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Year by Year Polls: 1935 (RESULTS)

500<400, Favourite 1001 movies, Doubling the Canon, Film World Cup and many other votes
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maxwelldeux
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Year by Year Polls: 1935 (RESULTS)

#1

Post by maxwelldeux » May 30th, 2020, 8:08 pm

ICM Forum's Favorite Films from 1935


There were 38 voters and 175 different films voted for in this poll. The table below shows all films that received at least 3 votes.

Rank Title AKA Director Points Received Number of Ballots Number of IMDB Votes Link
1 The 39 Steps 0 Alfred Hitchcock 317 30 49610 :imdb:
2 Bride of Frankenstein 0 James Whale 301.5 28 41578 :imdb:
3 Sazen Tange and the Pot Worth a Million Ryo Tange Sazen yowa: Hyakuman ryô no tsubo Sadao Yamanaka 215.5 20 891 :imdb:
4 Top Hat 0 Mark Sandrich 204.5 20 16681 :imdb:
5 Mutiny on the Bounty 0 Frank Lloyd 197.5 16 20018 :imdb:
6 A Night at the Opera 0 Sam Wood, Edmund Goulding 164.5 19 29680 :imdb:
7 Ruggles of Red Gap 0 Leo McCarey 159 14 3544 :imdb:
8 The Informer 0 John Ford 154 14 5433 :imdb:
9 The Devil Is a Woman 0 Josef von Sternberg 149.5 12 2882 :imdb:
10 Captain Blood 0 Michael Curtiz 141 15 12483 :imdb:
11 Carnival in Flanders La kermesse héroïque Jacques Feyder 131.5 12 1140 :imdb:
12 Toni 0 Jean Renoir 130.5 13 1433 :imdb:
13 A Tale of Two Cities 0 Jack Conway, Robert Z. Leonard 111 8 4948 :imdb:
14 Wife! Be Like a Rose! Tsuma yo bara no yô ni Mikio Naruse 108 9 336 :imdb:
15 Les Misérables 0 Richard Boleslawski 102 9 3227 :imdb:
16 A Midsummer Night's Dream 0 William Dieterle, Max Reinhardt 97 7 3051 :imdb:
17 The Band Concert 0 Wilfred Jackson 94 12 2811 :imdb:
18 David Copperfield The Personal History, Adventures, Experience, & Observation of David Copperfield the Younger George Cukor 88 9 3624 :imdb:
19 Triumph of the Will Triumph des Willens Leni Riefenstahl 82 10 14459 :imdb:
20 The Good Fairy 0 William Wyler 80 6 1176 :imdb:
21 Happiness Schaste Aleksandr Medvedkin 75 7 903 :imdb:
22 An Inn in Tokyo Tôkyô no yado Yasujirô Ozu 67 8 1201 :imdb:
23 Anna Karenina 0 Clarence Brown 61 5 4788 :imdb:
23 Crime and Punishment 0 Josef von Sternberg 61 7 1682 :imdb:
25 Mad Love 0 Karl Freund 57 7 4275 :imdb:
26 Mazurka 0 Willi Forst 56.5 5 123 :imdb:
27 Composition in Blue Komposition in Blau Oskar Fischinger 54 8 524 :imdb:
28 A Colour Box 0 Len Lye 48 7 755 :imdb:
29 Whirlpool Remous Edmond T. Gréville 47.5 4 78 :imdb:
30 Steamboat Bill Steamboat Round the Bend John Ford 45 5 880 :imdb:
31 The Lives of a Bengal Lancer 0 Henry Hathaway 43 4 2500 :imdb:
32 The Wedding Night 0 King Vidor 42 4 709 :imdb:
32 The Memory Expert Man on the Flying Trapeze Clyde Bruckman, W.C. Fields 42 3 1057 :imdb:
34 The Student of Prague Der Student von Prag Arthur Robison 39 3 104 :imdb:
35 Alice Adams 0 George Stevens 37 5 3608 :imdb:
36 Tôkyô no eiyû 0 Hiroshi Shimizu 35 4 51 :imdb:
37 La bandera 0 Julien Duvivier 34.5 7 558 :imdb:
38 The Crusades 0 Cecil B. DeMille 34 3 967 :imdb:
38 Flight Into Darkness L'équipage Anatole Litvak 34 4 116 :imdb:
40 The Raven 0 Lew Landers 33 4 4367 :imdb:
41 Passport to Fame The Whole Town's Talking John Ford 29 3 2119 :imdb:
41 Suburban Cabaret Vorstadtvariete Werner Hochbaum 29 3 47 :imdb:
43 The Ghost Goes West 0 René Clair 26.5 3 1618 :imdb:
43 Hands Across the Table 0 Mitchell Leisen 26.5 3 1446 :imdb:
45 Peter Ibbetson 0 Henry Hathaway 26 5 1772 :imdb:
46 Gold Diggers of 1935 0 Busby Berkeley 25 3 2368 :imdb:
46 Three Sisters with Maiden Hearts Otome-gokoro - Sannin-shimai Mikio Naruse 25 3 183 :imdb:
48 Music Land 0 Wilfred Jackson 23 3 946 :imdb:
49 Jinsei no onimotsu 0 Heinosuke Gosho 22 3 111 :imdb:
50 Les berceaux 0 Dimitri Kirsanoff 19 4 79 :imdb:
51 The Highway Dalu Yu Sun 18.5 3 236 :imdb:
52 Who Killed Cock Robin? 0 David Hand 17 3 659 :imdb:
53 The Tortoise and the Hare 0 Wilfred Jackson 13 3 2304 :imdb:


