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Paradise still not lost

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Paradise still not lost

#1

Post by Dolwphin » November 9th, 2013, 4:38 am

Films that I have seen in the formal place of a cinema. Since the first November, 2013.

1. Les Parents terribles (Jean Cocteau, 1948) 5/10

It is moderately entertaining and the characters are fairly charismatic. The craftsmanship is stable and supports the plot in a functional way. But this film is really permeated by "high quality" - that is with theatricality, bourgeois surroundings, and artificiality. On a positive note there is some irony and humor about this in the film. But the film lacks cinematic merit and reminds to much of a filmed theater piece.

2. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (George Roy Hill, 1969) 6/10

I appreciated the self-awareness and the parody of the Western genre. Also the chemistry between Newman / Redford creates much humor throughout the film. Many moments of cinematographic eye-candy which is always appreciated. Some of the landscape imagery is gorgeous and looks awesome on the big screen.

3. Un homme et une femme (Claude Lelouch, 1966) 5/10

There are some good humanistic moments in this film. I like the interaction the love couple have with their children and their initial encounters. The film also contains expressive cinematography which are to varying degrees interesting. But in my opinion it gets a bit to self-indulgent and meaningless. The music is annoying at times.

4. Mat' (Vsevolod Pudovkin, 1926) 7/10

Soviet montage. Skillful editing that enhances the dramatic tension and creates lyric imagery. The representations of right-wing extremists / capitalists is hilarious. I appreciate the subtle details and traits that signals their decadency. Thanks to the focus on the family it achieves a humanistic tone despite its polemical intent.

5. L' éternel retour (Jean Delannoy, 1943) 6/10

Good performances from the actors involved. Good chemistry in the romantic involvements and enjoyful comic relief. It gets a bit to emotional for me, although it is well made with the pompous music and Greek tragedy ending and all. It contains some excellent cinematography and effective storytelling. One good example of storytelling would be the 360 degree camera movement around a table; illustrating the hostility/tension of the characters.

6. Orphée (Jean Cocteau, 1950) 7+/10

The poetry, the magic, the sensuality. The humor, the bleakness, the romance. The beating drums, the eloquent camera movements, the precise editing. The aesthetics are fantastic and the contents really intriguing. I definitely want to revisit the two other parts in the trilogy. :wub:
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#2

Post by Dolwphin » November 9th, 2013, 10:42 pm

7. Chung Kuo - Cina (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1972) (6+/10)

I saw the theatrical version which is only 134 minutes and not the complete 208 minutes. The film is not focused so much on politics, although the theme about communism and the transformation of the Chinese society permeates the whole work, but rather on more commonplace events. I think it is an interesting depiction. We see imagery from a variety of locations; Peking, Hanan-province, Suzhou, Nanjing, Shanghai. The handheld camera movements and the kinetic energy gives the film a vitality, dynamic power, and sensuality. The more intimate scenes - like that of a childbirth - is very reminiscent of cinema verité. In the depiction of more public spaces - like the eloquent treatment of beautiful temples - Antonioni also frequently utilizes the zoom.

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The film itself addresses its boundaries. It can't explain the country, understand the soul of the people only recognize its face, but it can document it. The camera - like the audience - is an outsider in this world. In one funny sequence this is actually explicitly addressed: the people avoid the camera and our gaze. There is a reversal; the filmmaker: the audience: is now the weird one. There is also a conflict between the filmmaker and the domestic guides which is manifested primarily by inhibitions on what is allowed to film. I like the depiction of the different milieus - like a fish market or restaurant. The theme about indoctrination/discipline - showing people marching or children playing soldiers etc. - and the craftsmanship. Everything is good, although not great, and perhaps if I see the complete version; my appreciation will enhance.

