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Russia Challenge (Official, January 2019)

jeroeno
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Re: Russia Challenge (Official, January 2019)

#81

Post by jeroeno » January 11th, 2019, 5:36 am

20. Spores (2011)

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#82

Post by sol » January 11th, 2019, 7:23 am

funkybusiness wrote:
January 11th, 2019, 4:55 am
sorry to break it to ya, buddy, but Zolushka was shot in black and white, you watched a colorization. but if there's one thing the Russians have on Ted Turner, it's colorizations, they tend to nail it. I watched Tsirk (1936) in a colorization yesterday and it's a pretty decent job as well.
Huh. Colour me impressed (no pun intended). You might want to update the IMDb page since they have it down as a colour production too.

And thanks for the leader board update. Didn't realise that I was doing quite so well. Nor did I realise that you were still on zero yourself. Hope the shoulder gets better and hope you get a chance to see some of these Soviet gems yourself! Gamlet really floored me if you haven't seen it already.
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#83

Post by funkybusiness » January 11th, 2019, 7:51 am

I'm at about 12 so far but I haven't had the shoulder mobility to type up reviews yet. I might have to resort to a 1.2.3 list. and yeah Gamlet has been on my list for the last few eligible challenges.

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#84

Post by maxwelldeux » January 11th, 2019, 8:49 am

Time to learn about who's running my countryShow
1. Dom na Trubnoy (1928)
2. Ostrov AKA The Island (2006)
3. Chelovek-Amfibiya AKA Amphibian Man (1962)
4. Ivan the Terrible, Part I (1945)
5. Oktyabr (1928)

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#85

Post by sebby » January 11th, 2019, 11:08 am

01 russian ark 2002 7/10
02 earth 1930 4/10
SpoilerShow
01 russian ark 2002 7/10
02 earth 1930 4/10

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#86

Post by jdidaco » January 12th, 2019, 1:54 am

(Screenshots from 'Pie bagatas kundzes' & 'Belyy tigr')

Image

7. Klyuch (The Key, Lev Atamanov, 1961) 7/10
8. Luna (The Moon, Pavel Klushantsev, 1965) 8/10
9. Pie bagatas kundzes (Serving a Rich Mistress, Leonids Leimanis, 1969) 9.5/10 (Latvia)
10. Belyy tigr (White Tiger, Karen Shakhnazarov, 2012) 8/10

Image

SpoilerShow
1. Dom, kotoryy postroil Svift (The House That Swift Built, Mark Zakharov, 1982) 9.5/10
2. Na zlatom kryltse sideli (Sitting on the Golden Porch, Boris Rytsarev, 1987) 8/10
3. Proekt inzhenera Prayta (Engineer Prite's Project, Lev Kuleshov, 1918) 7/10 (30 min) + Skazka o rybake i rybke (Fishmonger and the Fish, Aleksandr Ptushko, 1937) 9/10 (30 min) (Total: 60 min)
4. Dvoryanskoe gnezdo (A Nest of Gentry, Andrey Konchalovskiy, 1969) 8.5/10
5. Bolshoe kosmicheskoe puteshestvie (The Big Space Travel, Valentin Selivanov, 1975) 6.5/10
6. Zerkalo dlya geroya (Mirror for a Hero, Vladimir Khotinenko, 1988) 9/10

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#87

Post by allisoncm » January 12th, 2019, 1:59 am

SpoilerShow
1. Brat/Brother (1997) 6/10
2. Vysota (1957) 4.5/10
3. Sto dney posle detstva/One Hundred Days After Childhood (1975) 6/10
4. Chastnaya zhizn/Private Life (1982) 5.5/10
5. Assa (1988) 6/10
6. Sudba cheloveka/Fate of a Man/Destiny of a Man (1959) 6/10
7. Beg/The Flight (1971) 5/10
8. Sorok pervyy (1956) 5.5/10

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#88

Post by sol » January 12th, 2019, 5:37 am

funkybusiness wrote:
January 11th, 2019, 7:51 am
I'm at about 12 so far but I haven't had the shoulder mobility to type up reviews yet. I might have to resort to a 1.2.3 list. and yeah Gamlet has been on my list for the last few eligible challenges.
:facepalm: Oh yeah - I just noticed that you mentioned that you saw Tsirk "yesterday". Need to stop skim reading. :pinch:
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#89

Post by sol » January 12th, 2019, 5:40 am

From Russia with LoveShow
1. Solaris (1972) REVISION
2. Solaris (1968)
3. Loveless (2017)
4. Kin-dza-dza ! (1986)
5. Test Pilot Pirx (1979)
6. A Dream Come True (1963)
7. Guest from the Future: Ep. 1 (1984)
8. Guest from the Future: Ep. 2 (1984)
9. Guest from the Future: Ep. 3 (1984)
10. Guest from the Future: Ep. 4 (1984)
11. Guest from the Future: Ep. 5 (1984)
12. Sportloto-82 (1982)
13. Night Watch (2004)
14. Cinderella (1947)
15. Elena (2011)
16. Gamlet (1964)

