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iCM Forum's Film Recommendations for Children: nominations due Apr 7

500<400, Favourite 1001 movies, Doubling the Canon, Film World Cup and many other votes
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Re: iCM Forum's Film Recommendations for Children: nominations due Apr 7

#81

Post by Wonderful Rainbow » February 7th, 2019, 11:09 am

Onderhond wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 11:19 pm
Wonderful Rainbow wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 10:33 pm
but I automatically imagined it would gravitate more towards films that are not purely entertaining but also have an added educational value, so I am happy to see the silents and foreign films.
How are they more educational
They show that there is much more to cinema than they might have thought by judging what they have been exposed to. I remember watching Chaplin’s The Circus when I was about 6, and the excitement I got from the physical comedy was unprecedented. Since then I was never “afraid” of watching silents. The same with foreign films, they tend to be more artistic than the Hollywood ones. The only time I have ever gone to the cinema to see the same film twice in one week was with The Triplets of Belleville when I was about 11.

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#82

Post by sol » February 7th, 2019, 12:34 pm

sol wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 1:22 pm
This should be an interesting list to compile since that is the age of kids that I teach and after eight years in the profession, I have a pretty good idea of what does and does not tend to go down well. As mentioned already, comedies are definitely the way to go when introducing to kids to "older" films. The Jerry Lewis stuff has always been very popular among my students, and silent comedies surprisingly tend to be very popular too; the climax of Safety Last! always brings howls of laughter and one of my students last year (8-9 years old) even told me that Buster Keaton was her favourite actor (!) after I had shown her class a whole bunch of his better shorts. Other: Singin' in the Rain tends to be quite popular too. I thought the musical numbers would leave some of the kids antsy, but they loved all of the comedy and really audibly gawked at Donald O'Connor bouncing off the walls etc (had to emphasise not to try that at home). There are probably a few others too, but it would require some thought, but yeah, can't go wrong with briskly paced comedies.
Re-quoting this since it is relevant to the silent film discussion - and since I don't know if mjf missed this when he was tossing up whether or not Singin' in the Rain was a good recommendation for kids.

Little kids love silent films - and, in my experience, they are far more tolerant (open-minded towards watching one) than older kids are who have been inundated in colour sound films for most of their lives. For younger kids, I think watching a silent film is somewhat akin to watching an animated movie. The people in a silent don't quite look or act the same as in 'real life', but the humour in silent comedies is extremely physical by nature, and physical comedy is very universal. I couldn't quite show all of One Week to my class because of the risque nudity, but hearing the fits of laughter from the kids watching it, you wouldn't think they were watching something almost a hundred years old.
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#83

Post by Onderhond » February 7th, 2019, 1:38 pm

Oh, I'm sure kids love silent films. They also love copious amounts of candy, playing with cow dung and eating cake until they throw up.

I was just wondering about the educational value and whether "broadening their minds" at such a young age is actually beneficial. I don't have a definite answer myself, but it doesn't really feel right to me.

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#84

Post by sol » February 7th, 2019, 1:51 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:38 pm
Oh, I'm sure kids love silent films. They also love copious amounts of candy, playing with cow dung and eating cake until they throw up.

I was just wondering about the educational value and whether "broadening their minds" at such a young age is actually beneficial. I don't have a definite answer myself, but it doesn't really feel right to me.
Film history is actually part of the Australian Curriculum for primary school aged students. From experience (having taught it), kids find the history of films pretty fascinating, and I guess it's a bit more tangible for them then looking at how something less dynamic (like clocks/watches) have changed over time. Best teaching moments come from taking a movie on iPad, then slowing it down frame by frame to show the kids that all movies are just a series of still photographs, and then there is the lead-in to the development of sound, how it was a separate process, and how (live) music cues were used in the early days of silent films, and the ability to tell stories principally through images as opposed to relying on words. And then watching Singin' in the Rain after having introduced kids to silent films is something really cool as they have that understanding about the evolution of sound. I mean, you're entirely free to have your own opinion, but from experience, using silent films as artefacts is really great for both history and media lessons. It is very much endorsed in the Australuan Curriculum, and if there are any overseas primary school teachers reading this thread, I would thoroughly encouraging including some film history where it fits into syllabus requirements.
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#85

Post by mightysparks » February 7th, 2019, 1:59 pm

sol wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:51 pm
Onderhond wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:38 pm
Oh, I'm sure kids love silent films. They also love copious amounts of candy, playing with cow dung and eating cake until they throw up.

