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Indigenous Narratives Challenge

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monty
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Indigenous Narratives Challenge

#81

Post by monty » September 10th, 2016, 12:41 am

Finally, a modicum of decency is shown in how First Nations are treated. Let's hope this heralds a new chapter in U.S. Government relations with Native American tribes.
Thanks for the update, RBG. Also, here's hoping you'll find the time to watch a few for this challenge. Why not start with DreamKeeper?

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#82

Post by RBG » September 10th, 2016, 12:44 am

i saw your review and it seems very interesting. had not heard about it before. will try to watch this weekend :)
Last edited by RBG on September 10th, 2016, 12:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#83

Post by RBG » September 10th, 2016, 8:46 pm

well i watched something but i don't know if it qualifies lol. i became its first check on icm. it's a documentary from 1976 about the huichol tribe of central mexico and their pilgrimage to their sacred place to collect peyote for their rituals. they must do this once a year to stay healthy and ensure a good harvest. i don't think this was made by tribal members as they are/were very traditional? it's on youtube (in spanish). here's some stuff about virikuta (the place) which is in san luis potosi, a rich silver mining area. tribes have been fighting to keep the mining companies out and won their battle in 2013 (at least temporarily)

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very interesting and nicely photographed. not in the best condition obvs. many native tribes use the peyote but the huichol (they call themselves wixáritari) rituals are believed to be among the most accurate from pre colombian times. they're well known for their rejection of catholicism and unbroken history of shamanistic practices
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#84

Post by Pretentious Hipster » September 10th, 2016, 8:50 pm

monty on Sep 4 2016, 07:15:51 PM wrote:You've got the spirit, RBG. Why don't you come join us for this challenge? The more, the merrier.
Given up on recruiting for the samurai challenge?
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#85

Post by monty » September 10th, 2016, 8:54 pm

Ettinauer226XL on Sep 10 2016, 02:50:49 PM wrote:
monty on Sep 4 2016, 07:15:51 PM wrote:You've got the spirit, RBG. Why don't you come join us for this challenge? The more, the merrier.
Given up on recruiting for the samurai challenge?
Hehe, as the saying goes, you can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink. Currently, I treat that challenge as my personal viewing log. If anyone gets anything out it, good for them. The view count is pretty good though.
Last edited by monty on September 10th, 2016, 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#86

Post by monty » September 10th, 2016, 9:10 pm

@RBG: I'll count it. What's its IMDB? Btw, you might want to check out this docu:

The Huichol, or Wixáritari as they call themselves, is one of the indigenous cultures in Mexico that continues to preserve its cultural identity — its language and cosmogony, or how they see the world. The documentary Huicholes: los últimos guardianes del peyote (Huicholes: The Last Peyote Guardians) portrays the challenges the Wixáritari face in the 21st century, as mining operations in their sacred land of Wirikuta threaten the survival of their ancient culture...[Director] Vilchez and his team did a commendable job, working for free for more than three years at the request of the Huichol, who wanted to share their plight with the world. SOURCE

Also, looking forward to hearing your thoughts on DreamKeeper
Last edited by monty on September 10th, 2016, 9:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#87

Post by RBG » September 10th, 2016, 9:11 pm

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0352981/ looks nearly forgotten

glad they're getting the word out about their plight with a new film :)
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#88

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » September 12th, 2016, 4:26 am

Image

4. Songs My Brothers Taught Me (Zhao, 2015)

As there are a number of elements big and small that carry through the last three films I've seen, it's almost as if I have seen one project evolving with the changing cinematic times: from goofy 80s comedy Powwow Highway, to quirky 90s indie film Smoke Signals, to dreamy, Malick-influenced Songs My Brothers Taught Me. And that evolution is definitely one of progressive improvement in quality.

