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1>500<400 Challenge - unofficial, ongoing

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Mario Gaborović
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Re: 1>500<400 Challenge - unofficial, ongoing

#41

Post by Mario Gaborović » November 6th, 2018, 8:27 pm

7. NBC Experiment in Television: The Cube (Jim Henson, 1969) - Daviddoes - 5/10
8. This World, Then the Fireworks (Michael Oblowitz, 1997) - Carmel1379 - 3/10

Not for me.
SpoilerShow
1. Tokyo.sora (Hiroshi Ishikawa, 2002) - Onderhond - 6.5/10
I enjoyed the voyeuristic approach in examining loneliness and, I'd say, cowardice. It was demanding solution to follow six different characters at once, out of which most of them are empty shells (though likable ones). I couldn't say there were pacing problems since 2hr07 went quite faster than what would you expect initially. Too empty for my taste. Or maybe there is something deeper here?
2. Ladybug, Ladybug (Frank Perry, 1963) - sol - 6.5/10
Children acting might be the greatest quality of this film. The subsequent wisdom makes me wonder whether the Cold War was actually only a hoax to keep people in constant fear of some untangible threat that was never to materialize, and thus manipulate them which right-wing parties (which dominate the present day) do to control their electoral basis - the continuous presence of foreign enemy makes you overlook real enemies which are your own fellow nationals. Not much of a story here but good ending.
3. Baby Bump (Kuba Czekaj, 2015) - clemmetarey - 2/10
Hate arised very early on and didn't unclench until the credits. Sorry clemmetarey. :(
4. J'attendrai (Léonide Moguy, 1939) - XxXApathy420XxX - 7/10
Sfumato war melodrama with some occasional slanted framing that didn't really click with me on emotional level. The whole film reminds me of a gas chamber that humanity was put into.
5. Professor Mamlock (Konrad Wolf, 1961) - Nathan Treadway - 5.5/10
Lifeless characters and run-of-the-mill script spoil the otherwise great cinematography and few nice directorial moves. The whole plot is kinda predictable plus my subjective indifference towards war genre made this another drag from Wolf. It's likely I won't become interested too much in WW2 in as many as six incarnations. But Joachim would love this.
6. Models (Ulrich Seidl, 1999) - nimimerkillinen - 7/10
Nothing big happens so you might get impression that the plot itself doesn't offer enough for the second viewing. However time went fast as the acting here is... as if there's no acting. I've seen/heard glimpses of this so many times in the nightclub toilets and backrooms. Good pacing, likable characters, albeit somewhat shallow.
Last edited by Mario Gaborović on November 10th, 2018, 3:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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#42

Post by Mochard » November 7th, 2018, 3:53 am

1. El Incidente (2014) - (filmbantha)

I chose El Incidente (recommended by filmbantha) as my first film to watch as I love sci-fi films, especially any that involve time manipulation. I wasn't disappointed. I enjoyed the way the film developed and I loved how in all the what is going on? the film made sense, sort of and some questions got answered, maybe! There were a couple of why's I had, not necessarily plot holes, in fact definitely not plot holes but more if that happened then why didn't that happen? I don't like writing about films as I don't want to spoil anything. It's why I'm going to stop there! If I had an ongoing list then I would be adding it to my favorites with less than 400 checks list. I have a feeling it wont be everyone's cup of tea but it was definitely mine. 7.5/10

A new favorite = 1 Not my cup of tea = 0Show
Green - A new favorite. Red - not my cup of tea.

1. El Incidente (2014) - 7.5/10

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#43

Post by Jimi Antiloop » November 7th, 2018, 12:48 pm

1. Professor Mamlock (Konrad Wolf, 1961)

8,5/10 - I definitely support this one.

Strong story arround racism and antisemitims in the year 1933 in germany, when the nazis took over the goverment, spreading fake news and doing a false flag attack. Well played, nice cinematopgraphy and a strong humanistic attitude. Also the fight of the "reds" (lefties) during this time is questioned.
Last edited by Jimi Antiloop on November 9th, 2018, 12:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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#44

Post by clemmetarey » November 7th, 2018, 1:05 pm

2. Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) 6/10
A very promising first film, although a bit too slow for my taste. The feeling of drifting apart from the other was very well steer. I see the director has a new film coming out, I added it to my watchlist.

No problem Mario, I should be the one sorry I guess :D. Thank you and PdA for checking it out, I'll get to your nominations in a few days.
SpoilerShow
1. BabaKiueria (1986) 6/10
2. Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) 6/10

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#45

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » November 7th, 2018, 9:19 pm

(Have rewatched The Cube last year and This World, then the Fireworks earlier this year, the former being a minor fave, and the latter a major one, after the latest viewing more than ever. 🎆)

5. De zee die denkt / The Sea That Thinks (2000)

Restless change of point of view for ego eradication and peace of mind.

Image

>If you aim at nothing, you will hit it.<
8-

6. Je t'attendrai / The Deserter / Three Hours (1939)

Being in perfect accordance with the overidealized French ideas about love this melodrama with suspense dressing was not an unclever potential mobilization tool for the then-upcoming war, using detachment (WWI), distraction (all you need is love), and in place of an un-French overt happy ending a strongly implied one, having the film take place a month before the end of the war, which the characters who are called back to the front can't know but we do. "Be in love and loved and you have already won, so everything will be fine. Now here's your gun, solider."

Image
5


the past is not pastShow
(nominated films seen before: The Music of Chance, Models, Feng yue / Temptress Moon, The Cube, This World, then the Fireworks)

1. Asha Jaoar Majhe / Labour of Love
Driven by two character's spiritual living in these our alienated times 'Labour of Love' bathes in the beauty of mundane everyday life not through romanticizing it but by evoking contemplation on its journey through one (working) day. Like its title that is ridiculously apt but comes with more than its conventional meaning which won't be apparent until the end of the film, it also takes the platitude "absence makes the heart grow fonder" and not only makes it strongly felt but also gives it a novel taste in what is overall pretty far from a romance movie, and in the end implying that a few precious, intense minutes each day are a fair trade-off for accepting an alienating modern life. And at least the way it is presented in the film this is the comparably simple version of modern urban life, not yet dominated by high tech à la TVs, computers, IPhones,... with a particular Indian flavor that in many ways I haven't tasted yet before.

Well, I'm not convinced about the "fair trade-off" part of its "message" (to derogatorily call it that for the moment), instead I'll write about what was a wonderful point in 'Labour of Love' for me where the mundanity of everyday chores is made feel irrelevant in the face of grander things, while the film had been almost nothing but about showing the mundanity of everyday chores in wondrous ways, making that flared up thought about grander things feel narrow, for the grand thing is neither one of them but rather the constant interplay between the constantly changing notions of what's grand and important in life and what isn't with the perpetual change of everything, and in this sense I'm down with its eventual endorsement of modern alienated life, it doesn't succumb to it, but it owns it, for contentment depends not on the view before you but on the outlook within you.
7+

2. BabaKiueria
Provoked its good share of thoughts but like 72allinncallme said, it's more for the evocative basic idea than for its inconsequential realization that felt confused and its (creds to beavis) lack of inner logic, and in my feeling this long comedy skit segment produced by Australia's national broadcaster ended up being more of a superficial and scattershot media parody about this type of minorities-related TV reportage by an overeager but closet cynic journalist (likely fresh out of media studies) than a meaningful or let alone subversive satire about the bigger picture, but like our Australian iCM residents implied, there may be more than meets the eye. But I'm a foreigner, so...
5

3. Über die Jahre / Over the Years (2015)

"Do you think that the work somebody does shapes them as a person", Geyrhalter asks one worker in the very first year of the film. Don't expect a profound reply from the worker. Spoiler - It's "Mh, is' scho' meglich." - If you don't know German or are unable to decipher the Waldviertler dialect you'll have to watch the film yourself and rely on the English subtitles.

Any possible romanticizing of "simple folk" and quasi-primitivism relative to my own living standards was perhaps nullified by my familiarity with the represented culture, this so-called community being a rural area basically right next to my urban one, knowing and having known many people like it. More or less the only thing I'm not confronted with on an average day out is this particular regional Austrian dialect, making this the perhaps only relatively novel element in this showcase of dull people living dull lives...or at least those were some of my first thoughts while I still was in the process of watching it.

