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iCM Forum's Film Recommendations for Children: nominations due Apr 7

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Re: iCM Forum's Film Recommendations for Children: nominations due Apr 7

#41

Post by burneyfan » February 6th, 2019, 1:18 am

This is an unranked list of films that my kids actually watch (and sometimes obsess over) that I don't absolutely loathe: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043365070/

Not necessarily what I'd always like them to watch, but what they actually like.

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#42

Post by mjf314 » February 6th, 2019, 1:48 am

mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:08 am
A happy coincidence that it is exactly 100 films but I've only skimmed through my spreadsheet and IMDb's PG-13 and less films that I've seen so far. I hope to rank it and possibly add others and take off some, but then I don't know what I'm ranking; how good they are for kids? How much I like them? Something else?
Rank it based on how strongly you would recommend the movie to children. It can be based on how much you think children would like it, or how important the film is for educational purposes, or a combination of both. I assume that most people are leaving out films that they personally dislike.

You can include R-rated films if you disagree with the rating. I have Amelie and Amadeus on my list.
burneyfan wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:18 am
This is an unranked list of films that my kids actually watch (and sometimes obsess over) that I don't absolutely loathe: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043365070/

Not necessarily what I'd always like them to watch, but what they actually like.
Are there any films that you think they would love, but they just haven't watched yet?

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#43

Post by Jimi Antiloop » February 6th, 2019, 5:47 am

tobias wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 9:35 am
Needs revision but somewhere in this direction so far (unranked):

https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043310508/
You got "Paprika" on your list. Do you really think it's suitable for a under 12 years old child brain?
I think it definitly is way to confusing for them. It is even for some adults.

Just see, you also got Shining on your list. Are you serious?
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#44

Post by Jimi Antiloop » February 6th, 2019, 6:17 am

GruesomeTwosome wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 7:51 pm
I see the South Park movie on your list, haha...fuck it, I think I'll add it to mine as well (I don't think I currently have any R-rated films in my list), since I started watching SP myself at age 10 and saw the film by age 11 and I think I turned out OK. :D
It just weird to think the South Park movie could be a good movie for an under 12 year old.
The reason: They don't know anything about the irony that is happening there. It's not that it is as easy to catch in SP as in the Simpsons.

When I go through some list, I also see that some really have no clue of what too much violence and cruelty does to a childrens psych.
(and yes violence in a Cartoon is different to violence in a real person movie)

It's like with my mates in elementary school that liked watching "Rambo" in 3rd grad, they were the numb guys.
Nowadays I see the fucked brains of 2 graders that are allowed to play "Fortnite" in there free time. It just is not good for them.
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#45

Post by mightysparks » February 6th, 2019, 6:26 am

It's not the films/games, it's the children's understanding and emotional capabilities and their parent's abilities to guide their children's morals. I definitely understood the irony of South Park at 7 (not allll of it, but I definitely got it), I don't know why people assume all kids are stupid. And I watched violent films and played violent games and I'm basically a pacifist. I get deeply upset at REAL violence and people manipulating/abusing/using etc in real life, films let me understand things in different contexts and so are not nearly as damaging or problematic. But there are certain kids who are gullible or sensitive and who can't be exposed to those things as well. My brother didn't watch horror movies, and is quite violent, and also watched South Park and swears like a madman sooo... some people are just not good people.
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#46

Post by Opio » February 6th, 2019, 9:32 am

I think, on balance, psychological research does show a link between violent media and violent/aggressive behavior in kids. This is an overall trend, of course, and wouldn't apply to 7-year olds who are intelligent, sophisticated, and just overall better humans than others.

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#47

Post by sol » February 6th, 2019, 9:50 am

mjf314 wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 12:56 am
sol wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 11:14 pm
I think that's the problem with the way most participants are compiling their ballot so far. They are thinking about which films they were okay to watch at 11 or 12, rather than the films that they think would be fine for all under-12-year-olds to see. Quoting what mjf said in the OP, "I hope we can create a useful guide for children, parents, and teachers." I think on this basis alone, we should get rid of films that teachers would get fired for showing to their class (graphic nudity, copious swearing, etc.) and I don't know if it's really fair to include such films in a guide for prospective parents either.
I think you should make your own decisions about what's appropriate, and not worry about what can be shown in school. Different schools have different rules, and some schools have stupider rules than others. If there's a risk of getting fired, the teacher should watch the film before showing it to their class.
I don't think you realise how extremely inappropriate some of the films are that are being cited in this poll. The Shining? Misery? South Park Bigger Longer & Uncut? I'm not talking about films that are perhaps a little violent or feature one or two scary scenes or a single cuss or two.