Songs My Brothers Taught Me is definitely the best film entirely about Native American culture from within Native American culture that I have seen. For the first half of the film I thought I was watching a good, but familiar Malick imitation indie, but there is a slow burn, cumulative effect here that really started to hit me by the end. The pace makes it feel like a loose rumination, but something does emerge here that is powerful and hard to achieve. I don't want to say much more as I don't want to spoil it for anyone. And if you do see it, it's best to lower your expectations, as mine were for half the film, and maybe you'll be surprised as I was, as I was really very impressed by the movie's end.

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#89

Post by allisoncm » September 12th, 2016, 6:57 am

Glad to hear that work on DAPL has temporarily stopped. Now, let's make that permanent.
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
1. Australia Rules - It was filmed like it was a TV movie. Very boring with the camera movements. The story was okay. I felt some of it was contrived
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
with the abusive father and such
but it was okay. I have about two more on my list for this challenge.
2. The Daughter of Dawn (1920) really beautiful cinematography and nice record to show how Native Americans dressed and lived. The story is a bit flimsy, but it made good viewing nonetheless. Yes, this film is available on Netflix, so Americans have one less excuse.

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#90

Post by monty » September 17th, 2016, 2:33 am

17. (60min worth of shorts)

A) The Ballad of Crowfoot (1969) - (10 min)
This one I really liked. A rapid montage of archival photos, etchings and contemporary newspaper clippings is married to the words and music of an impassioned ballad written by Mi'kmaq singer and songwriter Willie Dunn.

B ) From the Time of Foam Woman (2007) - (15 min)
An interesting docu about issues facing the Haida Nation today.
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C) Haida Gwaii: Restoring the Balance (2015) - (20 min)
Focusing on the vital role the Haida play in the sustainable management of land and fishery resources, this was an ok docu.

D) Marie's Dictionary (2015) - (10 min)
An inspirational meeting with the last fluent speaker of the Wukchumni language, who tells about the dictionary she made to keep her language alive.
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E) Writing the Land (2007) - (8 min)
A Musqueam elder rediscovers his Native language and traditions in the city of Vancouver. Sadly, a bungled effort.
Last edited by monty on September 17th, 2016, 2:46 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#91

Post by monty » September 17th, 2016, 3:25 am

18. Dakota 38 (2012)
A real good docu that follows native riders on a 330-mile journey across South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota in memory of the 38 Dakotas who were hanged there on December 26, 1862 by order of Abraham Lincoln. This is the the largest mass execution in U.S. history.
Throughout it's made clear that the ride is not just about honoring the ancestors, it’s also about healing, reconciliation and getting back to traditional ways.
The end credits show that several of the teens taking part in the ride are now deceased, thus providing ample evidence of the harsh socio-economic conditions facing young Native Americans today.

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A chilling reminder of the old days:
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Last edited by monty on September 17th, 2016, 3:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#92

Post by monty » September 17th, 2016, 1:55 pm

19. Homeland: Four Portraits of Native Action (2005)

Well-made docu about how Native American and their reservations are under attack from multinationals and the U.S. Government, keen on plundering the resources of what was once thought to be worthless land. In what amounts to another gold rush, these companies in collusion with the powers-that-be consistently and wilfully go against the wishes of the native communities, making Native American land unlivable for centuries to come. The focus here is on activists in four Native American reservations and their David-and-Goliath struggles to preserve their lands against the ravages of unchecked exploitation, toxic waste dumping, strip mining, oil drilling and nuclear contamination.
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Last edited by monty on September 17th, 2016, 2:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#93

Post by 3eyes » September 18th, 2016, 2:52 am

4. In the land of the head hunters/war canoes (1914)
Some fascinating dances. It made me want to shout "show, don't tell" in places, but to be fair, it wouldn't have made much sense without the lengthy intertitle expositions. I've never seen cinematography that reminded me so much of the movies we used to make en famille in the summers.