Not only does each individual shot basically seem like a separate episode with the whole film almost magically still feeling effortlessly cohesive, progressing in a seemingly natural way while covering ten years, but as the years go by three-quarters of an hour by three-quarters of an hour-or-so of following the same couple of people in the film, more and more subversive elements keep creeping in in steady quietness. Nikolaus Geyrhalter once again to me proved to be a filmmaker of integrity, making a long-term documentary that doesn't elicit the dire question of level of involvement of the filmmaker during the shooting process or a possible misrepresentation of people through editing to create drama or push the filmmaker's own agenda, not because those things aren't present here, but because while interested in the people and respectful toward them it doesn't feign to get intimate with the human subjects or has an illusion of exposing some hidden things in their character that even they themselves supposedly would be surprised to learn about themselves just through the act of sticking a camera into people's faces and recording a couple of hours of their lives. Inevitably it is an "UP" series-like portrayal of people to some degree, but overall the doc is less about the individual people and more about the issues that crop up on the periphery, like the bigger forces that guide these people's lives and thinking.

Just take for example the fact that the loss of a long-time-employment at one antiquated company results for all the people in this film in restless job-hopping at best, and in perpetual unemployment at worst. Or that they keep working for the mere sake of working, paid or not. Or that some of the people's statements about their current jobs stands in complete contradiction to what they said about their previous jobs, always in favor of their current jobs. "Arbeit macht frei" is not a slogan that is being used anymore in these parts for obvious reasons, but this mindset has never left the public conscious' mind, never mind who or what you work for.

The Verdinglichung is strong with this one.
7

4. Baby Bump (2015)

Adequately perverse, twisted and vulgar with a kaleidoscopic range of bodily fluids to be an authentic representation of an 11-year-old Polski boy's mind. - Akceptowane.
7

5. De zee die denkt / The Sea That Thinks (2000)

Restless change of point of view for ego eradication and peace of mind.
>If you aim at nothing, you will hit it.<
8-

6. Je t'attendrai / The Deserter / Three Hours (1939)

Being in perfect accordance with the overidealized French ideas about love this melodrama with suspense dressing was not an unclever potential mobilization tool for the then-upcoming war, using detachment (WWI), distraction (all you need is love), and in place of a real happy ending a strongly implied one, having the film take place a month before the end of the war, which the characters who are called back to the front can't know but we do. "Be in love and loved and you have already won, so everything will be fine. Now here's your gun, solider."
5
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#46

Post by clemmetarey » November 7th, 2018, 11:28 pm

3. The Music of Chance (1993) 7/10
A really nice discovery. I grew attached to the two main characters very quickly, Jim Nashe in particular. The two ''villains'' were great as well, I wish they would have show up more.
I'm not gonna add it to my list yet, but I added it to my ''to think about'' list to see how I feel about it in a few days.
And while looking for informations about the book I found out it is already in my wishlist.
SpoilerShow
1. BabaKiueria (1986) 6/10
2. Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) 6/10
3. The Music of Chance (1993) 7/10

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#47

Post by Nathan Treadway » November 8th, 2018, 4:53 pm

Jimi Antiloop wrote:
November 7th, 2018, 12:48 pm
1. Professor Mamlock (Konrad Wolf, 1961)

8,5/10 - I definitely support this one.
Strong story arround racism and antisemitims in the year 1933 in germany, when the nazis took over the goverment, spreading fake news and doing a false flag attack. Well played, nice cinematopgraphy and a strong humanistic attitude. Also the fight of the "reds" (lefties) during this time is questioned.
:cheers: I'm glad you enjoyed it!

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#48

Post by Nathan Treadway » November 8th, 2018, 4:58 pm

1. White Meadows Heavy on allegory, light on plot. It will likely be on my list, but, I'm not too sure where. A lot of the symbolism escapes me, but, I'd chalk that up as mere ignorance towards Iranian culture/life in general. Masterfully made, which is probably the main reason it'd appear on my list. Thank you, cinewest for this recommendation!

(I thought I had already seen it when you were discussing it this past month, but, I hadn't. I've gone through a lot of Iranian films the last couple years, and this one is a rather significant one, and really deserves to be seen!)

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#49

Post by Onderhond » November 8th, 2018, 9:32 pm

04. This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379)
Amusing film. Reminded me a little of the older Coen Brother films, though this one felt a little livelier. While the Coens are no doubt better directors, their films can be a bit dusty. For some reason though, This World, Then the Fireworks never found its audience. Ratings for the film are low and few people have seen it. I was expecting something pretty bad based on the oeuvre of the director, but was pleasantly surprised by the film. It looks nice, the acting is fine and it never gets boring. Good filler. 6/10

PreviousShow
00. Glasses [Megane] (2007) (albajos) - 9/10
00. Temptress Moon [Feng yue] (1996) (Melvelet) - 7/10
00. The Incident [El Incidente] (2014) (filmbantha) - 7+/10
00. The Sea That Thinks [De zee die denkt] (2000) (Jimi Antiloop) - 2/10

01. Labour of Love [Asha Jaoar Majhe] (2014) (beavis) - 6/10
02. Babakiueria (1986) (maxwelldeux) - 6/10
03. Models (1999) (nimimerkillinen) - 6/10
Last edited by Onderhond on November 9th, 2018, 1:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#50

Post by Jimi Antiloop » November 9th, 2018, 12:53 pm

2. El Incidente (Isaac Ezban, 2014)

8,5/10 Gets my support.

While in the beginning the film was kind of ok, so to say medicore, but after about 40 minutes it started to grab my interest and attention at it's fullest. Camera and Cut began to fit better, the story accelerated and more creative elements started to attract me. Finally there are some cryptic/meta elements in the story I can totally dig. In my eyes a very fine idependent sci-fi film.
Last edited by Jimi Antiloop on March 30th, 2019, 2:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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“Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.”― Philip K. Dick

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#51

Post by Onderhond » November 9th, 2018, 1:36 pm

Good to see people like El Incidente, even if I didn't nominate it myself :D

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#52

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » November 9th, 2018, 8:10 pm

7. The Music of Chance (1993) [rewatch]

No drastic change of perspective for me on this second viewing, so here is the CuM SWAP thread again.

Perhaps something that I took more notice of was the Jim Nashe (Mandy Patinkin) character, who is the protagonist after all, he just happens to be not anywhere near as refreshing a character as Jack Pozzi (James Spader). Like how he invites all the "trouble" that is coming to him. While on the surface Pozzi seems to drag him into all of this Nashe goes along with everything throughout the whole film almost gladly, it seems. His backstory is mostly implied, but there is a sense that he hit a dead end of sorts, became disillusioned and now is just waiting for new adventures to wake him up from his numbness. Interestingly Pozzi's attitude is pretty "laissez-faire" as well, albeit in a different way. He believes in his skill as a poker player and trusts that this will get him through life.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

This is also reflected by the fact that the "employers" are never seen again after the (unwritten) agreement has been made, their villainous owners literally become specters, uncaring, unfeeling, with a simple-working-class-type-of-guy supervisor as a mediator who speaks for the higher bosses who in this case funnily also are very "simple guys" who became nouveau riche by striking it lucky through a lottery win, intellectually below our two main characters. In other words simple folk, using the system to take out their frustrations on their own because they happen to have been handed the better cards, but what else is new? Everyone needs a hobby.
7

8. Tokyo.sora / Tokyo.Skies (2002)

Inhibited Japanese culture in fullest bloom,
film fancies this as something cute and touching,
and this is not a motherfucking Haiku.
3

the past is not pastShow
(nominated films seen before: The Music of Chance, Models, Feng yue / Temptress Moon, The Cube, This World, then the Fireworks)

1. Asha Jaoar Majhe / Labour of Love (2014)
Driven by two character's spiritual living in these our alienated times 'Labour of Love' bathes in the beauty of mundane everyday life not through romanticizing it but by evoking contemplation on its journey through one (working) day. Like its title that is ridiculously apt but comes with more than its conventional meaning which won't be apparent until the end of the film, it also takes the platitude "absence makes the heart grow fonder" and not only makes it strongly felt but also gives it a novel taste in what is overall pretty far from a romance movie, and in the end implying that a few precious, intense minutes each day are a fair trade-off for accepting an alienating modern life. And at least the way it is presented in the film this is the comparably simple version of modern urban life, not yet dominated by high tech à la TVs, computers, IPhones,... with a particular Indian flavor that in many ways I haven't tasted yet before.