With all due respect, I'd appreciate it if you could edit the OP to remove the suggestion that we are creating a recommendations list for teachers because, frankly, we aren't. With participants admitting that some of their choices would not be fine for all kids, or that some of their choices are merely based on what was okay for them at that age, the user base here is clearly thinking about recommendations for individual kids, not whole classes. I'm not sure if anybody else here is a primary school teacher, but I have taught kids aged 4 to 12 for the past eight years, and what we are seeing recommended here is okay stuff for telling parents, "maybe try this; you know what your kids are like", but for entire classes, a large number of films here are highly inappropriate.

I also still think this is a bit of an issue...
sol wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 3:46 pm
There are probably only a handful of films (The Shining, really?) that make me raise an eyebrow as a recommendation for an 11 or 12 year old, but if we are trying to come up with a list of films suitable for children of all ages, or at least of decent literacy age (6 or 7), I'd veto a large number of of the film suggested so far as grossly inappropriate were I allowed to. :shrug:

I like the idea of this project (kudos for that) but maybe it would be good idea to specify an age range, or break this into a series of polls, say recommendations for 0-4 years, 5-8 years, 9-12 years. Just a suggestion...
...since very few participants are considering films that are good for all ages. There is a big difference between a 6 and 12 year old kid, and while I understand that yeah, Carmel would include The Shining since he didn't find it scary when he watched it at age 11 or 12 himself, the lack of age specifics in the criteria or title of the thread would make it seem like Carmel is suggesting it as a film to show my pre-primaries (age 4-5), the youngest class that I am teaching this year.

I don't know. The last thing I want to do is sound too critical and I always admire the effort that it takes to put a poll together. I just have my reservations about how useful a list this will be with so many users not considering all-ages entertainment. But, I will still participate here - assuming you remove that part about the poll being a list of recommendations for teachers since that description is inaccurate and misleading.

Thanks for taking the time to respond to me. :) I look forward to seeing what the results of this poll are however weird they might seem to me.
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#48

Post by Onderhond » February 6th, 2019, 9:55 am

I honestly would be worried about all the terrible ADD animations people are listing here. If anything is potentially damaging to your kids, it's probably that :D

I do agree the age thing is a bit confusing as it isn't specifically stated what the point is (should it be eligible for ALL kids under a certain age or is it a list of films you'd show them by the time they reach a certain age?), so maybe clearing that up in the OP would help?

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#49

Post by mjf314 » February 6th, 2019, 10:46 am

@sol: Each recommendation doesn't have to be good for all ages. You can recommend some films for 6-year-olds and other films for 11-year-olds. I just clarified this in the OP.

I removed the part about teachers, although I do still think the list can be useful to teachers. The teacher shouldn't just pick a random film. The teacher should look at the list for ideas, and then decide which film is appropriate to show in class. However I expect the top 50 will probably be all appropriate. The less appropriate films will probably be ranked lower. I may recommend the list to teachers in the results thread, depending on what the list looks like.

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#50

Post by jvv » February 6th, 2019, 11:00 am

sol wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 3:46 pm
I like the idea of this project (kudos for that) but maybe it would be good idea to specify an age range, or break this into a series of polls, say recommendations for 0-4 years, 5-8 years, 9-12 years. Just a suggestion...
Breaking it up in age groups would be my preference as well.

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#51

Post by mjf314 » February 6th, 2019, 11:21 am

jvv wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 11:00 am
sol wrote:
February 5th, 2019, 3:46 pm
I like the idea of this project (kudos for that) but maybe it would be good idea to specify an age range, or break this into a series of polls, say recommendations for 0-4 years, 5-8 years, 9-12 years. Just a suggestion...
Breaking it up in age groups would be my preference as well.
One option is to take the ages from commonsensemedia.org and display them as I post the results. I think they're more reasonable than the MPAA ages, although I sometimes disagree with them. There are usually three ages: according to Common Sense staff, according to parents, and according to kids. I think the "according to kids" age is the most reliable of the three.

