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1940s Challenge (Official, April 2019)

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allisoncm
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Re: 1940s Challenge (Official, April 2019)

#161

Post by allisoncm » April 16th, 2019, 7:10 pm

1. The Flame (1947) 5/10
2. Große Freiheit Nr. 7 1944 — a.k.a. Port of Freedom, in 3 top lists 5/10

India Istanbul
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#162

Post by India Istanbul » April 16th, 2019, 8:36 pm

7. Shock (1946)
8. The Invisible Wall (1947)
9. The Guilty (1947)
10. Life With Father (1947)
11. Zombies on Broadway (1945)
12. Bowery at Midnight (1942)

Total: 12 points
SpoilerShow

1. Double Indemnity (1944)
2. The Fuller Brush Man (1948)
3. The Corpse Vanishes (1942)
4. Bluebeard (1944)
5. The Amazing Mr. X (1948)
6. Blonde Ice (1948)


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#163

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » April 16th, 2019, 9:08 pm

28. Captain from Castille (1947 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
29. Prince of Foxes (1949 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
30. Dr. Cyclops (1940 / Ernest B. Schoedsack) FTV 6+/10

31-39. (a-b.) Serials {542 min. total}
a. Batman and Robin (1949 / Spencer Gordon Bennet) FTV 6+/10 {264 min.}
b. Holt of the Secret Service (1941 / James W. Horne) FTV 7/10 {278 min.}

It’s not the coffee, it’s the bunk.Show
1. The Great Lie (1941 / Edmund Goulding) FTV 7+/10
2. Captive Wild Woman (1943 / Edward Dmytryk) FTV 6/10
3. Jungle Woman (1944 / Reginald Le Borg) FTV 4+/10
4. Man Made Monster (1941 / George Waggner) FTV 7+/10
5. Horror Island (1941 / George Waggner) FTV 5/10
6. Drums of the Desert (1940 / George Waggner) FTV 5/10
7. The Black Cat (1941 / Albert S. Rogell) FTV 7/10
8. Night Monster (1942 / Ford Beebe) FTV 6+/10
9. Jungle Man (1941 / Harry Fraser) FTV 5+/10
10. Waterloo Bridge (1940 / Mervyn Le Roy) FTV 7+/10
11. That Hamilton Woman (1941 / Alexander Korda) FTV 7+/10
12. Background to Danger (1943 / Raoul Walsh) FTV 8/10
13. The Mask of Dimitrios (1944 / Jean Negulesco) FTV 7+/10
14. Three Strangers (1946 / Jean Negulesco) FTV 7+/10
15. The Verdict (1946 / Don Siegel) FTV 8/10
16. Jungle Siren (1942 / Sam Newfield) FTV 6+/10
17. Arabian Nights (1942 / John Rawlins) FTV 7/10
18. The Mark of Zorro (1940 / Rouben Mamoulian) 8+/10
19. Blood and Sand (1941 / Rouben Mamoulian) FTV 8/10
20. Lucky Ghost (1942 / William Beaudine) FTV 6+/10
21. Jungle Jim (1948 / William Berke) FTV 6+/10
22. Find the Blackmailer (1943 / D. Ross Lederman) FTV 6/10
23. You’re Out of Luck (1941 / Howard Bretherton) FTV 6/10
24. The Lost Tribe (1949 / William Berke) FTV 6/10
25. Wake of the Red Witch (1948 / Edward Ludwig) FTV 6/10
26. Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake (1942 / John Cromwell) FTV 8/10
27. The Black Swan (1942 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10

28. Captain from Castille (1947 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
29. Prince of Foxes (1949 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
30. Dr. Cyclops (1940 / Ernest B. Schoedsack) FTV 6+/10

31-39, a-b. Serials {542 min. total}
a. Batman and Robin (1949 / Spencer Gordon Bennet) FTV 6+/10 {264 min.}
b. Holt of the Secret Service (1941 / James W. Horne) FTV 7/10 {278 min.}


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#164

Post by frbrown » April 17th, 2019, 1:29 am

Goofy

3a. Foul Hunting (1947)
3b. They're Off (1948)
3c. The Big Wash (1948)
3d. Tennis Racquet (1949)
3e. Goofy Gymnastics (1949)


Tom and Jerry

3f. A Mouse in the House (1947)
3g. The Invisible Mouse (1947)
3h. Kitty Foiled (1948)
3i. The Truce Hurts (1948)
3j. Old Rockin' Chair Tom (1948)
3k. Professor Tom (1948)


Donald Duck

4a. Timber (1941)
4b. Golden Eggs (1941) [rewatch]
4c. A Good Time for a Dime (1941)
4d. Early to Bed (1941) [rewatch]
4e. Truant Officer Donald (1941)
4f. Old MacDonald Duck (1941) [rewatch]
4g. Donald's Camera (1941)
4h. Chef Donald (1941) [rewatch]

SpoilerShow
1. The Biscuit Eater (1940)
2. Buy Me That Town (1941)
3a. Foul Hunting (1947)
3b. They're Off (1948)
3c. The Big Wash (1948)
3d. Tennis Racquet (1949)
3e. Goofy Gymnastics (1949)
3f. A Mouse in the House (1947)
3g. The Invisible Mouse (1947)
3h. Kitty Foiled (1948)
3i. The Truce Hurts (1948)
3j. Old Rockin' Chair Tom (1948)
3k. Professor Tom (1948)
4a. Timber (1941)
4b. Golden Eggs (1941) [rewatch]
4c. A Good Time for a Dime (1941)
4d. Early to Bed (1941) [rewatch]
4e. Truant Officer Donald (1941)
4f. Old MacDonald Duck (1941) [rewatch]
4g. Donald's Camera (1941)
4h. Chef Donald (1941) [rewatch]

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#165

Post by AB537 » April 17th, 2019, 3:46 am

11. Yoidore tenshi - Drunken Angel (Akira Kuorsawa, 1948)

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#166

Post by Traveller » April 17th, 2019, 4:28 am

38. Nazi Concentration Camps (1945) - 7/10
ICM
August Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#167

Post by ororama » April 17th, 2019, 7:14 am

4. The Saint in Palm Springs (1941) * 66 min.


SpoilerShow
1. The Heart of Britain (1941) * 9 min.
Words for Battle (1941) * 8 min.
Listen to Britain (1942) * 20 min.
This is England (1941) * 10 min.
Safeguarding Military Information (1942) * 10 min.
Themis (1940) * 4 min.
2. King of the Royal Mounted: Manhunt (1940) * 27 min.
King of the Royal Mounted: Winged Death (1940) * 17 min.
King of the Royal Mounted: Boomerang (1940) * 17 min.
3. The Saint Takes Over (1940) * 69 min.