ICM List
List of All 175 Films Nominated

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gromit82
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#2

Post by gromit82 » May 30th, 2020, 9:09 pm

Thanks, Maxwell!

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#3

Post by Angel Glez » May 31st, 2020, 8:10 pm

Good job, maxwell.
maxwelldeux wrote:
May 30th, 2020, 8:08 pm
51 The Highway Dalu Yu Sun 18.5 3 236 :imdb:
Phew! A near miss.

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#4

Post by St. Gloede » May 31st, 2020, 10:19 pm

I honestly don't know what I expected, 1935 is a bit of a strange year without a true established canon of top films, but this list is still very surprising to me. 39 Steps is an interesting winner. I always thought it was a lesser Hitchcock, but now I see it is on 16 list (3rd most) - have to admit though, while I own it I have not seen nor thought of it since I first got the boxset when getting into Hitchcock about 15 years ago. Maybe it is worth a rewatch. Remember it as great, tight fun, but not quite a great film (more or less the same feelings I have for the book).

Bride of Frankenstein is the obvious one, and while I'm not as huge a fan as many others I'm extremely happy Sazen Tange and the Pot Worth a Million Ryo has built up the following to get to 3rd. Also happy to see Triumph of the Will fall as low as 19. Interesting that almost all of the top films are Hollywood fare, but I suppose most of the other non-english language film competing here, i.e. just Toni and Wife! Be Like a Rose! in the top 20, aren't that big in terms of their directors' ouvre.

Very disappointed Happiness fell outside the top 20, but I saw the writings on the wall here, and at least my number 2, A Midsummer Night's Dream, fared somewhat better.

Overall stats: 39/53

Top 5 unseen:

23. Anna Karenina
27. Komposition in Blau
28. A Colour Box
32. The Wedding Night
33. Man on the Flying Trapeze

I think I'm most interested in Litvak's L'équipage (#39), though I'm mixed on his French work, though I know I should see Anna Karenina at some point, and don't have an excuse for the shorts there. I also generally like Vidor, so Wedding Night will likely be seen eventually as well.

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#5

Post by timshelboy » June 2nd, 2020, 5:19 am

Many thanks - the 5 I loosely predicted as potential winners came in at positions 1-6 - (SAZEN TANGE completely unknown to me,)... Haven't done that well since the old board when I accurately picked the top ten for 1954 - not in right order though - :rolleyes: :lol: (two Hitchcocks at numbers 1 and 10)

Hitchccks are by and large very widely seen, which obviously helps their chances

Looking forward to 74 where I'd say we have a very clear starting favourite......

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#6

Post by OldAle1 » June 2nd, 2020, 11:40 am

Cool beans. Not unexpected, but cool nonetheless. I watched a bunch of stuff over the last few weeks as this is a year I was weak on, and was especially impressed with the half-dozen Japanese films I saw; glad I could help one of the Naruse films into the top 20; at this point I think if more of his films were available in good copies on Criterion, MOC, etc, he'd be nearly as respected as Ozu and Mizoguchi - right up there among the greatest directors of all time. Nice to see Sazen Tange make it into the big leagues also.

Top 5 unseen:

15 Les Misérables
20 The Good Fairy
23 Anna Karenina
24 Crime and Punishment
26 Mazurka

3 classic 19th-century novel adaptations there; I guess I don't watch enough middlebrow stuff?