17. Zvenigora (1928)

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The ins and outs of the plot are a little hard to nut out here with limited exposition and title cards, but this remains a breathtaking silent film thanks to Dovzhenko's effective experimental visuals. Dissolve edits are used to excellent effect, especially as the face of a Devil character is plastered on top of those he has chased out of a forest. Rapid fire cuts are used very well too to tie reaction shots together a la Potemkin. Dovzhenko plays around thoughtfully with film speed too, opening the film with majestic slow motion shots.
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#90

Post by jeroeno » January 12th, 2019, 9:37 am

21. Svoy sredi chuzhikh, chuzhoy sredi svoikh (1974)
22. Priklyucheniya Sherloka Kholmsa i doktora Vatsona: Sokrovishcha Agry (1983) Ep 01
23. Priklyucheniya Sherloka Kholmsa i doktora Vatsona: Sokrovishcha Agry (1983) Ep 02

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#91

Post by hurluberlu » January 12th, 2019, 11:47 am

4. No Path Through Fire / V ogne broda net (Gleb Panfilov, 1968) 6

A naive nurse supporting Red Army soldiers during Russian Civil War is challenged to make any sense of her life through love, art and eventually political action. The film relies heavily on the lead actress Inna Churikova and her expressive figure, reminiscent of Maria Falconetti in the Passion of Joan of Arc. If the character study is fine, storytelling wanders a bit and seems to be framed in a political reading of the events which is hard to decipher without a history manual on Russian revisionism in the 60s.

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focus on Russian directors born in the 30sShow
(Tarkovsky, Klimov, Shepitko, Panfilov, German, Konchalovskiy,..).

1. Welcome, or No Trespassing / Dobro pozhalovat, ili Postoronnim vkhod vospreshchen (Elem Klimov, 1964) 8

Charming comedy about a summer camp for kids and the director's arbitrary rules to protect them from questionable dangers, which also serves as a metaphor of USSR and its political system. Camera placement and composition, especially filming crowds, are very inventive and perfectly capturing the contrast between forced discipline and freedom at reach. This is "only" Klimov final graduation work at Moscow's FIlm School but an impressive piece of work nonetheless. And funny.

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2. Heat / Znoy (Larisa Shepitko, 1963) 6+

A young graduate is sent to the Kirghiz countryside to help a local community in the fields. His idealism confronts with a rough and headstrong farmer who looks upon the new comer as a threat. Shepitko is taking a naturalistic approach, well in the Russian film tradition, keeping the treatment of all protagonists balanced and depicting the harsh reality of work outside. But somehow, as Shepitko doesn't take a clear stance on whether the graduate brings new ideas and methods for the best of the people (like some propaganda would suggest) or he is a only a subversive element which disturbs a natural order he doesn't fully understand (which is probably the right interpretation but sounds a little naive and conservative), I was not very much engaged into the "heat".


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3. The Story of Asya Klyachina, who loved but did not marry / Istoriya Asi Klyachinoy, kotoraya lyubila, da ne vyshla zamuzh (Andrei Konchalovsky, 1966) 7

It starts with a child sleeping peacefully in a middle of a wheat field. His parents look for him but are not overconcerned: what could happen to him anyway ? This sets the tone of the film about a village of farmers at rest with a prodigal land and where, despite the hard work and life conditions, everything is a pretext to songs, jokes and colorful anecdotes shared between neighbours. Even pregnant Asya, courted by all except the only man she cares about, is playful as ever. In beautiful black and white, Konchalovsky is using very fluid camera movements that drag you close to the action and make his care and tenderness for the characters all the more obvious.

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#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

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#92

Post by maxwelldeux » January 13th, 2019, 7:47 am

Time to learn about who's running my countryShow
1. Dom na Trubnoy (1928)
2. Ostrov AKA The Island (2006)
3. Chelovek-Amfibiya AKA Amphibian Man (1962)
4. Ivan the Terrible, Part I (1945)
5. Oktyabr (1928)
6. Zemlya AKA Earth (1930)

I just could not get into this one. I didn't care about anyone.

7. Ivan the Terrible, Part II (1958)

Not as good as the first. Plus, the intro of the color scenes was jarring as hell.

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#93

Post by hurluberlu » January 13th, 2019, 12:04 pm

5. The Eve of Ivan Kupalo / Vechir na Ivana Kupalalt (Yuri Ilyenko, 1968) 8-

A little break in Ukrainian, color territory of the same era: based on folktales by Nicolas Gogol, the film retraces the story of Piotr, compromising with devils to seduce a rich man's daughter. Told in a non-linear way where each sequence is carefuly crafted with an impressive wealth of details, we are immersed into a world of symbolism and vibrant mythology. The almost pictural composition of the shots is as impressive as the creative use of color filters that stress the intensity of some scenes. Soundtrack is unfortunately the weak spot with some rather disjointed choices but also bad sync which may be due to the quality of the copy I watched.