I was just wondering about the educational value and whether "broadening their minds" at such a young age is actually beneficial. I don't have a definite answer myself, but it doesn't really feel right to me.
Film history is actually part of the Australian Curriculum for primary school aged students. From experience (having taught it), kids find the history of films pretty fascinating, and I guess it's a bit more tangible for them then looking at how something less dynamic (like clocks/watches) have changed over time. Best teaching moments come from taking a movie on iPad, then slowing it down frame by frame to show the kids that all movies are just a series of still photographs, and then there is the lead-in to the development of sound, how it was a separate process, and how (live) music cues were used in the early days of silent films, and the ability to tell stories principally through images as opposed to relying on words. And then watching Singin' in the Rain after having introduced kids to silent films is something really cool as they have that understanding about the evolution of sound. I mean, you're entirely free to have your own opinion, but from experience, using silent films as artefacts is really great for both history and media lessons. It is very much endorsed in the Australuan Curriculum, and if there are any overseas primary school teachers reading this thread, I would thoroughly encouraging including some film history where it fits into syllabus requirements.
Not when I was at school :(
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#86

Post by sol » February 7th, 2019, 2:05 pm

mightysparks wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:59 pm
sol wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:51 pm
Onderhond wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:38 pm
Oh, I'm sure kids love silent films. They also love copious amounts of candy, playing with cow dung and eating cake until they throw up.

I was just wondering about the educational value and whether "broadening their minds" at such a young age is actually beneficial. I don't have a definite answer myself, but it doesn't really feel right to me.
Film history is actually part of the Australian Curriculum for primary school aged students. From experience (having taught it), kids find the history of films pretty fascinating, and I guess it's a bit more tangible for them then looking at how something less dynamic (like clocks/watches) have changed over time.
Not when I was at school :(
Same. The Australian Curriculum has only really been implemented in schools since around 2012, and that was just for "Phase One" subjects - English, Maths, etc. In the interim, Curriculum outlines have been released for more periphery subject areas, and primary school teachers these days need to report on subjects as diverse and far-reaching as Media Arts and Engineering. It's all pretty interesting stuff, and does kind of also make me wish that I was born 25 years later, lol. School seemed so much less interesting in the 1990s...
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#87

Post by Fergenaprido » February 7th, 2019, 2:32 pm

mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:13 pm
I don’t know what everyone else’s childhoods are like and I’m not trying to make a list that’s suitable for every kid under 12, I’m making a list of films that can be suitable for all kids under 12. I saw all of these around ages 8-11 and were important in establishing and understanding a lot of things about the world and myself.
Can you explain the difference between those two things (suitable for every kid vs. suitable for all kids), because they seem synonymous to me.

This is something where I think I'll enjoy the discussion thread more than the actual list we come up with. My eldest nephew just turned 6 and I've been talking to my sister about which films he likes, and what she thinks he might enjoy, as when I'm home for a visit, taking him to the cinema is starting to become an option for activities we can do together (once we've exhausted the science centre, zoo, and aquarium, since he adores those).
burneyfan wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 5:12 pm
I only put a few representative Popeye, Betty Boop, and Warner Bros cartoons on the list because I couldn't think of them all, but she is CRAZY about vintage American cartoons -- the ones I named, plus Felix the Cat, Woody Woodpecker, old Mickey Mouse, Casper the Friendly Ghost, older Tom & Jerry, anything that's animated pre-1970.
This is something I want to align with others on. I fondly remember a bunch of looney tunes and other such shorts from when I was a kid, and I definitely would recommend them, but there's no specific short I would endorse over the others. Similar to the directors poll when we use one person to represent a duo, can we use a representative short from each "series" as a placeholder? It could be the first short, or the most checked short, or something?

Ones I'm thinking of adding: Bugs Bunny shorts, Coyote & Roadrunner, Sylvester & Tweety, Tom & Jerry, Mickey Mouse, and maybe a few more (perhaps something also for film series?).

Or, if people are wanting to recommend specific shorts from those series, which ones are being considered?