8. Szegénylegények (Miklós Jancsó, 1966) 8/10

Masterful mise-en-scené and cinematography. Seeing this on a big screen, sitting in the front row, made me completely speechless. Jancsó really utilizes the entire screen space in his elaborate compositions and figure movements. A film about power structures. The atmosphere is really uncomfortable and the humor morbid. This quote summaries it well: "It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets." - Voltaire

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#3

Post by Dolwphin » November 13th, 2013, 2:44 am

8. At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman, 2013) 7/10

A documentary about the university of Berkeley. We see the different faculties and surroundings. The focus is on different discussions in class rooms and board meetings. A substantial amount of them is concerned with the educational system. Also the film is concerned with ideology and a substantial amount of the film is dedicated to student activism. The film presents a variety of insights and the social commentary is multifaceted. The film contains a theater piece that parodies our Facebook consumption among other things. There are some lyrical imagery of the surroundings as well, which is used primarily as pauses of the narrative flow.

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9. Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater (Gabe Klinger, 2013) 5/10

10. Stemple Pass (James Benning, 2012) 7/10

Very beautiful cinematography that offers a wealth of details. The compositions are eloquent, serene, lyrical, meditative, and captivating. I appreciate the developments in the four different tableaux: the fog that is moving over the mountain, the different rhythms of the rain & snow, the variations in light. Also all the faces that is lurking in the imagery. Also interesting to hear the diaries of Ted Kaczynski, which gives a great insight into his personality, and what comes across as morbid humor. This is perhaps his most statical work: 4 shots of the same cabin in the woods - during spring, summer, autumn, and winter - that are all 30 min in length.

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#4

Post by XxXApathy420XxX » November 13th, 2013, 2:45 am

Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:44:56 PM wrote:8. At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman, 2013) 7/10
IS THIS ONLINE?!
My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#5

Post by Dolwphin » November 13th, 2013, 2:49 am

ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:45:32 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:44:56 PM wrote:8. At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman, 2013) 7/10
IS THIS ONLINE?!
This is my cinematic experiences, not digital experiences. Stemple Pass is avaible though, I highly recommend it.
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#6

Post by XxXApathy420XxX » November 13th, 2013, 2:51 am

Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:49:05 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:45:32 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:44:56 PM wrote:8. At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman, 2013) 7/10
IS THIS ONLINE?!
This is my cinematic experiences, not digital experiences. Stemple Pass is avaible though, I highly recommend it.

The pictures got a big large.
Wiseman... in theaters. You don't understand how jealous I am right now.
My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#7

Post by Dolwphin » November 13th, 2013, 2:53 am

ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:51:06 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:49:05 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:45:32 PM wrote:IS THIS ONLINE?!
This is my cinematic experiences, not digital experiences. Stemple Pass is avaible though, I highly recommend it.

The pictures got a big large.
Wiseman... in theaters. You don't understand how jealous I am right now.
Yeah it was great. Those 4 hours went by pretty fast. (l)
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#8

Post by funkybusiness » November 13th, 2013, 4:18 am

ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:45:32 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:44:56 PM wrote:8. At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman, 2013) 7/10
IS THIS ONLINE?!
DVD comes out in January, about the same time it airs on PBS.

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#9

Post by Dolwphin » November 14th, 2013, 7:09 pm

11. Konets Sankt-Peterburga (Vsevolod Pudovkin, 1927) 7/10

Impressive montage editing and cinematography. The film creates both dynamic sequences - like the depiction of war - and poetic sequences; like the imagery of the windmills. It also have a humanistic tone and focuses to some extent on human relationships. There is off course a substantial amount of propaganda as well. I liked the playfulness in the negative depictions of the bourgeoisie though - not showing their faces etc - and the use of cross cutting to establish contrasts between the workers/bourgeoisie. The film is pure visual pleasure; eye-candy.