Image


focus on Russian directors born in the 30sShow
(Tarkovsky, Klimov, Shepitko, Panfilov, German, Konchalovskiy,..).

1. Welcome, or No Trespassing / Dobro pozhalovat, ili Postoronnim vkhod vospreshchen (Elem Klimov, 1964) 8

Charming comedy about a summer camp for kids and the director's arbitrary rules to protect them from questionable dangers, which also serves as a metaphor of USSR and its political system. Camera placement and composition, especially filming crowds, are very inventive and perfectly capturing the contrast between forced discipline and freedom at reach. This is "only" Klimov final graduation work at Moscow's FIlm School but an impressive piece of work nonetheless. And funny.

Image


2. Heat / Znoy (Larisa Shepitko, 1963) 6+

A young graduate is sent to the Kirghiz countryside to help a local community in the fields. His idealism confronts with a rough and headstrong farmer who looks upon the new comer as a threat. Shepitko is taking a naturalistic approach, well in the Russian film tradition, keeping the treatment of all protagonists balanced and depicting the harsh reality of work outside. But somehow, as Shepitko doesn't take a clear stance on whether the graduate brings new ideas and methods for the best of the people (like some propaganda would suggest) or he is a only a subversive element which disturbs a natural order he doesn't fully understand (which is probably the right interpretation but sounds a little naive and conservative), I was not very much engaged into the "heat".


Image


3. The Story of Asya Klyachina, who loved but did not marry / Istoriya Asi Klyachinoy, kotoraya lyubila, da ne vyshla zamuzh (Andrei Konchalovsky, 1966) 7

It starts with a child sleeping peacefully in a middle of a wheat field. His parents look for him but are not overconcerned: what could happen to him anyway ? This sets the tone of the film about a village of farmers at rest with a prodigal land and where, despite the hard work and life conditions, everything is a pretext to songs, jokes and colorful anecdotes shared between neighbours. Even pregnant Asya, courted by all except the only man she cares about, is playful as ever. In beautiful black and white, Konchalovsky is using very fluid camera movements that drag you close to the action and make his care and tenderness for the characters all the more obvious.

Image


4. No Path Through Fire / V ogne broda net (Gleb Panfilov, 1968) 6

A naive nurse supporting Red Army soldiers during Russian Civil War is challenged to make any sense of her life through love, art and eventually political action. The film relies heavily on the lead actress Inna Churikova and her expressive figure, reminiscent of Maria Falconetti in the Passion of Joan of Arc. If the character study is fine, storytelling wanders a bit and seems to be framed in a political reading of the events which is hard to decipher without a history manual on Russian revisionism in the 60s.

Image

#JeSuisCharlie Liberté, Liberté chérie !

Image
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#94

Post by clemmetarey » January 13th, 2019, 12:40 pm

7. Vozvrashchenie (2003) 8/10

8. Oktyabr (1928) 5/10
Weakest Eisenstein I've seen, I think all russian films from this period look the same for me storywise, so I found this film boring.

9. Poselenie (2002) 6/10

SpoilerShow
1. Kavkazskaya plennitsa, ili Novye priklyucheniya Shurika (1967) 6/10
2. Aelita (1924) 4/10
3. Pikovaya dama (1916) 4/10
4. Krug vtoroy (1990) 7/10
5. Igla (1988) 5/10
6. Solntse (2005) 6/10
7. Vozvrashchenie (2003) 8/10
8. Oktyabr (1928) 5/10
9. Poselenie (2002) 6/10

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#95

Post by St. Gloede » January 13th, 2019, 1:01 pm

4. Agoniya / Agony / Rasputin (1981, Elem Klimov)
Klimov truly delved into debauchery in his examination of Rasputin. My main issue would be that he just goes to far in trying to make Rasputin disgusting, disturbing and tragic. While well made, these elements seem more fit for a surreal nightmare than a serious biopic - and as such it would have worked - but the rest of the film is overly concerned with historical context. One interesting point is that the tzar is played in a very humane way, and it is interesting wondering how much the authorities were involved. While the style is very mixed, and I would deem it messy, it encompasses many of Klimov's strengths, and it is still an epic psychological drama. 6.5/10

5. Metel / The Blizzard (1965, Vladimir Basov)
The opening (and ending) are simply stunningly beautiful - strong colour photography and rhythm of images set to spectacular music. The issue here is the seemingly thin and bland story execution of a story which, while it had redeeming elements along the way, ends up being contrived and even insulting. It is worth noting that it is adapted from a famous short story, which of course has the same ending, but:
SpoilerShow
Story: two lovers run away in a blizzard to get married, seemingly a wedding does not take place. the man then volunteers for war and dies - she suffers the loss. At the end, we find out that a random trickster stopping by was mistaken as the lover (as she was sick and delirious) and went through with the marriage for the laughs before running away - he has now returned and the "couple" reconciles - and that this man has returned and the married
5/10