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#88

Post by GruesomeTwosome » February 7th, 2019, 2:51 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:38 pm
Oh, I'm sure kids love silent films. They also love copious amounts of candy, playing with cow dung and eating cake until they throw up.
Some sound comparisons there, mate. :ermm:
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#89

Post by Onderhond » February 7th, 2019, 2:57 pm

sol wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:51 pm
Film history is actually part of the Australian Curriculum for primary school aged students. From experience (having taught it), kids find the history of films pretty fascinating, and I guess it's a bit more tangible for them then looking at how something less dynamic (like clocks/watches) have changed over time. Best teaching moments come from taking a movie on iPad, then slowing it down frame by frame to show the kids that all movies are just a series of still photographs, and then there is the lead-in to the development of sound, how it was a separate process, and how (live) music cues were used in the early days of silent films, and the ability to tell stories principally through images as opposed to relying on words. And then watching Singin' in the Rain after having introduced kids to silent films is something really cool as they have that understanding about the evolution of sound. I mean, you're entirely free to have your own opinion, but from experience, using silent films as artefacts is really great for both history and media lessons. It is very much endorsed in the Australuan Curriculum, and if there are any overseas primary school teachers reading this thread, I would thoroughly encouraging including some film history where it fits into syllabus requirements.
It could be that it's some hidden trauma from my past. What I remember from my school years is that teachers/subjects ONLY focused on things from the past. It was old songs, old books, old movies, history, old art. It was completely detached from my own world, let alone that it could in any way guide me to dig deeper into the things that did interest me.

I mean, I get how your iPad example could inspire kids, but you could do exactly the same with a Pixar film, or something that targets their interests. Then again, very few parents/teachers are very up to date on the cultural world their kids reside in, since it's usually very detached from their own.

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#90

Post by mightysparks » February 7th, 2019, 3:07 pm

Fergenaprido wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 2:32 pm
mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:13 pm
I don’t know what everyone else’s childhoods are like and I’m not trying to make a list that’s suitable for every kid under 12, I’m making a list of films that can be suitable for all kids under 12. I saw all of these around ages 8-11 and were important in establishing and understanding a lot of things about the world and myself.
Can you explain the difference between those two things (suitable for every kid vs. suitable for all kids), because they seem synonymous to me.
Pretty bad wording on my part tbh. I mean not just films that are broad enough to apply for every kid under 12 or you know ‘generic kid under 12’ (eg films that are generally considered kids movies like Toy Story) but also films with something for any type of kid under 12 (so kids who like slightly more mature stuff, or kids who like scary stuff etc). So the list is inclusive of all types of films for all types of kids but it’s not a one size fits all list.. I don’t know if I’ve explained that any better lol
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#91

Post by sol » February 7th, 2019, 3:13 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 2:57 pm
I mean, I get how your iPad example could inspire kids, but you could do exactly the same with a Pixar film, or something that targets their interests. Then again, very few parents/teachers are very up to date on the cultural world their kids reside in, since it's usually very detached from their own.
Yeah, um, without having taught a single class in your life, I don't think it is at all fair to make such generalisations based on (what you admit) is personal bias from your own experiences growing up.

Believe it or not, I am pretty in-tune with what my students are into, and I also know that most of them like seeing films that they have not seen before when I show them as examples in class. And kids these days love filming things on iPads (or their parents' iPhones) so that does target their interests - not to mention the fact that, as a teacher, it is actually a curriculum requirement that I teach kids how to take and edit photos, as well film videos and teach them how to create short movies (at least for the older kids). I'm trying really hard not to be offended some of your comments since they come across to me as very critical of the validity of what I do for a living. I guess I'll just chalk it up to the fact that it is nigh on impossible to judge the teaching profession unless you have been a part of it and have experienced it first-hand.
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#92

Post by Onderhond » February 7th, 2019, 3:34 pm

It's not a diss towards teachers, just a reference on the general disconnect between parents and children. I'm sure there are ways these world touch and connect and film might very well be one of them, but overall how many parents are in tune with the world of YouTube stars, K-Pop celebs or Twitch streamers these days? All the more props to you if you are, but I think you can agree that you are the exception rather than the rule?

I'm sure they'd be just as happy, if not happier, if you used those things to teach them a thing or two about making vids, taking pics and exercising their creativity in the digital world (which I honestly think is a very worthwhile cause).

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#93

Post by jeff_v » February 7th, 2019, 4:54 pm

Can we all agree that the name of the list should be 1,000 films for Your Kids to Watch Before They Die, or Turn 13?