*First time viewing.

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#168

Post by frbrown » April 17th, 2019, 3:39 pm

5. Crime by Night (1944)

SpoilerShow
1. The Biscuit Eater (1940)
2. Buy Me That Town (1941)
3a. Foul Hunting (1947)
3b. They're Off (1948)
3c. The Big Wash (1948)
3d. Tennis Racquet (1949)
3e. Goofy Gymnastics (1949)
3f. A Mouse in the House (1947)
3g. The Invisible Mouse (1947)
3h. Kitty Foiled (1948)
3i. The Truce Hurts (1948)
3j. Old Rockin' Chair Tom (1948)
3k. Professor Tom (1948)
4a. Timber (1941)
4b. Golden Eggs (1941) [rewatch]
4c. A Good Time for a Dime (1941)
4d. Early to Bed (1941) [rewatch]
4e. Truant Officer Donald (1941)
4f. Old MacDonald Duck (1941) [rewatch]
4g. Donald's Camera (1941)
4h. Chef Donald (1941) [rewatch]
5. Crime by Night (1944)

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#169

Post by Traveller » April 17th, 2019, 4:59 pm

39. The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945) - 7/10
ICM
August Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#170

Post by Knaldskalle » April 17th, 2019, 5:20 pm

Okay, about time I got around to updating this:

2. The Children Are Watching Us (De Sica, 1944). Not bad, but doesn't reach the emotional heights his later movies would (Bicycles Thieves, Umberto D., Shoeshine...)

3. The Small Back Room (Powell/Pressburger, 1949). Pretty good little thriller about a bomb demolition expert during WWII. A bit thin on the story, but well filmed and acted.

4. That Hamilton Woman (Korda, 1941). It's hard not to see this as a rousing call to arms to a Britain at war with Germany, given that it's more about Admiral Nelson than Mrs. Hamilton.

5. Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Hall, 1941). I've seen this before, only it was called Heaven Can Wait and was with Warren Beatty. :)

6. Born to Kill (Wise, 1947). Awesome title, I only wish the movie was as awesome. I gradually lost interest, I have to confess.

SpoilerShow
1. The Murderer Lives at Number 21 (Clouzot, 1942)
2. The Children Are Watching Us (De Sica, 1944)
3. The Small Back Room (Powell/Pressburger, 1949)
4. That Hamilton Woman (Korda, 1941)
5. Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Hall, 1941)
6. Born to Kill (Wise, 1947)
Personal film goals for 2019.
ImageImageImageImage

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#171

Post by allisoncm » April 17th, 2019, 8:14 pm

SpoilerShow
1. The Flame (1947) 5/10
2. Große Freiheit Nr. 7 1944 — a.k.a. Port of Freedom, in 3 top lists 5/10
3. Mashenka (1942) 5/10

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#172

Post by weirdboy » April 17th, 2019, 9:01 pm

Colt 45 -- It works every time!Show
1. 49th Parallel (1942) - Michael Powell 6/10
2. Pitfall (1948) - Andre De Toth 6/10
3. He Walked By Night (1948) - Alfred Werker 7/10
4. Hollow Triumph AKA The Scar (1948) - Steve Sekely 6/10
5. Dark Mirror (1946) - Robert Siodmak 6/10
6. The Paradine Case (1947) - Alfred Hitchcock 6/10
7. The Little Foxes (1941) - William Wyler 6/10
8. Random Harvest (1942) - Mervyn LeRoy 8/10
9. My Name is Julia Ross (1946) - Joseph H. Lewis 6/10
10. So Dark the Night (1946) - Joseph H. Lewis 6/10
11. Oliver Twist (1948) - David Lean 8/10
12. Chichi ariki 父ありき AKA There Was a Father (1942) - Yasujiro Ozu 7/10
13. The Long Voyage Home (1940) - John Ford 6/10
14. Riso amaro AKA Bitter Rice (1949) - Guiseppe De Santis 8/10
15. Stranger on the Third Floor (1940) - Boris Ingster 6/10
16. I Remember Mama (1948) - George Stevens 7/10
17. Ride the Pink Horse (1947) - Robert Montgomery 8/10
18. Arch of Triumph (1948) - Lewis Milestone 5/10
19. Went the Day Well? (1942) - Alberto Cavalcanti 7/10

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#173

Post by albajos » April 17th, 2019, 9:28 pm

yesterday
23. The Outlaw (1943) USA 2 official lists 425 checks

today
24. The More the Merrier (1943) USA 5 official lists 859 checks [double]
25. Det regnar på vår kärlek (1946) Sweden 179 checks

Off. list progress
+6 1940s (100%)

The fair four tiesShow
01. Force of Evil (1948) USA 12 official lists 1 573 checks [double]
02. Scarlet Street (1945) USA 9 official lists 2 503 checks
03. The Little Foxes (1941) USA 6 official lists 1 425 checks
04. The Big Steal (1949) USA 1 official list 411 checks [double]
05. Now, Voyager (1942) USA 10 official lists 2 540 checks
06. The Long Voyage Home (1940) USA 3 official lists 576 checks [double]
07. Random Harvest (1942) USA 6 official lists 915 checks
08. I Remember Mama (1948) USA 2 official lists 811 checks
09. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) USA 4 official lists 969 checks
10. Secret Beyond the Door... (1947) USA 2 official lists 925 checks [double]
11. Monsieur Verdoux (1947) USA 11 official lists 2 944 checks [Platinum on 1940s]
12. This Gun for Hire (1942) USA 4 official lists 1 282 checks [double]
13. Brute Force (1947) USA 5 official lists 1 613 checks [double]
14. Nazi Concentration Camps (1945) USA 121 checks [double]
15. The Strawberry Blonde (1941) USA 1 official list 446 checks [double]
16. None But the Lonely Heart (1944) USA 1 official list 288 checks
17. In Which We Serve (1942) UK 6 official lists 856 checks
18. The True Glory (1945) USA | UK 2 official lists 134 checks
19. Oliver Twist (1948) UK 7 official lists 4 194 checks [double]
20. Brighton Rock (1948) UK 8 official lists 1 269 checks [double]
21. The Lady from Shanghai (1947) USA 9 official lists 5 162 checks
22. Night Monster (1942) USA 1 official list 90 checks