Well, I'm not convinced about the "fair trade-off" part of its "message" (to derogatorily call it that for the moment), instead I'll write about what was a wonderful point in 'Labour of Love' for me where the mundanity of everyday chores is made feel irrelevant in the face of grander things, while the film had been almost nothing but about showing the mundanity of everyday chores in wondrous ways, making that flared up thought about grander things feel narrow, for the grand thing is neither one of them but rather the constant interplay between the constantly changing notions of what's grand and important in life and what isn't with the perpetual change of everything, and in this sense I'm down with its eventual endorsement of modern alienated life, it doesn't succumb to it, but it owns it, for contentment depends not on the view before you but on the outlook within you.
7+

2. BabaKiueria (1986)
Provoked its good share of thoughts but like 72allinncallme said, it's more for the evocative basic idea than for its inconsequential realization that felt confused and its (creds to beavis) lack of inner logic, and in my feeling this long comedy skit segment produced by Australia's national broadcaster ended up being more of a superficial and scattershot media parody about this type of minorities-related TV reportage by an overeager but closet cynic journalist (likely fresh out of media studies) than a meaningful or let alone subversive satire about the bigger picture, but like our Australian iCM residents implied, there may be more than meets the eye. But I'm a foreigner, so...
5

3. Über die Jahre / Over the Years (2015)

"Do you think that the work somebody does shapes them as a person", Geyrhalter asks one worker in the very first year of the film. Don't expect a profound reply from the worker. Spoiler - It's "Mh, is' scho' meglich." - If you don't know German or are unable to decipher the Waldviertler dialect you'll have to watch the film yourself and rely on the English subtitles.

Any possible romanticizing of "simple folk" and quasi-primitivism relative to my own living standards was perhaps nullified by my familiarity with the represented culture, this so-called community being a rural area basically right next to my urban one, knowing and having known many people like it. More or less the only thing I'm not confronted with on an average day out is this particular regional Austrian dialect, making this the perhaps only relatively novel element in this showcase of dull people living dull lives...or at least those were some of my first thoughts while I still was in the process of watching it.

Not only does each individual shot basically seem like a separate episode with the whole film almost magically still feeling effortlessly cohesive, progressing in a seemingly natural way while covering ten years, but as the years go by three-quarters of an hour by three-quarters of an hour-or-so of following the same couple of people in the film, more and more subversive elements keep creeping in in steady quietness. Nikolaus Geyrhalter once again to me proved to be a filmmaker of integrity, making a long-term documentary that doesn't elicit the dire question of level of involvement of the filmmaker during the shooting process or a possible misrepresentation of people through editing to create drama or push the filmmaker's own agenda, not because those things aren't present here, but because while interested in the people and respectful toward them it doesn't feign to get intimate with the human subjects or has an illusion of exposing some hidden things in their character that even they themselves supposedly would be surprised to learn about themselves just through the act of sticking a camera into people's faces and recording a couple of hours of their lives. Inevitably it is an "UP" series-like portrayal of people to some degree, but overall the doc is less about the individual people and more about the issues that crop up on the periphery, like the bigger forces that guide these people's lives and thinking.

Just take for example the fact that the loss of a long-time-employment at one antiquated company results for all the people in this film in restless job-hopping at best, and in perpetual unemployment at worst. Or that they keep working for the mere sake of working, paid or not. Or that some of the people's statements about their current jobs stands in complete contradiction to what they said about their previous jobs, always in favor of their current jobs. "Arbeit macht frei" is not a slogan that is being used anymore in these parts for obvious reasons, but this mindset has never left the public conscious' mind, never mind who or what you work for.

The Verdinglichung is strong with this one.
7

4. Baby Bump (2015)

Adequately perverse, twisted and vulgar with a kaleidoscopic range of bodily fluids to be an authentic representation of an 11-year-old Polski boy's mind. - Akceptowane.
7

5. De zee die denkt / The Sea That Thinks (2000)

Restless change of point of view for ego eradication and peace of mind.
>If you aim at nothing, you will hit it.<
8-

6. Je t'attendrai / The Deserter / Three Hours (1939)

Being in perfect accordance with the overidealized French ideas about love this melodrama with suspense dressing was not an unclever potential mobilization tool for the then-upcoming war, using detachment (WWI), distraction (all you need is love), and in place of a real happy ending a strongly implied one, having the film take place a month before the end of the war, which the characters who are called back to the front can't know but we do. "Be in love and loved and you have already won, so everything will be fine. Now here's your gun, solider."
5

7. The Music of Chance (1993) [rewatch]

No drastic change of perspective for me on this second viewing, so here is the CuM SWAP thread again.

Perhaps something that I took more notice of was the Jim Nashe (Mandy Patinkin) character, who is the protagonist after all, he just happens to be not anywhere near as refreshing a character as Jack Pozzi (James Spader). Like how he invites all the "trouble" that is coming to him. While on the surface Pozzi seems to drag him into all of this Nashe goes along with everything throughout the whole film almost gladly, it seems. His backstory is mostly implied, but there is a sense that he hit a dead end of sorts, became disillusioned and now is just waiting for new adventures to wake him up from his numbness. Interestingly Pozzi's attitude is pretty "laissez-faire" as well, albeit in a different way. He believes in his skill as a poker player and trusts that this will get him through life.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

This is also reflected by the fact that the "employers" are never seen again after the (unwritten) agreement has been made, their villainous owners literally become specters, uncaring, unfeeling, with a simple-working-class-type-of-guy supervisor as a mediator who speaks for the higher bosses who in this case funnily also are very "simple guys" who became nouveau riche by striking it lucky through a lottery win, intellectually below our two main characters. In other words simple folk, using the system to take out their frustrations on their own because they happen to have been handed the better cards, but what else is new? Everyone needs a hobby.
7

8. Tokyo.sora / Tokyo.Skies (2002)

Inhibited Japanese culture in fullest bloom,
film fancies this as something cute and touching,
and this is not a motherfucking Haiku.
3
dream realityImage
LETTERBOXD | MUBI | IMDb | tumblr.

blocho
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#53

Post by blocho » November 10th, 2018, 1:59 am

I read and saw The Music of Chance about 15 years ago, so I don't remember much beyond the basics of the story. But I do remember that the Pozzi character seemed like a reference to Pozzo in Waiting for Godot. For those who have seen the movie over the past two weeks, does that work with the feeling of absurdism?

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#54

Post by 72allinncallme » November 10th, 2018, 10:40 pm

Perception de Ambiguity wrote:
November 9th, 2018, 8:10 pm
7. The Music of Chance (1993) [rewatch]

No drastic change of perspective for me on this second viewing, so here is the CuM SWAP thread again.


Read the SWAP-thread and your post and I agree with most of what have been said (bar the ratings ofc). It really is just a simple remake of the old Sisyphus story, but there are definetly layers here and I have my own little theory, but I really need to read the book first before I can express it in writing... Or at least watch the movie one more time :D
...