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#94

Post by 3eyes » February 7th, 2019, 6:35 pm

jeff_v wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 4:54 pm
Can we all agree that the name of the list should be 1,000 films for Your Kids to Watch Before They Die, or Turn 13?
(Whichever is later? sooner?)

Another question: I'm trying to focus on what I perceive as 2 underrepresented areas ("foreign" and also mid-20th cent anglophone, both for say 8-12). Assuming I get my act together I'd prefer to submit 2 separate lists if that's OK.
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#95

Post by Jimi Antiloop » February 7th, 2019, 6:38 pm

mjf314 wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 9:18 am
Jimi Antiloop wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 8:41 am
Some stuff from my perspective.
https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043368707/
I noticed you voted for the 2nd Harry Potter film but not the 1st. Is that a mistake?
I stopped putting in movies lower than a 7/10 rating. The first got a 6,5/10 from me. Maybe I will look through my 6,5 pointers an add it later.
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#96

Post by Jimi Antiloop » February 7th, 2019, 6:44 pm

3eyes wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 6:35 pm
jeff_v wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 4:54 pm
Can we all agree that the name of the list should be 1,000 films for Your Kids to Watch Before They Die, or Turn 13?
(Whichever is later? sooner?)

Another question: I'm trying to focus on what I perceive as 2 underrepresented areas ("foreign" and also mid-20th cent anglophone, both for say 8-12). Assuming I get my act together I'd prefer to submit 2 separate lists if that's OK.
First of all. The List is for children younger then 12.

Second. I don't vote for that list name, even with the number 12 in it.
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#97

Post by 3eyes » February 7th, 2019, 9:11 pm

Just found this -- comparative table of movie age ratings by country:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_pi ... ison_table
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#98

Post by mjf314 » February 8th, 2019, 3:00 am

sol wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 1:51 pm
Film history is actually part of the Australian Curriculum for primary school aged students.
Are there any Australian schools or organizations that publish a list of recommended films for students?

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#99

Post by zzzorf » February 8th, 2019, 7:56 am

As a father of 6 children (oldest 16, youngest 4) I have gone through various stages of what a child will and will not watch. For instance my second eldest was a horror fan from an early age. She would have Child's Play on repeat at 4years old and had watched Saw at 3 and Poltergeist was another of her favourites (though I allowed her to watch them I wouldn't allow most kids so they won't be appearing in my list) yet my eldest has refused to watch horror his entire life. With him a good absurd comedy or parody movie is normally a good watch with him such as the Polive Academy"s and the Carry On's. I have a girl (6) who is currently all about Barbie, when two years ago it was Tinkerbell on repeat. My 10 year old will happily sit and watch NCIS and the like with my wife.

Basically what I am trying to say with there is no right answer for the debate that is raging on here about people's choice of movies. What one kid watches will vary from person to person, just because I loved Jean Claude Van Damme movies when I was young does that mean I should recommend them.for others? I wish they would love them but I wouldn't recommend that they watch it.

Basically when it comes time to make my list I am going to think along the lines of if I had a group of my kids friends over what would I be fine to put on without having to ask their parents for permission.

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#100

Post by sol » February 8th, 2019, 11:47 am

mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 3:00 am
Are there any Australian schools or organizations that publish a list of recommended films for students?
Not that I'm aware of. While I have specific guidelines of the skill sets to teach my students (shot distance, camera angles, editing, etc.), it is left up to individual teachers to source G-rated examples and I guess I'm just lucky that I have an encyclopedic knowledge of movies to draw from. That said, I wouldn't mind publishing a Suggested Viewing list (Harvard style) for my school, but I don't know if there is really a demand for it.
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#101

Post by 3eyes » February 8th, 2019, 1:02 pm

zzzorf wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 7:56 am
As a father of 6 children (oldest 16, youngest 4) I have gone through various stages of what a child will and will not watch. For instance my second eldest was a horror fan from an early age. She would have Child's Play on repeat at 4years old and had watched Saw at 3 and Poltergeist was another of her favourites (though I allowed her to watch them I wouldn't allow most kids so they won't be appearing in my list) yet my eldest has refused to watch horror his entire life. With him a good absurd comedy or parody movie is normally a good watch with him such as the Polive Academy"s and the Carry On's. I have a girl (6) who is currently all about Barbie, when two years ago it was Tinkerbell on repeat. My 10 year old will happily sit and watch NCIS and the like with my wife.

