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What are you reading at the moment?

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blueboybob
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What are you reading at the moment?

#1081

Post by blueboybob » September 12th, 2017, 2:13 pm

Just started Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple's Greatest Products

Pretty interesting so far

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#1082

Post by AdamH » September 12th, 2017, 8:08 pm

Thanks for the advice funky. I'm definitely trying to go for books I'm interested in. I'd imagine it's a lot harder to read a book you're not liking than to watch a 90 minute/2 hour etc. film you don't like.

I love the film versions of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and To Kill a Mockingbird so they were obvious choices. Animal Farm is very short so read it very quickly but it's also an interesting concept. I've always been interested in reading The Hobbit so it was an easy choice too.

I plan to gradually expand the type of material I'm reading and venture out a bit of my comfort zone over time but I want to focus on books I'm pretty confident of liking first to get back into reading. Or, at least, books that sound interesting to me as obviously it's hard to tell for certain if you'll like something.

I have a few more books on my radar. Lord of the Flies, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (it's in the classics list and I loved the Disney film when I was a kid), Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (famous Scottish author and interesting concept) etc.

I'm also avoiding anything that is very long for now. Better to ease into reading with more manageable books.

Like you said, not a good idea to dive straight into books like Don Quijote.
Last edited by AdamH on September 12th, 2017, 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#1083

Post by AdamH » September 12th, 2017, 8:14 pm

Anyone on the forum, feel free to add add me on Goodreads.

It's more interesting going on the books and seeing the ratings from friends.

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#1084

Post by 3eyes » September 13th, 2017, 4:27 pm

AdamH on Sep 5 2017, 03:13:55 PM wrote:
funkybusiness on Sep 5 2017, 03:00:01 PM wrote:Adam, are you only interested in books with birds in the title? Limits the search for good books a bit...
I think I'll read The Raven next.
Sweet bird of youth, The thorn birds, I know why the caged bird sings, The painted bird, The Maltese falcon, The twa corbies.... (Now if I put my mind to it, maybe by next week....)

I'm reading Drawdown, about strategies for reducing atmospheric CO2. With the US Govt hellbent on taking giant strides in the wrong direction, it's heartening to read how so much positive stuff is going on all over the world.
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#1085

Post by sebby » September 13th, 2017, 4:54 pm

Are you guys up for resurrecting the quickly aborted ICM Forum Book Club and giving it another go?

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#1086

Post by maxwelldeux » September 13th, 2017, 5:16 pm

sebby on Sep 13 2017, 10:54:53 AM wrote:Are you guys up for resurrecting the quickly aborted ICM Forum Book Club and giving it another go?
Yes - I'd be up for that.

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#1087

Post by blueboybob » September 13th, 2017, 5:22 pm

AdamH on Sep 12 2017, 02:14:48 PM wrote:Anyone on the forum, feel free to add add me on Goodreads.

It's more interesting going on the books and seeing the ratings from friends.
I never rate. I use it like iCM. I just "check" that I have read them.

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#1088

Post by Kowry » September 15th, 2017, 3:28 pm

maxwelldeux on Sep 13 2017, 11:16:50 AM wrote:
sebby on Sep 13 2017, 10:54:53 AM wrote:Are you guys up for resurrecting the quickly aborted ICM Forum Book Club and giving it another go?
Yes - I'd be up for that.
Me too!

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#1089

Post by sebby » September 15th, 2017, 5:32 pm

Allll right. I'll start a thread and we'll see what happens.

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#1090

Post by XxXApathy420XxX » October 21st, 2017, 2:14 am

My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#1091

Post by blueboybob » October 21st, 2017, 4:05 pm

I am reading Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/971434.Tramp)

I am learning A LOT about Chaplin. Maybe some I didn't even want to know.

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#1092

Post by RedHawk10 » December 20th, 2017, 8:12 am

In the middle of Gravity's Rainbow. Easily the most challenging book I've ever read, and my all time favorite is Infinite Jest (which is a total breeze compared to this).

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#1093

Post by funkybusiness » December 20th, 2017, 12:10 pm

I love Gravity's Rainbow (and most of the other Thomas Pynchon novels). Some of my favorite bits are sixes and sevens, "the camera that follows" Katje through time, back to her ancestor hunting dodos (who might also be Van Gogh) (the whole sequence which may be the skeleton key to the novel depending on who you read), and, of course, Byron the Bulb but if you're halfway you've got a bit to go before that bit.

Okay great now I've got to re-read it some time soon. After I've finished these James Joyce books.
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#1094

Post by cinephage » December 20th, 2017, 6:58 pm

I just finished Moonlight Mile, the last of Denis Lehane's Kenzie-Gennaro novels. I enjoyed these novels more than I thought I would, I will actually miss these characters.

