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1930s Challenge (Official, February 2019)

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jdidaco
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Re: 1930s Challenge (Official, February 2019)

#81

Post by jdidaco » February 6th, 2019, 3:59 am

13. Ariane, jeune fille russe (Ariane, Russian Maid, Paul Czinner, 1932) 9/10
14. Samson (Maurice Tourneur, 1936) 8/10
15. Mollenard (Hatred, Robert Siodmak, 1938) 9/10

Trauner's sets for 'Mollenard',

Image

SpoilerShow
1. Un chien qui rapporte (A Dog That Fetches, Jean Choux, 1932) 8/10
2. Histoire du soldat inconnu (Story of the Unknown Soldier, Henri Storck, 1932) 9/10 (11 min), Affaire classée (Case Closed, Charles Vanel, 1932) 7/10 (23 min), Amour et publicité (Love & Advertising, Leo Mittler, 1933) 8/10 (26 min) (Total: 60 min)
3. Remous (Whirlpool, Edmond T. Gréville, 1935) 10/10
4. With Byrd at the South Pole (Joseph T. Rucker & Willard Van der Veer, 1930) 8/10
5. Trader Horn (W.S. Van Dyke,1931) 7/10
6. Eskimo (W.S. Van Dyke, 1933) 9/10
7. Cape Forlorn (Ewald André Dupont, 1931) 9.5/10
8. Broken Blossoms (John Brahm, 1936) 8.5/10
9. Pygmalion (Ludwig Berger, 1937) 8.5/10
10. Yu guang qu (Song of the Fishermen, Cai Chusheng, 1934) 7.5/10
11. Dushi fengguang (Scenes of City Life, Yuan Muzhi, 1935) 8/10
12. Ye ban ge sheng (Song at Midnight, Ma-Xu Weibang, 1937) 8/10

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#82

Post by jdidaco » February 6th, 2019, 4:21 am

St. Gloede wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 7:10 am
1. Remous / Whirlpool (1935, Edmond T. Gréville)
While a little rough around the edges, especially in sound design, I ended up absolutely loving Remous. The expressionistic visuals, tieing in with just a general air of visual playfulness, clever editing and a scandalous tale (to the point that it just could not get shown in the US) made this an absolutely wonderful experience. I simply loved how it moved and felt, and while it may even have been better as a silent, it did know how to use sound and the sparse dialog when needed (I would mostly have tweaked the first 10 minutes, and minor tweaks throughout). Remous feels like a film which deserves a proper rediscovery and gets entered into the film canon, as it would sit very well next to Epstein, Vigo and Renoir. 8.5/10.

Edit: While not too similar in content another artistic and visually clever and breezy film I was reminded of was the severely underrated Treno popolare. I would highly recommend it. Edit two: Had missed how it had actually been included on two toplists including DtC by now, that is amazing.
Yay :D , glad you liked it. In full agreement!; I actually love the haphazard first ten minutes, fragments of happiness, quick-cuts of bliss, before it's all crushed (crashed!). Scriptwise it's not much than recreations around a Lady Chatterley's scenario, but what Gréville does with it is incredibly sensorial, expressive, inventive (and erotic!). So many memorable moments along the way leading to that unforgettable ending - at once epic and majestic, unequivocally sad and intimate. I'm saving a Gréville for the 40s and another one for the 50s challenges! And yes, I love 'Treno popolare', and I can picture Gréville as the undisciplined, naughty cousin of Matarazzo!

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#83

Post by Hunziker » February 6th, 2019, 6:44 am

3. Murders in the Zoo (1933) - 6/10
4. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) - 7.5/10

ScrewballingShow
1. The Awful Truth (1937)
2. Midnight (1939)
3. Murders in the Zoo (1933)
4. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
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#84

Post by jeroeno » February 6th, 2019, 7:05 am

12. The Rains Came (1939)
13. San Francisco (1936)
14. Black Legion (1937)
15. Treasure Island (1934)

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#85

Post by St. Gloede » February 6th, 2019, 7:13 am

2. Shunkinsho: Okoto to Sasuke (1935, Yasujirô Shimazu)
The performances were a little too anonymous for me, to the point that the "shocking climax" did not have the effect on me it may otherwise have had - but still a strong film, well directed by the largely forgotten Shimazu. 7/10.