5. Ukamau / And so it is (Bolivia 66)
This kept me riveted - and what a stunning score! Fave.

Spoiler: click to toggleShow
1. Shorts:
1a. Taua (NZ 07) - 15m
1b. Warbrick (NZ 09 - 12m)
1c. Tama tu (NZ 05 - 17m)
1d. Weewar (NZ 06 - 8m)
1e. Two cars, one night (NZ 03 - 12m)
2. Boy (NZ 10)
3. Daughter of Dawn (20)
4. In the land of the head hunters/war canoes (1914)
5. Ukamau / And so it is (Bolivia 66)
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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#94

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » September 18th, 2016, 4:45 am

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5. Skins (Eyre, 2002)

This is a follow-up from the director of Smoke Signals, and it felt very much like a re-tread of that film, but without the standout moments (although the subversive final scene of the film is memorable). This is another film set on the Pine Ridge Reservation, and I've enjoyed getting to know the place a little through these films. However, while the movie clearly has its heart in a good place, there's no ignoring the writing, which is entirely mediocre throughout. Still, like all the films I've caught for this challenge so far, I'm glad I saw it.

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#95

Post by monty » September 19th, 2016, 3:17 pm

20. Big Bear (1998) Part 1 (90min)
21. Big Bear (1998) Part 2 (90min)

This mini-series provides an interesting insight into the later years of Mistahimaskwa AKA Big Bear, a powerful Cree chief. The focus is on his refusal to sign Treaty 6, which he prophetically felt would only ensure perpetual poverty and the destruction of his people's way of life. His defiance of the Canadian government made him even more influential with the Cree. In the end, however, Big Bear and his people were starved into submission and thus forced to accept the harsh and injust treaty terms.
An important story that needed telling for sure but one would have wished for a higher production budget and better actors (Gordon Tootoosis is great in the lead role though). One thing I really liked about this show was the idea of having all the whites speak gobbledygook whereas all First Nations people speak English - a stroke of genius indeed!
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Last edited by monty on September 19th, 2016, 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#96

Post by monty » September 25th, 2016, 12:26 am

22. We Were Children (2012)

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A harrowing examination of the horrorshow that was Indian Residential schools in Canada, the last of which closed as late as 1996. The film is a dramatized retelling of the experiences of survivors of this incredibly brutal and soul-destroying system. Apart from forcibly depriving aboriginal kids of their language and cultural identity, inflicting emotional distress, there was also rampant sexual abuse of kids by Catholic priests in charge of the school system (and in the rare event their predatory ways were exposed, the priests in question were simply moved on to a different school - to continue indulging their desires there). The intercut interviews with survivors just add to one's feelings of outrage. Overall, an important piece of history that needs telling and retelling. Essential viewing.

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#97

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » September 25th, 2016, 12:47 am

monty on Sep 19 2016, 09:17:39 AM wrote:20. Big Bear (1998) Part 1 (90min)
21. Big Bear (1998) Part 2 (90min)

One thing I really liked about this show was the idea of having all the whites speak gobbledygook whereas all First Nations people speak English - a stroke of genius indeed!
That is an interesting choice, and that detail alone tempts me to see this. What was the effect after 30 or 60 minutes -- mind-shifting phenomenon or annoyingly distracting gimmick?

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#98

Post by monty » September 25th, 2016, 12:56 am

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on Sep 24 2016, 06:47:09 PM wrote:
monty on Sep 19 2016, 09:17:39 AM wrote:20. Big Bear (1998) Part 1 (90min)
21. Big Bear (1998) Part 2 (90min)

One thing I really liked about this show was the idea of having all the whites speak gobbledygook whereas all First Nations people speak English - a stroke of genius indeed!
That is an interesting choice, and that detail alone tempts me to see this. What was the effect after 30 or 60 minutes -- mind-shifting phenomenon or annoyingly distracting gimmick?
I didn't find it distracting in the least. It was rather refreshing to have the whites speak gibberish, sounding a bit like stuttering fools all the while - the way First Nations people traditonally have been represented in countless westerns. I bet any native viewer would get a kick out this narrative approach.
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#99