I switched to something entirely different (an old japanese book of short tales with samurais and ghosts), but I will certainly return to read more books by Lehane. It's easy to see why so many of his books were made into movies, he writes in a very smooth manner.

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#1095

Post by blocho » November 4th, 2018, 2:03 am

I just finished reading Geoff Dyer's "Broadsword Calling Danny Boy: Watching Where Eagles Dare."

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/book ... 524747572/

My brother was in London a couple of weeks ago and spotted it in a bookstore (not published in the states yet) and knew that both of us had to have a copy. For most of my childhood, I assumed that my family's love for war movies like Where Eagles Dare, The Guns of Navarone, The Great Escape, The Dirty Dozen, and many others was a lonely fixation. My schoolmates seemed far more interested in Will Smith and Titanic and Tamagotchis and other nonsense. (Didn't they know a war had been fought a half-century before!? One that provided the plots for several thousand movies?!) I think my first inkling that there was a wider cultural phenomenon came when I heard Tarantino name drop Guns of Navarone in some dialogue he gave Sam Jackson in Pulp Fiction.

Anyway, this book is the bizarrely glorious culmination of what I now know is a society-wide adoration of a particular sub-genre of war movie: WWII flicks with desperately cool commandos who are expert in operating behind enemy lines--the sort of people who can slit Nazi throats with the same casual sangfroid with which they trade witty banter.

And it is a bizarre book. In a coda, the author claims that it is the result of years of watching and re-watching Where Eagles Dare. I don't doubt that he has done so, but I'm also convinced that he wrote the majority of the book in one sitting and went back only to add some research info, clean up the prose, and insert clever punch-ups. The entire text (apart from that coda) is simply a description of the narrative of the movie with clever observations, occasional trivia tidbits, and strange and sometimes metaphysically impossible imagined scenes--what if Mary Ure had shown that gestapo officer an iphone, what if instead of tying his shoe Eastwood had given Burton a blowjob, what if Eastwood only called Scorpio a "punk" in Dirty Harry because Burton called him a punk in this movie (I'm kind of partial to that last one).

Recommended for people who can quote many lines of dialogue from Where Eagles Dare. Not recommended for anyone else.

And if you need help with the title:

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#1096

Post by mightysparks » December 29th, 2018, 9:41 am

I've been wanting to get back into reading since finishing my studies for the year but am struggling. Partly because it's hard to juggle between time consuming hobbies like film and video games and partly because my eyes get tired quickly - especially if I've been on the computer all day. I've wanted to set aside an hour or so at night to read but I never do it. Anyway, I was curious as to what other's reading habits are like (not sure if this has been discussed before)?

Do you set aside time for reading or do you just read when you feel like it?
Do you read one book start to finish before picking up another or have multiple books on the go?
Do you always finish a book even if you don't like it?
How many books would you read in a typical week/month?
Other?

I've read fecking 2 books this year which is terrible and I'm ashamed but I also had quite heavy readings for uni this year. I think I read about 13 in a month when I lived in London and had a 40 minute commute 5 days a week but for some reason I struggle to read at home. I'd like to be able to read one a week. I tend to read one book at a time, but sometimes I pick up other things, and I always try to finish a book no matter how bad it is.
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#1097

Post by Carmel1379 » December 29th, 2018, 8:35 pm

I always read multiple books simultaneously, such that when I get tired with one (style of writing/set of themes/characters) I can move to a different, and the act of reading itself is preserved, not lost.

When I consciously realise in front of my computer that I'm bored and have nothing to do, then I make myself alert and just go read something. I always leave plenty of books lying around in my room and try to keep a steady influx of new ones from the library. I also always read on public transports and carry books around with me just in case I end up somewhere I have to wait, can spare a few minutes, or whatever.
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#1098

Post by Leopardi » December 30th, 2018, 2:14 am

I usually have two to three books on the go at any given time, one for the commute to and from work (130-150 minutes each day), one for bedtime, and (infrequently) one that can be used as an alternate for either of the first two books if I need a break from them. I don't usually plan for the latter, they usually just crop up as recommendations from friends, or as ICM book club selections (although we haven't had one of those for a long while!). Aside from the commute and before bed, I find I don't have time for reading (other than my newspaper backlog).

The last time I didn't finish a book was around 2005. It was Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and that was mainly because (aside from the fact I wasn't really enjoying it much) I was on a regimen of 50 pages a day of classic lit and found I didn't have time for both. I stopped that regimen in 2011, and now I typically read 15-30 books each year. Honestly, ICM has probably contributed to this small number - I often find myself watching movies right up until bedtime, which means the book slated for that time takes forever to finish. I'm not proud of this fact.