2. This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379)
This amused me more than it should’ve and I probably rate it too high, but it was a fun watch. Thanks Carmel.
7/10
SpoilerShow
0. Black Roots (1970) (sebby) 8.5/10
0. Je t'attendrai (1939) (XxXApathy420XxX) 8.5/10
1. Babakiueria (1986) (maxwelldeux) 6.5/10
2. This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379) 7/10


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#55

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » November 11th, 2018, 12:51 am

9. Black Roots (1970)

4+

10. Megane / Glasses (2007)

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waiting & forgettingShow
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sleep with the fishesShow
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Mir ist bewusst was Freiheit bedeutet. 무엇이 자유인지 알고 있다.
Folge dem Wege geradeaus, 길을 따라 똑바로 걸어라.
meide die Tiefen des Meeres. 깊은 바다에는 가까이 가지 마라
Doch hab ich solche Worte hinter mir gelassen, 그런 그대의 말들은 뒤로하고 왔다
Der Mond scheinet auf jedem Wege. 달빛은 온 거리를 비추고
wie die, in der Dunkelheit, wie Diamanten schwimmende Fische, 어둠 속을 헤엄치는 물고기는 보석처럼 빛난다.
heiß' wie durch Zufall Mensch - und hier bin ich. 우연히 인간이라 불리우며 여기있는 나
Was hatt' ich zu befürchten, mit was zu kämpfen, 무엇을 두려워하고 있었는가,무엇과 싸워왔는가
bald ist es Zeit die Lasten zu legen. 이제 어깨를 누르는 짐을 벗어버릴 시간
Erteile mir noch mehr Kraft, 나에게 용기를 다오
Kraft zur Liebe. 너그러워질 수 있는 용기를
Mir ist bewusst was Freiheit bedeutet. 무엇이 자유인지 알고 있다
Mir ist bewusst was Freiheit bedeutet. 무엇이 자유인지 알고 있다.
(Rainer Maria Rilke)

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(Zen porn)

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6+


the past is not pastShow
(nominated films seen before: The Music of Chance, Models, Feng yue / Temptress Moon, The Cube, This World, then the Fireworks)

1. Asha Jaoar Majhe / Labour of Love (2014)
Driven by two character's spiritual living in these our alienated times 'Labour of Love' bathes in the beauty of mundane everyday life not through romanticizing it but by evoking contemplation on its journey through one (working) day. Like its title that is ridiculously apt but comes with more than its conventional meaning which won't be apparent until the end of the film, it also takes the platitude "absence makes the heart grow fonder" and not only makes it strongly felt but also gives it a novel taste in what is overall pretty far from a romance movie, and in the end implying that a few precious, intense minutes each day are a fair trade-off for accepting an alienating modern life. And at least the way it is presented in the film this is the comparably simple version of modern urban life, not yet dominated by high tech à la TVs, computers, IPhones,... with a particular Indian flavor that in many ways I haven't tasted yet before.

Well, I'm not convinced about the "fair trade-off" part of its "message" (to derogatorily call it that for the moment), instead I'll write about what was a wonderful point in 'Labour of Love' for me where the mundanity of everyday chores is made feel irrelevant in the face of grander things, while the film had been almost nothing but about showing the mundanity of everyday chores in wondrous ways, making that flared up thought about grander things feel narrow, for the grand thing is neither one of them but rather the constant interplay between the constantly changing notions of what's grand and important in life and what isn't with the perpetual change of everything, and in this sense I'm down with its eventual endorsement of modern alienated life, it doesn't succumb to it, but it owns it, for contentment depends not on the view before you but on the outlook within you.
7+

2. BabaKiueria (1986)
Provoked its good share of thoughts but like 72allinncallme said, it's more for the evocative basic idea than for its inconsequential realization that felt confused and its (creds to beavis) lack of inner logic, and in my feeling this long comedy skit segment produced by Australia's national broadcaster ended up being more of a superficial and scattershot media parody about this type of minorities-related TV reportage by an overeager but closet cynic journalist (likely fresh out of media studies) than a meaningful or let alone subversive satire about the bigger picture, but like our Australian iCM residents implied, there may be more than meets the eye. But I'm a foreigner, so...
5

3. Über die Jahre / Over the Years (2015)

"Do you think that the work somebody does shapes them as a person", Geyrhalter asks one worker in the very first year of the film. Don't expect a profound reply from the worker. Spoiler - It's "Mh, is' scho' meglich." - If you don't know German or are unable to decipher the Waldviertler dialect you'll have to watch the film yourself and rely on the English subtitles.

Any possible romanticizing of "simple folk" and quasi-primitivism relative to my own living standards was perhaps nullified by my familiarity with the represented culture, this so-called community being a rural area basically right next to my urban one, knowing and having known many people like it. More or less the only thing I'm not confronted with on an average day out is this particular regional Austrian dialect, making this the perhaps only relatively novel element in this showcase of dull people living dull lives...or at least those were some of my first thoughts while I still was in the process of watching it.

Not only does each individual shot basically seem like a separate episode with the whole film almost magically still feeling effortlessly cohesive, progressing in a seemingly natural way while covering ten years, but as the years go by three-quarters of an hour by three-quarters of an hour-or-so of following the same couple of people in the film, more and more subversive elements keep creeping in in steady quietness. Nikolaus Geyrhalter once again to me proved to be a filmmaker of integrity, making a long-term documentary that doesn't elicit the dire question of level of involvement of the filmmaker during the shooting process or a possible misrepresentation of people through editing to create drama or push the filmmaker's own agenda, not because those things aren't present here, but because while interested in the people and respectful toward them it doesn't feign to get intimate with the human subjects or has an illusion of exposing some hidden things in their character that even they themselves supposedly would be surprised to learn about themselves just through the act of sticking a camera into people's faces and recording a couple of hours of their lives. Inevitably it is an "UP" series-like portrayal of people to some degree, but overall the doc is less about the individual people and more about the issues that crop up on the periphery, like the bigger forces that guide these people's lives and thinking.

Just take for example the fact that the loss of a long-time-employment at one antiquated company results for all the people in this film in restless job-hopping at best, and in perpetual unemployment at worst. Or that they keep working for the mere sake of working, paid or not. Or that some of the people's statements about their current jobs stands in complete contradiction to what they said about their previous jobs, always in favor of their current jobs. "Arbeit macht frei" is not a slogan that is being used anymore in these parts for obvious reasons, but this mindset has never left the public conscious' mind, never mind who or what you work for.

The Verdinglichung is strong with this one.
7

4. Baby Bump (2015)

Adequately perverse, twisted and vulgar with a kaleidoscopic range of bodily fluids to be an authentic representation of an 11-year-old Polski boy's mind. - Akceptowane.
7

5. De zee die denkt / The Sea That Thinks (2000)

Restless change of point of view for ego eradication and peace of mind.
>If you aim at nothing, you will hit it.<
8-

6. Je t'attendrai / The Deserter / Three Hours (1939)

Being in perfect accordance with the overidealized French ideas about love this melodrama with suspense dressing was not an unclever potential mobilization tool for the then-upcoming war, using detachment (WWI), distraction (all you need is love), and in place of a real happy ending a strongly implied one, having the film take place a month before the end of the war, which the characters who are called back to the front can't know but we do. "Be in love and loved and you have already won, so everything will be fine. Now here's your gun, solider."
5

7. The Music of Chance (1993) [rewatch]

No drastic change of perspective for me on this second viewing, so here is the CuM SWAP thread again.

Perhaps something that I took more notice of was the Jim Nashe (Mandy Patinkin) character, who is the protagonist after all, he just happens to be not anywhere near as refreshing a character as Jack Pozzi (James Spader). Like how he invites all the "trouble" that is coming to him. While on the surface Pozzi seems to drag him into all of this Nashe goes along with everything throughout the whole film almost gladly, it seems. His backstory is mostly implied, but there is a sense that he hit a dead end of sorts, became disillusioned and now is just waiting for new adventures to wake him up from his numbness. Interestingly Pozzi's attitude is pretty "laissez-faire" as well, albeit in a different way. He believes in his skill as a poker player and trusts that this will get him through life.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

This is also reflected by the fact that the "employers" are never seen again after the (unwritten) agreement has been made, their villainous owners literally become specters, uncaring, unfeeling, with a simple-working-class-type-of-guy supervisor as a mediator who speaks for the higher bosses who in this case funnily also are very "simple guys" who became nouveau riche by striking it lucky through a lottery win, intellectually below our two main characters. In other words simple folk, using the system to take out their frustrations on their own because they happen to have been handed the better cards, but what else is new? Everyone needs a hobby.
7

8. Tokyo.sora / Tokyo.Skies (2002)

Inhibited Japanese culture in fullest bloom,
film fancies this as something cute and touching,
and this is not a motherfucking Haiku.
3

9. Black Roots (1970)

4+

10. Megane / Glasses (2007)

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[...]