To bad that some in the audience where a nuisance - people slept, phones vibrated, and somebody even took pictures of the screen. :down:

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12. Rattle of a Simple Man (Muriel Box, 1964) 5/10

It is basically a filmed play without much cinematic merit. Not that humorous either and it is very repetitive. Still it is quite charming and there are some good moments. But Box is a rather mediocre director, although Simon and Laura was quite good, and the reason the films are screened is because of her gender.
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#10

Post by Dolwphin » November 17th, 2013, 4:57 pm

13. Letter from an Unknown Woman (Max Ophüls, 1948) 7/10

The combination of the sensual, romantic, beautiful cinematography and the cynical reality is interesting. The protagonists subjectivity that permeates the narration creates interesting effects. I also appreciated the eloquent camera work and the unity it creates. I liked the chemistry between Louis Jourdan/Joan Fontaine and their intimate interactions. Especially the charming moments - e.g. the dance hall sequence with the musicians or their first encounter. And then there is the more cynical undertone that permeates the film. One good example would be the doubling of the camera movement in the stairway. To summaries it: excellent cinematography, charming romance, and dark undertones.

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14. Fästmö uthyres (Gustav Molander, 1950) 5+/10
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#11

Post by XxXApathy420XxX » November 17th, 2013, 5:01 pm

This was a film that got better the more I think about it. Plus Joan Fontaine :wub:
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#12

Post by Leopardi » November 17th, 2013, 5:34 pm

Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:53:07 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:51:06 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:49:05 PM wrote:This is my cinematic experiences, not digital experiences. Stemple Pass is avaible though, I highly recommend it.

The pictures got a big large.
Wiseman... in theaters. You don't understand how jealous I am right now.
Yeah it was great. Those 4 hours went by pretty fast. (l)
I'd love to see Wiseman on the big screen (and At Berkeley looks and sounds fantastic), but here in Ottawa it looks like we're out of luck, as I think TIFF 2013 was the closest we could have come to seeing it on the big screen, back in September. Arthur, we should have organized a road trip to TO!

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#13

Post by Dolwphin » November 19th, 2013, 1:51 am

15. Le joli mai (Chris Marker, 1963) 7+/10

It is a documentary film that combines the essay form with cinéma vérité. It is about the city of Paris during the month of May. The film consists of interviews with inhabitants and they are often spontaneous in nature. People from different socioeconomic conditions and ethnicity's are interviewed. The film is therefore multifaceted and addresses many different topics. There are some general themes -peoples attitude towards politics, the capitalistic society - as well though. I like the insights this film provides and the interesting people you encounter during the journey. The pessimistic man that complains about the lack of freedom and who also dismisses L'année dernière à Marienbad is one of the most memorable. The cinematography is very good; especially the urban imagery of buildings and the use of time-lapse in the final scenes. And off course there are cats! See image below.
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#14

Post by Dolwphin » November 20th, 2013, 3:10 am

16. A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (Ben Rivers & Ben Russell, 2013) 6/10

Solid film with beautiful imagery, good structure, and entertaining content. The films is about an Afro-American and three disparate moments in his life. His life in an Estonian collective, his wanderings in the wilderness of northern Finland, and his career as a neo-pagan black metal band artist in Norway.
I liked the intimate cinematography that captured the everyday activities in the collective. Also there are some humorous moments concerning fingers in peoples assholes. The second part consists of beautiful imagery of nature juxtaposed with fractions of civilization. I liked the close-ups in particular, but also the element of fire is utilized effectively. The performance in the final part is really awesome to experience. It utilizes direct cinema techniques to capture the intensity and atmosphere. It is an interesting contrast with the beginning of the film - that consisted of contemplative imagery of a lake.
But my favorite scene is the final one who presents some truly astonishing imagery of a city at night. Why not a higher grade? Well, I definitely liked it, but it borders on the banal/pretentious occasionally, and it is not that multifaceted or insightful.

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17. Manakamana (Stephanie Spray, Pacho Velez, 2013) 7/10

Minimalistic - the films consist of 11 takes with no camera movements - and anthropological - the films location is inside a funicular in Nepal and we observe people who is visiting the Manakamana temple - documentary film. I like how the beautiful imagery is gradually presented before your eyes and the fragmentation of the frame. Also the audio creates good rhythm that is reminiscent of a projector. Funny enough the film ends with the physical film burning up. Gradually, through the interaction of different people, an rich account of the society emerges and the everyday-life of the place is revealed. I guess it is worth mentioning that this is a work by Harvard's Sensory Ethnography Laboratory who was responsible for Leviathan.