That can be done after we finish the poll. I don't think we should have multiple polls, because it'll be too much work for the participants.

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#52

Post by ChrisReynolds » February 6th, 2019, 11:56 am

mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:08 am
This is my list at the moment, currently unranked: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043367218/

A happy coincidence that it is exactly 100 films but I've only skimmed through my spreadsheet and IMDb's PG-13 and less films that I've seen so far. I hope to rank it and possibly add others and take off some, but then I don't know what I'm ranking; how good they are for kids? How much I like them? Something else?
You'd recommend The Green Mile, Scream, Pet Sematary and Ginger Snaps for under-12s? Ginger Snaps in particular contains suicide imagery, frequent bloody violence, rape, drug use and dealing, self-harm and cannibalism.

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#53

Post by mjf314 » February 6th, 2019, 12:12 pm

Should I show what the list looks like so far, so we can debate more easily? The top 50 looks appropriate to me. I think the scariest films in the top 50 are probably Gremlins and Jurassic Park.

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#54

Post by 3eyes » February 6th, 2019, 1:32 pm

I read through this thread last night and was too tired to comment then, but I'm so grateful to mjf for starting this and for all the thoughtful lists and commentary from everybody. I'm delighted that there are so many silent films on people's lists - great for childen to be exposed to them early as by the time you're an adult it's definitely an acquired taste.

I'm also glad for the discussion of age differences. (Loved your empirical list for younger children, Burney!) Maybe those who have already posted could edit their posts to indicate which age(s) they had in mind?

There are lots of tricky issues here. Aside from the whole retro PC thing - I concur with what I take to be the consensus that we won't get into that - what will upset children is such an individual matter. Grave of the Fireflies, for example? It would have upset me - but I (and my progeny) had sheltered childhoods. Are we even making lists for kids who don't? (Which of course is another reason for specifying younger or older children.) There's my Children and War list - not designed to be watched by children but some titles might be appropriate.

I'm also glad to see so many non-American films, including some I never heard of and will try to seek out.

Thanks again for this - I will make a list with the hope of filling in some gaps. I think this project needs to be approached not as our usual popularity contest but as something more, well, curated?
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#55

Post by Onderhond » February 6th, 2019, 1:42 pm

3eyes wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:32 pm
Grave of the Fireflies, for example? It would have upset me - but I (and my progeny) had sheltered childhoods.
I think people in general are way (!) too protective of kids. I'm sure some kids might have a bad dream, might have some tough questions or might feel extremely sad after watching certain films, but that's no reason not to show them. Isn't that kind of the point of parenting - explaining them these things as they happen, making sure they understand them and can give them a place/context as they'll happen again.

Imo, it's better to learn certain negative aspects of life as a kid - in a warm and sheltered environment - rather than in actual adult life.
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#56

Post by 3eyes » February 6th, 2019, 2:05 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:42 pm
3eyes wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:32 pm
Grave of the Fireflies, for example? It would have upset me - but I (and my progeny) had sheltered childhoods.
I think people in general are way (!) too protective of kids. I'm sure some kids might have a bad dream, might have some tough questions are might feel extremely sad after watching certain films, but that's no reason not to show them. Isn't that kind of the point of parenting - explaining them these things as they happen, making sure they understand them and can give them a place/context as they'll happen again.

Imo, it's better to learn certain negative aspects of life as a kid - in a warm and sheltered environment - rather than in actual adult life.
Good point. I had nightmares about the death of the dinosaurs in Fantasia when I was around 10. My father responded by digging out his kid dinosaur books and read me The Lost World and it led to a lifelong interest in (mostly invertebrate) paleontology.
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#57

Post by mightysparks » February 6th, 2019, 2:13 pm

ChrisReynolds wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 11:56 am
mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:08 am
This is my list at the moment, currently unranked: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043367218/

