young director and uses this to his advantage, going for a more natural approach to bring some extra depth to the characters. While it lacks something to set it apart from its peers, it's a quality drama nonetheless.

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#64

Post by hurluberlu » September 3rd, 2019, 6:59 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 4:16 am
Bonus Challenge Tracking (score = 3):Show
Completed:
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still (1)
The characters see it - we don't.Show
Image
In Progress:
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP (1/3) [Battle Royale - Asian Cinema Field Guide;]
- Watch four films from four different decades (1/4) [2000s - Battle Royale;]

Not started:
- Guess 4 films from the OP Poster. Stills are numeroted from 1 to 18 from left to right and top to Bottom. (4)
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike (1)
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô (1)
- Watch a film in theater (1)
Hi max, glad you are taking up the Banzai !!! side challenge, although please note that a film can only count for one task so you need to decide whether Battle Royale counts for the picture, the Official/Non-official list or the Decade.
:cheers:
#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#65

Post by maxwelldeux » September 3rd, 2019, 7:11 pm

hurluberlu wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 6:59 pm
maxwelldeux wrote:
September 3rd, 2019, 4:16 am
Bonus Challenge Tracking (score = 3):Show
Completed:
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still (1)
The characters see it - we don't.Show
Image
In Progress:
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP (1/3) [Battle Royale - Asian Cinema Field Guide;]
- Watch four films from four different decades (1/4) [2000s - Battle Royale;]

Not started:
- Guess 4 films from the OP Poster. Stills are numeroted from 1 to 18 from left to right and top to Bottom. (4)
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike (1)
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô (1)
- Watch a film in theater (1)
Hi max, glad you are taking up the Banzai !!! side challenge, although please note that a film can only count for one task so you need to decide whether Battle Royale counts for the picture, the Official/Non-official list or the Decade.
:cheers:
Oops... I missed that one. Noted and edited my post above.

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#66

Post by Ritesh » September 3rd, 2019, 9:09 pm

7. Zatoichi's Cane Sword (1967)
8. Zatoichi Challenged (1967)
9. Zatoichi and the Fugitives (1968)

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#67

Post by 72allinncallme » September 3rd, 2019, 9:10 pm

10. Gendai yakuza: hito-kiri yota / Street Mobster (1972)
11. Shiranui kengyô / Agent Shiranui (1960)
SpoilerShow
1. Jôen / The Affair (Yoshishige Yoshida, 1967)
2. Mata au hi made / Till We Meet Again (Tadashi Imai, 1950)
3. Chikamatsu monogatari / The Crucified Lovers (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1954)
4. Miyamoto Musashi / Samurai I: Musashi Miyamoto (Hiroshi Inagaki, 1954)
5. Ukigumo / Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse 1955)
6. Akarui mirai / Bright Future (2002)
7. Kimi ga wakamono nara / If You Were Young: Rage (1970)
8. Sono otoko, kyôbô ni tsuki / Violent Cop (1989)
9. Nippon konchûki / The Insect Woman (1963)
10. Gendai yakuza: hito-kiri yota / Street Mobster (1972)
11. Shiranui kengyô / Agent Shiranui (1960)

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#68

Post by monty » September 3rd, 2019, 9:16 pm

Feel free to make this a double bill and join the samurai cinema challenge as well: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=953&view=unread#unread

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#69

Post by edward5 » September 3rd, 2019, 11:05 pm

SpoilerShow
1. The Eagle and the Hawk (Umetsugu Inoue, 1957, tt0324502) C-
2. Umbrella Flower (Shinji Sômai, 2000, tt0261000) B-
3. Face (Junji Sakamoto, 2001, tt0256127) B-
4. M/Other (Nobuhiro Suwa, 1999, tt0201743) B+
5. Epoch of Murder Madness (Kihachi Okamoto, 1967, tt0062232) B+
6. An Inn at Osaka (Heinosuke Gosho, 1954, tt0047315) B+
SpoilerShow
1. 鷲と鷹 (井上梅次, 1957) C-
2. 風花 (相米慎二, 2000) B-
3. 顔 (阪本順治, 2001) B-
4. M/Other (諏訪敦彦, 1999) B+
5. 殺人狂時代 (岡本喜八, 1967) B+
6. 大阪の宿 (五所平之助, 1954) B+

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#70

Post by morrison-dylan-fan » September 4th, 2019, 1:39 am

FTV:4: The Man Who Stole the Sun (1979) 10.