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#15

Post by plasma_birds » November 21st, 2013, 10:19 pm

Dolwphin on Nov 19 2013, 08:10:33 PM wrote:16. A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (Ben Rivers & Ben Russell, 2013) 6/10

Solid film with beautiful imagery, good structure, and entertaining content. The films is about an Afro-American and three disparate moments in his life. His life in an Estonian collective, his wanderings in the wilderness of northern Finland, and his career as a neo-pagan black metal band artist in Norway.
I liked the intimate cinematography that captured the everyday activities in the collective. Also there are some humorous moments concerning fingers in peoples assholes. The second part consists of beautiful imagery of nature juxtaposed with fractions of civilization. I liked the close-ups in particular, but also the element of fire is utilized effectively. The performance in the final part is really awesome to experience. It utilizes direct cinema techniques to capture the intensity and atmosphere. It is an interesting contrast with the beginning of the film - that consisted of contemplative imagery of a lake.
But my favorite scene is the final one who presents some truly astonishing imagery of a city at night. Why not a higher grade? Well, I definitely liked it, but it borders on the banal/pretentious occasionally, and it is not that multifaceted or insightful.
This looks really cool. A collab from Ben Rivers and Ben Russell sounds astonishing (especially since I used to always get their names confused!), plus the added theme about black metal sounds even more intriguing.

Do you have prior experience with the directors? I've seen Russell's Let Each One Go Where He May, which was very good if not quite great. It definitely reminded me of Raya Martin's Autohystoria but not as much of a strange and wholly original experience as that film. It had its banal moments. Rivers, on the other hand, has several miniature masterpieces to his name, Ah, Liberty! and Origin of the Species being the two that stand out especially well in my opinion.
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#16

Post by Dolwphin » November 21st, 2013, 10:22 pm

plasma_birds on Nov 21 2013, 03:19:23 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 19 2013, 08:10:33 PM wrote:16. A Spell to Ward Off the Darkness (Ben Rivers & Ben Russell, 2013) 6/10

Solid film with beautiful imagery, good structure, and entertaining content. The films is about an Afro-American and three disparate moments in his life. His life in an Estonian collective, his wanderings in the wilderness of northern Finland, and his career as a neo-pagan black metal band artist in Norway.
I liked the intimate cinematography that captured the everyday activities in the collective. Also there are some humorous moments concerning fingers in peoples assholes. The second part consists of beautiful imagery of nature juxtaposed with fractions of civilization. I liked the close-ups in particular, but also the element of fire is utilized effectively. The performance in the final part is really awesome to experience. It utilizes direct cinema techniques to capture the intensity and atmosphere. It is an interesting contrast with the beginning of the film - that consisted of contemplative imagery of a lake.
But my favorite scene is the final one who presents some truly astonishing imagery of a city at night. Why not a higher grade? Well, I definitely liked it, but it borders on the banal/pretentious occasionally, and it is not that multifaceted or insightful.
This looks really cool. A collab from Ben Rivers and Ben Russell sounds astonishing (especially since I used to always get their names confused!), plus the added theme about black metal sounds even more intriguing.

Do you have prior experience with the directors? I've seen Russell's Let Each One Go Where He May, which was very good if not quite great. It definitely reminded me of Raya Martin's Autohystoria but not as much of a strange and wholly original experience as that film. It had its banal moments. Rivers, on the other hand, has several miniature masterpieces to his name, Ah, Liberty! and Origin of the Species being the two that stand out especially well in my opinion.
I have not seen any previous films by these directors. But I am looking forward to seeing more of their work, although it is not a priority at the moment.
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#17

Post by Dolwphin » November 25th, 2013, 2:10 am

18. Bound by Honor (Taylor Hackford, 1993) 5/10

Despite being stereotypical and banal, it is very entertaining and provides some insights into a troubled neighborhood and a maximum-security prison.