3. Mon père avait raison / My Father Was Right (1936, Sacha Guitry)
As was often the case for Guitry this is a straight adaptation of one of his plays, but as was also usually the case, it work perfectly. Witticism of the best kind, usually in one to one conversations. The visuals are perfectly adequate, but this is a narrative driven by the written word (and comical delivery) and each part of it is masterfully crafted. Spanning 20 years we open with the relationship of 30 year old Guitry and his aging father, before moving 20 years later, to see the effect on Guitry's own son. The ending may not be all that special (and I really thought they had jumped 10 more years for a little while) but throughout this work is simply thoroughly delightful. 8.5/10.


4. Saison in Kairo / Cairo Season (1933, Reinhold Schünzel)
A warm-up for before I watch Schünzel's most acclaimed film, Viktor und Viktoria, made the same year, and despite the poor print, this was an absolute delight - capturing just about everything great about German comedies in the early 30s. It is naughty, perhaps just a little bit raunchy. but still incredibly sweet. Playing off miscommunications, conventional morality and the lack of it Cairo Season has a young CEO trying to force his merry widow playgirl mother into an arbitrary marriage to avoid more scandals - but in attempting to set her up with a nearly bankrupt count he may just get entangled with the count's daughter. It is of course complete with random songs (it is a musical of sorts!), but they are largely placed in the early-middle - and doesn't really go anywhere ... and somehow that just doesn't bother me (plus having the two older to-be-set-up couple singing about staying true to their significant bits of the side regardless of who they marry - while sitting right opposite each other - is not something you see every day). All in all a great comedy I would definitely recommend! 8/10.

5. Le roi des aulnes / The Erlking (1931, Marie-Louise Iribe)
Part of me had hoped for something a little more, but this clearly low budget adaptation of a Goethe poem, interestingly shown so it can all be read (and all events expected) at the very beginning, goes all-out in early special effects and becomes an interesting viewing. It does not quite ring true, but at just 45 minutes it deserves a viewing. 5.5-6/10.

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#86

Post by St. Gloede » February 6th, 2019, 8:33 am

Will do Cape Forlorn and hopefully one other film today.

Have to say, the 30s aesthetics are feeling absolutely wonderful. This challenge came at exactly the right time, and I can definitely say I will watch more than the estimated 10. Now I just need to pinpoint what films to focus on. Already have some lesser known Pabst films lined up, been meaning to explore more of his sound work (only found Kameradschaft great so far), but I am hopeful of more pearls.

@jdidaco :cheers: re: Mollenard.

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#87

Post by Nathan Treadway » February 6th, 2019, 12:38 pm

7. A nous la liberte (1931)
8. Me and My Gal (1932)
9. Queen Christina
10. The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933)
11. The Dark Angel (1935)
12. The Hurricane (1937)
13. A Damsel in Distress (1937)
14. The Cowboy and the Lady (1938)

Focusing heavily on the 1930s this week, my focus will shift almost exclusively toward Oscar (a lot of these are Oscar winners), so, I'm just about done here. I think I have 2 more, and anything else will be incidental.

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#88

Post by sol » February 6th, 2019, 1:06 pm

Zero Dark ThirtiesShow
1. Dead End (1937)
2. Chun Can (1933)
3. Svengali (1931)
4. Bad Girl (1931)
5. Holiday (1938)
6. Laughter (1930)
7. The Ghoul (1993)

8. Block-Heads (1938)

Image

Frequently cited as one of Laurel and Hardy's best films, Block-Heads is certainly refreshingly unique with Stan given much more dialogue than usual and Ollie actually feeling sorry for him half the time and seldom belittling him. There are some very funny routines too, from broken telephone lines, to out-of-order lifts, to a chair that keeps whacking a bewildered Stan. The film does not quite milk the potential of Stan discovering so much new technology (after twenty years away) for all that it is worth though and the ending is incredibly abrupt.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#89

Post by St. Gloede » February 6th, 2019, 1:26 pm

Nathan Treadway wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 12:38 pm
7. A nous la liberte (1931)
I really love A nous la liberte. In the running for best film of '31 - and this year is possibly the strongest in the 30s as far as I'm concerned.

Sadly I only have one French Rene Clair film left unseen from the 30s, The Last Billionaire, may catch it this challenge.

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#90

Post by maxwelldeux » February 6th, 2019, 3:56 pm

psychotronicbeatnik wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 12:16 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 5:50 pm
A depressing decadeShow
1. Sweet Dream (1936)
2. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
3. You and Me (1938)
4. The Front Page (1931)
I hope you mean your spoiler title ironically - the Great Depression and all - because I always have a lot of fun with 30s cinema - most of it brings me a great madcap joy. Which is probably what almost everyone needed at the time. Anyway, great spoiler tag - unless you mean it! :cheers:
Hah! Yes - it's my Great Depression pun. And thanks!