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#1099

Post by max-scl » January 4th, 2019, 11:48 pm

I have never been a reader, but I moved close to a library and after my semester of studies ended I decided to start to read. Movies made mi interested in Japanese movies, which made me interested in Japanese literature, so that's where I started. It has been great, I've read 4 books these past 4 weeks and my favourite so far is Mishima's Confessions of a Mask. I hope I can keep this rythm. (That means watching less films).
I have a Goodreads account: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/335 ... aximiliano

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#1100

Post by Traveller » January 30th, 2019, 6:08 pm

In what it proposes to discuss – that is the idea and need for a film canon – Jonathan Rosenbaum’s Essential Cinema does not succeed for me, or perhaps, since I had not known anything prior before opening the book except for the forum’s list, my expectations leaning towards a more direct approach and discussion of such list were illusive and thus not matched. I received the book for Christmas and have been reading it over the last month, one up to three excerpts a day depending on various factors. It contains some sixty articles and essays Rosenbaum wrote over a period of time, ranging from popular movies (Taxi Driver, Pretty Woman) to lesser known ones (Flaming Creatures, Scotch Tape) to the examination of various (writer-)directors, all structured into five chapters which are, at least formally, connected to the book’s subject matter. Despite my misconception of what to expect, I overall enjoyed the book’s structure as well as content. Naturally, some essays I liked more than others, but I can’t say that any of them were bad or of no interest to me - reading each excerpt, it - the obvious - becomes clear that Rosenbaum has a fundamental knowledge of cinema that he shares in these essays. Some movies I had already seen but found his different way of looking at those or minor details mixed with (personal or historic) stories fascinating; others, which I have not seen yet, moved up on my watchlist simply because his descriptions made them promising viewings for me. Plus, the book was a nice companion guide to this month’s challenge, too.


On the other hand, I also tried my luck with Senlin Ascends by Josiah Bancroft, but oh my, halfway through I had to stop this unbearable torture and reeking garbage. The main character was insufferable and infuriating. A teacher in his little hometown, he also feels that people outside his school not only need but want his schooling. His inability to understand the urgency of his situation (his wife goes missing in the first chapter on their honeymoon to the Tower of Babel, also the main storyline and only one really), his idealistic naiveté displayed not only by his actions but also train of thought (at an advanced point in the story, the worst he could think of that happened to his wife was that she was already back home waiting for him) as well as his complete denial of the real world (all he knows of the tower is what his little fairy tale book told him, but nothing appears that way, and contrary to what occurs, he maintains this denial) justified only indifference towards him and his quest. It’s a comfort book, one that’s sole purpose seems to be escapism - and that just doesn’t cut it for me.
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#1101

Post by mightysparks » February 19th, 2019, 2:14 am

I’m still slowly making my way through the NPR list of best sci fi and fantasy, but was wondering if anyone had any other better lists more sci-fi focused? Even if it’s your own. I just want more good sci fi.
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#1102

Post by 3eyes » February 20th, 2019, 1:14 am

Being in my second childhood (and my style being considerably cramped by construction work going on in our house) I got myself some Asterix comics in English translation. All the puns make me wish I could compare them with the French.
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#1103

Post by PirateJenny » February 24th, 2019, 1:55 pm

Blue Highways William Least Heat-Moon

This is the kind of book I can spend months reading. I got given a selection of 'travel' books and it's quite long as you might tell from the map.
http://littourati.squarespace.com/stora ... on_map.htm I like Americana stuff so...

Last I read was The Wrench Primo Levi which I read in a couple of days.
First Levi book and incredibly descriptive about construction forensics.

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#1104

Post by Traveller » March 7th, 2019, 6:15 pm

The Great Ordeal (The Aspect-Emperor #3) - R. Scott Bakker
It’s been a few days, a much needed time to let everything sink in. I’m not sure how to rate the book and where to place it in the overall ranking – much of it depends on how - if at all? - the second part and last book can and will bring it all to a satisfying conclusion. At times I read the to date best book of the series or, that is, any fantasy book: the worldbuilding and metaphysical system and implications so deeply entangled in the philosophical approach are without equal in the fantasy world. However, towards the end some … stuff happened which put a big question mark to the overall planning of the series, as some plot points seemed somewhat out of place, too convenient and, without any explanation in the last book, damn lazy. Yet, I was intrigued by the fact that some major points were so vague, so reverse Sanderson, that - for me, at least, with my limited English - it was hard to tell what really happened if one didn’t paid enough attention, leaving one to ponder again and again, while his writing remained superb and the pacing, to my liking, just right. At last, approaching the last book (which I will probably delay a bit more), a feeling slowly creeps in, nagging more and more, begging the question: what comes after? I dare not think about it.