!seen 25

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#174

Post by 72allinncallme » April 17th, 2019, 9:41 pm

3. Act of Violence (1949)
SpoilerShow
1. Moontide (1942)
2. Panique (1946)
3. Act of Violence (1949)

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#175

Post by frbrown » April 18th, 2019, 1:58 am

6. Manon (1949)

SpoilerShow
1. The Biscuit Eater (1940)
2. Buy Me That Town (1941)
3a. Foul Hunting (1947)
3b. They're Off (1948)
3c. The Big Wash (1948)
3d. Tennis Racquet (1949)
3e. Goofy Gymnastics (1949)
3f. A Mouse in the House (1947)
3g. The Invisible Mouse (1947)
3h. Kitty Foiled (1948)
3i. The Truce Hurts (1948)
3j. Old Rockin' Chair Tom (1948)
3k. Professor Tom (1948)
4a. Timber (1941)
4b. Golden Eggs (1941) [rewatch]
4c. A Good Time for a Dime (1941)
4d. Early to Bed (1941) [rewatch]
4e. Truant Officer Donald (1941)
4f. Old MacDonald Duck (1941) [rewatch]
4g. Donald's Camera (1941)
4h. Chef Donald (1941) [rewatch]
5. Crime by Night (1944)
6. Manon (1949)

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#176

Post by Simba63 » April 18th, 2019, 2:58 am

8. I Remember Mama (1948) - 8/10

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#177

Post by sol » April 18th, 2019, 3:39 am

Out of the PastShow
1. The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947)
2. The Street with No Name (1948)
3. All This, and Heaven Too (1940)
4. Christmas in Connecticut (1945)
5a. Know for Sure (1941) 22min
5b. The Cage (1947) 28min and
5c. At Land (1946) 15m = 65min
6. The Dancing Masters (1943)
7. Give Us This Day (1949)
8. To Each His Own (1946)
9. The Wicked Lady (1945)
10. 40,000 Horsemen (1940)
11. Caught in the Draft (1941)
12. Bell-Bottom George (1944)
13. The Face of Marble (1946)
14. Monsieur Beaucaire (1946)

15. The Way of All Flesh (1940)

Image

Not the long-lost Emil Jannings film but rather a remake of it starring Akim Tamiroff, the Russian thespian absolutely shines here and provides a glimpse of what the Oscar winning turn by Jannings may have looked like. Tamiroff plays a banker and dedicated family man whose life is turned on its head when money entrusted to him is stolen through his ignorance and fate gives him a chance to clear his name at a cost. A film that gives plenty to ponder in terms of sacrifice, personal identity and what it means to be happy. The ending here really resonates too.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#178

Post by connordenney » April 18th, 2019, 8:24 am

2. My Name Is Julia Ross (Joseph H. Lewis, 1945)
SpoilerShow
1. So Dark the Night (Joseph H. Lewis, 1946)
2. My Name Is Julia Ross (Joseph H. Lewis, 1945)

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sol
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#179

Post by sol » April 18th, 2019, 12:15 pm

Out of the PastShow
1. The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947)
2. The Street with No Name (1948)
3. All This, and Heaven Too (1940)
4. Christmas in Connecticut (1945)
5a. Know for Sure (1941) 22min
5b. The Cage (1947) 28min and
5c. At Land (1946) 15m = 65min
6. The Dancing Masters (1943)
7. Give Us This Day (1949)
8. To Each His Own (1946)
9. The Wicked Lady (1945)
10. 40,000 Horsemen (1940)
11. Caught in the Draft (1941)
12. Bell-Bottom George (1944)
13. The Face of Marble (1946)
14. Monsieur Beaucaire (1946)
15. The Way of All Flesh (1940)

16. King of the Zombies (1941)

Image

This early zombie flick benefits from a spooky setting and a lot of mysteriousness regarding a mad doctor's private experiments, but it is actually as a comedy that the film works best. While playing a superstitious black caricature on the surface, Mantan Moreland is unexpectedly excellent with several funny moments as he banters with the doctor's servants, fails to convince everyone else of the zombies and even believes that he has become a zombie at one point. Some of his dialogue is racially insensitive, but it is refreshing to find a 1940s horror movie with an African American star.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#180

Post by peeptoad » April 18th, 2019, 12:29 pm

sol wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 12:15 pm
16. King of the Zombies (1941)

Image

This early zombie flick benefits from a spooky setting and a lot of mysteriousness regarding a mad doctor's private experiments, but it is actually as a comedy that the film works best. While playing a superstitious black caricature on the surface, Mantan Moreland is unexpectedly excellent with several funny moments as he banters with the doctor's servants, fails to convince everyone else of the zombies and even believes that he has become a zombie at one point. Some of his dialogue is racially insensitive, but it is refreshing to find a 1940s horror movie with an African American star.
Agree with you this one, sol. Moreland was great and the comedy moments were actually pretty good (non-PC or not...)
Move over boys, I'm one of the gang now... :lol:

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#181

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » April 18th, 2019, 12:43 pm

Image

6. 'Fény és árnyék' / 'Light and Shadow' / 1943, Klára Tüdõs / 6.5 or 7/10
7. 'Blood on the Sun' / 1945, Frank Lloyd / 6.5/10
8. 'Our Vines Have Tender Grapes' / 1945, Roy Rowland / 8/10
9. 'Dark Passage' / 1947, Delmer Daves / 9/10

Image
Last edited by RogerTheMovieManiac88 on April 18th, 2019, 9:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
That's all, folks!