6. Pisma myortvogo cheloveka / Dead Man's Letters (1986, Konstantin Lopushanskiy)
This is a film I have had high on my watchlist for well over a decade, and somehow never got around to. The visual styl, or shall we say heavy tints, gives it a powerful atmosphere, but at the same time it is overly clear it is being used to cover technical shortcomings. The dystopian nightmare starts strong, focusing on the depraved and low lives of the post-apocalypse survivors. It does well in embracing the ugly and off, and paints a very effective world with fairly easy steps. It also does well with limited sets. While slightly uneven throughout it fell short of greatness in the end as we are left with a slow-burn out, lacking the previous intensity, and sadly it never quite won me over on its melancholy. 7.5/10


7. Strogiy yunosha / A Severe Young Man (1935, Abram Room)
This incredibly absurd and extravagant pro-inequality propaganda film. It is centered around an important doctor living in a massive mansion, frequently gorgeously shot. This luxury life is shared with his much younger wife, an a seemingly poor man called a freeloader. Tensions starts arising when the wife starts a flirtatious affair with the titular character, this "severe", ideological man in a communist youth organization. What follows is in a way a strange mutual understanding where the young communists are shown as fully promoting the luxurious life of those of merit, and calling out anyone who'd have an issue with this - while at the same time forming a free love narrative where the doctor in a way accepts the affair - complete with romantic quotes by Marx. Of course, Marxist communism is not a pro-equality ideology, that has always been a strange strawman completely ignorant of the actual stances and views of Marx and Engels - but this film takes it to such an extreme it becomes comical - and can be seen as a way to try to justify the lives of those in power. At the same time it is so absurd as the doctor is not necessarily positively portrayed , and this with the extreme level of visual romanticism (which is done so well). A beautiful mess? Absolutely! (but even the visuals are not always on par). It is also worth noting that is is a hybrid between a silent and sound - though this hurts it less than Room's previous effort The Ghost That Never Was (which was destroyed by the sound), here most of the problems are within the presentation itself, which simply feels heavy handed and absurd. 5/10.

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#96

Post by nimimerkillinen » January 13th, 2019, 1:21 pm

1. Tikhie stranitsy - ~liked it
2. Aerograd - liked it
3. Zacharovannaya Desna - favourite

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#97

Post by Knaldskalle » January 13th, 2019, 6:32 pm

15.-26. Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973). TV Miniseries, 12 episodes of 1+ hour each. This was nothing short of AMAZING! The idea is brilliant and the execution is top-notch! I can't say enough good things about this show! It's on Youtube, it's must-watch!

SpoilerShow
1. Operation 'Y' and Other Shurik's Adventures (Gaidai, 1965)
2. Kin-Dza-Dza! (Daneliya, 1986)
3. Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (Gaidai, 1967)
4. Aerograd (Dovhzenko, 1935)
5.-9. The Meeting Place Cannot Be Changed (1979). TV Miniseries.
10.-14. Guest from the Future (1985). TV Miniseries.
15.-26. Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973). TV Miniseries.
Personal film goals for 2019.
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#98

Post by flavo5000 » January 14th, 2019, 3:58 am

2. Zvenigora (1928)
3. Aerograd (1935)
SpoilerShow
1. Zacharovannaya Desna (1964)
2. Zvenigora (1928)
3. Aerograd (1935)

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#99

Post by weirdboy » January 14th, 2019, 5:53 am

SpoilerShow
1. Aerograd AKA Frontier (1935) - Aleksandr Dovzhenko
2-13. Semnadtsat mgnoveniy vesny AKA Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973) - Tatyana Lioznova
14. Aelita: Queen of Mars - 1924 - Yakov Protazanov
15-16. A few shorts [149 minutes]
a. Shakhmatnaya goryachka (Chess Fever) - 1925 - Vsevolod Pudovkin,Nikolai Shpikovsky [short - 28 mini]
b. Ditya bolshogo goroda AKA Child of the Big City (1914) - Yevgeny Bauer [short - 37 min]
c. Kivski Freski (1966) - Sergei Parajanov [short - 15 min]
d. Slava - nam, smert' - vragam (Glory to Us, Death to the Enemy!) - 1914 - Yevgeny Bauer [short - 32 min]
e. Grozy AKA Daydreams (1915) - Yevgeny Bauer [short - 37 min]
17. Vostochnaya elegiya AKA Eastern Elegy/Oriental Elegy (1996) - Aleksandr Sokurov
18. Nochnoy dozor AKA Night Watch (2004) - Timur Bekmambetov

What a strange take on vampire genre movie. Very frenetic and bombastic. Like a Russian take on Blade, I suppose, with more incompetence for the lulz.