Basically what I am trying to say with there is no right answer for the debate that is raging on here about people's choice of movies. What one kid watches will vary from person to person, just because I loved Jean Claude Van Damme movies when I was young does that mean I should recommend them.for others? I wish they would love them but I wouldn't recommend that they watch it.

Basically when it comes time to make my list I am going to think along the lines of if I had a group of my kids friends over what would I be fine to put on without having to ask their parents for permission.
I wasn't allowed to see The Wizard of Oz at 4 because my mother thought (probably correctly) that it would be too scary. My granddaughter watched it at 1 1/2, I think. Very young children don't understand enough to be scared, maybe. There may be a "hidden persuader" effect of exposing them to such imagery that early, same as with commercials.
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#102

Post by Caracortada » February 8th, 2019, 4:08 pm

Eyes of Innocence: Movies for Children

Many of these are children's or family movies, but I also included some grown-up movies with a child in a leading role.

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#103

Post by ChrisReynolds » February 8th, 2019, 6:32 pm

I've been down my list of favourite films, eliminating things I don't think were either suitable or enjoyable for children. I eliminated everything the BBFC had rated 18, but the following films that are rated 15 seem from memory as though they would be suitable for children near the top of the age range, either because they have relatable child characters, or because elements of comedy/fantasy/animation/child-characters soften the impact and increase the appeal to children. Does anybody else have any opinions on whether they should be included?

A Fish Called Wanda (1988)
Amélie (2001)
Beetlejuice (1988)
Brazil (1985)
Ed Wood (1994)
Gremlins (1984)
Kung Fu Hustle (2004)
Michael Jackson: Thriller (1983)
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979)
Mr. Vampire (1985)
Poltergeist (1982)
Rushmore (1998)
Stand by Me (1986)
The City of Lost Children (1995)
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
This Is Spinal Tap (1984)
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (2000)

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#104

Post by joachimt » February 8th, 2019, 6:44 pm

I'm currently sitting in a corner of the living room, because the couches are occupied by a total of 9 children younger than 12. My kids are 9 and 6, but all the other girls present are 10 or 11 years old. They are watching Peter Rabbit and are having a blast. I'm not watching the movie, but I am watching the emotions on their faces. Lovely to see them go from sadness to pure joy within seconds. They think it's funny, romantic, sad and at times shocking as well.

My daughter really wanted to watch this one again on her party today and I was afraid her 11 year old girlfriends would think it's too childish. I was clearly wrong.

The most shocking thing in the movie hasn't happened yet. I wonder how they'll react. I'll post again when it happened.
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#105

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » February 8th, 2019, 6:57 pm

Most children would not give two shits about Amelie, Brazil or Ed Wood. The things they speak to aren't really relevant to children and their form of whimsy and humour isn't universal enough. I'm sure like any film there are some kids out there who would find appeal in the visuals and tone of the first two or the goofiness of Ed Wood, but you could say that for most any good film. I think the same is true of Rushmore and The City of Lost Children, but I don't remember them well enough to be sure.

I think the others would at least stand a chance at the right age for a meaningful segment of the population, though I don't know how accessible the comedy in This is Spinal Tap is without familiarity to the things it references which I would not expect a child born post 2007 to get.

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#106

Post by joachimt » February 8th, 2019, 7:14 pm

joachimt wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:44 pm
I'm currently sitting in a corner of the living room, because the couches are occupied by a total of 9 children younger than 12. My kids are 9 and 6, but all the other girls present are 10 or 11 years old. They are watching Peter Rabbit and are having a blast. I'm not watching the movie, but I am watching the emotions on their faces. Lovely to see them go from sadness to pure joy within seconds. They think it's funny, romantic, sad and at times shocking as well.

My daughter really wanted to watch this one again on her party today and I was afraid her 11 year old girlfriends would think it's too childish. I was clearly wrong.

The most shocking thing in the movie hasn't happened yet. I wonder how they'll react. I'll post again when it happened.
Nobody cried, but they were really shocked when
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Peter's house blew up and the tree fell down.
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#107

Post by joachimt » February 8th, 2019, 7:16 pm

Oh wait...... the movie is almost over and they oldest girl is crying! Real tears are going down her cheeks.