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#182

Post by Tarris1 » April 18th, 2019, 2:20 pm

21. Kanzashi (1941) 7/10
20. The Uninvited (1944) 7.5/10
19. Kiss of Death (1947) 7/10
SpoilerShow
18. Fallen Angel (1945) 7/10
17. He Walked By Night (1948) 7.5/10
16. Sorry, Wrong Number (1948) 7/10
15. I Wake Up Screaming (1941) 8/10
14. Whisky Galore! (1949) 7/10
13. Caught (1949) 7/10
12. Remorques (1941) 6/10
11. Suspicion (1941) 8/10
10. Jour de Fête (1949) 8/10
9. Act of Violence (1949) 8/10
8. Le Silence de la Mer (1949) 7.5/10
7. Brighton Rock (1948) 8/10
6. The Spiral Staircase (1946) 6/10
5. The Long Voyage Home (1940) 8/10
4. My Favorite Blonde (1942) 7/10
3. 4 passi fra le nuvole (1942) 8/10
2. Jane Eyre (1943) 8/10
1. A Mortal Storm (1940) 8/10
174/250

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#183

Post by sol » April 18th, 2019, 2:51 pm

peeptoad wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 12:29 pm
sol wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 12:15 pm
16. King of the Zombies (1941)

Image

This early zombie flick benefits from a spooky setting and a lot of mysteriousness regarding a mad doctor's private experiments, but it is actually as a comedy that the film works best. While playing a superstitious black caricature on the surface, Mantan Moreland is unexpectedly excellent with several funny moments as he banters with the doctor's servants, fails to convince everyone else of the zombies and even believes that he has become a zombie at one point. Some of his dialogue is racially insensitive, but it is refreshing to find a 1940s horror movie with an African American star.
Agree with you this one, sol. Moreland was great and the comedy moments were actually pretty good (non-PC or not...)
Move over boys, I'm one of the gang now... :lol:
Oh, phew. :sweat: I made that post with some trepidation, wondering if I would be accused of political incorrectness. :ermm: Some of Moreland's dialogue was a little cringe-inducing ("if it was in me, I sure would be pale now") but he had me laughing out loud for the most part. I wouldn't be surprised if the film was rewritten around him when the filmmakers noticed how bland their leading actors were. And yes, that "one of the gang" part was great. ;)
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#184

Post by weirdboy » April 18th, 2019, 3:54 pm

Colt 45 -- It works every time!Show
1. 49th Parallel (1942) - Michael Powell 6/10
2. Pitfall (1948) - Andre De Toth 6/10
3. He Walked By Night (1948) - Alfred Werker 7/10
4. Hollow Triumph AKA The Scar (1948) - Steve Sekely 6/10
5. Dark Mirror (1946) - Robert Siodmak 6/10
6. The Paradine Case (1947) - Alfred Hitchcock 6/10
7. The Little Foxes (1941) - William Wyler 6/10
8. Random Harvest (1942) - Mervyn LeRoy 8/10
9. My Name is Julia Ross (1946) - Joseph H. Lewis 6/10
10. So Dark the Night (1946) - Joseph H. Lewis 6/10
11. Oliver Twist (1948) - David Lean 8/10
12. Chichi ariki 父ありき AKA There Was a Father (1942) - Yasujiro Ozu 7/10
13. The Long Voyage Home (1940) - John Ford 6/10
14. Riso amaro AKA Bitter Rice (1949) - Guiseppe De Santis 8/10
15. Stranger on the Third Floor (1940) - Boris Ingster 6/10
16. I Remember Mama (1948) - George Stevens 7/10
17. Ride the Pink Horse (1947) - Robert Montgomery 8/10
18. Arch of Triumph (1948) - Lewis Milestone 5/10
19. Went the Day Well? (1942) - Alberto Cavalcanti 7/10
20. The Gang's All Here (1943) - Busby Berkeley 7/10
21. Caesar and Cleopatra (1945) - Gabriel Pascal 5/10
22. Act of Violence (1949) - Fred Zimmerman 7/10

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#185

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » April 18th, 2019, 5:25 pm

sol wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 2:51 pm
peeptoad wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 12:29 pm
sol wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 12:15 pm
16. King of the Zombies (1941)

Image

This early zombie flick benefits from a spooky setting and a lot of mysteriousness regarding a mad doctor's private experiments, but it is actually as a comedy that the film works best. While playing a superstitious black caricature on the surface, Mantan Moreland is unexpectedly excellent with several funny moments as he banters with the doctor's servants, fails to convince everyone else of the zombies and even believes that he has become a zombie at one point. Some of his dialogue is racially insensitive, but it is refreshing to find a 1940s horror movie with an African American star.
Agree with you this one, sol. Moreland was great and the comedy moments were actually pretty good (non-PC or not...)
Move over boys, I'm one of the gang now... :lol:
Oh, phew. :sweat: I made that post with some trepidation, wondering if I would be accused of political incorrectness. :ermm: Some of Moreland's dialogue was a little cringe-inducing ("if it was in me, I sure would be pale now") but he had me laughing out loud for the most part. I wouldn't be surprised if the film was rewritten around him when the filmmakers noticed how bland their leading actors were. And yes, that "one of the gang" part was great. ;)
This film made me a fan of Mantan Moreland when I first saw it many years ago, and this month I have finally gotten around to seeing more of his films. He is usually the best part in all of them - a genuinely funny performer. He was often paired with Frankie Darro and got nearly as much screen time and respect as the Darro characters did. There are sometimes a few cringe-worthy moments, but Mantan always seemed in on the gag and often I laugh in spite of my inner PC meter. Moreland had a semi-recurring role in the Charlie Chan films and I plan to watch a few of those in the upcoming Mystery/thriller challenge.

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#186

Post by Traveller » April 18th, 2019, 5:51 pm

40. This Gun for Hire (1942) - 6/10
41. Unfaithfully Yours (1948) - 7/10
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August Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#187

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » April 18th, 2019, 6:16 pm

40. Topper Returns (1941 / Roy Del Ruth) FTV 7/10
41. Chasing Trouble (1940 / Howard Bretherton) FTV 6/10
42. The Smiling Ghost (1941 / Lewis Seilor) FTV 6/10
43. Revenge of the Zombies (1943 / Steve Sekely) 6/10
44. The Hidden Hand (1942 / Ben Stoloff) FTV 7/10
45. The Ape Man (1943 / William Beaudine) 7/10