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » September 25th, 2016, 1:43 am

monty on Sep 24 2016, 06:56:44 PM wrote:
Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on Sep 24 2016, 06:47:09 PM wrote:
monty on Sep 19 2016, 09:17:39 AM wrote:20. Big Bear (1998) Part 1 (90min)
21. Big Bear (1998) Part 2 (90min)

One thing I really liked about this show was the idea of having all the whites speak gobbledygook whereas all First Nations people speak English - a stroke of genius indeed!
That is an interesting choice, and that detail alone tempts me to see this. What was the effect after 30 or 60 minutes -- mind-shifting phenomenon or annoyingly distracting gimmick?
I didn't find it distracting in the least. It was rather refreshing to have the whites speak gibberish, sounding a bit like stuttering fools all the while - the way First Nations people traditonally have been represented in countless westerns. I bet any native viewer would get a kick out this narrative approach.
Yeah, it's a gutsy, subversive move. Too bad the film itself doesn't sound so great, but I might check it out.

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#100

Post by 3eyes » September 28th, 2016, 1:31 pm

6. La otra conquista / The other conquest (Mex 98)
An Aztec forcibly "converted" to Christianity by Cortez & Co and forced to live as a monk continues inward spiritual resistance for the rest of his life, and eventually brings the priest around to a more universalist way of seeing. Since neither Mariolatry nor goddess worship computes for me, there was a lot I didn't get, but was fascinated all the same. The human sacrifice scenes had an eerie resonance with the suicide bomber scenes which frame Tusen ganger god natt (Norway 2013).

7. Shorts (2):
7a. Tauushi (Venezuela 20 - 7m)
7b. Writing the land (Canada 07 - 8m)
7c. Toba (10) - 10m
7d. Marie’s dictionary (15) - 10m
7e. Running Deer (13) - 25m
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
1. Shorts (1):
1a. Taua (NZ 07) - 15m
1b. Warbrick (NZ 09 - 12m)
1c. Tama tu (NZ 05 - 17m)
1d. Weewar (NZ 06 - 8m)
1e. Two cars, one night (NZ 03 - 12m)
2. Boy (NZ 10)
3. Daughter of Dawn (20)
4. In the land of the head hunters/war canoes (1914)
5. Ukamau / And so it is (Bolivia 66)
6. La otra conquista / The other conquest (Mex 98)
7. Shorts (2):
7a. Tauushi (Venezuela 20 - 7m)
7b. Writing the land (Canada 07 - 8m)
7c. Toba (10) - 10m
7d. Marie’s dictionary (15) - 10m
7e. Running Deer (13) - 25m
Last edited by 3eyes on September 28th, 2016, 7:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#101

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » September 29th, 2016, 3:40 am

Image

6. I Will Fight No More Forever (Heffron, 1975)

This movie may not quite qualify for this challenge; it shows the Nez Perce on their own terms, from their perspective, but it gives nearly equal time to the perspectives of the U.S. Cavalry commanders.

PROS

--The film tells the engrossing and tragic story of the Nez Perce in their final military engagement with the U.S. Army. The movie clearly wants to remind Americans of this story and cry out over the injustices involved.

--While the film actually downplays much of the physical horrors the Nez Perce went through, from what I can tell it is remarkably accurate in terms of the history, sticking closely to the specific events and even including communiques verbatim.

--The movie is clearly imbued with the spirit of the Vietnam Era, evoking common political sentiment of the 70s in many lines, such as when a young, 70s-youth-looking Sam Elliot, who plays an army captain, says, "I'm following orders, but I still can't sleep at night." There are a few interesting ideas in terms of how the movie was conceived, such as General Howard comparing his two greatest military opponents, Robert E. Lee ("who fought for slavery") and Chief Joseph ("who fought for freedom"). However ...

CONS

--Most of the sentiments and ideas of the film are delivered in clunky declamatory style.