Gloede's point is an interesting one, which I only agree with partially. I DO think there is an established canon of classics here, with #s 1,2,4,6 in particular standing out - but I have to admit they don't stand out as much as the top few films from most other years of the 30s. Take 1934 with L'atalante and It Happened One Night or 1937 with La grande illusion and Snow White or 1939 with... a dozen or more. The hits here just don't seem to reach the heights of fame of the top few films from a lot of years, that's true. But even after 85 years things can change and I think more exposure to Naruse, Yamanaka and some of the others may make a somewhat more interesting and larger 1935 canon in years to come.

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#7

Post by brokenface » June 2nd, 2020, 3:27 pm

OldAle1 wrote:
June 2nd, 2020, 11:40 am
Gloede's point is an interesting one, which I only agree with partially. I DO think there is an established canon of classics here, with #s 1,2,4,6 in particular standing out - but I have to admit they don't stand out as much as the top few films from most other years of the 30s. Take 1934 with L'atalante and It Happened One Night or 1937 with La grande illusion and Snow White or 1939 with... a dozen or more. The hits here just don't seem to reach the heights of fame of the top few films from a lot of years, that's true. But even after 85 years things can change and I think more exposure to Naruse, Yamanaka and some of the others may make a somewhat more interesting and larger 1935 canon in years to come.
I think there's a slight mid-30s lull. I think maybe it's the case that a number of the real standouts of early 30s essentially feel like continuations of the peak of the late-silent era ( e.g. I think of things like Tabu, M, Vampyr, L'atalante), which counterbalances the often fairly clunky early dialogue-driven sound films (though of course there were exceptions to this).

By '35/'36 there wasn't so much of these types of silent holdovers, it was fully into sound era but still a bit transitional in quality. And also by then there's been a big Nazi-related decline in German cinema which was responsible for some of those early 30s classics. Then there's a new peak towards end of 30s as sound films mature, before everywhere gets scuttled by WW2.

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#8

Post by Rufus-T » June 4th, 2020, 6:16 am

Interesting. Hitchcock won out over Bride. 39-Steps was a very good film, but not among his bests. Thanks for the result Maxwell!!

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#9

Post by Caracortada » June 4th, 2020, 9:32 am

The 39 Steps is one of the two best early Hitchcocks, along with The Lady Vanishes. Weirdly enough the title is never explained in the film. In John Buchan's novel the spy headquarters are in a house on top of outside stairs with 39 steps.

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#10

Post by blocho » June 4th, 2020, 4:03 pm

Caracortada wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 9:32 am
The 39 Steps is one of the two best early Hitchcocks, along with The Lady Vanishes. Weirdly enough the title is never explained in the film. In John Buchan's novel the spy headquarters are in a house on top of outside stairs with 39 steps.
I remember that the meaning of the title was different in the novel than the film, but at the end of the movie isn't it explained that
SpoilerShow
39 steps is a code word for the international conspiracy the hero uncovers?

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#11

Post by Caracortada » June 4th, 2020, 6:03 pm

blocho wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 4:03 pm
Caracortada wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 9:32 am
The 39 Steps is one of the two best early Hitchcocks, along with The Lady Vanishes. Weirdly enough the title is never explained in the film. In John Buchan's novel the spy headquarters are in a house on top of outside stairs with 39 steps.
I remember that the meaning of the title was different in the novel than the film, but at the end of the movie isn't it explained that
SpoilerShow
39 steps is a code word for the international conspiracy the hero uncovers?
Yes, I think so. So they came up with an explanation different from the novel, so they didn't need to find a house with 39 steps.

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#12

Post by Opio » June 5th, 2020, 4:45 am

blocho wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 4:03 pm
Caracortada wrote:
June 4th, 2020, 9:32 am
The 39 Steps is one of the two best early Hitchcocks, along with The Lady Vanishes. Weirdly enough the title is never explained in the film. In John Buchan's novel the spy headquarters are in a house on top of outside stairs with 39 steps.
I remember that the meaning of the title was different in the novel than the film, but at the end of the movie isn't it explained that
SpoilerShow
39 steps is a code word for the international conspiracy the hero uncovers?
More specifically, I remember the end as
SpoilerShow
an injured Mr. Memory, who we saw putting on his stage act at the first of the film, revealing the 39 steps to be steps in making a bomb or a war plane or some other important military secret that he had committed to his powerful memory. Something like "Step 1: Place the plutonium into a well-greased steel canister. Step 2: ... etc." Pretty ingenious to bring him back from the first of the film and have him be involved like that I thought.

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