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#91

Post by peeptoad » February 6th, 2019, 6:42 pm

4. Son of Frankenstein (1939) 7
the dirty thirtiesShow
1. The Ghoul (1933) 6
2. The Human Monster (1939) 6
3. Black Moon (1934) 7

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#92

Post by allisoncm » February 6th, 2019, 8:53 pm

1. Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff (1931) 5/10

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#93

Post by jdidaco » February 6th, 2019, 10:11 pm

Teuvo Tulio as a bisexual violinist breaking hearts between Helsinki-Paris amidst gorgeous Art Deco sets ('Laveata tietä') and an extraordinary version of 'Juha',

ImageImage

16. Laveata tietä (The Wide Road, Valentin Vaala, 1931) 8/10
17. Palos brudefærd (The Wedding of Palo, Friedrich Dalsheim, 1934) 8.5/10
18. Juha (Nyrki Tapiovaara, 1937) 9/10

Image

SpoilerShow
1. Un chien qui rapporte (A Dog That Fetches, Jean Choux, 1932) 8/10
2. Histoire du soldat inconnu (Story of the Unknown Soldier, Henri Storck, 1932) 9/10 (11 min), Affaire classée (Case Closed, Charles Vanel, 1932) 7/10 (23 min), Amour et publicité (Love & Advertising, Leo Mittler, 1933) 8/10 (26 min) (Total: 60 min)
3. Remous (Whirlpool, Edmond T. Gréville, 1935) 10/10
4. With Byrd at the South Pole (Joseph T. Rucker & Willard Van der Veer, 1930) 8/10
5. Trader Horn (W.S. Van Dyke,1931) 7/10
6. Eskimo (W.S. Van Dyke, 1933) 9/10
7. Cape Forlorn (Ewald André Dupont, 1931) 9.5/10
8. Broken Blossoms (John Brahm, 1936) 8.5/10
9. Pygmalion (Ludwig Berger, 1937) 8.5/10
10. Yu guang qu (Song of the Fishermen, Cai Chusheng, 1934) 7.5/10
11. Dushi fengguang (Scenes of City Life, Yuan Muzhi, 1935) 8/10
12. Ye ban ge sheng (Song at Midnight, Ma-Xu Weibang, 1937) 8/10
13. Ariane, jeune fille russe (Ariane, Russian Maid, Paul Czinner, 1932) 9/10
14. Samson (Maurice Tourneur, 1936) 8/10
15. Mollenard (Hatred, Robert Siodmak, 1938) 9/10

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#94

Post by albajos » February 6th, 2019, 10:39 pm

07. The Great Ziegfeld (1936) USA 3 official lists 1 380 checks [double]

Off. list progress
+1 1930s (80,0%)

SpoilerShow
01. You Can't Take It with You (1938) USA 5 official lists 3 304 checks [double]
02. Grand Hotel (1932) USA 4 official lists 2 766 checks [double]
03. Dead End (1937) USA 4 official lists 756 checks [double]
04. Holiday (1938) USA 5 official lists 2 032 checks [double]
05. The Black Cat (1934) USA 6 official lists 2 256 checks
06. The Life of Emile Zola (1937) USA 7 official lists 1 500 checks

!seen 7

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#95

Post by 3eyes » February 7th, 2019, 4:20 am

1. The keeper of the bees (35)
pretty hokey.
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#96

Post by jeroeno » February 7th, 2019, 7:05 am

16. Hans Westmar (1933)

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#97

Post by St. Gloede » February 7th, 2019, 7:11 am

6. Jeunes filles en détresse / Young Girls in Trouble (1939, Georg Wilhelm Pabst)
This is a very strange film for Pabst - a cutesy comedy about a girl boarding school, and their frustration at the lack of attention from their (especially divorced) parents. Playing it in part for absurdity the film sees the girls founding an anti-divorce club and even attempting to end divorce once and for all. It is played with a lot of heart, but feels a little ham-fisted, especially in regard to the ending. Perfectly enjoyable, but they could have taken the idea further. (Note: Pabst's still showcases great skill as a director and I am looking forward to see if the two other Pabst films I have lined up fits his strengths a little better). 5-6/10.