--In direction, acting, and especially the writing throughout, the movie feels like exactly what it is: a TV movie. As artistic endeavor, it is thoroughly mediocre at best. Sorry, Monty, because I know you praised this film quite highly, but I think it fails artistically. There was a huge resurgence of general sympathy for Native American causes in the 1970s, and it's a shame that a better film didn't emerge to tell the Nez Perce story. Perhaps the movie to do this story justice may yet appear.
Last edited by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on September 29th, 2016, 3:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#102

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » September 29th, 2016, 3:45 am

This challenge may not have seen an overwhelming level of participation, but for what it's worth, my vote would be to make this an ongoing challenge. It's unofficial anyway, so leaving it open won't interfere with any official challenges.

But if others prefer the challenge to close, I'll defer.

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#103

Post by 3eyes » September 29th, 2016, 3:58 am

I agree, Local - let's keep it going, so that interested folks can drop in when convenient.
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#104

Post by monty » September 29th, 2016, 4:18 am

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on Sep 28 2016, 09:40:24 PM wrote:6. I Will Fight No More Forever (Heffron, 1975)

CONS

--Most of the sentiments and ideas of the film are delivered in clunky declamatory style.

--In direction, acting, and especially the writing throughout, the movie feels like exactly what it is: a TV movie. As artistic endeavor, it is thoroughly mediocre at best. Sorry, Monty, because I know you praised this film quite highly, but I think it fails artistically. There was a huge resurgence of general sympathy for Native American causes in the 1970s, and it's a shame that a better film didn't emerge to tell the Nez Perce story. Perhaps the movie to do this story justice may yet appear.
I think you're being unnecessarily harsh here. It is a 1970s TV movie operating within the limitations set by a 1970s TV movie production budget and taken as such it does a pretty darn good job, imo. It's certainly not any worse than a lot of generic westerns that people here lavishly praise. I never maintained that this film was a pinnacle of artistic achievement but I do find it significant in its telling of a sadly neglected piece of American history and for that reason in particular richly deserves to be seen even today. I do agree, however, that there's room for improvement in the telling of the Nez Perce story but going by what Hollywood chooses to focus on these days I wouldn't be expecting another film on this topic any time soon.
Last edited by monty on September 29th, 2016, 4:28 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#105

Post by monty » September 29th, 2016, 4:25 am

Btw, Local, you're now tied with 3eyes - which one of you will have the 2nd spot before the month is up?
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#106

Post by mathiasa » September 30th, 2016, 3:51 pm

Only managed to watch 1 movie:

1) The Daughter of Dawn

Which didn't feel very authentic (although they claim to have consulted an expert) and wasn't very good.

Jokingly, I add

0) Himmel und Erde

An epic 5h doc about a austrian village but I guess they don't really count as indigenous.

Also I'd encourage everybody to watch Black Harvest and El Norte. Two very good movies.

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#107

Post by albajos » September 30th, 2016, 4:55 pm

2. Kautokeino-opprøret (2008)
I didn't manage to find the ones I was looking for. I might have Ante on video, but I haven't even set up my VHS-player here yet. And Sami Jakki I've already seen this year. So I'll just end it with the biggest movie about Sami since Ofelas.

!seen 2

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#108

Post by monty » September 30th, 2016, 8:37 pm

3eyes on Sep 28 2016, 07:31:39 AM wrote:7. Shorts (2):
7a. Tauushi (Venezuela 20 - 7m)
7b. Writing the land (Canada 07 - 8m)
7c. Toba (10) - 10m
7d. Marie’s dictionary (15) - 10m
7e. Running Deer (13) - 25m
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
1. Shorts (1):
1a. Taua (NZ 07) - 15m
1b. Warbrick (NZ 09 - 12m)
1c. Tama tu (NZ 05 - 17m)
1d. Weewar (NZ 06 - 8m)
1e. Two cars, one night (NZ 03 - 12m)
2. Boy (NZ 10)
3. Daughter of Dawn (20)
4. In the land of the head hunters/war canoes (1914)
5. Ukamau / And so it is (Bolivia 66)
6. La otra conquista / The other conquest (Mex 98)
7. Shorts (2):
7a. Tauushi (Venezuela 20 - 7m)
7b. Writing the land (Canada 07 - 8m)
7c. Toba (10) - 10m
7d. Marie’s dictionary (15) - 10m
7e. Running Deer (13) - 25m
How did you like the shorts? Any standouts?