A happy coincidence that it is exactly 100 films but I've only skimmed through my spreadsheet and IMDb's PG-13 and less films that I've seen so far. I hope to rank it and possibly add others and take off some, but then I don't know what I'm ranking; how good they are for kids? How much I like them? Something else?
You'd recommend The Green Mile, Scream, Pet Sematary and Ginger Snaps for under-12s? Ginger Snaps in particular contains suicide imagery, frequent bloody violence, rape, drug use and dealing, self-harm and cannibalism.
As an 11/12 year old girl deaing with her first period and getting boobs and pubes, yes I think Ginger Snaps is good for young girls dealing with those first steps of puberty. The Green Mile isn’t very graphic and is vague enough, I found it very uplifting as a kid. And Pet Sematary deals with family, grief and death in a way that is helpful for kids though admittedly it may be scary. Scream was always a black comedy to me and a fun and clever poke at horror films. I don’t know what everyone else’s childhoods are like and I’m not trying to make a list that’s suitable for every kid under 12, I’m making a list of films that can be suitable for all kids under 12. I saw all of these around ages 8-11 and were important in establishing and understanding a lot of things about the world and myself.
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#58

Post by ChrisReynolds » February 6th, 2019, 2:42 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:42 pm
3eyes wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:32 pm
Grave of the Fireflies, for example? It would have upset me - but I (and my progeny) had sheltered childhoods.
I think people in general are way (!) too protective of kids. I'm sure some kids might have a bad dream, might have some tough questions or might feel extremely sad after watching certain films, but that's no reason not to show them. Isn't that kind of the point of parenting - explaining them these things as they happen, making sure they understand them and can give them a place/context as they'll happen again.

Imo, it's better to learn certain negative aspects of life as a kid - in a warm and sheltered environment - rather than in actual adult life.
Grave of the Fireflies is one I've thought about as I'm making my list. I think it's on the edge of what I'll include: it will be upsetting for a lot of children, but it's clearly made with a child audience in mind - showing the horrors of war to children as honestly as possible but in an animated form and not dwelling on the more gory aspects.

Gremlins is a similar edge case that is for a child audience but contains a surprising amount of violence and death. The fantastical aspects of the Gremlins makes it more palatable for younger children.

I won't include anything more violent than these two
mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:13 pm
ChrisReynolds wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 11:56 am
mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:08 am
This is my list at the moment, currently unranked: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043367218/

A happy coincidence that it is exactly 100 films but I've only skimmed through my spreadsheet and IMDb's PG-13 and less films that I've seen so far. I hope to rank it and possibly add others and take off some, but then I don't know what I'm ranking; how good they are for kids? How much I like them? Something else?
You'd recommend The Green Mile, Scream, Pet Sematary and Ginger Snaps for under-12s? Ginger Snaps in particular contains suicide imagery, frequent bloody violence, rape, drug use and dealing, self-harm and cannibalism.
As an 11/12 year old girl deaing with her first period and getting boobs and pubes, yes I think Ginger Snaps is good for young girls dealing with those first steps of puberty. The Green Mile isn’t very graphic and is vague enough, I found it very uplifting as a kid. And Pet Sematary deals with family, grief and death in a way that is helpful for kids though admittedly it may be scary. Scream was always a black comedy to me and a fun and clever poke at horror films. I don’t know what everyone else’s childhoods are like and I’m not trying to make a list that’s suitable for every kid under 12, I’m making a list of films that can be suitable for all kids under 12. I saw all of these around ages 8-11 and were important in establishing and understanding a lot of things about the world and myself.
Hopefully the lists will balance out. I think children can cope with a lot, but I do want to consider what an adult would think would be appropriate for their children if they were given this list.

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#59

Post by mightysparks » February 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm

Maybe but I can only judge for myself as having been a child and what I would want my kids to watch if I had any (and don’t worry I ain’t gonna have any). I think everything on my list is appropriate for a particular type of child, and offers something to the way they learn to interpret the world. Childhood to me isn’t about avoiding ‘bad’ or inappropriate things but understanding them.
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#60

Post by Onderhond » February 6th, 2019, 2:53 pm

mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm
Childhood to me isn’t about avoiding ‘bad’ or inappropriate things but understanding them.
Hear hear! Nothing worse than bumping in some 18 year old and thinking "what they hell did you do these past 18 years, were you even a part of this universe?".

