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What are you reading at the moment?

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Leopardi
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Re: What are you reading at the moment?

#1201

Post by Leopardi » February 16th, 2020, 1:53 am

mightysparks wrote:
February 15th, 2020, 11:58 pm
Well I started reading Les Misérables last month but haven’t read anything in weeks. I couldn’t find the translations mentioned above so I’ve continued with the one I had (Julie Rose). I had read beforehand that the first ‘book’ wasn’t the main story and though I thought it was good, it wasn’t gripping me. I started reading it again a couple days ago and read the chapter with the line about constellations and ducks feet and was like holy crap every line is beautiful and I was a little more interested. Then last night I got to the ‘actual’ story. And oh damn. Seriously the writing is just so beautiful. I’ve had to reread a few lines here and there, and check definitions a lot, because I don’t understand stuff but I’m also rereading parts just because of the way it makes me feel to read it. I didn’t want to put it down but had to sleep. Already looking forward to going to bed tonight so I can read more.
(l) (l) (l)

My favourite novel of all time - I'm so glad you're enjoying it! Notre Dame of Paris is also in my top five, he captures that same magic again, in my opinion. I read it while visiting Paris and it's about as perfect a pairing as you can imagine - you should try to do the same if you can!

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#1202

Post by mightysparks » February 16th, 2020, 5:48 am

I'll save it in case I ever go to Paris again..

Wasn't really sure what to expect from Les Mis, the terrible musical version from a few years ago is the only film adaptation I'd seen (which I've now forgotten), and I knew the plot was something to do with some guy stealing some bread so it didn't sound like it was going to be too interesting. But I just love 'listening' to the author, everything he says just.. idk.. hits me right in the soul. I don't even know how to explain it. But I really love it so far and I hope it doesn't disappoint later.
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#1203

Post by mightysparks » February 19th, 2020, 3:28 pm

I gave my boyfriend the chapter ‘Deep Waters, Dark Shadows’ to read and now even he wants to read this book lol. He liked it so much that he’s (finally) going out tomorrow to buy his own Kindle. He wasn’t totally convinced about Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, but I did convince him that Les Mis is probably not where he wants to start, so he settled again on 1984. I also rec’d Lord of the Flies and suggested classics that people study in highschool would be more accessible for him to begin with. He said he wanted ‘more things like that chapter’ but I haven’t really read anything else like this.

He said when he tries to read he often finds himself reading the same line over and over again and finds it hard to remember what he’s read, but he loved reading that chapter.
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#1204

Post by mightysparks » February 24th, 2020, 2:29 pm

First day back at uni today. Since I’m doing a writing major, it was a writing class and the lecturer asked about what people liked to read. Ok so I get that 99% of the class is made up of 19/20 year old women but only 2, besides myself, didn’t primarily read young adult fiction. One girl with fairly floss colored hair said that adult fiction was dull, slow and too dry/had no sense of humour, and the others agreed. I was surprised that none of them were into classics and either only read fantasy or random new books. Sad times.

Bf decided to read some short stories before hitting the novels. Sandkings was the chosen first one and he really enjoyed it. We have a family of cockroaches living in one of our bathrooms and he said at one point after reading it ‘I’m really glad I’m nice to those roaches’ lol.

I’m still slowly getting through Les Mis. Often too tired at night to read :(
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#1205

Post by fakeusername2 » March 1st, 2020, 7:22 pm

mightysparks wrote:
February 24th, 2020, 2:29 pm
First day back at uni today. Since I’m doing a writing major, it was a writing class and the lecturer asked about what people liked to read. Ok so I get that 99% of the class is made up of 19/20 year old women but only 2, besides myself, didn’t primarily read young adult fiction. One girl with fairly floss colored hair said that adult fiction was dull, slow and too dry/had no sense of humour, and the others agreed. I was surprised that none of them were into classics and either only read fantasy or random new books. Sad times.
I need to interrupt just because reading this post makes me sad. I wasn't a literature or writing major but I went to graduate school at a place with a supposedly elite "creative writing MFA" or something and the students were all into children's books (I'm not accepting "young adult fiction" as a proper literary category). You can imagine that they weren't able to hold even basic conversation about classic or contemporary literature.