7. Cape Forlorn (1931, Ewald André Dupont)
Sadly I did not love Cape Forlorn, and it was another early 30s film which would likely have been better as a silent as the use of dialog rang fairly off-key. The atmosphere and mood was largely spot on, and while the plot felt a little flimsy as well, the film as a whole hit a lot of interesting notes and provided a pretty strong overall experience. 6.5/10.

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#98

Post by maxwelldeux » February 7th, 2019, 7:19 am

A depressing decadeShow
1. Sweet Dream (1936)
2. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
3. You and Me (1938)
4. The Front Page (1931)
5. Malu Tianshi AKA Street Angel (1937)
"6-7. Shorts (120m):

Television (1939, 9m)
Boy Meets Dog (1938, 9m)
The River (1938, 31m)
Parabola (1937, 9m)
Misere au Borinage (1933, 36m)
The Mascot (1933, 26m)"
8. Child Bride (1938)
Well, that's over with... on the Tim Dirk list for having a naked 12yo swimming on film. Pretty terrible film and a horrific reason to be "famous" or "interesting".

9. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)
This movie broke me in the best possible way. I hate musicals. I hate movies about show business. I have a strong dislike for innumerable aspects of that film (including the title). But I fucking LOVED this movie. Everything worked. It was fun. And funny. And sexy. And complex. And a visual masterpiece. And (mostly) pro-women and women-focused. I started just cursing at the movie at one point because I unexpectedly liked it so much and my brain hadn't fully processed that. The thing that really put me over the top to get around to watching it was seeing clips in The Story of Film - sure it's on 11 lists, but TSoF showed short clips of some visually awesome scenes, and I figured it might be OK. But holy crap was this good.

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#99

Post by St. Gloede » February 7th, 2019, 8:23 am

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 7:19 am
9. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)
This movie broke me in the best possible way. I hate musicals. I hate movies about show business. I have a strong dislike for innumerable aspects of that film (including the title). But I fucking LOVED this movie. Everything worked. It was fun. And funny. And sexy. And complex. And a visual masterpiece. And (mostly) pro-women and women-focused. I started just cursing at the movie at one point because I unexpectedly liked it so much and my brain hadn't fully processed that. The thing that really put me over the top to get around to watching it was seeing clips in The Story of Film - sure it's on 11 lists, but TSoF showed short clips of some visually awesome scenes, and I figured it might be OK. But holy crap was this good.
(l) (l) (l) (l) (l) (l)

We are largely in the same boat there. Gold Diggers of 1933 was one of the films that made me entirely re-evaluate my more general disinterest in musicals. Busby Berkely is genuinly fantastic. The visual feasts he creates could not be more fit for the screen and feels genuinely magical. I never saw anything of his that quite measured up Footlight Parade and 42nd Street (two films he did with Lloyd Bacon) are also great. I really should get around to watching the films he directed himself.

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#100

Post by Opio » February 7th, 2019, 9:51 am

My favorite decade for genre watches right now, with most clocking in around an hour, so I'd like to play.

1. Cynara (1932)
2. Where Sinners Meet (1934)

Didn't have high hopes for either of these, but was pleasantly surprised, especially with the comedy of the latter.

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#101

Post by clemmetarey » February 7th, 2019, 10:50 am

Not exactly the greatest beginning:

1. Kuhle Wampe oder: Wem gehört die Welt? (1932) 4/10
2. Koi mo wasurete (1937) 5/10
3. Zouzou (1934) 4/10

SpoilerShow
1. Kuhle Wampe oder: Wem gehört die Welt? (1932) 4/10
2. Koi mo wasurete (1937) 5/10
3. Zouzou (1934) 4/10

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#102

Post by maxwelldeux » February 7th, 2019, 5:05 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 8:23 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 7:19 am
9. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)
This movie broke me in the best possible way. I hate musicals. I hate movies about show business. I have a strong dislike for innumerable aspects of that film (including the title). But I fucking LOVED this movie. Everything worked. It was fun. And funny. And sexy. And complex. And a visual masterpiece. And (mostly) pro-women and women-focused. I started just cursing at the movie at one point because I unexpectedly liked it so much and my brain hadn't fully processed that. The thing that really put me over the top to get around to watching it was seeing clips in The Story of Film - sure it's on 11 lists, but TSoF showed short clips of some visually awesome scenes, and I figured it might be OK. But holy crap was this good.
(l) (l) (l) (l) (l) (l)