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#61

Post by mightysparks » February 6th, 2019, 3:07 pm

Onderhond wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:53 pm
mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm
Childhood to me isn’t about avoiding ‘bad’ or inappropriate things but understanding them.
Hear hear! Nothing worse than bumping in some 18 year old and thinking "what they hell did you do these past 18 years, were you even a part of this universe?".
When I was 15, I had a very sheltered friend who loved Care Bears and wasn’t allowed to watch anything rated over PG-13 and someone asked her once what bondage was. She didn’t know but guessed ‘a type of cream’. It was hilarious but also pretty sad. .
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#62

Post by Onderhond » February 6th, 2019, 3:42 pm

I guess bondage can have a very moisturizing effect though, so they do share some common traits.

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#63

Post by albajos » February 6th, 2019, 5:02 pm

I wont be voting in this poll. The frequent use of the word sheltered just make me want to puke.

This is absolutely not the thread to make fun of children.

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#64

Post by burneyfan » February 6th, 2019, 5:12 pm

mjf314 wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:48 am
burneyfan wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 1:18 am
This is an unranked list of films that my kids actually watch (and sometimes obsess over) that I don't absolutely loathe: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043365070/

Not necessarily what I'd always like them to watch, but what they actually like.
Are there any films that you think they would love, but they just haven't watched yet?
Great question; I thought about it a bit last night. My nine-year-old girl is a big fan of musicals (both stage and film), animated films, wacky comedy, anything to do with animals, and is particularly drawn to movies tied to environmental or social justice issues (if anyone can think of a child-friendly film dealing with the Civil Rights movement OR kid-friendly nature documentaries, for example, I think she'd massively dig those). She recently said she wants to see West Side Story. She loved a stage production of The King and I a year ago, and I bet she'd love the film. I think she'd love a lot of musicals like The Music Man, Into the Woods (even with the darker stuff -- she loves the Broadway soundtrack), Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Meet Me in St. Louis, On the Town, Bye Bye Birdie...anything like that. In another couple of years, probably Grease, My Fair Lady, Fiddler on the Roof, A Hard Day's Night, Victor/Victoria. She's just starting to get into Studio Ghibli -- she was a little too easily distracted and mostly attracted to goofier, faster-paced American animation until recently. She recently loved Kiki's Delivery Service, and I think she'll go for Ponyo, Totoro, Spirited Away, Mononoke, etc. I think she would absolutely, obsessively freak out (in an awful way) over Grave of the Fireflies or something like Watership Down -- some kids could totally take it, I bet, but she's definitely not one of them (yet). On the animal front, I think she'd love Babe and Free Willy (not my favorites, but I think she'd love them), National Velvet, That Darn Cat!, Jungle Book, probably March of the Penguins or Fly Away Home when she gets slightly older. She loved Crin blanc when she was too tiny to remember now, so she'd probably like it again. I only put a few representative Popeye, Betty Boop, and Warner Bros cartoons on the list because I couldn't think of them all, but she is CRAZY about vintage American cartoons -- the ones I named, plus Felix the Cat, Woody Woodpecker, old Mickey Mouse, Casper the Friendly Ghost, older Tom & Jerry, anything that's animated pre-1970. I'm looking forward to her getting into screwball comedies (I think she will) -- I think she's getting ready for Bringing Up Baby and Duck Soup. I think she'd like Isle of Dogs, too -- she loved Fantastic Mr. Fox (though she is also obsessed with anything by Roald Dahl).

Silent slapstick comedies were among films that both kids loved when they were youngest, I think because they didn't have to read or understand wordplay to get the jokes -- they liked people bopping other people on the heads or spilling stuff everywhere or falling down. They'll still watch them with me sometimes, but they loved them even more when they were little.