And now she's laughing again. :)
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#108

Post by mjf314 » February 8th, 2019, 8:27 pm

zzzorf wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 7:56 am
Basically when it comes time to make my list I am going to think along the lines of if I had a group of my kids friends over what would I be fine to put on without having to ask their parents for permission.
I hope you're assuming that the parents are reasonable, because there are some parents who shelter their kids way too much. For example, there are some parents who wouldn't let their 10-year-old watch Star Wars or Back to the Future because they're too violent, but most parents would be ok with those films.
sol wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 11:47 am
mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 3:00 am
Are there any Australian schools or organizations that publish a list of recommended films for students?
Not that I'm aware of. While I have specific guidelines of the skill sets to teach my students (shot distance, camera angles, editing, etc.), it is left up to individual teachers to source G-rated examples and I guess I'm just lucky that I have an encyclopedic knowledge of movies to draw from. That said, I wouldn't mind publishing a Suggested Viewing list (Harvard style) for my school, but I don't know if there is really a demand for it.
It sounds like a good idea to me. I think film is an important part of children's education, and if you're able to make better choices than other teachers, they may find it useful. As more schools publish such lists, it may convince some teachers to take films more seriously.
ChrisReynolds wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:32 pm
Does anybody else have any opinions on whether they should be included?

Beetlejuice (1988)
I think I was under 12 when I watched Beetlejuice, and I liked it. I don't remember exactly how old I was. I had forgotten it but I think I'll add it to my list.
PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:57 pm
Most children would not give two shits about Amelie, Brazil or Ed Wood.
I'm not sure, but I think I was 13 when I watched Amelie, and I liked it. I don't know if I would have liked it at 11.

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#109

Post by joachimt » February 8th, 2019, 8:45 pm

mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 8:27 pm
zzzorf wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 7:56 am
Basically when it comes time to make my list I am going to think along the lines of if I had a group of my kids friends over what would I be fine to put on without having to ask their parents for permission.
I hope you're assuming that the parents are reasonable, because there are some parents who shelter their kids way too much. For example, there are some parents who wouldn't let their 10-year-old watch Star Wars or Back to the Future because they're too violent, but most parents would be ok with those films.
If I had a bunch of 10 year olds coming over (hey, I just had!), I would never put on Star Wars. Not because I'm too protective or because I think other parents might not agree with it, but because I don't know the other kids well enough to predict how they would respond to it. Like zzzorf said, different kids react differently to certain things in movies. Some of those kids might enjoy Star Wars, but other kids would be in shock seeing those violent things. And don't start that the parents of those kids probably were too protective so they never saw enough of those things. That's true in a few cases, but mostly parents judge these things based on how their kids are. My oldest has a huge imagination and an extreme capability of feeling with the things she's seeing on screen. She's a thinker, so here brain just won't stop going over and over things, even things that seem minor points to others. She's making a big deal about a lot of small things. She certainly can't handle Star Wars. When Peter Rabbit was playing, she actually went out of the room for the scenes in which she knew the old man was going to die, because she thought it was terrible to see somebody die, even though it's a natural death and there's nothing awful to see. Can you imagine how she would react seeing body parts being cut off by light sabers? Not showing her those movies has nothing to do with being overly protective. It's about knowing my kid.

I'm not going to vote, but if I would, I would absolutely go along the lines of zzzorf: "I am going to think along the lines of if I had a group of my kids friends over what would I be fine to put on without having to ask their parents for permission"
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#110

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » February 8th, 2019, 9:03 pm

mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 8:27 pm
PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:57 pm
Most children would not give two shits about Amelie, Brazil or Ed Wood.
I'm not sure, but I think I was 13 when I watched Amelie, and I liked it. I don't know if I would have liked it at 11.
Well yeah. For a 13 or 14 year old I think it could work. But there's a big difference in the perception of romance between 11 and 13, let alone younger. Before puberty romance is much more about mimicking adult behaviours or expectations, and as such even if they enjoy Amelie they wouldn't really get any of what it says about romance.

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#111

Post by mjf314 » February 8th, 2019, 9:23 pm

It's a list for all kids under 12, but that doesn't mean every kid has to watch every film. For example, if we want the list to be useful to 10-year-olds, it would be unfair if we only include films that are good for both 5-year-olds and 10-year-olds.

Similarly, if a film is good for 90% of 10-year-olds, and the other 10% of 10-year-olds can't handle it, excluding it would be unfair to the 90%.

