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Back to square one

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tirefeet
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Back to square one

#1

Post by tirefeet » April 2nd, 2013, 6:27 pm

My interest for movies maybe started when I was 12-13 back when I was in 7th grade. Mostly I catched movies on tv before then but it was around that time that I started to follow new movies from magazines. I remember that I saw the Recruit the week it premiered, my first glimpse of Pacino, not knowing his importance, but aware of his fame. Then I'm remembering our state tv going huge one month (probably November 2003) and decided to view acclaimed movies week after week. I watched the Godfather series and the Pianist during that span, I remember waiting for sundays for each Godfather movie and the Pianist moved me so much that I didn't want to sleep with a blanket on cause the situation of people in that movie affected me deeply, but then of course mom interfered in and talked me out of it.

During my first year in college I discovered utorrent, started to download movies and stored them in cd's. I noticed Imdb and the notorious top 250, and started to cherry-pick the movies I watch according to their ranks. If you asked what are my favorite 3 movies in March 2009 my answers would be Forrest Gump, Seven and American Beauty.

Of course storing movies in dvd's was not practical for collection purposes so in October 2009 I bought my first external hdd and this time I was more serious about movie watching. I started with the movies I took much time to watch: Last of the Mohicans, Dangerous Minds, the Zeitgeist documentary. Along with those three, the Insider and Citizen Kane were on my list. I recall checking the clock for the first time while watching the Insider (probably was a bit long for me then) and it took me almost one month to complete Citizen Kane :woot: Understandably it didn't grew on me that much, plus I watched every episode of Oz, Lost and Coupling during that time.

From October 2009 to March 2013 I watched about 750 feature films, ranked about 500 of them (since July 2011). After completing shows like the Wire, the Sopranos and Deadwood non of the tv series doesn't do it for me anymore so I'm all about movies and mini-series since April 2011 after finishing Six Feet Under.

I don't if I was fed up or wasn't taking pleasure as I should from watching movies anymore I decided to have a go at it again. I considered about it for some time and decided it's for the best.

And that takes us to now. I decided to start with 10 movies, each are among the most prominents from their respective countries:

1. Citizen Kane
2. The Rules of the Game
3. Tokyo Story
4. 8,5
5. Battleship Potemkin
6. Persona
7. Ordet
8. M
9. Pather Panchali
10. In the Mood for Love

It's not hard to see why Citizen Kane is regarded as the greatest. As for the Rules of the Game I didn't remember so much of it despite I saw it less then a year ago. I rated it 6 back then, now my ranking is 7. My favorite movie of Fellini is probably La Strada, not fan of his dreamy movies, of course that doesn't mean he didn't dish up those exceptionally as well. To me the most important aspect of 8,5 is basically it's an autobiographical movie of one of the greatest directors.

I don't know why people view Battleship Potemkin as boring, only 90 minutes and pretty captivating for me. Now I know Persona is regarded among greatest works of Bergman but I don't see it, easily I can name 5 better Bergmans for my part. Ordet is an odd movie, I find it unnecessary to put emphasis on the events occurred in the movie as I'm aware of Dreyer's obsession of religious themes (not a jab on him, that's his way, nothing for me to do but respect that he made great films). M is still great, I believe it came in top 5 on ICM 2013 poll.

Pather Panchali was a sad one and the only movie I saw from this list for the first time. The situation of the mother and her daugher teared me from inside and Shankar's simple score was perfect. Interesting to learn that it was Ray's debut after viewing it, what more interesting was Truffaut's criticism, look it up if you don't know, it's a strange one.

In the Mood for Love is still great as well, it's bit confusing at times but leaves no question in mind after it ends. Not with many movies you can tolerate the same music rolling over and over again but this one's an exception of course. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypY9OaKCfRU

Umm yeah, so that was a brief narrative about my interest in movies and the first 10 movies I decided to watch after starting over :lol:

Cippenham
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#2

Post by Cippenham » April 2nd, 2013, 7:11 pm

Nowadays according to Sight & Sound in fact Vertigo is often considered ahead of Citizen Kane, but that remains ahead on TSPDT due to the big lead in ranking points from previous and other polls.

The Man with a Movie Camera is No 11 on the list and has increased in ratings recently also and is now ahead of Battleship Potemkin.

http://www.icheckmovies.com/lists/sight ... ulanarchy/
Turning over a new leaf :ICM:

tirefeet
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#3

Post by tirefeet » April 2nd, 2013, 9:47 pm

Yeah, I took Tspdt as a starting guide. Though now I'm back to casual watching.

Cippenham
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#4

Post by Cippenham » April 2nd, 2013, 10:17 pm

I was only really interested in TSPDT and no other lists for a long time.

I started working on TSPDT long before I knew about ICM, I remember getting past 500 - I was using other checking sites nowhere near as good and spreadsheets, had so many to watch recording on TV, getting DVD, not really into downloading then, but managed to get to last 100 or so after joining ICM in 2009 and now almost done with new updates. I have In Vanda's Room to come and the other two really not available one as it has no English subs-Amor de Perdição (the Director was born in 1908 and is still alive and making films at 104 :woot: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0210701/ ) and of course The Art of Vision.
Turning over a new leaf :ICM:

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funkybusiness
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#5

Post by funkybusiness » April 2nd, 2013, 10:31 pm

In Vanda's Room isn't as terrible a viewing experience as some have made it out to be and Amor de Perdição should have English subs in a couple of months, hopefully.

tirefeet
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#6

Post by tirefeet » April 2nd, 2013, 10:34 pm

Haha, yeah I heard about that guy.

I think I saw around 300 movies from Tspdt, I was aware of the list before I joined Icm, though I didn't know it's importance for cinephiles. It's one of the most solid lists out there obviously. If I got to choose a specific list to work on, it would be either Tspdt or Criterion Collection.

Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi
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#7

Post by Local Hero -- aka MestnyiGeroi » April 2nd, 2013, 11:29 pm

funkybusiness on Apr 2 2013, 04:31:51 PM wrote:In Vanda's Room isn't as terrible a viewing experience as some have made it out to be and Amor de Perdição should have English subs in a couple of months, hopefully.
Tell that to my DVR. I carefully set it to record In Vanda's Room from TCM this weekend, and apparently it absolutely refused to carry out the order.


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