My son turns five this month, and compared to his sister, he is definitely drawn more to stop-motion animation and action/adventure films. Dougal and the Blue Cat is his thing -- he has insisted on watching it every night for months. He was also more into films like Flaklypa Grand Prix, old Rankin/Bass stop-motion TV specials, or he'd probably like Jiri Trnka's puppet films, if he saw them -- any animations using little figures instead of drawings. (He likes cartoons, too -- he's just WAY more into stop-motion stuff than his sister.) There are some on my list that only his sister has seen so far and liked -- he already likes Star Wars, and when he sees Raiders of the Lost Ark, Kubo and the Two Strings, How to Train Your Dragon, or The Iron Giant, I think he will flip. I suspect he'll get into Jurassic Park, Pirates of the Caribbean, and superhero films -- he's already into a lot of the characters even without having seen the films. I think he'll dig Black Panther, Captain America, Spider-Man, and the 1978 Superman particularly. (BOTH kids were absolutely crazy about Spider-Man: Into the Spiderverse recently. Both kids also like Wonder Woman.) I think he would already be crazy about martial arts films if he saw them -- I bet he'd like the 1994 Legend of Drunken Master(or quite a few other Jackie Chan films dubbed into English) or some Shaw Bros stuff -- he's very into ninjas, kung fu, etc. even without the movies.

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#65

Post by beasterne » February 6th, 2019, 5:34 pm

burneyfan wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 5:12 pm
Great question; I thought about it a bit last night. My nine-year-old girl is particularly drawn to movies tied to environmental or social justice issues (if anyone can think of a child-friendly film dealing with the Civil Rights movement OR kid-friendly nature documentaries, for example, I think she'd massively dig those)
Hidden Figures and Remember the Titans came to mind for civil rights-adjacent movies (both on my list). Maybe Guess Who's Coming to Dinner as well.

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#66

Post by burneyfan » February 6th, 2019, 6:08 pm

beasterne wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 5:34 pm
burneyfan wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 5:12 pm
Great question; I thought about it a bit last night. My nine-year-old girl is particularly drawn to movies tied to environmental or social justice issues (if anyone can think of a child-friendly film dealing with the Civil Rights movement OR kid-friendly nature documentaries, for example, I think she'd massively dig those)
Hidden Figures and Remember the Titans came to mind for civil rights-adjacent movies (both on my list). Maybe Guess Who's Coming to Dinner as well.
Thanks for the ideas! Hairspray (2007) turned out to be one she absolutely loved, both because it was a musical and because of the integration subplot. (We'll save most of John Waters for a little while... ;) )

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#67

Post by Wonderful Rainbow » February 6th, 2019, 10:33 pm

I would like to say that this is one of the lists that people with a wider insight in cinema could really point out to the busy parent what to expose their children to. Creating a list that would be suitable to all kids for 12 years and old is very problematic as children mature noticeably year by year, so splitting this in at least two groups like 0-8 / 8-12 would be suitable.

Secondly, I am unpleasantly surprised be majority of these lists. Do you really believe Shrek should be pointed out to children? I wouldn't be worried that my future children might skip this or that pop culture reference. I was hoping everyone would automatically exclude films which include characters printed on H&M t-shirts or have their own Lego series. Maybe I have a confused impression of the purpose of this list, but I automatically imagined it would gravitate more towards films that are not purely entertaining but also have an added educational value, so I am happy to see the silents and foreign films. Still missing more of the "creative" shorts though.

I actually started making a list like this back in 2014 but haven't really updated since, will try to fix that. https://www.imdb.com/list/ls059954609/

Plus, I believe South Park is something children should find out on their own. The same as with porn at a later age. (Maybe an extra list of "The Cool Uncle/Aunt recommends best films for early teens" should be made? Heavy Metal would top that poll for sure.)

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#68

Post by mightysparks » February 6th, 2019, 11:18 pm

I guess it depends on the ages the voters were when having seen certain films. Most films you see as a kid you like purely for entertainment value tbh but every film has some kind of message or theme. Shrek was a big childhood film for me and every kid loved it, it was a fun film but it also has the whole ‘don’t judge a book by its cover’ thing in a package that works for kids and is still entertaining. I purposely left out films I only liked for entertainment value (and I didn’t think had much else to offer), I also left out popular kiddie films that I don’t like and think are pointless or have bad/weak messages, and only included ‘adult’ horror films that I saw as a kid and didn’t just like because they were scary or fun, and I tried to choose films that had a particular effect or were particularly enjoyable because of the age when I watched it.