Infinite Resignation - Eugene Thacker
It’s a collection of aphorisms and fragments on philosophy and pessimism, in which Thacker mixes quotes, self composed aphorisms and personal observations in the first part and gives brief summaries on the lives of major contributors on pessimism such as Schopenhauer, Leopardi et. al. in the second. My major problem with this book was that it was just that: a collection, without any obvious idea or arrangement as to why such order was chosen, with two parts which didn't really fit together much. Still, one can’t go too wrong on pessimism, and a few names were unfamiliar to me, so there is at least new ground to explore.
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But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#1105

Post by Traveller » March 9th, 2019, 8:11 pm

I read Cosmic Pessimism by Eugene Thacker today, which I enjoyed and which had a much better flow to it than Infinite Resignation. A quite short book with a fitting title and clearer structure and narrative. I was, however, confused by the fact that much of the book's content found its way into Infinite Resignation, word for word. While this is not at all criticism for Cosmic Pessimism (since it was released prior and, in its short form, works way better for me personally), my opinion on Infinite Resignation takes another hit.
ICM
August Challenge: ImageImage
But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#1106

Post by PirateJenny » March 15th, 2019, 7:17 pm

Do The Blind Dream - Barry Gifford

Gifford seems like such a unique writer. On the back cover it says "like a piece of Bunuel and Cocteau" but it's just an oddball and intense mix of genres, so intense at times I have to put it down and ask myself what did I just read?

I also recently read Men without Women by Murakami. Another collection of short stories that have found their audience in me, it reads like stream of consciousness social observations that always stay humorous and fun to read.

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#1107

Post by PirateJenny » March 17th, 2019, 10:37 am

American Tabloid - James Ellroy

This is my second Ellroy. The Black Dahlia was my first and I got through it quite quickly, enjoyed the heavy hitting hardboiled style. This is denser, longer and stylistically even heavier, so it's going to be a challenge to finish it. Not at any speed anyway. The kind of thing I'll bookmark and pick up again when I want a dose of Ellroy's short sentences.

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#1108

Post by brokenface » March 17th, 2019, 8:34 pm

PirateJenny wrote:
March 17th, 2019, 10:37 am
American Tabloid - James Ellroy

This is my second Ellroy. The Black Dahlia was my first and I got through it quite quickly, enjoyed the heavy hitting hardboiled style. This is denser, longer and stylistically even heavier, so it's going to be a challenge to finish it. Not at any speed anyway. The kind of thing I'll bookmark and pick up again when I want a dose of Ellroy's short sentences.
funnily enough I just finished this a couple of weeks ago. I'd started it last year and read <100 pages but put it down and didn't go back for months. Started at the start again and really got into it & went through it pretty quick second time. I'd warn that there's a lot of characters, plot threads & shifting motivations to keep track of if you put it down and pick it up.

I'd read The Cold Six Thousand years ago without knowing that was a sequel to this. And I'd really struggled with it, 'cause I was new to Ellroy's style and I think that one is supposed to be one of the most extreme examples. I quite keen to go back and read that again now, and also Blood's a Rover to complete this trilogy.

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#1109

Post by PirateJenny » March 17th, 2019, 8:42 pm

brokenface wrote:
March 17th, 2019, 8:34 pm
PirateJenny wrote:
March 17th, 2019, 10:37 am
American Tabloid - James Ellroy

This is my second Ellroy. The Black Dahlia was my first and I got through it quite quickly, enjoyed the heavy hitting hardboiled style. This is denser, longer and stylistically even heavier, so it's going to be a challenge to finish it. Not at any speed anyway. The kind of thing I'll bookmark and pick up again when I want a dose of Ellroy's short sentences.
funnily enough I just finished this a couple of weeks ago. I'd started it last year and read <100 pages but put it down and didn't go back for months. Started at the start again and really got into it & went through it pretty quick second time. I'd warn that there's a lot of characters, plot threads & shifting motivations to keep track of if you put it down and pick it up.

I'd read The Cold Six Thousand years ago without knowing that was a sequel to this. And I'd really struggled with it, 'cause I was new to Ellroy's style and I think that one is supposed to be one of the most extreme examples. I quite keen to go back and read that again now, and also Blood's a Rover to complete this trilogy.
Black Dahlia is pure noir. It's more hardboiled than the originals. Loved it. So going to give it a try but it's not easy reading compared to that so far.