We are largely in the same boat there. Gold Diggers of 1933 was one of the films that made me entirely re-evaluate my more general disinterest in musicals. Busby Berkely is genuinly fantastic. The visual feasts he creates could not be more fit for the screen and feels genuinely magical. I never saw anything of his that quite measured up Footlight Parade and 42nd Street (two films he did with Lloyd Bacon) are also great. I really should get around to watching the films he directed himself.
And in the "often imitated, never bettered" category, I totally agree with you about how they were perfect for the screen. Some of those dance sequences would have been pretty boring if viewed from theater seating, instead of having the camera overhead (which, incidentally, if one of my pet peeves of stage performance, where they do dance numbers that would only really be cool viewed overhead). This was fun to watch, as I've seen a lot of films reference it, but now I get it all.

Incidentally, in my early-morning pre-coffee rambling, this film is a great example of why I dislike heavy use of CGI. That violin sequence blew my mind. I think I shouted "NO!" at the screen. And part of what made it so good was that they actually did it. But nowadays, that seems like the sort of thing that would be done in post-production, which just somehow removes the soul for me.

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#103

Post by St. Gloede » February 7th, 2019, 5:34 pm

maxwelldeux wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 5:05 pm
St. Gloede wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 8:23 am
maxwelldeux wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 7:19 am
9. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)
This movie broke me in the best possible way. I hate musicals. I hate movies about show business. I have a strong dislike for innumerable aspects of that film (including the title). But I fucking LOVED this movie. Everything worked. It was fun. And funny. And sexy. And complex. And a visual masterpiece. And (mostly) pro-women and women-focused. I started just cursing at the movie at one point because I unexpectedly liked it so much and my brain hadn't fully processed that. The thing that really put me over the top to get around to watching it was seeing clips in The Story of Film - sure it's on 11 lists, but TSoF showed short clips of some visually awesome scenes, and I figured it might be OK. But holy crap was this good.
(l) (l) (l) (l) (l) (l)

We are largely in the same boat there. Gold Diggers of 1933 was one of the films that made me entirely re-evaluate my more general disinterest in musicals. Busby Berkely is genuinly fantastic. The visual feasts he creates could not be more fit for the screen and feels genuinely magical. I never saw anything of his that quite measured up Footlight Parade and 42nd Street (two films he did with Lloyd Bacon) are also great. I really should get around to watching the films he directed himself.
And in the "often imitated, never bettered" category, I totally agree with you about how they were perfect for the screen. Some of those dance sequences would have been pretty boring if viewed from theater seating, instead of having the camera overhead (which, incidentally, if one of my pet peeves of stage performance, where they do dance numbers that would only really be cool viewed overhead). This was fun to watch, as I've seen a lot of films reference it, but now I get it all.

Incidentally, in my early-morning pre-coffee rambling, this film is a great example of why I dislike heavy use of CGI. That violin sequence blew my mind. I think I shouted "NO!" at the screen. And part of what made it so good was that they actually did it. But nowadays, that seems like the sort of thing that would be done in post-production, which just somehow removes the soul for me.
Btw, if you haven't you should really see Ken Russell's Berkely homage "The Boy Friend".

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#104

Post by maxwelldeux » February 7th, 2019, 5:49 pm

St. Gloede wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 5:34 pm
Btw, if you haven't you should really see Ken Russell's Berkely homage "The Boy Friend".
Thanks - adding that to my watchlist!

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#105

Post by RogerTheMovieManiac88 » February 7th, 2019, 7:29 pm

Thanks for hosting, 72!

1. 'Music Hall' / 1934, John Baxter / 6 or 6.5/10 / UK
2. 'The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo' / 1935, Stephen Roberts / 7.5 or 8/10 / USA
3. 'Dusty Ermine' / 1936, Bernard Vorhaus / 6/10 / UK
4. 'Passenger to London' / 1937, Lawrence Huntington / 5.5/10 / UK
5. 'Second Best Bed' / 1938, Tom Walls / 5.5 or 6/10 / UK

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That's all, folks!