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#100

Post by jeroeno » January 14th, 2019, 6:09 am

24. Michurin (1949)
25. Bumbarash (1972)
26. Ilya Muromets (1956)
27. Lilovyy shar (1987)
28. Serebryanye golovy (1999)

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#101

Post by St. Gloede » January 14th, 2019, 8:22 am

8. Mne dvadtsat let / I am Twenty (1965, Marlen Khutsiev)
In many ways I Am Twenty feels like a new wave film. It is a slow, meandering journey into the youthful angst of the post-WW2 generation, complete with free camera movements and a self-conscious style of film-making that was sweeping through the world at just this moment in time. It uses the streets of Moscow incredibly well, especially at night, and draws you in with long existential conversations filled with lost sadness.

What sets I Am Twenty apart should be slightly more obvious with it's original title, Ilyich's Gate (after Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, i.e. Lenin). Apparently some of the political commentary/reflection was originally cut down, I saw the 187 minute directors cut (which to be fair I see has some negative comments attached to it, and perhaps it would have run better in the shorter version). It is a deeply political film, specifically looking at how the youth lives and how they should look at the struggle that took place before them and how they fit in history. In the second part it gets especially heavy handed, with long speeches and sentimentality that feels a little forced and on the nose - complete of course with soldiers marching to Lenin's Tomb. It lost me a little during the last hour or so, but there are many great to spectacular moments here, and I would definitely recommend it. 7.5/10.

9. Dvoryanskoe gnezdo / Nest of Gentry (1969, Andrey Konchalovskiy)
Andrey Konchalovskiy's is another director who embraced many new wave characteristics.,while maintaining simply gorgeous cinematography. Nest of Genry is elevated by fantastic cutting, and interesting angle choices, such as following peoples hands, and here, as a contrast to his far more traditional camera work in Asya's Happiness, the camera has a tendency to move freely, or simply pan quickly to the side - creating a free and creative narrative and underpinning the mental state of our protagonist.

The story itself is fairly simple, and filled with sorrow. It is a remarkably gentle exploration of the upper classes as these are our leads and our points of sympathy - but at the same time the critique is there and beautifully subtle, covering the dreamlike, but wasteful and tragic state of their lives. My only critique of this film is that it may not pack the greatest punch/cinematic purpose, and perhaps it could have utilized space a little more in the shots (just look at the way Tarkovsky shoots dust, it felt lacking in the scenes where we are taken through the abandoned mansion) which are critiques I only come with as it otherwise might have been a new top favorite. But still, the character journey is a wonderful tale and ends on such a desperate and great note. 8.5/10.

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#102

Post by sol » January 14th, 2019, 10:25 am

From Russia with LoveShow
1. Solaris (1972) REVISION
2. Solaris (1968)
3. Loveless (2017)
4. Kin-dza-dza ! (1986)
5. Test Pilot Pirx (1979)
6. A Dream Come True (1963)
7. Guest from the Future: Ep. 1 (1984)
8. Guest from the Future: Ep. 2 (1984)
9. Guest from the Future: Ep. 3 (1984)
10. Guest from the Future: Ep. 4 (1984)
11. Guest from the Future: Ep. 5 (1984)
12. Sportloto-82 (1982)
13. Night Watch (2004)
14. Cinderella (1947)
15. Elena (2011)
16. Gamlet (1964)
17. Zvenigora (1928)

18. The Circus (1936)

Image

Or Tsirk by its Russian title. The melodrama involving the main characters is dull and there is some literal patriotic flag-waving, but this is an absolutely spectacular film to look at. The editing is top notch with many creative scene changes (one shot literally melts into the next) and lots of effective dissolves. The circus acts themselves are impressively choreographed and there are several memorable images too, such as wings 'lighting up' behind an actor. The lions running towards the camera looks quite daring a feat too.
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#103

Post by funkybusiness » January 14th, 2019, 12:24 pm

yeah, Tsirk was very well crafted, I enjoyed it. better than Alexandrov's previous film, which, I dunno if you caught it, but the very opening of the film, before the credits even begin, there's a poster for said film, Jolly Fellows, on display, presumably outside, and a canvasser dude slaps on some glue and adheres the poster for Tsirk on top of the previous film's poster. I thought that pretty nifty.

Also, Gloede, ya gotta number that shit, buddy.

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#104

Post by sol » January 14th, 2019, 12:45 pm

funkybusiness wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 12:24 pm
yeah, Tsirk was very well crafted, I enjoyed it. better than Alexandrov's previous film, which, I dunno if you caught it, but the very opening of the film, before the credits even begin, there's a poster for said film, Jolly Fellows, on display, presumably outside, and a canvasser dude slaps on some glue and adheres the poster for Tsirk on top of the previous film's poster. I thought that pretty nifty.
Ah, that explains it. I saw the subtitles announce "Jolly Fellows" at the start of the film, but had no idea what it was about. Tsirk is the first Alexandrov comedy I've seen, though I have a couple more lined up for later this month: Vogla and Moscow Laughs.
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#105

Post by St. Gloede » January 14th, 2019, 12:56 pm

Fixed, and as I have already caught 9 (+ 4 relatively short silents I'll write up soon) I will double my original aim from 10 films to 20.