It’s not the coffee, it’s the bunk.Show
1. The Great Lie (1941 / Edmund Goulding) FTV 7+/10
2. Captive Wild Woman (1943 / Edward Dmytryk) FTV 6/10
3. Jungle Woman (1944 / Reginald Le Borg) FTV 4+/10
4. Man Made Monster (1941 / George Waggner) FTV 7+/10
5. Horror Island (1941 / George Waggner) FTV 5/10
6. Drums of the Desert (1940 / George Waggner) FTV 5/10
7. The Black Cat (1941 / Albert S. Rogell) FTV 7/10
8. Night Monster (1942 / Ford Beebe) FTV 6+/10
9. Jungle Man (1941 / Harry Fraser) FTV 5+/10
10. Waterloo Bridge (1940 / Mervyn Le Roy) FTV 7+/10
11. That Hamilton Woman (1941 / Alexander Korda) FTV 7+/10
12. Background to Danger (1943 / Raoul Walsh) FTV 8/10
13. The Mask of Dimitrios (1944 / Jean Negulesco) FTV 7+/10
14. Three Strangers (1946 / Jean Negulesco) FTV 7+/10
15. The Verdict (1946 / Don Siegel) FTV 8/10
16. Jungle Siren (1942 / Sam Newfield) FTV 6+/10
17. Arabian Nights (1942 / John Rawlins) FTV 7/10
18. The Mark of Zorro (1940 / Rouben Mamoulian) 8+/10
19. Blood and Sand (1941 / Rouben Mamoulian) FTV 8/10
20. Lucky Ghost (1942 / William Beaudine) FTV 6+/10
21. Jungle Jim (1948 / William Berke) FTV 6+/10
22. Find the Blackmailer (1943 / D. Ross Lederman) FTV 6/10
23. You’re Out of Luck (1941 / Howard Bretherton) FTV 6/10
24. The Lost Tribe (1949 / William Berke) FTV 6/10
25. Wake of the Red Witch (1948 / Edward Ludwig) FTV 6/10
26. Son of Fury: The Story of Benjamin Blake (1942 / John Cromwell) FTV 8/10
27. The Black Swan (1942 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
28. Captain from Castille (1947 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
29. Prince of Foxes (1949 / Henry King) FTV 7+/10
30. Dr. Cyclops (1940 / Ernest B. Schoedsack) FTV 6+/10
31-39, a-b. Serials {542 min. total}
a. Batman and Robin (1949 / Spencer Gordon Bennet) FTV 6+/10 {264 min.}
b. Holt of the Secret Service (1941 / James W. Horne) FTV 7/10 {278 min.}


40. Topper Returns (1941 / Roy Del Ruth) FTV 7/10
41. Chasing Trouble (1940 / Howard Bretherton) FTV 6/10
42. The Smiling Ghost (1941 / Lewis Seilor) FTV 6/10
43. Revenge of the Zombies (1943 / Steve Sekely) 6/10
44. The Hidden Hand (1942 / Ben Stoloff) FTV 7/10
45. The Ape Man (1943 / William Beaudine) 7/10

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#188

Post by albajos » April 18th, 2019, 8:33 pm

26. Act of Violence (1949) USA 3 official lists 752 checks [double]
27. The Web (1947) USA 1 official list 137 checks [double]
28. Moontide (1942) USA 1 official list 173 checks [double]
29. The Gang's All Here (1943) USA 3 official lists 344 checks [double]
30. The Fountainhead (1949) USA 1 official list 993 checks [double]
31. Voice in the Wind (1944) USA 1 official list 59 checks [double]
32. Undertow (1949) USA 1 official list 54 checks
33. Pattes blanches (1949) France 1 official list 21 checks

Off. list progress
+6 1940s (100%)

The fair four tiesShow
01. Force of Evil (1948) USA 12 official lists 1 573 checks [double]
02. Scarlet Street (1945) USA 9 official lists 2 503 checks
03. The Little Foxes (1941) USA 6 official lists 1 425 checks
04. The Big Steal (1949) USA 1 official list 411 checks [double]
05. Now, Voyager (1942) USA 10 official lists 2 540 checks
06. The Long Voyage Home (1940) USA 3 official lists 576 checks [double]
07. Random Harvest (1942) USA 6 official lists 915 checks
08. I Remember Mama (1948) USA 2 official lists 811 checks
09. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) USA 4 official lists 969 checks
10. Secret Beyond the Door... (1947) USA 2 official lists 925 checks [double]
11. Monsieur Verdoux (1947) USA 11 official lists 2 944 checks [Platinum on 1940s]
12. This Gun for Hire (1942) USA 4 official lists 1 282 checks [double]
13. Brute Force (1947) USA 5 official lists 1 613 checks [double]
14. Nazi Concentration Camps (1945) USA 121 checks [double]
15. The Strawberry Blonde (1941) USA 1 official list 446 checks [double]
16. None But the Lonely Heart (1944) USA 1 official list 288 checks
17. In Which We Serve (1942) UK 6 official lists 856 checks
18. The True Glory (1945) USA | UK 2 official lists 134 checks
19. Oliver Twist (1948) UK 7 official lists 4 194 checks [double]
20. Brighton Rock (1948) UK 8 official lists 1 269 checks [double]
21. The Lady from Shanghai (1947) USA 9 official lists 5 162 checks
22. Night Monster (1942) USA 1 official list 90 checks
23. The Outlaw (1943) USA 2 official lists 425 checks
24. The More the Merrier (1943) USA 5 official lists 859 checks [double]
25. Det regnar på vår kärlek (1946) Sweden 179 checks
!seen 33

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#189

Post by VincentPrice » April 18th, 2019, 11:06 pm

7. Detour-1945: 9/10 (rewatch)
SpoilerShow
1. Hangover Square-1945: 10/10 (rewatch)
2. The Threat-1949: 8/10
3. Footsteps in the Dark-1941: 7/10
4. Meet Boston Blackie-1941: 7/10
5. Detective Kitty O'Day-1944: 6/10
6. Having Wonderful Crime-1944: 7/10

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#190

Post by frbrown » April 18th, 2019, 11:23 pm

7. The Case of the Black Parrot (1941)

SpoilerShow
1. The Biscuit Eater (1940)
2. Buy Me That Town (1941)
3a. Foul Hunting (1947)
3b. They're Off (1948)
3c. The Big Wash (1948)
3d. Tennis Racquet (1949)
3e. Goofy Gymnastics (1949)
3f. A Mouse in the House (1947)
3g. The Invisible Mouse (1947)
3h. Kitty Foiled (1948)
3i. The Truce Hurts (1948)
3j. Old Rockin' Chair Tom (1948)
3k. Professor Tom (1948)
4a. Timber (1941)
4b. Golden Eggs (1941) [rewatch]
4c. A Good Time for a Dime (1941)
4d. Early to Bed (1941) [rewatch]
4e. Truant Officer Donald (1941)
4f. Old MacDonald Duck (1941) [rewatch]
4g. Donald's Camera (1941)
4h. Chef Donald (1941) [rewatch]
5. Crime by Night (1944)
6. Manon (1949)
7. The Case of the Black Parrot (1941)