19. Så går ett år – Tiden i Sjöbo (Ebbe Gilbe, Gunnar Källström, Kjell Tunegård) 5/10

Apparently this is on the FLM list of best Swedish films. Sure, it is an interesting document of a small municipality (Sjöbo) in southern Sweden and the people/ideas of that place. The depiction of the anti-immigrant discourse is probably the most relevant, considering how our society is developing at the moment. Although the film merely presents the political rhetoric and states that there is is two opposing sides. I would have wished that the film expanded on its themes more. A similar but IMO much more rewarding film to see is Jan Troell's Sagolandet.
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#18

Post by lampadatriste » November 25th, 2013, 2:28 am

Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:53:07 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:51:06 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:49:05 PM wrote:This is my cinematic experiences, not digital experiences. Stemple Pass is avaible though, I highly recommend it.

The pictures got a big large.
Wiseman... in theaters. You don't understand how jealous I am right now.
Yeah it was great. Those 4 hours went by pretty fast. (l)
Stemple Pass and At Berkeley were exhibited here at the same precise time and I had another appointment so missed both. fml

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#19

Post by Dolwphin » November 25th, 2013, 3:11 am

lampadatriste on Nov 24 2013, 07:28:48 PM wrote:
Dolwphin on Nov 12 2013, 07:53:07 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Nov 12 2013, 07:51:06 PM wrote:Wiseman... in theaters. You don't understand how jealous I am right now.
Yeah it was great. Those 4 hours went by pretty fast. (l)
Stemple Pass and At Berkeley were exhibited here at the same precise time and I had another appointment so missed both. fml
I almost reported this instead of quoting. But did I do the right thing though? Perhaps you are not hardcore-cinephile enough, do you have a life or something? :P
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#20

Post by Dolwphin » November 28th, 2013, 12:04 am

20. Film socialisme (Jean-Luc Godard, 2010) 6/10

I have now seen it twice and both times with the infamous (Navajo)subtitles. It is possible to follow and construct coherent narrative developments. The general thoughts is decipherable, but I really want to revisit it with proper subtitles in the future. This film has a substantial amount of creativity, playfulness, and eloquence. The cinematography is really gorgeous and rich in contrasts; color/b&w, amateurish granular imagery / professional and smooth imagery, and found footage is utilized in striking ways. A good specific example would be the arrangement of title cards. My favorite moment in the film is when the child is painting and the image becomes a painting.

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21. JLG/JLG - autoportrait de décembre (Jean-Luc Godard, 1995) 6/10

This feels as an honest and revealing self-portrait. Godard reads pretentious, but also insightful, phrases and his personality / department is displayed before our eyes. It contains some very good cinematography; especially of lyrical landscape images. But also some more intimate and subtle depictions of his apartment. Also wouldn't you want to see Godard play Tennis!? Lastly, I liked his depiction of himself: ""A man, nothing but a man, no better than any other, but no other better than him".

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22. Numéro deux (Jean-Luc Godard, 1975) 6/10

Fragmentation of the screen; most of the film is displayed on different Television screens. We see explicit nudity of all types (women, man, child) and themes such as sex education, feminism, and sexuality is explored. As usual the theme about the dangers of capitalism and its exploitative nature is discussed. The formal device of title cards is used creatively and there are some interesting cinematography. It sure is an interesting film and it would probably benefit from greater scrutiny.

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#21

Post by brokenface » November 28th, 2013, 12:31 am

"I have now seen it twice and both times with the infamous (Navajo)subtitles. It is possible to follow and construct coherent narrative developments. The general thoughts is decipherable, but I really want to revisit it with proper subtitles in the future. This film has a substantial amount of creativity, playfulness, and eloquence."

out of interest, how can you tell how eloquent it is if you are only just able to decipher it?!