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#106

Post by Mate_cosido » January 14th, 2019, 3:42 pm

1. Morozko - Jack Frost (1965, Aleksandr Rou)

2. Alyonka (1961, Boris Barnet)

3. Aleksandr Nevskiy (1938, Sergei M. Eisenstein, Dmitriy Vasilev)

4. Zhenshchina - Woman's World (1932, Efim Dzigan, B. Shreyber)

5. Istoriya Asi Klyachinoy, kotoraya lyubila, da ne vyshla zamuzh - The Story of Asya Klyachina (1966, Andrey Konchalovskiy)

6. Pyat nevest - Five Brides (1930, Aleksandr Solovyov)

7. Moskva slezam ne verit - Moscow Does Not Believe in Tears (1980, Vladimir Menshov)

8. Telokhranitel - The Bodyguard (1979, Ali Khamraev)

9. Protsess o tryokh millionakh - Three Thieves (1926, Yakov Protazanov)

I thought i had already posted the first week, but i guess no

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#107

Post by cinephage » January 14th, 2019, 6:02 pm

02. Potomok Chingis-Khana / Storm over Asia, by Vsevolod Pudovkin (1928) 8/10

Almost documentary-like at times, yet with a strong story and a very inventive approach to editing...
SpoilerShow
01. Vesyolye rebyata / Moscow laughs, by Grigori Aleksandrov (1934) 6/10

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#108

Post by weirdboy » January 15th, 2019, 4:15 am

SpoilerShow
1. Aerograd AKA Frontier (1935) - Aleksandr Dovzhenko
2-13. Semnadtsat mgnoveniy vesny AKA Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973) - Tatyana Lioznova
14. Aelita: Queen of Mars - 1924 - Yakov Protazanov
15-16. A few shorts [149 minutes]
a. Shakhmatnaya goryachka (Chess Fever) - 1925 - Vsevolod Pudovkin,Nikolai Shpikovsky [short - 28 mini]
b. Ditya bolshogo goroda AKA Child of the Big City (1914) - Yevgeny Bauer [short - 37 min]
c. Kivski Freski (1966) - Sergei Parajanov [short - 15 min]
d. Slava - nam, smert' - vragam (Glory to Us, Death to the Enemy!) - 1914 - Yevgeny Bauer [short - 32 min]
e. Grozy AKA Daydreams (1915) - Yevgeny Bauer [short - 37 min]
17. Vostochnaya elegiya AKA Eastern Elegy/Oriental Elegy (1996) - Aleksandr Sokurov
18. Nochnoy dozor AKA Night Watch (2004) - Timur Bekmambetov
19. Faust (2011) - Aleksandr Sokurov
20. Elegiya dorogi AKA Elegy of a Voyage (2001) - Aleksandr Sokurov

Faust was a bit of a mess. I realize that Sokurov probably was not intending to tell the same story, but the story he did tell felt clumsy and confused to me. The photography was as beautiful as always with his films, but I didn't like this adaptation of Goethe. Murnau's is still my favorite.

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#109

Post by funkybusiness » January 15th, 2019, 4:31 am

sol wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 12:45 pm
funkybusiness wrote:
January 14th, 2019, 12:24 pm
yeah, Tsirk was very well crafted, I enjoyed it. better than Alexandrov's previous film, which, I dunno if you caught it, but the very opening of the film, before the credits even begin, there's a poster for said film, Jolly Fellows, on display, presumably outside, and a canvasser dude slaps on some glue and adheres the poster for Tsirk on top of the previous film's poster. I thought that pretty nifty.
Ah, that explains it. I saw the subtitles announce "Jolly Fellows" at the start of the film, but had no idea what it was about. Tsirk is the first Alexandrov comedy I've seen, though I have a couple more lined up for later this month: Vogla and Moscow Laughs.
yup. and Jolly Fellows and Moscow Laughs are the same film. I've seen Kompozitor Glinka mentioned as his best film but it unfortunately is without english subtitles for the time being.

oh and Volga Volga was Stalin's favorite film!

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#110

Post by jdidaco » January 16th, 2019, 3:15 am

(Screenshots from 'Ar daidardo' & 'Tam, na nevedomykh dorozhkakh...')