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#109

Post by monty » October 1st, 2016, 1:49 am

23. Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015)

Beautiful cinematography, nice acting and a moving story, this is among the best takes I've seen on contemporary rez life. Warmly recommended.

Image
Spoiler: click to toggleShow
1. Miss Navajo (2007)

2. (A total of 60 min of shorts)
A) Tama tu (2005), 17 min
B ) Weewar, 8 min
C) Two Cars, One Night (2004) - 12 min
D) Ganggu mama, 12 min
E) No Way to Forget (1996), 11 min

3. (ca. 60 minutes of shorts)
A) Sikumi (2008) - (15min)
B ) Running Deer (2013) - (25min)
C) I Am Yu'Pik (2016) - (17min)

4. (60 min worth of shorts)
A) Warbrick (2009) - (12 min)
B ) Taua (2007) - (15 min)
C) Toba (2007) - (10 min)
D) La voz de las cigarras (2005) - (14 min)
E) Tatuushi (2010)

5. Kingpin (1985)

6. (66 min of shorts)
A) Mataku: Sands of Time (2002) - 22min
B ) Mataku: Going to War (2002) - 22min
C) Mataku: The Final Plume (2002) - 22min

7. (A total of approximately 60 min.)
A) Waka Huia: Te Kahautu Maxwell (2014) - (29 min)
B ) Waka Huia: Paitangi Ostick (29 min)

8. Cochochi (2007)
9. Bastardy (2008)
10. Barking Water (2009)
11. Superchief (1999)
12. The Battle for Whiteclay (2008)
13. Crooked Earth (2001)
14. Dance Me Outside (1994)
15. Yolngu Boy (2001)
16. DreamKeeper (2003)

17. (60min worth of shorts)
A) The Ballad of Crowfoot (1969) - (10 min)
B ) From the Time of Foam Woman (2007) - (15 min)
C) Haida Gwaii: Restoring the Balance (2015) - (20 min)
D) Marie's Dictionary (2015) - (10 min)
E) Writing the Land (2007) - (8 min)

18. Dakota 38 (2012)
19. Homeland: Four Portraits of Native Action (2005)
20. Big Bear (1998) Part 1 (90min)
21. Big Bear (1998) Part 2 (90min)
22. We Were Children (2012)
23. Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015)
Last edited by monty on October 1st, 2016, 2:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#110

Post by monty » October 1st, 2016, 3:55 pm

September is up, so here is the scoreboard. Thanks to everyone for taking part.

Participants:

monty --------------------------------------------------> 23

3eyes ---------------------------------------------------> 7

Local Hero ----------------------------------------------> 6

albajos --------------------------------------------------> 2

allie -----------------------------------------------------> 2

blocho --------------------------------------------------> 2

RBG ------------------------------------------------------> 1

mathiasa ------------------------------------------------> 1


PeacefulAnarchy ------------- 0


In accordance with the wishes of participants here, the challenge is forthwith made ongoing.
Last edited by monty on October 1st, 2016, 10:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#111

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » October 1st, 2016, 4:32 pm

I have shamefully neglected this challenge, though I have popped in to read the reviews. Since it is ongoing I will do my best make up for it.

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#112

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » October 1st, 2016, 6:56 pm

monty on Sep 28 2016, 10:18:20 PM wrote:
Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on Sep 28 2016, 09:40:24 PM wrote:6. I Will Fight No More Forever (Heffron, 1975)

CONS

--Most of the sentiments and ideas of the film are delivered in clunky declamatory style.