I'm not thinking of the list as a checklist that every kid has to finish before turning 12. I'm thinking of it as a list of suggestions. Ideally the list should indicate the age at which each film is appropriate for most kids, with a brief description of disturbing scenes (or a link to a webpage that has this information), so kids who can't handle it know to avoid it.

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#112

Post by mightysparks » February 8th, 2019, 11:16 pm

ChrisReynolds wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:32 pm
I've been down my list of favourite films, eliminating things I don't think were either suitable or enjoyable for children. I eliminated everything the BBFC had rated 18, but the following films that are rated 15 seem from memory as though they would be suitable for children near the top of the age range, either because they have relatable child characters, or because elements of comedy/fantasy/animation/child-characters soften the impact and increase the appeal to children. Does anybody else have any opinions on whether they should be included?

A Fish Called Wanda (1988)
Amélie (2001)
Beetlejuice (1988)
Brazil (1985)
Ed Wood (1994)
Gremlins (1984)
Kung Fu Hustle (2004)
Michael Jackson: Thriller (1983)
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979)
Mr. Vampire (1985)
Poltergeist (1982)
Rushmore (1998)
Stand by Me (1986)
The City of Lost Children (1995)
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
This Is Spinal Tap (1984)
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (2000)
I think Beetlejuice and Gremlins are fine. I saw the former when I was 11 and found it really fun. I didn’t see Gremlins until I was older but I hear lots of people saying they loved it as a kid. Stand By Me seems more suitable for teens, and the rest I feel kids either wouldn’t get or enjoy but idk.

Also I never thought Star Wars would be something people would question for kids to watch :/ Crazy. I left off LOTR because though I loved it as an 11 year old, I was teased for it being too geeky and every other kid found it boring but I think those kinds of films are great light adventure films. I think I was maybe a more mature kind of kid or maybe kids have changed since then, but I definitely would’ve been a frustrated kid at some of the suggestions on here. I definitely preferred more complex and adult film and TV, and I used to argue with adults to stop treating me like a kid. Like, I know I would’ve hated being in Sol’s class when it came to film time :P I would be the grumpy kid not laughing and complaining the films were stupid. I hated every film I was shown at school, and I really hate those physical comedies.
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#113

Post by mjf314 » February 8th, 2019, 11:30 pm

Here's the Star Wars scene where the arm gets cut off: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lfy5Esue_ls
I think most 10-year-olds can handle this scene.

I think most kids would be more upset by Mufasa's death in The Lion King.
mightysparks wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 11:16 pm
I hated every film I was shown at school, and I really hate those physical comedies.
Do you remember which films you were shown in school?

I don't remember which films, if any, I saw in elementary school, but I remember watching A Streetcar Named Desire in 8th grade, Terminator in 9th or 10th grade, and American History X in 12th grade.

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#114

Post by mightysparks » February 9th, 2019, 12:04 am

mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 11:30 pm
Here's the Star Wars scene where the arm gets cut off: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lfy5Esue_ls
I think most 10-year-olds can handle this scene.

I think most kids would be more upset by Mufasa's death in The Lion King.
mightysparks wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 11:16 pm
I hated every film I was shown at school, and I really hate those physical comedies.
Do you remember which films you were shown in school?

I don't remember which films, if any, I saw in elementary school, but I remember watching A Streetcar Named Desire in 8th grade, Terminator in 9th or 10th grade, and American History X in 12th grade.
In primary school, I only remember The Castle, Mousehunt and an Ace Ventura movie, an episode of Round the Twist, but I remember trying to get out of watching the movies every time because they always annoyed me. They also had an excursion to see the first Harry Potter movie at the cinema but I got out of that, though I ended up liking it when I did see it.

In highschool, it was stuff like Strictly Ballroom, The Princess Bride (I liked it on a rewatch by myself years later), Monsoon Wedding, Bend it Like Beckham, To Kill a Mockingbird (which I had liked previously, but stopped liking it after that). 3/5 of those are 1/10s from me.