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#22

Post by Dolwphin » November 28th, 2013, 12:54 am

brokenface on Nov 27 2013, 05:31:42 PM wrote:"I have now seen it twice and both times with the infamous (Navajo)subtitles. It is possible to follow and construct coherent narrative developments. The general thoughts is decipherable, but I really want to revisit it with proper subtitles in the future. This film has a substantial amount of creativity, playfulness, and eloquence."

out of interest, how can you tell how eloquent it is if you are only just able to decipher it?!
I was referring to the formalistic aspects.
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#23

Post by brokenface » November 28th, 2013, 1:38 am

er, ok :ermm:

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#24

Post by Gershwin » November 28th, 2013, 1:40 am

Eat that, BF! tehe
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#25

Post by brokenface » November 28th, 2013, 1:44 am

Gershwin on Nov 27 2013, 06:40:49 PM wrote:Eat that, BF! tehe
I'm going to start using it as a chat up line "hey, you have some really eloquent formalistic aspects, if you know what I mean, wink wink"

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#26

Post by Dolwphin » November 28th, 2013, 2:10 am

brokenface on Nov 27 2013, 06:44:19 PM wrote:
Gershwin on Nov 27 2013, 06:40:49 PM wrote:Eat that, BF! tehe
I'm going to start using it as a chat up line "hey, you have some really eloquent formalistic aspects, if you know what I mean, wink wink"
Sounds like something Godard would say. I loved his depiction of his own sexism in JLG/JLG by the way. :wub:
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#27

Post by Gershwin » November 28th, 2013, 2:37 am

I'm rewatching Une femme est une femme, because I didn't remember a single thing about it. Love it.

But indeed, what do you mean when you say formalistic aspects?
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#28

Post by Dolwphin » November 28th, 2013, 3:09 am

Gershwin on Nov 27 2013, 07:37:16 PM wrote:I'm rewatching Une femme est une femme, because I didn't remember a single thing about it. Love it.

But indeed, what do you mean when you say formalistic aspects?
Everything that is awesome about films. That is cinematography, editing, mise en scene, and other formal aspects. That is form, not content. Or you could frame it as what is medium specific to film.
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#29

Post by Dolwphin » November 30th, 2013, 3:36 am

23. Fitzcarraldo (Werner Herzog, 1982) 5/10
24. Les salauds (Claire Denis, 2013) 3/10

I really disliked its aesthetics which felt artificial, unimaginative, bombastic, and ugly. It is obvious already from the beginning. The "cool" / "epic" cinematography, reminiscent of a high concept Hollywood production, it tries to achieve is so unconvincing. Even the better moments in the film is quite banal and typical. It is an important topic it tries to shed light on, but it is depicted in such a sensationalist and unimaginative way. Surprised to see Denis direct such, at best, a mediocre film. Since I like all her other works, I'll give this a new chance in the future.

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25. La vie d'Adèle (Abdellatif Kechiche, 2013) 6+/10

I liked the intimate and sensual cinematography. It captures the emotions/atmosphere perfectly and really vitalizes the scenes. Both Léa Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos did excellent performances and their chemistry was spot on. The depiction of romance and heartbreak is IMO really moving. Also appreciated the cultural discussions and the film references.

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#30

Post by Dolwphin » December 5th, 2013, 8:45 pm

26. Burden of Dreams (Les Blank, 1982) 4/10
27. Madame de... (Max Ophüls, 1953) 7/10

It is almost as emotionally overwhelming and well written as Letter from an Unknown Woman. I enjoy it much more on an aesthetic level though and stylistically there have been much improvement. The eloquent camera work is used consistently and the coherency is much stronger. The continuity and flow of the film is really captivating, one excellent example of that is: the pieces of paper thrown out the train window, transforming into snow flakes. Another obvious example is the dance sequence montage. Also these camera movements are smooth, graceful, and beautiful in their own right. And how can you not adore the beautiful costumes, set designs, and the luxurious universe the film creates? "But Ophuls is decadent, have no substance, and does not criticize the society we live in..." I think the visual extravaganza is well integrated with the narrative though. And there are some social awareness present in the film. The working class, so to speak, is showed briefly and they highlight the absurdity of the aristocratic society.
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#31

Post by jvv » December 6th, 2013, 12:50 pm

If you want to see an Ophüls movie with social criticism you could watch Komedie om geld (1936).

It's not a great movie, although entertaining enough, but it definitely has a stance on society. However in this earlier Ophüls work his visual style isn't as developed yet (I think, I have only seen this and Letter from an Unknown Woman), so you might be disappointed on that account.

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