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11. Ne goryuy!/Ar daidardo (Don't Grieve, Georgiy Daneliya, 1969) 9.5/10 (Georgia)
12. Tam, na nevedomykh dorozhkakh... (Along Unknown Paths, Mikhail Yuzovsky, 1983) 7.5/10
13. Zhena kerosinshchika (Kerosene Salesman's Wife, Aleksandr Kaydanovskiy, 1989) 10/10
14. Podzemelye vedm (The Witches Cave, Yuriy Moroz, 1990) 7/10

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SpoilerShow
1. Dom, kotoryy postroil Svift (The House That Swift Built, Mark Zakharov, 1982) 9.5/10
2. Na zlatom kryltse sideli (Sitting on the Golden Porch, Boris Rytsarev, 1987) 8/10
3. Proekt inzhenera Prayta (Engineer Prite's Project, Lev Kuleshov, 1918) 7/10 (30 min) + Skazka o rybake i rybke (Fishmonger and the Fish, Aleksandr Ptushko, 1937) 9/10 (30 min) (Total: 60 min)
4. Dvoryanskoe gnezdo (A Nest of Gentry, Andrey Konchalovskiy, 1969) 8.5/10
5. Bolshoe kosmicheskoe puteshestvie (The Big Space Travel, Valentin Selivanov, 1975) 6.5/10
6. Zerkalo dlya geroya (Mirror for a Hero, Vladimir Khotinenko, 1988) 9/10
7. Klyuch (The Key, Lev Atamanov, 1961) 7/10
8. Luna (The Moon, Pavel Klushantsev, 1965) 8/10
9. Pie bagatas kundzes (Serving a Rich Mistress, Leonids Leimanis, 1969) 9.5/10 (Latvia)
10. Belyy tigr (White Tiger, Karen Shakhnazarov, 2012) 8/10

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#111

Post by sol » January 16th, 2019, 3:31 am

funkybusiness wrote:
January 15th, 2019, 4:31 am
yup. and Jolly Fellows and Moscow Laughs are the same film. I've seen Kompozitor Glinka mentioned as his best film but it unfortunately is without english subtitles for the time being.

oh and Volga Volga was Stalin's favorite film!
Interesting (on both points). Now I'm intrigued to see if Volga is as flag-waving as Tsirk.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#112

Post by sol » January 16th, 2019, 3:36 am

From Russia with LoveShow
1. Solaris (1972) REVISION
2. Solaris (1968)
3. Loveless (2017)
4. Kin-dza-dza ! (1986)
5. Test Pilot Pirx (1979)
6. A Dream Come True (1963)
7. Guest from the Future: Ep. 1 (1984)
8. Guest from the Future: Ep. 2 (1984)
9. Guest from the Future: Ep. 3 (1984)
10. Guest from the Future: Ep. 4 (1984)
11. Guest from the Future: Ep. 5 (1984)
12. Sportloto-82 (1982)
13. Night Watch (2004)
14. Cinderella (1947)
15. Elena (2011)
16. Gamlet (1964)
17. Zvenigora (1928)
18. The Circus (1936)

19. Repentance (1984)

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This Soviet comedy-drama gets off to a quirky start as the corpse of a mayor keeps reappearing in his son's garden despite being repeatedly reburied. Is something supernatural afoot? Alas, not. The woman responsible is caught and put on trial where she spends one and an a half hours recounting her family's experience with the dictatorial mayor. Things quickly turn repetitive as we are shown again and again how cruel he was, and with a ridiculous Hitler moustache, the film is not at all subtle. Dictators are bad, yeah, we get that.
Former IMDb message boards user /// iCM | IMDb | My Top 500+ Favourite Films /// Long live the new flesh!
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#113

Post by Knaldskalle » January 16th, 2019, 5:20 am

27. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Acquaintance (1979). TV Miniseries, 1+ hour episode.
28. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Bloody Inscription (1979). TV Miniseries, 1+ hour episode.
29. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: King of Blackmailers (1980). TV Miniseries, 1+ hour episode.
30. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: Mortal Fight (1980). TV Miniseries, 1+ hour episode.
31. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Hunt for the Tiger (1980). TV Miniseries, 1+ hour episode.

I had a hard time wrapping my head around how the Soviet Union could produce a Sherlock Holmes version that was both so faithful to the stories and so well done. They make me want to revisit the Jeremy Brett version just to verify that it's still the best...

SpoilerShow
1. Operation 'Y' and Other Shurik's Adventures (Gaidai, 1965)
2. Kin-Dza-Dza! (Daneliya, 1986)
3. Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (Gaidai, 1967)
4. Aerograd (Dovhzenko, 1935)
5.-9. The Meeting Place Cannot Be Changed (1979). TV Miniseries.
10.-14. Guest from the Future (1985). TV Miniseries.
15.-26. Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973). TV Miniseries.
27. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Acquaintance (1979). TV Miniseries.
28. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Bloody Inscription (1979). TV Miniseries.
29. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: King of Blackmailers (1980). TV Miniseries.
30. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: Mortal Fight (1980). TV Miniseries.
31. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Hunt for the Tiger (1980). TV Miniseries.
Personal film goals for 2019.
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#114

Post by funkybusiness » January 16th, 2019, 5:30 am

you now have the theme tune stuck in your head for the rest of your life
BUM...BA BUM..BUM..BABABABABUM....BUM...BUM...BUMDADABUMBABUMBUM BUM BUM...do..da do do do dou.