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6+
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#56

Post by XxXApathy420XxX » November 11th, 2018, 4:13 pm

3. Illuminated Texts (1982) 7/10

Overall a nice trip. I hated some parts like the beginning, and unfortunately I did start getting tired of the 3 hour runtime. Great film, but not great enough for me to support.

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#57

Post by Onderhond » November 11th, 2018, 5:43 pm

05. The Cube (1969) (Daviddoes)
This one reminded me of a lot of other films. There's Cube (well yeah), but Hitoshi Matsumoto's Symbol and Fincher's The Game also passed through my brain while watching this one. Of course, these are all older than Henson's The Cube.

The film itself feels like an exercise in allegories and symbolism, with Henson asking himself "what can a man trapped in a room become". The setup of the film is like a sketch-show, only with every sketch themed around the same idea. Some of the bits are funny and poignant, others feel a bit more shallow and predictable. It's also a shame that the film looks like it was shot for TV, a bit more stylistic muscle would've been nice. Still, it's an interesting watch and there definitely are some good ideas there, but overall there wasn't quite enough to keep me fully engaged for 60 minutes. 5/10

PreviousShow
00. Glasses [Megane] (2007) (albajos) - 9/10
00. Temptress Moon [Feng yue] (1996) (Melvelet) - 7/10
00. The Incident [El Incidente] (2014) (filmbantha) - 7+/10
00. The Sea That Thinks [De zee die denkt] (2000) (Jimi Antiloop) - 2/10

01. Labour of Love [Asha Jaoar Majhe] (2014) (beavis) - 6/10
02. Babakiueria (1986) (maxwelldeux) - 6/10
03. Models (1999) (nimimerkillinen) - 6/10
04. This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379) 6/10

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#58

Post by Mario Gaborović » November 11th, 2018, 7:52 pm

9. Megane (Naoko Ogigami, 2007) - albajos - 4/10
Great photography, though.
SpoilerShow
1. Tokyo.sora (Hiroshi Ishikawa, 2002) - Onderhond - 6.5/10
I enjoyed the voyeuristic approach in examining loneliness and, I'd say, cowardice. It was demanding solution to follow six different characters at once, out of which most of them are empty shells (though likable ones). I couldn't say there were pacing problems since 2hr07 went quite faster than what would you expect initially. Too empty for my taste. Or maybe there is something deeper here?
2. Ladybug, Ladybug (Frank Perry, 1963) - sol - 6.5/10
Children acting might be the greatest quality of this film. The subsequent wisdom makes me wonder whether the Cold War was actually only a hoax to keep people in constant fear of some untangible threat that was never to materialize, and thus manipulate them which right-wing parties (which dominate the present day) do to control their electoral basis - the continuous presence of foreign enemy makes you overlook real enemies which are your own fellow nationals. Not much of a story here but good ending.
3. Baby Bump (Kuba Czekaj, 2015) - clemmetarey - 2/10
Hate arised very early on and didn't unclench until the credits. Sorry clemmetarey. :(
4. J'attendrai (Léonide Moguy, 1939) - XxXApathy420XxX - 7/10
Sfumato war melodrama with some occasional slanted framing that didn't really click with me on emotional level. The whole film reminds me of a gas chamber that humanity was put into.
5. Professor Mamlock (Konrad Wolf, 1961) - Nathan Treadway - 5.5/10
Lifeless characters and run-of-the-mill script spoil the otherwise great cinematography and few nice directorial moves. The whole plot is kinda predictable plus my subjective indifference towards war genre made this another drag from Wolf. It's likely I won't become interested too much in WW2 in as many as six incarnations. But Joachim would love this.
6. Models (Ulrich Seidl, 1999) - nimimerkillinen - 7/10
Nothing big happens so you might get impression that the plot itself doesn't offer enough for the second viewing. However time went fast as the acting here is... as if there's no acting. I've seen/heard glimpses of this so many times in the nightclub toilets and backrooms. Good pacing, likable characters, albeit somewhat shallow.
7. NBC Experiment in Television: The Cube (Jim Henson, 1969) - Daviddoes - 5/10
8. This World, Then the Fireworks (Michael Oblowitz, 1997) - Carmel1379 - 3/10
Not for me.

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#59

Post by beavis » November 11th, 2018, 9:56 pm

1. BabaKiueria - 7
2. Je t'attendrai - 8,5
3. Black Roots - 7,5

4.
I watched the Cube this morning. Like Onderhond it also reminded me of something. Shout out to Chris Landreth's Bingo:

The humor and absurdist touches of Jim Henson are clearly present. Too bad about the low budget and experimental/tv nature... this had a lot of nightmarish potential. Now it remains stuck a bit in "nice idea" territory… but I like it very much nonetheless, rounding it off upwards to a
7,5

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#60

Post by Mario Gaborović » November 12th, 2018, 12:48 am

10. Friends (Lewis Gilbert, 1971) - zzzorf - 7/10
Sweet and gentle and heartwarming; also very refreshing to see such an early film showing younger adolescents engaging in free-minded activities. They don't know of shame! Kudos to that. My only remark concerns awful acting by the female lead, plus something else, rather strange: what the hell they've been living on, as they're rarely seen leaving the estate, going to the groceries or their jobs, save for the wedding feast? :lol:
SpoilerShow
1. Tokyo.sora (Hiroshi Ishikawa, 2002) - Onderhond - 6.5/10
I enjoyed the voyeuristic approach in examining loneliness and, I'd say, cowardice. It was demanding solution to follow six different characters at once, out of which most of them are empty shells (though likable ones). I couldn't say there were pacing problems since 2hr07 went quite faster than what would you expect initially. Too empty for my taste. Or maybe there is something deeper here?
2. Ladybug, Ladybug (Frank Perry, 1963) - sol - 6.5/10
Children acting might be the greatest quality of this film. The subsequent wisdom makes me wonder whether the Cold War was actually only a hoax to keep people in constant fear of some untangible threat that was never to materialize, and thus manipulate them which right-wing parties (which dominate the present day) do to control their electoral basis - the continuous presence of foreign enemy makes you overlook real enemies which are your own fellow nationals. Not much of a story here but good ending.
3. Baby Bump (Kuba Czekaj, 2015) - clemmetarey - 2/10
Hate arised very early on and didn't unclench until the credits. Sorry clemmetarey. :(
4. J'attendrai (Léonide Moguy, 1939) - XxXApathy420XxX - 7/10
Sfumato war melodrama with some occasional slanted framing that didn't really click with me on emotional level. The whole film reminds me of a gas chamber that humanity was put into.
5. Professor Mamlock (Konrad Wolf, 1961) - Nathan Treadway - 5.5/10
Lifeless characters and run-of-the-mill script spoil the otherwise great cinematography and few nice directorial moves. The whole plot is kinda predictable plus my subjective indifference towards war genre made this another drag from Wolf. It's likely I won't become interested too much in WW2 in as many as six incarnations. But Joachim would love this.
6. Models (Ulrich Seidl, 1999) - nimimerkillinen - 7/10
Nothing big happens so you might get impression that the plot itself doesn't offer enough for the second viewing. However time went fast as the acting here is... as if there's no acting. I've seen/heard glimpses of this so many times in the nightclub toilets and backrooms. Good pacing, likable characters, albeit somewhat shallow.
7. NBC Experiment in Television: The Cube (Jim Henson, 1969) - Daviddoes - 5/10
8. This World, Then the Fireworks (Michael Oblowitz, 1997) - Carmel1379 - 3/10
Not for me.
9. Megane (Naoko Ogigami, 2007) - albajos - 4/10
Great photography, though.

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#61

Post by clemmetarey » November 12th, 2018, 10:20 am

4. Tokyo.Sora (2002) 5/10
I think 6 characters was a bit much, I also got confused at who was who very early on which didn't help. I loved how it was filmed, and their interactions, sometime non talking ones, were interesting to see, but once again having 6 differents characters to follow at the same time was a bit much for me, especially since there isn't that many changes between the way they live their lives.