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#191

Post by sol » April 19th, 2019, 3:24 am

psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
April 18th, 2019, 5:25 pm
This film made me a fan of Mantan Moreland when I first saw it many years ago, and this month I have finally gotten around to seeing more of his films. He is usually the best part in all of them - a genuinely funny performer.
Interestingly enough, I have actually seen six other films with Moreland in them, but I don't recall his character in them off-hand. He'll definitely be someone that I will look out for from now on if I see his name in the credits.
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#192

Post by sol » April 19th, 2019, 3:33 am

Out of the PastShow
1. The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947)
2. The Street with No Name (1948)
3. All This, and Heaven Too (1940)
4. Christmas in Connecticut (1945)
5a. Know for Sure (1941) 22min
5b. The Cage (1947) 28min and
5c. At Land (1946) 15m = 65min
6. The Dancing Masters (1943)
7. Give Us This Day (1949)
8. To Each His Own (1946)
9. The Wicked Lady (1945)
10. 40,000 Horsemen (1940)
11. Caught in the Draft (1941)
12. Bell-Bottom George (1944)
13. The Face of Marble (1946)
14. Monsieur Beaucaire (1946)
15. The Way of All Flesh (1940)
16. King of the Zombies (1941)

Image

A forties double that showcases two different sides of this US state:

17. Louisiana Purchase (1941)

Image

Bob Hope has to frame and blackmail a virtuous Victor Moore, wearing a ridiculous fake moustache that keeps changing direction (see above) in the first third of this comedy. After this strong beginning, the film sags in the middle with many of elongated song and dance routines (the revealing costumes are pretty cool though). The pace picks up a bit in the final 20 minutes though with double crosses and a Mr. Smith Goes to Washington homage. The film has an unshakable nasty streak though with Moore's life made difficult simply because he is unbribable, but both Hope and Moore are in good form.

18. Louisiana Story (1948)

Image

This Robert J. Flaherty film begins promisingly with lots of luscious shots of the swamp and pseudo-documentary narration, but the voiceover soon disappears and with very limited dialogue, things quickly become repetitive. This is a dramatically inert film. With no conflict between the boy and the oil workers - nor any hint of an environmental impact of the oil rig - there is not really much driving the film. A hungry alligator is the closest that the film has to an antagonist, but it only appears fleetingly. The scenery may be gorgeous, but I would have preferred an actual documentary about Cajuns.
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#193

Post by weirdboy » April 19th, 2019, 3:45 am

Colt 45 -- It works every time!Show
1. 49th Parallel (1942) - Michael Powell 6/10
2. Pitfall (1948) - Andre De Toth 6/10
3. He Walked By Night (1948) - Alfred Werker 7/10
4. Hollow Triumph AKA The Scar (1948) - Steve Sekely 6/10
5. Dark Mirror (1946) - Robert Siodmak 6/10
6. The Paradine Case (1947) - Alfred Hitchcock 6/10
7. The Little Foxes (1941) - William Wyler 6/10
8. Random Harvest (1942) - Mervyn LeRoy 8/10
9. My Name is Julia Ross (1946) - Joseph H. Lewis 6/10
10. So Dark the Night (1946) - Joseph H. Lewis 6/10
11. Oliver Twist (1948) - David Lean 8/10
12. Chichi ariki 父ありき AKA There Was a Father (1942) - Yasujiro Ozu 7/10
13. The Long Voyage Home (1940) - John Ford 6/10
14. Riso amaro AKA Bitter Rice (1949) - Guiseppe De Santis 8/10
15. Stranger on the Third Floor (1940) - Boris Ingster 6/10
16. I Remember Mama (1948) - George Stevens 7/10
17. Ride the Pink Horse (1947) - Robert Montgomery 8/10
18. Arch of Triumph (1948) - Lewis Milestone 5/10
19. Went the Day Well? (1942) - Alberto Cavalcanti 7/10
20. The Gang's All Here (1943) - Busby Berkeley 7/10
21. Caesar and Cleopatra (1945) - Gabriel Pascal 5/10
22. Act of Violence (1949) - Fred Zimmerman 7/10
23. Panique (1946) - Julien Duvivier 8/10
24. They Knew What They Wanted (1940) - Garson Kanin 6/10

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#194

Post by Knaldskalle » April 19th, 2019, 4:18 am

7. Bitter Rice (de Santis, 1949). I quite enjoyed this "neo-realist film noir".

8. Sorry, Wrong Number (Litvak, 1948). Barbara Stanwyck nails it as the overbearing upper-class wife who's used to getting her way. The rest of the movie is fine too.

SpoilerShow
1. The Murderer Lives at Number 21 (Clouzot, 1942)
2. The Children Are Watching Us (De Sica, 1944)
3. The Small Back Room (Powell/Pressburger, 1949)
4. That Hamilton Woman (Korda, 1941)
5. Here Comes Mr. Jordan (Hall, 1941)
6. Born to Kill (Wise, 1947)
7. Bitter Rice (de Santis, 1949)
8. Sorry, Wrong Number (Litvak, 1948)
Personal film goals for 2019.
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#195

Post by sol » April 19th, 2019, 8:28 am

Out of the PastShow
1. The Sin of Harold Diddlebock (1947)
2. The Street with No Name (1948)
3. All This, and Heaven Too (1940)
4. Christmas in Connecticut (1945)
5a. Know for Sure (1941) 22min
5b. The Cage (1947) 28min and
5c. At Land (1946) 15m = 65min
6. The Dancing Masters (1943)
7. Give Us This Day (1949)
8. To Each His Own (1946)
9. The Wicked Lady (1945)
10. 40,000 Horsemen (1940)
11. Caught in the Draft (1941)
12. Bell-Bottom George (1944)
13. The Face of Marble (1946)
14. Monsieur Beaucaire (1946)
15. The Way of All Flesh (1940)
16. King of the Zombies (1941)
17. Louisiana Purchase (1941)
18. Louisiana Story (1948)