--In direction, acting, and especially the writing throughout, the movie feels like exactly what it is: a TV movie. As artistic endeavor, it is thoroughly mediocre at best. Sorry, Monty, because I know you praised this film quite highly, but I think it fails artistically. There was a huge resurgence of general sympathy for Native American causes in the 1970s, and it's a shame that a better film didn't emerge to tell the Nez Perce story. Perhaps the movie to do this story justice may yet appear.
I think you're being unnecessarily harsh here. It is a 1970s TV movie operating within the limitations set by a 1970s TV movie production budget and taken as such it does a pretty darn good job, imo. It's certainly not any worse than a lot of generic westerns that people here lavishly praise. I never maintained that this film was a pinnacle of artistic achievement but I do find it significant in its telling of a sadly neglected piece of American history and for that reason in particular richly deserves to be seen even today. I do agree, however, that there's room for improvement in the telling of the Nez Perce story but going by what Hollywood chooses to focus on these days I wouldn't be expecting another film on this topic any time soon.
Agreed, as I've said, that the movie tells the story of an important chapter in history, and I enjoyed it even if I just went by this alone.

I also agree that if judged as a TV movie, it's very good. But if judged as a film, I'd say it feels like a TV movie, which is to say it's quite mediocre as a movie. I don't agree that it's as good as most Westerns that have praise heaped on them, as it's stiffly dramaturgical in most scenes, and the writing is talky and awkwardly declamatory.

Still, on the whole, I enjoyed it, and I'm glad I saw it, but I think my enjoyment stems from a pre-set desire for a film on this topic.

Anyway, I'm glad you liked Songs My Brothers Taught Me. For me it was the standout find of this challenge.
Last edited by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on October 1st, 2016, 6:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#113

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » October 1st, 2016, 7:16 pm

monty on Sep 28 2016, 10:25:28 PM wrote:Btw, Local, you're now tied with 3eyes - which one of you will have the 2nd spot before the month is up?
One behind Esther, actually. If the challenge had extended into this weekend, I could have made a go of it, but this workweek was extremely busy for me.

But does this post and your final tally imply you don't want to make the challenge ongoing? Maybe you want to add it to the official calendar for the next year? Or maybe you found it awkward that you dominated and had so little competition? I don't, and my vote would be for this challenge to carry forward, even if that only meant occasional contributions. But you're the one who created this challenge, so I'll defer to your preference.

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#114

Post by monty » October 1st, 2016, 7:30 pm

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on Oct 1 2016, 01:16:50 PM wrote:But does this post and your final tally imply you don't want to make the challenge ongoing? Maybe you want to add it to the official calendar for the next year? Or maybe you found it awkward that you dominated and had so little competition? I don't, and my vote would be for this challenge to carry forward, even if that only meant occasional contributions. But you're the one who created this challenge, so I'll defer to your preference.
Not to worry, Local. As you may have noticed, I did state in the final line of that post that the challenge would now be made ongoing. The topic header has been changed accordingly. And yes, it was a bit awkward not having any major competition but I guess it's that way whenever a brand new concept is introduced around here. Some may even have skipped this challenge out of fear that there would be no official checks for them, which after all is far from the truth.
Anyhow, I hope that by giving this challenge ongoing status, it will pick up more steam in the coming months. The topic certainly merits more exploration.
Last edited by monty on October 1st, 2016, 7:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#115