Image

Going round the sun for 2 and a half hours, co-writer/(with Leonard “brother of Paul” Schrader ) director Kazuhiko Hasegawa & cinematographer Tatsuo Suzuki keep the rotation topsy-turvy with a thrilling ease to slide genres/styles around, from ultra-stylised multi-coloured, zany Comedy Pop-Art hopping to Kido stealing the nuke, transforming into a gritty close-ups smash-cut car chase and of a cop going nuclear on Kido. Holding the nuke over a long period, Hasegawa finely balances a bright off-beat Comedy atmosphere with vast-wide shots tracking the cops following Kido’s demands,and their attempts to pick him from out of a crowd.

Taking the sun to bed with him, the screenplay by Hasegawa and Schrader develops the characterisation of Kido with a refreshing zest, bringing out in the sparkling Black Comedy dialogue Kido’s friendly, but peculiar nature, whose stealing of a nuke takes him from being a loner up to his own devices, to Kido stretching out his hand for some level of friendship owing to the nuke.Powered by a wondrous genre bending taking in fears of nukes and promises of the Rolling Stones playing in Japan, the writers keep sending out curve balls,which act to switch gears,and at the same time increase Kido’s fever from the simmering comedic,into a thunderous, fabulous boiling point ending. Holding the whole nuke in his hands,Kenji Sawada gives a excellent performance as Kido, who Sawada trims from lively and chirpy to shacking with sickness,and ringing radio shows for advice from listeners over what he should do,as the man who stole the sun.

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#71

Post by maxwelldeux » September 4th, 2019, 4:09 am

Hello from across the other pondShow
1. Battle Royale (2000k Kinji Fukasaku)
2. Sansho the Bailiff (1954, Kenji Mizoguchi)
A very good film, but I didn't connect with it quite enough to get me to "great." The cinematography was nice, and at its core, it was a nice story. The arc and pacing had me bored and confused a bit at various times, but was pretty interesting overall. 7/10 for me.

Bonus Challenge Tracking (score = 2):Show
Completed:
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still (1)
The characters see it - we don't.Show
Image
In Progress:
- Watch four films from four different decades (1/4) [1950s: Sansho the Bailiff;]

Not started:
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP (0/3)
- Guess 4 films from the OP Poster. Stills are numeroted from 1 to 18 from left to right and top to Bottom. (4)
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike (1)
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô (1)
- Watch a film in theater (1)

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weirdboy
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#72

Post by weirdboy » September 4th, 2019, 4:34 am

As it turns out, I was already watching some Japanese movies for other reasons. So, it looks like I have a few points in this challenge already.

1. Zoku Zatoichi monogatari 続座頭市物語 AKA Tale of Zatoichi Continues (1962) - Mori Kazuo
2. Shin Zatoichi monogatari 新・座頭市物語 AKA New Tale of Zatoichi
3. Zatoichi kyojo-tabi 座頭市兇状旅 AKA Zatoichi the Fugitive (1963) - Tanaka Tokuzo
4. Zatôichi kenka-tabi 座頭市喧嘩旅 AKA Zatoichi on the Road (1963) - Yasuda Kimiyoshi
5. Zatôichi senryô-kubi 座頭市千両首 AKA Zatoichi and the Chest of Gold (1964) - Kazuo Ikehiro
6. Zatôichi abare tako 座頭市あばれ凧 AKA Zatoichi's Flashing Sword (1964) - Kazuo Ikehiro

wasabi
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#73

Post by wasabi » September 4th, 2019, 2:34 pm

1. Seven Samurai (Akira Kurosawa 1954)
Great combination if entertaining and art, I liked it more than Rashômon.

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#74

Post by wasabi » September 4th, 2019, 2:38 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
September 4th, 2019, 4:09 am
2. Sansho the Bailiff (1954, Kenji Mizoguchi)
A very good film, but I didn't connect with it quite enough to get me to "great." The cinematography was nice, and at its core, it was a nice story. The arc and pacing had me bored and confused a bit at various times, but was pretty interesting overall. 7/10 for me.
I liked it, I think the pace was slow but good. The ending was pretty touching.

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Lonewolf2003
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#75

Post by Lonewolf2003 » September 4th, 2019, 3:36 pm

1. Riaru onigokko [Tag] (2015): 7.2 -In this movie by Sono a highs school student gets stuck in a surreal reality in which violent stuff keeps happening around her all the time. The violence is so grotesque it get a bit mind numbing unfortunately. But it's the reveal at the end that makes this more than a simple exploitation movie. Leave it to Sono turn a movie in which a classroom is gunned down violently by their teacher into a critique on violent masculine society. Although I get the criticism that Sono wants to have and eat his cake too in this movie.