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#115

Post by funkybusiness » January 16th, 2019, 5:31 am

and you haven't even watched the best parts yet. Baskerville is great, Treasures is very good and I adored the 20th Century Approaches.

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#116

Post by jeroeno » January 16th, 2019, 6:44 am

29. Test pilota Pirxa (1978)
30. Zazda strasti (1991)
31. Kosmicheskiy reys: Fantasticheskaya novella (1935)
32. Alye parusa (1961)
33. Doroga k zvezdam (1958)
34. Skazka o tsare Saltane (1967)

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#117

Post by clemmetarey » January 16th, 2019, 3:34 pm

10. Aleksandra (2007) 6/10

SpoilerShow
1. Kavkazskaya plennitsa, ili Novye priklyucheniya Shurika (1967) 6/10
2. Aelita (1924) 4/10
3. Pikovaya dama (1916) 4/10
4. Krug vtoroy (1990) 7/10
5. Igla (1988) 5/10
6. Solntse (2005) 6/10
7. Vozvrashchenie (2003) 8/10
8. Oktyabr (1928) 5/10
9. Poselenie (2002) 6/10
10. Aleksandra (2007) 6/10

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#118

Post by St. Gloede » January 16th, 2019, 3:40 pm

Caught 4 silents, all about 1 hour long:

10. Gospoda Skotininy / The Gentlefolks of Skotinin (1926, Grigori Roshal)
I really liked the broad scope, tieing together two romances and multiple perspectives as the brutal and spoiled landowners clash with their servants/serfs. Parts relied a bit too much on caricatures, but that was expeected, and the drama was well done. It was especially impressive that it played with elements of comedy/satire and drama/tragedy, with a decent bit of suspense added in as well. 6.5/10

11. Yego prevoskhoditelstvo / Seeds of Freedom (1928, Grigori Roshal)
Sadly missing the first reel, but still a relatively good semi-fictional look at a famous assassination attempt. Fairly straight forward, but often refreshingly shot. 6/10

12. Yeyo put AKA Her Way (1929, Dmitri Poznansky & Aleksandr Shtrizhak)
A more personal drama that pits a woman versus the elements once her husband goes off to fight in WW1. Tieing in a new romance, and of course a communist subplot, the end becomes a little too obvious (and the title starts to make less sense until the very end - as the male takes the forefront). 7/10

13. Segodnya / Today (1929, Esfir Shub)
Not quite Dziga Vertov, but this is a great Soviet Montage film, taking us around the world, complete with patriotic/ideological zeal that somehow works so well in these films - propaganda done wonderfully right. 8/10

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#119

Post by Knaldskalle » January 16th, 2019, 5:45 pm

funkybusiness wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 5:30 am
you now have the theme tune stuck in your head for the rest of your life
BUM...BA BUM..BUM..BABABABABUM....BUM...BUM...BUMDADABUMBABUMBUM BUM BUM...do..da do do do dou.
The score is good, but it's used in a way that makes it very intrusive, there's no subtlety. One of the weaknesses of the series.
funkybusiness wrote:
January 16th, 2019, 5:31 am
and you haven't even watched the best parts yet. Baskerville is great, Treasures is very good and I adored the 20th Century Approaches.
I just finished it, 'Genry' Baskerville was amazing, he really lifted it to new heights!
Personal film goals for 2019.
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#120

Post by Knaldskalle » January 16th, 2019, 5:56 pm

32-33. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1981). TV Miniseries, 2 episodes of 1+ hour each. I didn't think it could get much better, but it did. "Genry" Baskerville, an uncouth Canuck, adds some welcome comic relief.

SpoilerShow
1. Operation 'Y' and Other Shurik's Adventures (Gaidai, 1965)
2. Kin-Dza-Dza! (Daneliya, 1986)
3. Kidnapping, Caucasian Style (Gaidai, 1967)
4. Aerograd (Dovhzenko, 1935)
5.-9. The Meeting Place Cannot Be Changed (1979). TV Miniseries.
10.-14. Guest from the Future (1985). TV Miniseries.
15.-26. Seventeen Moments of Spring (1973). TV Miniseries.
27. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Acquaintance (1979). TV Miniseries.
28. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Bloody Inscription (1979). TV Miniseries.
29. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: King of Blackmailers (1980). TV Miniseries.
30. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: Mortal Fight (1980). TV Miniseries.
31. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Hunt for the Tiger (1980). TV Miniseries.
32-33. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1981). TV Miniseries.
Personal film goals for 2019.
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