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#106

Post by jdidaco » February 7th, 2019, 11:15 pm

19. Das Lied vom Leben (Song of Life, Alexis Granowsky, 1931) 9/10
20. Mirages de Paris (Fyodor Otsep, 1933) 9/10
21. Stadt Anatol (The City of Anatol, Viktor Tourjansky, 1936) 8/10

Image

SpoilerShow
1. Un chien qui rapporte (A Dog That Fetches, Jean Choux, 1932) 8/10
2. Histoire du soldat inconnu (Story of the Unknown Soldier, Henri Storck, 1932) 9/10 (11 min), Affaire classée (Case Closed, Charles Vanel, 1932) 7/10 (23 min), Amour et publicité (Love & Advertising, Leo Mittler, 1933) 8/10 (26 min) (Total: 60 min)
3. Remous (Whirlpool, Edmond T. Gréville, 1935) 10/10
4. With Byrd at the South Pole (Joseph T. Rucker & Willard Van der Veer, 1930) 8/10
5. Trader Horn (W.S. Van Dyke,1931) 7/10
6. Eskimo (W.S. Van Dyke, 1933) 9/10
7. Cape Forlorn (Ewald André Dupont, 1931) 9.5/10
8. Broken Blossoms (John Brahm, 1936) 8.5/10
9. Pygmalion (Ludwig Berger, 1937) 8.5/10
10. Yu guang qu (Song of the Fishermen, Cai Chusheng, 1934) 7.5/10
11. Dushi fengguang (Scenes of City Life, Yuan Muzhi, 1935) 8/10
12. Ye ban ge sheng (Song at Midnight, Ma-Xu Weibang, 1937) 8/10
13. Ariane, jeune fille russe (Ariane, Russian Maid, Paul Czinner, 1932) 9/10
14. Samson (Maurice Tourneur, 1936) 8/10
15. Mollenard (Hatred, Robert Siodmak, 1938) 9/10
16. Laveata tietä (The Wide Road, Valentin Vaala, 1931) 8/10
17. Palos brudefærd (The Wedding of Palo, Friedrich Dalsheim, 1934) 8.5/10
18. Juha (Nyrki Tapiovaara, 1937) 9/10

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#107

Post by Nathan Treadway » February 7th, 2019, 11:34 pm

15. The Big Broadcast of 1938 (1938)
16. When Tomorrow Comes (1939)

There's a pretty good chance I'm done with this challenge, as I'm done with the 1930's section of my old watchlist. My focus is now shifting to the Oscar challenge for the rest of the month. (Although, these are both Oscar winners).

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#108

Post by psychotronicbeatnik » February 8th, 2019, 12:09 am

14. Mutiny on the Bounty (1935 / Frank Lloyd) 9/10 {8 noms, 1 win / Double}
15. Bad Girl (1931 / Frank Borzage) FTV 7+/10 {3 noms, 2 wins / Double}
16. Hell’s Angels (1930 / Howard Hughes, Edmund Goulding, James Whale) 8+/10 {1 nom, 0 wins / Double}

30somethingsShow
1. The Divorcee (1930 / Robert Z. Leonard) FTV 6+/10 {4 noms, 1 win / Double}
2. Suzy (1936 / George Fitzmaurice) FTV 7+/10 {1 nom, 0 wins / Double}
3. King of Jazz (1930 / John Murray Anderson) 7+/10 {1 nom, 1 win / Double}
4. A Free Soul (1931 / Clarence Brown) FTV 7+/10 {3 noms, 1 win / Double}
5. Grand Hotel (1932 / Edmund Goulding) 8+/10 {1 nom, 1 win / Double}
6. Pygmalion (1938 / Anthony Asquith, Leslie Howard) FTV 9/10 {4 noms, 1 win / Double}
7. The Prisoner of Zenda (1937 / John Cromwell) 9+/10 {2 noms, 0 wins / Double}
8. Captain Blood (1935 / Michael Curtiz) 10/10 {5 noms, 0 wins / Double}
9. Topper (1937 / Norman Z. McLeod) 9/10 {2 noms, 0 wins / Double}
10. The Awful Truth (1937 / Leo McCarey) 9/10 {6 noms, 1 win / Double}
11. The Thin Man (1934 / W.S. Van Dyke) 9/10 {4 noms, 0 wins / Double}
12. After the Thin Man (1934 / W.S. Van Dyke) 8/10 {1 nom, 0 wins / Double}
13. Dead End (1937 / William Wyler) FTV 9/10 {4 noms, 0 wins / Double}
14. Mutiny on the Bounty (1935 / Frank Lloyd) 9/10 {8 noms, 1 win / Double}
15. Bad Girl (1931 / Frank Borzage) FTV 7+/10 {3 noms, 2 wins / Double}
16. Hell’s Angels (1930 / Howard Hughes, Edmund Goulding, James Whale) 8+/10 {1 nom, 0 wins / Double}