SpoilerShow
1. BabaKiueria (1986) 6/10
2. Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) 6/10
3. The Music of Chance (1993) 7/10
4. Tokyo.Sora (2002) 5/10

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#62

Post by Onderhond » November 12th, 2018, 1:06 pm

clemmetarey wrote:
November 12th, 2018, 10:20 am
I think 6 characters was a bit much, I also got confused at who was who very early on which didn't help. I
Myeah, there's little in the way of actual introductions and Ishikawa introduces new characters at different points in the film. Since they all added something to the central theme of the film I didn't mind much, but if you prefer more character-driven stories then I can see how this could be annoying. With roughly 20 minutes per character I didn't feel like Ishikawa was cramped for space, I also didn't feel like there was much more to explore with each character, at least not in relation to the theme of the film. Thanks for giving it a shot though!

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#63

Post by matthewscott8 » November 12th, 2018, 7:28 pm

blocho wrote:
October 31st, 2018, 9:55 pm
Anyway, I wonder if people will like The Music of Chance without being prepped by reading the original novel.
Certainly, I've been a long time adorer of this movie without reading the book (I have read some Auster but not this one). I think this means I am a supporter :banana:

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#64

Post by matthewscott8 » November 12th, 2018, 7:45 pm

@pedeamb, I remain unconvinced that this guy is a regular beer drinker. The subtitle says stuff, but the flat stomach talks.

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#65

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » November 12th, 2018, 9:57 pm

matthewscott8 wrote:
November 12th, 2018, 7:45 pm
@pedeamb, I remain unconvinced that this guy is a regular beer drinker. The subtitle says stuff, but the flat stomach talks.

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Sad to see you say this, but then again...
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*burp*
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#66

Post by Daviddoes » November 13th, 2018, 3:31 am

1. This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) 7.5/10

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#67

Post by Gershwin » November 13th, 2018, 6:48 pm

Mochard wrote:
November 7th, 2018, 3:53 am
1. El Incidente (2014) - (filmbantha)
(...)
Don't forget to nominate a film here as well, if you feel like it.
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#68

Post by Gershwin » November 13th, 2018, 7:47 pm

1. The Cube
I second the things some said before: really too bad it looks so much like a made for television film. I found it quite hard to look through the bad quality of the images, subpar cinematography and mediocre sound recording. Apart from that, I have to admit I've never shared this fascination for alternate realities, so this didn't resonate with me either. Some nice ideas and nice finds though.
5/10

2. BabaKiueria
Also very much made for television, but this is a concept I can really get behind. Could have worked even better if a bit shorter, but it does get its message across very sharply. Still an eye-opener in certain ways, or maybe we the world just hasn't changed much since the 80s.
7/10

3. Temptress Moon
So much beauty, but such a confusing story. Am I the only one who had to look up the synopsis a few times to understand everything that was happening? Maybe it's just because I was very tired when watching it. I might give it another try sometime.
For now 6/10
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#69

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » November 14th, 2018, 3:20 am

11. Keshtzar haye sepid / The White Meadows (2009)
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Ritual and ceremonies are a beautiful and human thing, keeping the demons of unknowing of an uncontrollable world at bay, but I myself personally like my sadness and yearning to have a different taste, namely instead of seas of tears I prefer drowning in nostalgia by way of oceans of wine. So henceforth let it be known that the guy who painted the ocean red was right all along!
6


the past is not pastShow
(nominated films seen before: The Music of Chance, Models, Feng yue / Temptress Moon, The Cube, This World, then the Fireworks)

1. Asha Jaoar Majhe / Labour of Love (2014)

Driven by two character's spiritual living in these our alienated times 'Labour of Love' bathes in the beauty of mundane everyday life not through romanticizing it but by evoking contemplation on its journey through one (working) day. Like its title that is ridiculously apt but comes with more than its conventional meaning which won't be apparent until the end of the film, it also takes the platitude "absence makes the heart grow fonder" and not only makes it strongly felt but also gives it a novel taste in what is overall pretty far from a romance movie, and in the end implying that a few precious, intense minutes each day are a fair trade-off for accepting an alienating modern life. And at least the way it is presented in the film this is the comparably simple version of modern urban life, not yet dominated by high tech à la TVs, computers, IPhones,... with a particular Indian flavor that in many ways I haven't tasted yet before.

Well, I'm not convinced about the "fair trade-off" part of its "message" (to derogatorily call it that for the moment), instead I'll write about what was a wonderful point in 'Labour of Love' for me where the mundanity of everyday chores is made feel irrelevant in the face of grander things, while the film had been almost nothing but about showing the mundanity of everyday chores in wondrous ways, making that flared up thought about grander things feel narrow, for the grand thing is neither one of them but rather the constant interplay between the constantly changing notions of what's grand and important in life and what isn't with the perpetual change of everything, and in this sense I'm down with its eventual endorsement of modern alienated life, it doesn't succumb to it, but it owns it, for contentment depends not on the view before you but on the outlook within you.
7+

2. BabaKiueria (1986)

Provoked its good share of thoughts but like 72allinncallme said, it's more for the evocative basic idea than for its inconsequential realization that felt confused and its (creds to beavis) lack of inner logic, and in my feeling this long comedy skit segment produced by Australia's national broadcaster ended up being more of a superficial and scattershot media parody about this type of minorities-related TV reportage by an overeager but closet cynic journalist (likely fresh out of media studies) than a meaningful or let alone subversive satire about the bigger picture, but like our Australian iCM residents implied, there may be more than meets the eye. But I'm a foreigner, so...
5

3. Über die Jahre / Over the Years (2015)

"Do you think that the work somebody does shapes them as a person", Geyrhalter asks one worker in the very first year of the film. Don't expect a profound reply from the worker. Spoiler - It's "Mh, is' scho' meglich." - If you don't know German or are unable to decipher the Waldviertler dialect you'll have to watch the film yourself and rely on the English subtitles.

Any possible romanticizing of "simple folk" and quasi-primitivism relative to my own living standards was perhaps nullified by my familiarity with the represented culture, this so-called community being a rural area basically right next to my urban one, knowing and having known many people like it. More or less the only thing I'm not confronted with on an average day out is this particular regional Austrian dialect, making this the perhaps only relatively novel element in this showcase of dull people living dull lives...or at least those were some of my first thoughts while I still was in the process of watching it.

Not only does each individual shot basically seem like a separate episode with the whole film almost magically still feeling effortlessly cohesive, progressing in a seemingly natural way while covering ten years, but as the years go by three-quarters of an hour by three-quarters of an hour-or-so of following the same couple of people in the film, more and more subversive elements keep creeping in in steady quietness. Nikolaus Geyrhalter once again to me proved to be a filmmaker of integrity, making a long-term documentary that doesn't elicit the dire question of level of involvement of the filmmaker during the shooting process or a possible misrepresentation of people through editing to create drama or push the filmmaker's own agenda, not because those things aren't present here, but because while interested in the people and respectful toward them it doesn't feign to get intimate with the human subjects or has an illusion of exposing some hidden things in their character that even they themselves supposedly would be surprised to learn about themselves just through the act of sticking a camera into people's faces and recording a couple of hours of their lives. Inevitably it is an "UP" series-like portrayal of people to some degree, but overall the doc is less about the individual people and more about the issues that crop up on the periphery, like the bigger forces that guide these people's lives and thinking.

Just take for example the fact that the loss of a long-time-employment at one antiquated company results for all the people in this film in restless job-hopping at best, and in perpetual unemployment at worst. Or that they keep working for the mere sake of working, paid or not. Or that some of the people's statements about their current jobs stands in complete contradiction to what they said about their previous jobs, always in favor of their current jobs. "Arbeit macht frei" is not a slogan that is being used anymore in these parts for obvious reasons, but this mindset has never left the public conscious' mind, never mind who or what you work for.