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Traveller
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#76

Post by Traveller » September 4th, 2019, 3:53 pm

12. Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in Peril (1972, Buichi Saito) - 7/10
13. Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in the Land of Demons (1973, Kenji Misumi) - 7/10
14. Lone Wolf and Cub: White Heaven in Hell (1974, Yoshiyuki Kuroda) - 7/10

The same as for the first bunch can be said about the last three movies. Loved the snowy scenery in the final one. The overall story arc never got me too invested, but taken together it was an entertaining samurai series.
ICM
September Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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maxwelldeux
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#77

Post by maxwelldeux » September 4th, 2019, 5:06 pm

wasabi wrote:
September 4th, 2019, 2:38 pm
maxwelldeux wrote:
September 4th, 2019, 4:09 am
2. Sansho the Bailiff (1954, Kenji Mizoguchi)
A very good film, but I didn't connect with it quite enough to get me to "great." The cinematography was nice, and at its core, it was a nice story. The arc and pacing had me bored and confused a bit at various times, but was pretty interesting overall. 7/10 for me.
I liked it, I think the pace was slow but good. The ending was pretty touching.
Very true - a hell of an ending that might have wrecked me on a different day.

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shugs
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#78

Post by shugs » September 4th, 2019, 5:17 pm

2. Pâfekuto burû [Perfect Blue] (Satoshi Kon, 1997) - 8/10
3. Kumonosu-jô [Throne of Blood] (Akira Kurosawa, 1957) - 9/10
SpoilerShow
1. Yakuza keibatsu-shi: Rinchi! [Yakuza Law] (Teruo Ishii, 1969) - 7/10
Side ChallengeShow
- Guess 4 films from the OP Poster. Stills are numeroted from 1 to 18 from left to right and top to Bottom.
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP
- Watch four films from four different decades
  • Kumonosu-jô [Throne of Blood] (Akira Kurosawa, 1957)
  • Pâfekuto burû [Perfect Blue] (Satoshi Kon, 1997)
  • Yakuza keibatsu-shi: Rinchi! [Yakuza Law] (Teruo Ishii, 1969)
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still
- Watch a film in theater

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shugs
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#79

Post by shugs » September 4th, 2019, 7:58 pm

4. Kokuhaku [Confessions] (Tetsuya Nakashima, 2010) - 6.5/10
Starts off in an excellent, gripping way but loses its edge in the second half when the story becomes kind of cliche and some stylistic choices (like the overused music and slow-mo) become tiresome.
SpoilerShow
1. Yakuza keibatsu-shi: Rinchi! [Yakuza Law] (Teruo Ishii, 1969) - 7/10
2. Pâfekuto burû [Perfect Blue] (Satoshi Kon, 1997) - 8/10
3. Kumonosu-jô [Throne of Blood] (Akira Kurosawa, 1957) - 9/10
Side ChallengeShow
- Guess 4 films from the OP Poster. Stills are numeroted from 1 to 18 from left to right and top to Bottom.
- Watch one film from Takashi Miike
- Watch one film with Machiko Kyô
- Watch three films from the Official and Non-Official lists mentioned in the OP
- Watch four films from four different decades DONE
  • Kumonosu-jô [Throne of Blood] (Akira Kurosawa, 1957)
  • Yakuza keibatsu-shi: Rinchi! [Yakuza Law] (Teruo Ishii, 1969)
  • Pâfekuto burû [Perfect Blue] (Satoshi Kon, 1997)
  • Kokuhaku [Confessions] (Tetsuya Nakashima, 2010)
- Watch a film with a character watching the horizon and post the still
- Watch a film in theater

DareDaniel
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#80

Post by DareDaniel » September 4th, 2019, 8:12 pm

Onderhond wrote:
September 2nd, 2019, 10:14 pm
DareDaniel wrote:
September 2nd, 2019, 8:03 pm
Ken Ninomya (The Limit of Sleeping Beauty) is a talent to follow. I've been checking almost daily for english subtitles for his new movie Chiwawa.
You and me both. Best film I've seen in years :)
DareDaniel wrote:
September 2nd, 2019, 8:03 pm
It was pretty cool to see Love On Sunday on the list, such an hidden gem. :wub:
I feel Hiroki is quite well-known as a director, but many of his films are very hard to come by. I watched it at a small Japanese film fest in Amsterdam (Dejima) back in the day, with Hiroki himself attending. It's Only Talk is also a superb film (saw that one at IFFR). Sadly DVD/BR releases with EN subs of his films are extremely rare.

Do you have a list of your own DareDaniel? I'd love to take a peak at your Japanese favorites, I sure could use some extra tips :)
My favourites are Kabukicho Love Hotel, Last Words, Strobe Edge and River.

I don't have one but it would be very similar to yours as pretty much every good modern japanese director is represented there with at least 1 movie. I would add the directors of these movies:

-A Stranger of Mine
-Eureka (2000)
-Gonin
-Brass Knuckle Boys
-Swing Girls
-Linda Linda Linda
-Wonderful World End
-Moonlight Whispers
-Harmonium

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