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#109

Post by Simba63 » February 8th, 2019, 4:06 am

06. Pépé le Moko (1937) - 7/10

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#110

Post by jeroeno » February 8th, 2019, 6:02 am

17. Folies Bergère de Paris (1935)
18. The Sign of the Cross (1932)
19. Three on a Match (1932)

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#111

Post by St. Gloede » February 8th, 2019, 6:43 am

jdidaco wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 11:15 pm
19. Das Lied vom Leben (Song of Life, Alexis Granowsky, 1931) 9/10
20. Mirages de Paris (Fyodor Otsep, 1933) 9/10
21. Stadt Anatol (The City of Anatol, Viktor Tourjansky, 1936) 8/10

Image

SpoilerShow
1. Un chien qui rapporte (A Dog That Fetches, Jean Choux, 1932) 8/10
2. Histoire du soldat inconnu (Story of the Unknown Soldier, Henri Storck, 1932) 9/10 (11 min), Affaire classée (Case Closed, Charles Vanel, 1932) 7/10 (23 min), Amour et publicité (Love & Advertising, Leo Mittler, 1933) 8/10 (26 min) (Total: 60 min)
3. Remous (Whirlpool, Edmond T. Gréville, 1935) 10/10
4. With Byrd at the South Pole (Joseph T. Rucker & Willard Van der Veer, 1930) 8/10
5. Trader Horn (W.S. Van Dyke,1931) 7/10
6. Eskimo (W.S. Van Dyke, 1933) 9/10
7. Cape Forlorn (Ewald André Dupont, 1931) 9.5/10
8. Broken Blossoms (John Brahm, 1936) 8.5/10
9. Pygmalion (Ludwig Berger, 1937) 8.5/10
10. Yu guang qu (Song of the Fishermen, Cai Chusheng, 1934) 7.5/10
11. Dushi fengguang (Scenes of City Life, Yuan Muzhi, 1935) 8/10
12. Ye ban ge sheng (Song at Midnight, Ma-Xu Weibang, 1937) 8/10
13. Ariane, jeune fille russe (Ariane, Russian Maid, Paul Czinner, 1932) 9/10
14. Samson (Maurice Tourneur, 1936) 8/10
15. Mollenard (Hatred, Robert Siodmak, 1938) 9/10
16. Laveata tietä (The Wide Road, Valentin Vaala, 1931) 8/10
17. Palos brudefærd (The Wedding of Palo, Friedrich Dalsheim, 1934) 8.5/10
18. Juha (Nyrki Tapiovaara, 1937) 9/10
I have Mirages de Paris coming up, extra excited now. Fyodor Otsep is without a doubt one of the more interesting lesser known directors of the 20s and 30s. The Living Corpse is a favorite, and both Amok and Der Mörder Dimitri Karamasoff are made in such a brilliant and unique way (sadly I did not like Zemlya v plenu, but that was also the first film I saw from him - and I have not yet seen Miss Mend).

Is the screenshot from Das Lied vom Leben?

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#112

Post by weirdboy » February 8th, 2019, 6:58 am

1. Cleopatra (1934) - Cecil B. DeMille
2. Dark Victory (1939) - Edmund Goulding

Bette Davis turns in another great performance.

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#113

Post by St. Gloede » February 8th, 2019, 7:01 am

8. Mademoiselle Docteur (1937, Georg Wilhelm Pabst)
Without a doubt playing closer to Pabst's strength, and gaining additional points interest of interest through moral ambiguity in its WW1 spy scenario. Unlike most war films that clearly picks and follows a side Mademoiselle Docteur features a German director, and a German lead actress making a French film following the acts of a German spy (and of course she falls in love with a French Officer). While I feel a lot more could have been done with the idea and that it does not quite rise to the occasion on tension or heavier emotion this is well directed, well acted and altogether a very good film. 7/10.

(Still hoping for another great Pabst talkie though)

Edit: Interesting sidenote/trivia: Gréville shot the English language version at the same time using the same lead actress (thought this tradition had died earlier in the 30s), though with the rest of the cast entirely replaced - and given the tagline on the poster "The Most Sinister of Spy Rings" I have to assume there is less ambiguity in who we are supposed to "root for".