19. Spare a Copper (1940)

Image

A better-than-average George Formby film go due to director John Paddy Carstairs focusing on the stunts rather than Formby with his shrill voice and toothy overbite. An obstacle course gone awry and Formby driving a truck through a theatre (which the applauding audience assume is part of the act) stick out in particular, but the climax is also topped off with a well coordinated car chase that even goes under the legs of a horse at one point! The plot is really too complex for a lighthearted affair like this, but the stunts and songs carry things through.
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#196

Post by peeptoad » April 19th, 2019, 9:30 am

18. Phantom of the Opera (1943) 4
hep catsShow
*rewatch
1. The Mummy’s Hand (1940) 7*
2. The Mummy’s Ghost (1944) 6
3. Son of Dracula (1943) 6
4. House of Dracula (1945) 6
5. King of the Zombies (1941) 6
6. Shadow of a Doubt (1943) 8*
7. Strangler of the Swamp (1946) 6
8. The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942) 6
9. Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) 7
10. Before I Hang (1940) 6
11. Nazi Concentration Camps (1945)
12. Bluebeard (1944) 4
13. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad (1949) 7
14. Dr. Cyclops (1940) 7
15. The Devil Bat (1940) 5
16. Return of the Vampire (1943) 7
17. Le corbeau (1943) The Raven 8

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#197

Post by Traveller » April 19th, 2019, 10:10 am

42. Body and Soul (1947) - 7/10
43. Dead of Night (1945) - 7/10
ICM
August Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#198

Post by AB537 » April 19th, 2019, 6:38 pm

12. My Name is Julia Ross (Joseph H. Lewis, 1945)

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#199

Post by Lonewolf2003 » April 19th, 2019, 8:27 pm

22. Magnificent Doll (1946): 6.5 - Ginger Rogers is surprisingly convincing as the future First Lady Dolly Payne Madison. The central romantic threesome plot between her, Madison and Aaron Burr is far from historical correct, although the great production design does feel historical accurate. The romance is the least interesting part of the movie, still the movie was enjoyable in its depiction of early American politics. The emphasis on big American values might be more a result of its production time than the depicted time.
23. Panique (1946): 8.0 - In style a good example of the overlap between noir and poetic realism (the first own a lot to the later, so it's hard to make the distinction. Maybe someone more enlightened could do that.) In plot it's clearly a product of its production time and place; prejudices and gossip leading to mob rule being a clear allegory to French behavior during the occupation. Michel Simon is very convincing in the lead, by first being a haughty outsider that falls for the femme fatale because of his secret loneliness and need for human contact.
24. Kris [Crisis](1946): 7.8 - This debut by Bergman gets a lot of flak. Undeservedly so, cause it's a very decent debut. The plot is a very simple moralistic tale, so the character might not have the depth of later Bergman movie. But it is matched with surprisingly confident simple directing from Bergman, who already shows impressive skills for framing, long shots and camera movements. (Tho this might have been the influence of Sjöström, who consulted Bergman on this).
25. Skepp till India land [A Ship to India] (1947): 6.8 -
26. Secret Beyond the Door... (1947): 6.8 - Great direction with some expressionistic touches by Lang lifts this up. But like so many of these 40s psychological crime drama it relies too heavily on pseudo-Freudian psychobabble to explain its character motivations. Redgrave was very miscast. The movie does has an extra layer when one consider Lang’s personal history about his first wife’s dubious suicide.
27. Kiss of Death (1947): 7.5 - Very enjoyable noir with some added realism trough its location shooting and the socioeconomic background leading to its protagonist life-of-crime. Though one could argue the later is only there to make the criminal protagonist acceptable for a Hays code audience.
28. Ride the Pink Horse (1947): 8.0 - Eccentric noir, partly thanks its New Mexican setting and going against tropes. Partly because it has a surreal feel to it that almost borders on absurd black comedy at times. Montgomery's acting somehow totally fits with the movie, which understandable since he also directed it.
29. Brighton Rock (1947): 7.2
30. L'amore (1948): 7.2 - a showcase for Anna Magnani acting skills.
31. Moonrise (1948): 8.0 - Great direction and cinematography Often labelled as a noir, but more a humane crime drama. What I really liked about this one is how the psychological isolation of Danny is also a result from his own stubbornness and inclination to see the worst in people as a result of his childhood of being bullied, which make him blind to all the understanding people around him. Borzage, the romanticist he is, shows that the predetermined fatalism typical for noir protagonists isn't irreversible; redemption through love is always possible.
32. Hamnstad [Port of Call] (1948): 6.0 - Bergman cited Rossellini as a major influence for this and that exactly what you get; a young Bergman trying to do Rossellini. These outside neorealist parts are the best bits. The interior psychological bits, which are more reminiscent of later Bergman, are the weakest and clash with the neorealist style.
33. Törst [Thirst] (1949): 6.2 - After a strong start about a young woman's affair with a married man, the movie switches some years ahead when she's on vacation with her new other husband. This young couple, like many Bergman couples will, argue a lot. Unfortunately it couldn't interest me much. Firstly because we never seen the two lovers in better days its was very hard to feel involved in their relationship. Secondly and more important the characters are underdeveloped, reducing any understanding or sympathy with the characters. These faults are even more evident in the other even weaker story strand about a former lover of the husband. Because the story strands never come together either thematically or in plot, the dis-structured narrative doesn't work either.
Credits for Bergman for addressing controversial topics in both movies for those times; an abortion and a lesbian seduction. I do like how these early Bergman are the works of a young director, whose sympathies clearly lay with its younger protagonist.
34. Twelve O'Clock High (1949): 6.8 - solid realistic WWII movie about the efforts of Gregory Peck trying to lead an American bomber crew.