The Verdinglichung is strong with this one.
7

4. Baby Bump (2015)

Adequately perverse, twisted and vulgar with a kaleidoscopic range of bodily fluids to be an authentic representation of an 11-year-old Polski boy's mind. - Akceptowane.
7

5. De zee die denkt / The Sea That Thinks (2000)

Restless change of point of view for ego eradication and peace of mind.
>If you aim at nothing, you will hit it.<
8-

6. Je t'attendrai / The Deserter / Three Hours (1939)

Being in perfect accordance with the overidealized French ideas about love this melodrama with suspense dressing was not an unclever potential mobilization tool for the then-upcoming war, using detachment (WWI), distraction (all you need is love), and in place of a real happy ending a strongly implied one, having the film take place a month before the end of the war, which the characters who are called back to the front can't know but we do. "Be in love and loved and you have already won, so everything will be fine. Now here's your gun, solider."
5

7. The Music of Chance (1993) [rewatch]

No drastic change of perspective for me on this second viewing, so here is the CuM SWAP thread again.

Perhaps something that I took more notice of was the Jim Nashe (Mandy Patinkin) character, who is the protagonist after all, he just happens to be not anywhere near as refreshing a character as Jack Pozzi (James Spader). Like how he invites all the "trouble" that is coming to him. While on the surface Pozzi seems to drag him into all of this Nashe goes along with everything throughout the whole film almost gladly, it seems. His backstory is mostly implied, but there is a sense that he hit a dead end of sorts, became disillusioned and now is just waiting for new adventures to wake him up from his numbness. Interestingly Pozzi's attitude is pretty "laissez-faire" as well, albeit in a different way. He believes in his skill as a poker player and trusts that this will get him through life.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

So neither of them are the worrying type at all. It's interesting, then, that those two characters so freely agree to and try to honor the rotten deal that is at the basis of this story. To digress for a moment, this gives the film a very absurdist feel, but it is for me also a pretty blatantly allegorical film, none of it feels exactly naturalistic. Back to the story, I think they are bound to their obligation to build a pointless wall more by their own mindset than by exterior circumstances. In other words I found it to be a parable of the employer-employee relationship and really the social contract as a whole. They could easily walk out of there and move on without much fear of consequences, they are imprisoned by their mind more than anything else, wanting to be able to think of themselves as good people.

This is also reflected by the fact that the "employers" are never seen again after the (unwritten) agreement has been made, their villainous owners literally become specters, uncaring, unfeeling, with a simple-working-class-type-of-guy supervisor as a mediator who speaks for the higher bosses who in this case funnily also are very "simple guys" who became nouveau riche by striking it lucky through a lottery win, intellectually below our two main characters. In other words simple folk, using the system to take out their frustrations on their own because they happen to have been handed the better cards, but what else is new? Everyone needs a hobby.
7

8. Tokyo.sora / Tokyo.Skies (2002)

Inhibited Japanese culture in fullest bloom,
film fancies this as something cute and touching,
and this is not a motherfucking Haiku.
3

9. Black Roots (1970)

4+

10. Megane / Glasses (2007)

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[...]

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6+

11. Keshtzar haye sepid / The White Meadows (2009)
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Ritual and ceremonies are a beautiful and human thing, keeping the demons of unknowing of an uncontrollable world at bay, but I myself personally like my sadness and yearning to have a different taste, namely instead of seas of tears I prefer drowning in nostalgia by way of oceans of wine. So henceforth let it be known that the guy who painted the ocean red was right all along!
6
dream realityImage
LETTERBOXD | MUBI | IMDb | tumblr.

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#70

Post by zzzorf » November 14th, 2018, 8:28 am

3. El Incidente (2014) - filmbantha

I'm left scratching my head on how exactly I feel about this movie. The concept was intriguing and it had moments of brilliance but overall the movie was a let down for me. I think the major failure was the ending, even though I got the basics of what happened I was left having as little understanding as I had before it. It just didn't tie the movie into a good conclusion. Unfortunately this one just didn't do it for me so I will be unable to help assist it into next years list. 5/10

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#71

Post by Mario Gaborović » November 14th, 2018, 9:56 am

11. The Music of Chance (Phillip Haas, 1993) - 6.5/10 - 72allinncallme
12. Asha Jaoar Majhe (Aditya Vikram Sengupta, 2014) - 5/10 - beavis
13. Feng yue (Kaige Chen, 1996) - 4/10 - Melvelet
SpoilerShow
1. Tokyo.sora (Hiroshi Ishikawa, 2002) - Onderhond - 6.5/10
I enjoyed the voyeuristic approach in examining loneliness and, I'd say, cowardice. It was demanding solution to follow six different characters at once, out of which most of them are empty shells (though likable ones). I couldn't say there were pacing problems since 2hr07 went quite faster than what would you expect initially. Too empty for my taste. Or maybe there is something deeper here?
2. Ladybug, Ladybug (Frank Perry, 1963) - sol - 6.5/10
Children acting might be the greatest quality of this film. The subsequent wisdom makes me wonder whether the Cold War was actually only a hoax to keep people in constant fear of some untangible threat that was never to materialize, and thus manipulate them which right-wing parties (which dominate the present day) do to control their electoral basis - the continuous presence of foreign enemy makes you overlook real enemies which are your own fellow nationals. Not much of a story here but good ending.
3. Baby Bump (Kuba Czekaj, 2015) - clemmetarey - 2/10
Hate arised very early on and didn't unclench until the credits. Sorry clemmetarey. :(
4. J'attendrai (Léonide Moguy, 1939) - XxXApathy420XxX - 7/10
Sfumato war melodrama with some occasional slanted framing that didn't really click with me on emotional level. The whole film reminds me of a gas chamber that humanity was put into.
5. Professor Mamlock (Konrad Wolf, 1961) - Nathan Treadway - 5.5/10
Lifeless characters and run-of-the-mill script spoil the otherwise great cinematography and few nice directorial moves. The whole plot is kinda predictable plus my subjective indifference towards war genre made this another drag from Wolf. It's likely I won't become interested too much in WW2 in as many as six incarnations. But Joachim would love this.
6. Models (Ulrich Seidl, 1999) - nimimerkillinen - 7/10
Nothing big happens so you might get impression that the plot itself doesn't offer enough for the second viewing. However time went fast as the acting here is... as if there's no acting. I've seen/heard glimpses of this so many times in the nightclub toilets and backrooms. Good pacing, likable characters, albeit somewhat shallow.
7. NBC Experiment in Television: The Cube (Jim Henson, 1969) - Daviddoes - 5/10
8. This World, Then the Fireworks (Michael Oblowitz, 1997) - Carmel1379 - 3/10
Not for me.
9. Megane (Naoko Ogigami, 2007) - albajos - 4/10
Great photography, though.
10. Friends (Lewis Gilbert, 1971) - zzzorf - 7/10
Sweet and gentle and heartwarming; also very refreshing to see such an early film showing younger adolescents engaging in free-minded activities. They don't know of shame! Kudos to that. My only remark concerns awful acting by the female lead, plus something else, rather strange: what the hell they've been living on, as they're rarely seen leaving the estate, going to the groceries or their jobs, save for the wedding feast? :lol:

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#72

Post by beavis » November 15th, 2018, 9:11 pm

1. BabaKiueria - 7
2. Je t'attendrai - 8,5
3. Black Roots - 7,5
4. the Cube - 7,5


5. Models (1999) - 7.5
Typical Seidl. Not about the most interesting of people, but it was still kinda fascinating. And I always like his style

6. Hell Is a City (1960) - 7.5
The story is alright. Helped a lot by fast paced dialogue and a charismatic central character. I liked it, but at the same time find it kinda nothing special...