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#114

Post by peeptoad » February 8th, 2019, 10:29 am

5. L'âge d'or (1930) 8
the dirty thirtiesShow
1. The Ghoul (1933) 6
2. The Human Monster (1939) 6
3. Black Moon (1934) 7
4. Son of Frankenstein (1939) 7

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#115

Post by Lonewolf2003 » February 8th, 2019, 11:09 am

1. Pygmalion (1938): 7.2 - very decent adaption of Shaw's play that would later become the famous My Fair Lady musical (and film).
2. Little Caesar (1931): 5.8 - my enjoyment of this was hampered by some subpar acting and very monotonous line-delivery.
3. My Man Godfrey (1936): 7.5 - Powell is absolutely sensational in this. Of course it isn't hard to come across as a great person, when the rest are so horrible, annoying, entitled and racist. Even Lombard character, who's supposed to be to most sympathetic of the family I guess, is a spoiled hysterical brat. Also for this to work as a social satire the characters were too broad. So while I enjoyed the very witty dialogue, this kept me from seeing the absolute greatness of this.
4. A Farewell to Arms (1932): 7.8 - This adaption by Borzage of Hemingway's classic look absolutely stunning, especially the mis en scene is great So it's no wonder it won the Best Cinematography Oscar. Borzage adaption more focus on the melodramatic romantic aspect than the war aspect, most we see from the later is a stunning expressionistic sequence near the end. But this was a correct choice, it makes for a tighter better story instead of trying to cram the whole novel in 90 minutes of movie. It also aligns better with Borzage sentiments as a director.
5. The Roaring Twenties (1939): 7.8 - Good gangster movie about the rise and fall of a gangster during the prohibition era. Cagney sells every stage his character goes trough (which not many actors can). Bogart is great in his supporting role.

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#116

Post by clemmetarey » February 8th, 2019, 11:16 am

4. Olympia 1. Teil - Fest der Völker (1938) 7/10
The first 20 minutes or so are impressive and constitute the highlight of this documentary. I enjoyed the rest as well, the editing creates some very suspenseful moments. I'll watch part two today.
SpoilerShow
1. Kuhle Wampe oder: Wem gehört die Welt? (1932) 4/10
2. Koi mo wasurete (1937) 5/10
3. Zouzou (1934) 4/10
4. Olympia 1. Teil - Fest der Völker (1938) 7/10

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#117

Post by ororama » February 8th, 2019, 12:37 pm

1. Philips-Radio (1931) * 36 min.
Black and White (1932) * 2 min.
The Music Box (1933) * 20 min.
Book Bargain (1937) * 8 min.


*First time viewing.

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#118

Post by maxwelldeux » February 8th, 2019, 6:04 pm

A depressing decadeShow
1. Sweet Dream (1936)
2. The Lady Vanishes (1938)
3. You and Me (1938)
4. The Front Page (1931)
5. Malu Tianshi AKA Street Angel (1937)
"6-7. Shorts (120m):

Television (1939, 9m)
Boy Meets Dog (1938, 9m)
The River (1938, 31m)
Parabola (1937, 9m)
Misere au Borinage (1933, 36m)
The Mascot (1933, 26m)"
8. Child Bride (1938)
9. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)
10. The Most Dangerous Game (1932)
Surprisingly entertaining - great sets and a quick fun story. Weird old attitudes on hunting, but still a pretty entertaining watch.

11. The Thin Man (1934)
The comedy was way better than the mystery, but a very enjoyable film.

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#119

Post by flavo5000 » February 8th, 2019, 7:44 pm

5. The Good Earth (1937)
6. Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)
7. Imitation of Life (1934)
8. The Four Feathers (1939)
9. Anna Christie (1930)
10. Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939)
11. Love Affair (1939)
12. Block-Heads (1938)
13. Little Women (1933)
SpoilerShow
1. The Big House (1930)
2. Cleopatra (1934)
3. Stage Door (1937)
4. A Tale of Two Cities (1935)
5. The Good Earth (1937)
6. Ruggles of Red Gap (1935)
7. Imitation of Life (1934)
8. The Four Feathers (1939)
9. Anna Christie (1930)
10. Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939)
11. Love Affair (1939)
12. Block-Heads (1938)
13. Little Women (1933)

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#120

Post by 72allinncallme » February 8th, 2019, 10:43 pm

5. Crime and Punishment (1935) (l)
SpoilerShow
1. Gjest Baardsen (1939)
2. Chanson d'Armor (1934)
3. Hyppolit a lakáj (1931)
4. Borderline (1930)
5. Crime and Punishment (1935)

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