And yea, I cried as a kid during the Mufasa death, and the horse scene in The Neverending Story made me bawl every time. I didn't see Star Wars until I was 15 but I thought of it as a kids movie as most people had seen/liked it as a kid.
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#115

Post by mjf314 » February 9th, 2019, 12:07 am

PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 9:03 pm
mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 8:27 pm
PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:57 pm
Most children would not give two shits about Amelie, Brazil or Ed Wood.
I'm not sure, but I think I was 13 when I watched Amelie, and I liked it. I don't know if I would have liked it at 11.
Well yeah. For a 13 or 14 year old I think it could work. But there's a big difference in the perception of romance between 11 and 13, let alone younger. Before puberty romance is much more about mimicking adult behaviours or expectations, and as such even if they enjoy Amelie they wouldn't really get any of what it says about romance.
You may be right about the romance, but if I remember correctly, Amelie doesn't meet the guy until about 3/4 through the film, so kids may like the earlier parts of the film.

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#116

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » February 9th, 2019, 12:30 am

mjf314 wrote:
February 9th, 2019, 12:07 am
PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 9:03 pm
mjf314 wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 8:27 pm


I'm not sure, but I think I was 13 when I watched Amelie, and I liked it. I don't know if I would have liked it at 11.
Well yeah. For a 13 or 14 year old I think it could work. But there's a big difference in the perception of romance between 11 and 13, let alone younger. Before puberty romance is much more about mimicking adult behaviours or expectations, and as such even if they enjoy Amelie they wouldn't really get any of what it says about romance.
You may be right about the romance, but if I remember correctly, Amelie doesn't meet the guy until about 3/4 through the film, so kids may like the earlier parts of the film.
It's one third of the way through, but the whole film is about a frustrated single woman interfering with other people's love lives. If you haven't experienced some form of romantic frustration then I don't see how any of that hits. Yeah there's parts here and there they might enjoy, but as a whole it's not really going to work.

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#117

Post by Fergenaprido » February 9th, 2019, 5:49 am

ChrisReynolds wrote:
February 8th, 2019, 6:32 pm
I've been down my list of favourite films, eliminating things I don't think were either suitable or enjoyable for children. I eliminated everything the BBFC had rated 18, but the following films that are rated 15 seem from memory as though they would be suitable for children near the top of the age range, either because they have relatable child characters, or because elements of comedy/fantasy/animation/child-characters soften the impact and increase the appeal to children. Does anybody else have any opinions on whether they should be included?

A Fish Called Wanda (1988) - probably not, humour is a bit too adult-oriented for kids to grasp
Amélie (2001) - not sure, absolutely love this film, and think kids might love the visuals and music, but not get much of the story
Beetlejuice (1988) - haven't seen
Brazil (1985) - would NOT recommend, I think it touches on many topics way out of the grasp of kids
Ed Wood (1994) - haven't seen
Gremlins (1984) - should be fine, I know I saw all or part of it as a kid, and rewatched it last year. A tad violent, but I think 10-12-year-olds would be okay
Kung Fu Hustle (2004) - funny, but not sure I want to be exposing kids to gang violence and such
Michael Jackson: Thriller (1983) - yes (though it will be scary for some)
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975) - not sure, absurd humour can be hit and miss
Monty Python's Life of Brian (1979) - not sure, absurd humour can be hit and miss, also may offend the parents who are more religious if you show this to their kids
Mr. Vampire (1985) - haven't seen
Poltergeist (1982) - haven't seen
Rushmore (1998) - no, definitely a movie for teens, not kids
Stand by Me (1986) - yes, the protagonists are 12/13 IIRC, and I think it's at the right level for 10+
The City of Lost Children (1995) - haven't seen (but maybe I'll watch before submitting a list)
The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975) - it's go some fun moments that would go over well with kids, but I think I would wait until high school before showing this one
This Is Spinal Tap (1984) - no, mockumentary of rock n roll is something I would save until later
Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust (2000) - undecided, saw this in my 20s and it just okay, and don't remember much of what happened to give a proper recommendation
I'm thinking of ordering my list in terms of age (i.e. 1 is suitable for all ages, 100 is suitable for 12-year olds), or just leaving it unranked. Very hard to organize this.

Edit: my notes are nested in the quote.

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#118

Post by Wonderful Rainbow » February 9th, 2019, 7:57 am

A question for parents not living in anglophone countries: does your children watch English language films dubbed or in English with/without subtitles?

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#119

Post by joachimt » February 9th, 2019, 9:00 am

How often do you guys think kids watch movies?
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#120

Post by mightysparks » February 9th, 2019, 10:03 am

I probably watched at least 3 a week including rewatches. I don’t know how often any other people watch movies :shrug:
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