That's irrelevant, though. Are you early in your university career? If so, or even if not, you have an excellent opportunity on the horizon if you play your cards right. First step, change majors immediately. Obviously your university isn't serious about the things you care about anyway and, besides, one can't make all their avocational interests vocational ones. Physics, math, electrical engineering--anything that's worth the opportunity cost. Graduate school in one of these areas is a plus but not necessary. Second step, turn your major into five solid years of business experience. No more, no less. Any more and you're wasting your life, any less and step three will be difficult. Third step, start your own consulting firm that specializes in creative content. Hire people to take care of the boring logistics even if it means taking a pay cut; you don't want to remain in the drudgery of step two forever and you'll have saved some money from previously. Fourth step, become a rising star in the consultancy world in your country; in a few years, it should be known as the premier institution for generating creative content across the spectrum of media, although with a specialty in literary content. And, more importantly, you become known for catapulting the underemployed arts and literature majors into solid professional careers, a beacon of hope for those who erroneously thought the world always fails to recognize erudition, beauty, and aspiration. Fifth step, utterly decimate the phonies whose wasted the precious moments of their creative writing degrees indulging in infantile fantasies about wizards and warlocks. They reach your desk--it goes without saying that, as principal creator, the sole area where you still actively participate in your firm's life is in screening the potential talent that gives hope to an otherwise decaying culture--and, when they do, you slightly prod them about their studies, their grand explorations into the pinnacle of human emotional life we call literature, their retreat into the dark recesses of their minds that momentarily flicker alight in pale understanding as they traverse the contours of the human literary soul, their confrontation with the inner mental Siberia that one finds when drawn into the timeless human grappling with guilt, longing, tragedy, loneliness, nihilism, and suffering, those fictional struggles that recreate in more whimsical form what the Greeks could only personify as dieties. "Uhhhh," the newly minted writing BA interjects. "What are you talking about? I like stories about wizards." It's just then that you shut their file and start them on the long shuffle out the door and into well deserved destitution. "How," you begin patiently, "can I possibly hire you when you haven't begun to appreciate or understand the one area to which you dedicated those precious, fleeting few years where curiosity and exploration were rewarded? I cannot in good faith hire someone like that." As you escort the prospective (and now failed) hire down the long hallways she's introduced to those who excelled where they have have failed: John Viereck, creative marketing manager, who during his graduate studies created the largest conceptual map of Jungian archetypes in Western literature and Sarah Liu, VP, whose published undergraduate thesis explicated the hitherto unexplored independent invention of a Sartrean existentialism in China through the lens of A Dream of Red Mansions and Lust, Caution. As you the approach the door to the cold, uninviting exterior world, the student realizes that this was a pivot point, that they had wasted 25 plus years of life on trivialities and that, quite rightly, the world doesn't reward trivialities, despite what their parents, teachers, and the media had taught them. This scenario will play out dozens, if not hundreds, of times over your prosperous career. Sometimes, however, you will face a last-ditch rebellion. "I don't care," the failed hire will exclaim at you but to the heavens. "You're all phonies, anyway. I won't work for the 'man', I'm going to be a great novelist." Now here comes the real beauty of surprise, a hidden step I omitted previously. You open your purse and pull out one weighty volume. It's A Tale of Spoons and -- Oh. My. God., the student is floored -- you are the author. How could they not have realized? A Tale of Spoons? Probably the sole contemporary novel universally hailed as a modern masterpiece, a novel that has made hardened killers weep and sane men mad? "But . . but," they stammer; "people with jobs are supposed to be phonies." But you don't hear the last words, the door slowly having crept shut before their awestruck immobility. They turn around and feel the frigid air of a long winter before them. Weak-kneed and wobbly, a cold world within and without extends into the visible distance, and they lurch quietly forward without even the solace of literature to comfort them.

. . . Sorry I think I got carried away.

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#1206

Post by mightysparks » March 1st, 2020, 11:42 pm

Lol. I’m not doing creative writing and I don’t want to be a novelist, I’m just trying to learn how to formulate my thoughts and arguments better. I’m not at all well read and not very knowledgeable about literature, I was just really surprised at how little variation there was between the students and how negatively they talked about ‘adult’ fiction. In some cultural studies units I did a few years ago, everyone seemed really into the classics and had clearly read a lot all over the board. It was really exciting hearing them discuss things, but I don’t feel nearly as excited to learn about, what they describe as ‘trashy’, YA fiction.
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#1207

Post by dinah » March 11th, 2020, 9:09 am

mightysparks wrote:
February 24th, 2020, 2:29 pm
I was surprised that none of them were into classics and either only read fantasy or random new books. Sad times.
The same goes for the few people I hang out with a couple times a month, and they're all approaching their thirties. That is, if they even read (much) at all.
Though to be fair, I'm not entirely innocent in this regard as I just finished re-reading Harry Potter (most of them for the first time since I read them when they were initially released), only to realize that, in terms of writing style, they really are written for children (shocking revelation, I know). It does get better as the series progresses, but the first two/three books were painful to read at times.

Now, I'm re-reading The Awakening because it's just too good not to. It was assigned reading in one of the courses I took in uni, and I enjoyed it immensely.
After that, I'll have to look for something I haven't read before for a change. Got my eye pegged on Berlin Alexanderplatz (having seen the new film recently, maybe I'd find the motivation to finally finish watching the RWF series) and/or Menschen im Hotel (having been to an excellent theater production that actually plays in a hotel for the most part).

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#1208

Post by clemmetarey » March 16th, 2020, 12:06 pm

I started Madame Bovary last night, it should keep me busy for a few days. In the meantime, I found this list of 15 books about plagues and epidemics, in case anyone is looking for some suggestions on how to spend the next few days/weeks.

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#1209

Post by Pretentious Hipster » March 24th, 2020, 4:08 am

Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism by Lenin might be the most dense thing I've ever read. I can only read a few pages at a time before I get too exhausted.

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#1210

Post by funkybusiness » March 24th, 2020, 4:46 am

probably his Irish accent that's doing you in.

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#1211

Post by mightysparks » March 24th, 2020, 4:51 am

Haven't been in the mood for Les Mis for a while, but hopefully can get back into that soon. In the mean time, I read Stephen King's On Writing. As much as I love his stories, he's a pretty meh writer (I've not read much of his work, though) and I actually think this is the most well-written thing he's done. I don't agree with all his suggestions, but it's engaging and it did give me some useful tips I can apply to my own writing.

Most of my classes have been focusing on creative non-fiction, so I was trying to read some more memoirs and things of that nature but I haven't found any others that interest me yet.
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