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » October 1st, 2016, 7:43 pm

monty on Oct 1 2016, 01:30:27 PM wrote:
Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi on Oct 1 2016, 01:16:50 PM wrote:But does this post and your final tally imply you don't want to make the challenge ongoing? Maybe you want to add it to the official calendar for the next year? Or maybe you found it awkward that you dominated and had so little competition? I don't, and my vote would be for this challenge to carry forward, even if that only meant occasional contributions. But you're the one who created this challenge, so I'll defer to your preference.
Not to worry, Local. As you may have noticed, I did state in the final line of that post that the challenge would now be made ongoing. The topic header has been changed accordingly. And yes, it was a bit awkward not having any major competition but I guess it's that way whenever a brand new concept is introduced around here. Some may even have skipped this challenge out of fear that there would be no official checks for them, which after all is far from the truth.
Anyhow, I hope that by giving this challenge ongoing status, it will pick up more steam in the coming months. The topic certainly merits more exploration.
Oops! No, I totally missed the last line of your tally post. I think because it is in red my eyes just glossed over it assuming it was a signature.

Anyway, that's good news! I'll be adding more viewing to this thread then here and there. :thumbsup:

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#116

Post by allisoncm » October 2nd, 2016, 1:06 am

I have 2-3 more on my shortlist.

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#117

Post by Pretentious Hipster » October 13th, 2016, 7:39 am

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My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#118

Post by monty » December 4th, 2016, 11:38 pm

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24. ThuleTuvalu (2014)

An alarming report from the forefronts of climate change, this docu details the impact on indigenous people in Greenland, where the ice is melting at record levels, and in the Pacific island state of Tuvalu, which is slowly drowning in the rising sea. Recommended viewing.

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Spoiler: click to toggleShow
1. Miss Navajo (2007)

2. (A total of 60 min of shorts)
A) Tama tu (2005), 17 min
B ) Weewar, 8 min
C) Two Cars, One Night (2004) - 12 min
D) Ganggu mama, 12 min
E) No Way to Forget (1996), 11 min

3. (ca. 60 minutes of shorts)
A) Sikumi (2008) - (15min)
B ) Running Deer (2013) - (25min)
C) I Am Yu'Pik (2016) - (17min)

4. (60 min worth of shorts)
A) Warbrick (2009) - (12 min)
B ) Taua (2007) - (15 min)
C) Toba (2007) - (10 min)
D) La voz de las cigarras (2005) - (14 min)
E) Tatuushi (2010)

5. Kingpin (1985)

6. (66 min of shorts)
A) Mataku: Sands of Time (2002) - 22min
B ) Mataku: Going to War (2002) - 22min
C) Mataku: The Final Plume (2002) - 22min

7. (A total of approximately 60 min.)
A) Waka Huia: Te Kahautu Maxwell (2014) - (29 min)
B ) Waka Huia: Paitangi Ostick (29 min)

8. Cochochi (2007)
9. Bastardy (2008)
10. Barking Water (2009)
11. Superchief (1999)
12. The Battle for Whiteclay (2008)
13. Crooked Earth (2001)
14. Dance Me Outside (1994)
15. Yolngu Boy (2001)
16. DreamKeeper (2003)

17. (60min worth of shorts)
A) The Ballad of Crowfoot (1969) - (10 min)
B ) From the Time of Foam Woman (2007) - (15 min)
C) Haida Gwaii: Restoring the Balance (2015) - (20 min)
D) Marie's Dictionary (2015) - (10 min)
E) Writing the Land (2007) - (8 min)

18. Dakota 38 (2012)
19. Homeland: Four Portraits of Native Action (2005)
20. Big Bear (1998) Part 1 (90min)
21. Big Bear (1998) Part 2 (90min)
22. We Were Children (2012)
23. Songs My Brothers Taught Me (2015)
24. ThuleTuvalu (2014)
Last edited by monty on December 4th, 2016, 11:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#119

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » December 5th, 2016, 1:47 am

Glad to see an entry here. I hain't forgotten this thread -- just been watching very little lately in general.

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#120

Post by 3eyes » December 5th, 2016, 4:20 pm

Well, we have something to provisionally celebrate today anyhow. Only provisional, I fear.
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/04/us/fe ... eline.html

I do intend to watch more, but I too have cut back on movies. And Monty, I have not signed on as a reviewer.
:run: STILL the Gaffer!

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