Catching up on the 40sShow
1. The Wolf Man (1941): 6.8 -
2. Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941): 8.0
3. Man Hunt (1941): 7.5
4. The Gang's All Here (1943): 6.8
5. I Walked with a Zombie (1943): 6.5
6. Ministry of Fear (1944): 7.5
7. Laura (1944) (rewatch): 6.5 > 7.8
8. Cover Girl (1944): 7.2 -
9. Phantom Lady (1944): 8.0
10. The Killers (1946) (rewatch): 8.0 > 8.0
11. The Uninvited (1944): 7.5
12. Night Train to Munich (1940): 7.5
13. The Palm Beach Story (1942) (rewatch): 8.5 > 8.5
14. Les visiteurs du soir [The Devil's Envoys] (1942): 7.2
15. The Chronicle History of King Henry the Fift with His Battell Fought at Agincourt in France [Henry V] (1944): 7.0
16. Dead of Night (1945): 6.8
17. Mildred Pierce (1945): 8.0
18. Brief Encounter (1945) (rewatch): 9.0 > 8.8
19. My Name Is Julia Ross (1945): 7.0
20. So Dark the Night (1946): 7.2
21. The Dark Mirror (1946): 7.5

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#200

Post by OldAle1 » April 19th, 2019, 10:00 pm

1. 40,000 Horsemen (Charles Chauvel, 1940)

And after the war challenge last month, I start off this one with another heavily combat-oriented film. I guess I knew what I was getting into, but perhaps I'm a little over war stuff for the moment (and I didn't even compete well in the previous month). Anyway this is the story of a trio of friends who go off to the Great War in the middle east, first hanging around Jerusalem bored and itching for action - then getting too much of it, and too deadly, in the Sinai in what would eventually be known as the Battle of Beersheba, featuring what is generally considered the last successful cavalry charge in a major engagement. The action sequences are very well done, and the three young blokes are all decent, especially the great Chips Rafferty who is always a pleasure, but the overt propagandizing (this was clearly made to try to drum up support for the new war) and the rather silly love story and awful mustache-twirling villain stereotyping of the Germans is wearisome. Very mixed bag overall.

2. The Gang's All Here (Busby Berkely, 1943)

I'll get the bad out of the way first - none of the songs are all that memorable apart from Carmen Miranda's showstopper "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat" and "Brazil" - the latter song not original to this film - and leads Alice Faye and James Ellison really aren't that scintillating. These aren't really huge issues though as, being a Busby Berkeley film, it's more notable for the dancing, choreography, and staging than for the singing, and the rest of the cast, including Miranda, Edward Everett Horton, Charlotte Greenwood and Eugene Pallette, makes up for the relative dullness of the leads. Oh, and the color, the truly outstanding color cinematography by 7-time Oscar nominee Edward Cronjager. There weren't a lot of color features made during the war so we need to savor the ones we have and this delightful frothy comedy dance musical, despite some faults, certainly deserves to be remembered.

3. None Shall Escape (André De Toth, 1944)

Cinema, new 4K restoration, at the Wisconsin International Film Festival. It opens with a war crimes trial, with Nazi Wilhelm Grimm (Alexander Knox) on the stand for crimes against humanity, with several witnesses including a priest (Henry Travers), Grimm's former fiancee (Marsha Hunt) and his brother (Erik Rolf) testifying as to the man''s activities during the war in their small Polish town, as well as how he came to be the monster that we're presented with. This is an amazing rediscovery, a film that wasn't lost but was rarely seen for decades, until this new restoration. The woman in charge of the restoration spoke before the screening, telling us how Columbia knew from the first that they had something important, and so kept several prints in their archives - but the prints were all lacquered over, which did keep them from deteriorating on the outside but also did some damage that couldn't be repaired in the old photochemical method - this is one of those films that had to wait for digital technology to fix it up. And it was worth it. Keep in mind that this was made in 1943 - released in February of the following year - a full two years before the Allies liberated the concentration camps, and yet it paints a starkly accurate and horrific picture of the master race''s atrocities, and also, perhaps an even greater achievement, paints a portrait of a man who was perhaps only subconsciously racist and arrogant during the previous war, and his inevitable radicalization under the lies, promises and hatemongering of the Nazi propaganda. It's all shot on sets of course, but this bears all the hallmark's of one of the director's trademarks, his ability to create an almost three dimensional filmic space with minimal resources; and it also visually looks forward somewhat to film noir in DP Lee Garmes' shadowy staircases and night time sequences. The performances are pretty much top-notch though Richard Crane as Willie, nephew of Wilhelm and a member of the Hitler Youth who represents the insidious lure of the autocrat's message to the young, is perhaps less impressive than the other principals. Knox is a revelation though, giving one of the best performances of this kind that I've seen, and the film as a whole is remarkable, though some may find the opening and closing couple of minutes of pure propaganda tough to deal with. In the context of what the film says overall, I didn't, and this ended up easily the best first time viewing for me of the films I saw at the festival, and I'd say it's quite likely De Toth's best film and one of the very best American WWII films made during the war.

4. Panique (Julien Duvivier, 1946)

I saw Monsier Hire when it was first released in the US almost 30 years ago, and my memory is awfully dim, so I'm not sure I would have recognized this as the earlier version of the same story - apart from the name of the title character of course, played in this film by the great Michel Simon in an uncharacteristically melancholy, almost subdued performance. He still manages to totally dominate the screen and give a "big" performance despite the lack of overt gusto - a tribute to the actor and to Duvivier's careful filmmaking I think. Essentially this is one of those "somebody's been murdered, let's blame the weird guy who's not like the rest of us" story, with Simon's Mr. Hire a rather misanthropic, sometimes rude intellectual and mystic who keeps to himself and resists the friendship of others or any real sense of community. One interesting element - never overt as I recall - is the origin of M. Hire - whose real name is "Hirovich". One year after the war, and I don't think many French filmmakers wanted to deal with antisemitism, and the possible hounding of someone to death merely for his (perceived) Jewishness - so it is little remarked upon, but it is there. It's all beautifully done, very noir I guess in many respects, though I can't say it bowled me over.

5. La nuit fantastique / Fantastic Night (Marcel L'Herbier, 1942)

This is the first of L'Herbier's sound films that I've seen, and it's quite different from the more intense, dramatic, and generally larger-scale silents that I've watched. It's a fairly light and playful fantasy, a dream-logic experience of a young man who fantasizes about a beautiful woman while asleep, to the point where he is obsessed and no longer cares for his real-life girlfriend. One day he takes a little nap at his place of employment and the dream-world takes over, with a madcap adventure involving magicians, seedy nightclubs, rooftop and car/bike chases, and of course the promise of romance with the mysterious beauty - if he can ever find her when he's awake again, of course. This was wonderful and developed a feeling of both surrealism and noirish danger at times, and in the end felt much more serious in it's examination of the logic and importance of dreaming than it's relatively silly beginning promised. Fernand Gravéy is quite a bit too old to seem a likely student, but his resemblance at times to William Powell made me not care, and Micheline Presle - 20 at the time, 96 now and one of the last of her generation of French screen thespians - has the right mix of allure, mysteriousness, and good humor. I know I'd follow her on just about any adventure.

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