Some of the films, particularly the silent and foreign films, are confusing to me because there’s no way I would’ve watched or liked those as a kid. I didn’t see my first foreign or silent film until I was 13.
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#69

Post by Onderhond » February 6th, 2019, 11:19 pm

Wonderful Rainbow wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 10:33 pm
but I automatically imagined it would gravitate more towards films that are not purely entertaining but also have an added educational value, so I am happy to see the silents and foreign films.
How are they more educational?

In the end I'm not even sure I'd subject my potential child to my own list here, since it feels healthier to me that kids don't bother with old stuff their parents liked, instead committing to their own generation's culture.

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#70

Post by mjf314 » February 6th, 2019, 11:24 pm

A few shout outs:

I added 12 Angry Men after seeing it on maxwelldeux's list. It has a good message and I think it's not hard to understand.
I added The Day the Earth Stood Still after seeing it on jvv's list. I think it's a good sci-fi film for children.
I added Flaklypa Grand Prix after seeing it on burneyfan's and jvv's lists.

Let's try to get some non-English-language family animation closer to the top. Other than the obvious Ghibli, I voted for Ernest & Celestine, The King and the Mockingbird, Vinni pukh, Kirikou and the Sorceress, Hedgehog in the Fog, There Once Was a Dog, the Cheburashka series, Flaklypa Grand Prix, and Cat City.

I might add a couple more live-action musicals to my list, but I'm not sure which ones to add. I already have The Wizard of Oz, Mary Poppins, Willy Wonka, and Labyrinth. I don't remember Singin' in the Rain very well, so I'm not sure if it's good for children, and I haven't seen The Sound of Music.
Edit: I added Singin' in the Rain to my list.

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#71

Post by burneyfan » February 7th, 2019, 2:12 am

Wonderful Rainbow wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 10:33 pm
I would like to say that this is one of the lists that people with a wider insight in cinema could really point out to the busy parent what to expose their children to. Creating a list that would be suitable to all kids for 12 years and old is very problematic as children mature noticeably year by year, so splitting this in at least two groups like 0-8 / 8-12 would be suitable.

Secondly, I am unpleasantly surprised be majority of these lists. Do you really believe Shrek should be pointed out to children? I wouldn't be worried that my future children might skip this or that pop culture reference. I was hoping everyone would automatically exclude films which include characters printed on H&M t-shirts or have their own Lego series.
Only answering for myself here, of course, but I think that users are making different types of lists; for example, I made a list of what my kids actually like, rather than the films that I wish they would love. There have definitely been (IMO) great films I've tried on them that were total flops. In most cases, their dad and I tuck the film away and hope to try again another time, when they're in a different mood or when their tastes have morphed.

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#72

Post by Jimi Antiloop » February 7th, 2019, 2:33 am

mightysparks wrote:
February 6th, 2019, 2:50 pm
Maybe but I can only judge for myself as having been a child and what I would want my kids to watch if I had any (and don’t worry I ain’t gonna have any). I think everything on my list is appropriate for a particular type of child, and offers something to the way they learn to interpret the world. Childhood to me isn’t about avoiding ‘bad’ or inappropriate things but understanding them.
I see it the same way. You definitly should learn about the bad as a child. (There for the Brothers Grimm are a very important source for good stories) If this poll was called, movies for kids they should watch with their parents, it would be a differnet task. Watching The X files series with my mum, when I was 9-10 years was also challenging, but I had someone to explain things and wasn't left alone.


@mighty I would recommend this to put on your list. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5773402/
The kids, could really learn something with value from that.
Me for myself I won't put it on my list, because I think the age of 12 is perfect to introduce these facts about humanity to a child. Before I would just tell him who it looks like, but not show the actual pictures.
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#73

Post by PeacefulAnarchy » February 7th, 2019, 2:43 am

burneyfan wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 2:12 am
There have definitely been (IMO) great films I've tried on them that were total flops. In most cases, their dad and I tuck the film away and hope to try again another time, when they're in a different mood or when their tastes have morphed.
I'm curious to hear what films these are. Knowing what doesn't work is just as interesting as what does.