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#73

Post by sebby » November 21st, 2018, 7:25 am

01 this world, then the fireworks - 3/10

didn't really work for me

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#74

Post by clemmetarey » November 22nd, 2018, 1:14 pm

So it's been a bit more than 3 weeks since we started. Here's the ranking so far:

Mario Gaborovic: 13
Perception de Ambiguity : 11
beavis: 6
Onderhond: 5
clemmetarey: 4
XxXApathy420XxX: 3
zzzorf: 3
Gershwin: 3
Jimi Antiloop: 2
72allincallme: 2
sol: 2
blocho: 1
Mochard: 1
Nathan Treadway: 1
Daviddoes: 1
sebby: 1

And here's the ratings for each film!
SpoilerShow
Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) (beavis)
clemmetarey: 6/10
Mario Gaborovic: 5/10
Onderhond: 3/5
Perception de Ambiguity: 7+

BabaKiueria (1986) (Maxwelldeux)
72allincallme: 6.5/10
beavis: 7/10
clemmetarey: 6/10
Gershwin: 7/10
Onderhond: 6/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 5
sol: Add to my 500<400 list (at #267)
zzzorf: 7/10

Baby Bump (2015) (clemmetarey)
Mario Gaborovic: 2/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 7

Black Roots (1970) (sebby)
beavis: 7.5/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 4+
XxXApathy420XxX: 8/10

De zee die denkt (2000) (Jimi Antiloop)
Perception de Ambiguity: 8-

Edi (2002) (Gorro)

El incidente (2014) (filmbantha)
Jimi Antiloop: 8.5/10
Mochard: 7.5/10
zzzorf: 5/10

Feng yue (1996) (Melvelet)
Gershwin: 6/10
Mario Gaborovic: 4/10

Friends (1971) (zzzorf)
Mario Gaborovic: 7/10
sol: add it to my 500<400 ballot, but it probably won't be too high up

Hell Is a City (1960) (blocho)
beavis: 7.5/10

Illuminated Texts (1982) (Perception de Ambiguity)
XxXApathy420XxX: 7/10

Je t'attendrai (1939) (XxXApathy420XxX)
beavis: 8.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 7/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 5

Keshtzar haye sepid (2009) (cinewest)
Nathan Treadway: will likely be on my list, but, I'm not too sure where
Perception de Ambiguity: 6

Ladybug Ladybug (1963) (sol)
blocho
Mario Gaborovic: 6.5/10
zzzorf: 8/10

Megane (2007) (albajos)
Mario Gaborovic: 4/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 6+

Models (1999) (nimimerkillinen)
beavis: 7.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 7/10
Onderhond: 6/10

Professor Mamlock (1961) (Nathan Treadway)
Jimi Antiloop: 8.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 5.5/10

Sivi dom (1st ep.) (1984) (Mario Gaborovic)

The Cube (1969) (Daviddoes)
beavis: 7.5/10
Gershwin: 5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 5/10
Onderhond: 5/10

The Music of Chance (1993) (72allincallme)
clemmetarey: 7/10
Mario Gaborovic: 6.5/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 7 (rewatch)

This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379)
72allinncallme: 7/10
Daviddoes: 7.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 3/10
Onderhond: 6/10
sebby: 3/10

Tokyo.sora (2002) (Onderhond)
clemmetarey: 5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 6-6.5/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 3

Über die Jahre (2015) (Gershwin)
Perception de Ambiguity: 7
XxXApathy420XxX: 8/10

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#75

Post by beavis » November 22nd, 2018, 2:06 pm

thanks for the recap!

I hope to get Edi of its zero views soon :) This week I've been busy with other watch-lists
From the current selection I think I will watch at least five more before the end of the year

Any concrete ideas yet on when and how we can actively broaden the selection Gershwin?

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#76

Post by 72allinncallme » November 22nd, 2018, 2:16 pm

Thanks clem! Forgot to post it here, but I’ve seen one more.

3. Hell Is a City (1960) (blocho)
7.5/10 (added to the unranked part of my list)
Like beavis I thought that it was a well made movie and I liked it, but nothing special.
SpoilerShow
0. Black Roots (1970) (sebby) 8.5/10
0. Je t'attendrai (1939) (XxXApathy420XxX) 8.5/10
1. Babakiueria (1986) (maxwelldeux) 6.5/10
2. This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379) 7/10

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#77

Post by zuma » November 22nd, 2018, 2:54 pm

clemmetarey wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 1:14 pm
So it's been a bit more than 3 weeks since we started. Here's the ranking so far:

Mario Gaborovic: 13
Perception de Ambiguity : 11
beavis: 6
Onderhond: 5
clemmetarey: 4
XxXApathy420XxX: 3
zzzorf: 3
Gershwin: 3
Jimi Antiloop: 2
72allincallme: 2
sol: 2
blocho: 1
Mochard: 1
Nathan Treadway: 1
Daviddoes: 1
sebby: 1

And here's the ratings for each film!
SpoilerShow
Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) (beavis)
clemmetarey: 6/10
Mario Gaborovic: 5/10
Onderhond: 3/5
Perception de Ambiguity: 7+

BabaKiueria (1986) (Maxwelldeux)
72allincallme: 6.5/10
beavis: 7/10
clemmetarey: 6/10
Gershwin: 7/10
Onderhond: 6/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 5
sol: Add to my 500<400 list (at #267)
zzzorf: 7/10

Baby Bump (2015) (clemmetarey)
Mario Gaborovic: 2/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 7

Black Roots (1970) (sebby)
beavis: 7.5/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 4+
XxXApathy420XxX: 8/10

De zee die denkt (2000) (Jimi Antiloop)
Perception de Ambiguity: 8-

Edi (2002) (Gorro)

El incidente (2014) (filmbantha)
Jimi Antiloop: 8.5/10
Mochard: 7.5/10
zzzorf: 5/10

Feng yue (1996) (Melvelet)
Gershwin: 6/10
Mario Gaborovic: 4/10

Friends (1971) (zzzorf)
Mario Gaborovic: 7/10
sol: add it to my 500<400 ballot, but it probably won't be too high up

Hell Is a City (1960) (blocho)
beavis: 7.5/10

Illuminated Texts (1982) (Perception de Ambiguity)
XxXApathy420XxX: 7/10

Je t'attendrai (1939) (XxXApathy420XxX)
beavis: 8.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 7/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 5

Keshtzar haye sepid (2009) (cinewest)
Nathan Treadway: will likely be on my list, but, I'm not too sure where
Perception de Ambiguity: 6

Ladybug Ladybug (1963) (sol)
blocho
Mario Gaborovic: 6.5/10
zzzorf: 8/10

Megane (2007) (albajos)
Mario Gaborovic: 4/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 6+

Models (1999) (nimimerkillinen)
beavis: 7.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 7/10
Onderhond: 6/10

Professor Mamlock (1961) (Nathan Treadway)
Jimi Antiloop: 8.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 5.5/10

Sivi dom (1st ep.) (1984) (Mario Gaborovic)

The Cube (1969) (Daviddoes)
beavis: 7.5/10
Gershwin: 5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 5/10
Onderhond: 5/10

The Music of Chance (1993) (72allincallme)
clemmetarey: 7/10
Mario Gaborovic: 6.5/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 7 (rewatch)

This World, Then the Fireworks (1997) (Carmel1379)
72allinncallme: 7/10
Daviddoes: 7.5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 3/10
Onderhond: 6/10
sebby: 3/10

Tokyo.sora (2002) (Onderhond)
clemmetarey: 5/10
Mario Gaborovic: 6-6.5/10
Perception de Ambiguity: 3

Über die Jahre (2015) (Gershwin)
Perception de Ambiguity: 7
XxXApathy420XxX: 8/10
Good to see you guys progressing. I will be jumping into this around late December or early January.

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#78

Post by Gershwin » November 22nd, 2018, 3:28 pm

beavis wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 2:06 pm
thanks for the recap!

I hope to get Edi of its zero views soon :) This week I've been busy with other watch-lists
From the current selection I think I will watch at least five more before the end of the year

Any concrete ideas yet on when and how we can actively broaden the selection Gershwin?
Nope. But should we already do that? Or should we wait till more people have seen a bigger part of the current selection?
RokP 250

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#79

Post by beavis » November 22nd, 2018, 3:51 pm

Gershwin wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 3:28 pm
beavis wrote:
November 22nd, 2018, 2:06 pm
Any concrete ideas yet on when and how we can actively broaden the selection Gershwin?
Nope. But should we already do that? Or should we wait till more people have seen a bigger part of the current selection?
With all the things i need to see before the end of the year, i'm happy with the current selection. Others are still starting to watch. So there is no real pressure. But since discussion about this has already been had for a bit, i always look to my leaders for a bit of clarity :) and it is never too early for that.

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#80

Post by clemmetarey » November 22nd, 2018, 3:58 pm

I think it's best to wait for at least another month. Personally, I'm far from being done. So far, on average every user has seen about 2.4 films out of 23, I think it's very low.

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