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#74

Post by burneyfan » February 7th, 2019, 4:01 am

PeacefulAnarchy wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 2:43 am
burneyfan wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 2:12 am
There have definitely been (IMO) great films I've tried on them that were total flops. In most cases, their dad and I tuck the film away and hope to try again another time, when they're in a different mood or when their tastes have morphed.
I'm curious to hear what films these are. Knowing what doesn't work is just as interesting as what does.
Some that are on my list failed at one time, but then were a big hit later (or one kid hated it, then his/her sibling saw it and loved it).

Films that I would vote for but that are considered flops by whichever of my kids has seen them include: The Adventures of Robin Hood (Curtiz), The Witches (Roeg -- even though my daughter loves Roald Dahl), Sounder (Ritt), The Emperor's Nightingale (Trnka), A Little Princess (Cuaron), The Secret Garden (Holland), The Secret Garden (Wilcox), The Secret of Kells (Twomey & Moore), Spirited Away (Miyazaki -- pretty sure my daughter's ready to try this again), Hugo (Scorsese), Close Encounters of the Third Kind (Spielberg -- big flop) Labyrinth (Henson -- daughter hated it), The Dark Crystal (Henson), Whale Rider (Caro), The Goonies (Donner), A Christmas Story (Clark -- I don't mind so much but my husband is crushed), La belle et la bête (Cocteau -- subtitles were not an issue -- my daughter just wasn't interested). Those are the ones that come to mind...there are definitely others.

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#75

Post by 3eyes » February 7th, 2019, 4:45 am

thanks for providing such detail, Burney. I like your whole approach (the right movie for the right viewer at the right time).

It's hard to remember with my own kids because home video was in its infancy when my son was that age and my daughter, being autistic, had ... peculiar tastes. It is hard to predict what a given kid will like, tho one gets a feel for it as one goes along. And when they show interest in a certain subject / issue / historical event /whatever, one can look for a film that will address it on their level.
autistic daughter's childhood favoritesShow
The swimmer (obsession with water)
The mouse that roared ("lady taking a bath")
The autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (at 12 she made an illustrated book about "James" which entirely missed the historical context)
The secret life of Walter Mitty (watching it over and over, she gradually learned to distinguish the fantasy sequences from the rest)

Because of the water thing I tried her on Esther Williams, but that didn't go over at all.
Last edited by 3eyes on February 7th, 2019, 3:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#76

Post by mjf314 » February 7th, 2019, 4:52 am

I found this list of the best Pixar films, as voted by children (it doesn't say how many children voted).
https://slate.com/culture/2015/06/the-b ... quels.html

I was trying to find a more general movie poll voted by children, but I couldn't find any.

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#77

Post by mightysparks » February 7th, 2019, 5:23 am

I know for some reason my childhood doesn't count, but I always kept lists of my favourites and this is one I made some years ago with the ages that I first watched/liked it: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls000364985/
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#78

Post by maxwelldeux » February 7th, 2019, 7:42 am

mightysparks wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 5:23 am
I know for some reason my childhood doesn't count, but I always kept lists of my favourites and this is one I made some years ago with the ages that I first watched/liked it: https://www.imdb.com/list/ls000364985/
That is a great list - and it seems as though we had similar (with a few key differences) childhoods. In my house, violent movies were OK - very early on, it was stressed to me that it was all fake, no one was hurt, and doing anything like this in real life was not OK. And this conversation was repeated often. Terminator 2 was OK because I knew and my parents knew I knew it wasn't real and those behaviors were bad.

But Terminator 1 was NOT OK - there were boobs. Apparently, in my house, the human female nipple is the morally corruptive scourge of society and inappropriate for any child. Like I remember having to sneak to watch Species at age ~16 on a free preview weekend of Cinemax because boobs.

And then there are those movies that I want to yell at you for seeing at that age because that's wildly inappropriate and has absolutely NOTHING to do with the fact I was able to see R-rated films because I'm about a decade older... :whistling:

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#79

Post by Jimi Antiloop » February 7th, 2019, 8:41 am

Some stuff from my perspective.
https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043368707/
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#80

Post by mjf314 » February 7th, 2019, 9:18 am

Jimi Antiloop wrote:
February 7th, 2019, 8:41 am
Some stuff from my perspective.
https://www.imdb.com/list/ls043368707/
I noticed you voted for the 2nd Harry Potter film but not the 1st. Is that a mistake?

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