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#1110

Post by Traveller » April 3rd, 2019, 4:29 am

Finished Kellanved's Reach by Ian C. Esslemont, the third and final book of the Path to Ascendancy trilogy set in the Malazan universe. It was the weakest book of the three, perhaps even of all ICE books so far (maybe recency is a factor here). It felt too big for such a small book and wanted to cover far too much it could handle, with many (important) events getting only a few pages to be resolved (pace was too fast!), the focus shifting to newly introduced characters, leaving for my taste too few chapters for the two stars, Kellanved and Dancer. A quick and fun read, nevertheless, which I would normally not really like, were it not for the world and with the humor working because of the characters.
Next up is The God is not Willing in November, and I’m very curious what Erikson gifts us this time (though I’m still saddened that he had to abandon The Kharkanas Trilogy for now). Plus, from what I read, Esslemont is, too, already working on a new trilogy, so plenty of stuff yet to come.
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But at the bottom, the immanent philosopher sees in the entire universe only the deepest longing for absolute annihilation, and it is as if he clearly hears the call that permeates all spheres of heaven: Redemption! Redemption! Death to our life! and the comforting answer: you will all find annihilation and be redeemed!

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#1111

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » April 4th, 2019, 8:04 pm

Just finished Don't Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/270 ... _Be_Lonely

Now I'm reading Insomniac City by Bill Hayes

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/300 ... mniac-city

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#1112

Post by albajos » April 4th, 2019, 8:14 pm

I always reading about 4-5 at the same time

One for home, one for the subway, one for the train etc

But right now
Frankenstein
People you might now - Synnøve Macody Lund (norwegian author I used to go to school with (she is also an actor so it's very possible you have seen her in Hodejegerne or The Girl in the Spider's Web )
Beyond Good and Evil - Friedrich Nietzsche
The Odyssey - Homer (still in very old english, so it takes a while to get through it (I need to read it in a quiet place))

Last one I compelted was Jekyll and Hyde. I read it when I was a teenager as well, but I have of course realised that they edit books to fit for children or teens. So it was quite different to read the "adult" version
I have for example read everything by Jules Verne when I was a teen, but probably I haven't read any of them, as all of them was edited versions

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#1113

Post by Armoreska » April 13th, 2019, 3:16 pm

just finished reading this (4 pages)
https://libcom.org/files/ursula-k-le-gu ... omelas.pdf
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currently working towards a vegan/low waste world + thru such film lists (besides TV): 2010s bests, RW Fassbinder, Luis Bunuel, Yasujiro Ozu, Eric Rohmer, Visual Effects nominees, kid-related stuff, great animes (mini-serie or feature), very 80s movies, 17+ sci-fi lists on watchlist, ENVIRO, remarkable Silent Films and Pre-Code (exploring 1925 atm) and every shorts and docu list I'm aware of and
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1434
and "Gordon" Liu Chia-Hui/Liu Chia-Liang and Yuen Woo-ping and "Sammo" Hung Kam-bo

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#1114

Post by blocho » April 13th, 2019, 4:33 pm

I'm reading Daniel Yergin's The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money, and Power. It's been on my to-read list for well over a decade, ever since my undergrad adviser said it was a defining book in business history, environmental history, and just overall modern history. My brother read it last year and lent me his copy. It is certainly a slog. About 800 pages and feels longer. There is a boring quality to some of the business narrative--I don't really care about the endless litany of which company was looking to buy a piece of another company, which was looking for refining capacity from another company. But there's a lot of great stuff about wildcatting, great power politics, warfare, robber barons, well blowouts, social effects, etc.

And while I'm reading, I sometimes get this Daniel Plainview itch and feel like I direly need to control some natural resources. There's a quote in the book from Churchill (a pivotal figure in the history of oil) that comes up repeatedly: "Mastery itself was the prize of the venture." And that defines the relationship between oil and humans in a nutshell. People and societies and nations went completely crazy for oil. Some people wanted money, others wanted excitement, others wanted fame--but all of them were obsessed with power, mastery, control.

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#1115

Post by Grunge Rock & Ally McBeal » April 14th, 2019, 3:57 am

Troll Hunting: Inside the world of online hate and its human fallout by Ginger Gorman.

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#1116

Post by PirateJenny » April 16th, 2019, 9:03 pm

The Road to Darkess - Paul Leppin

I picked it up without knowing anything about and almost at the end of the first novella and it's good lurid stuff. Dark erotic debuachery with existential whining thrown in for wit. Do I really want to finish it? Probably not. Am I glad I found the darkness. Yeah! It's pretty crazy.

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#1117

Post by PirateJenny » April 24th, 2019, 8:54 am

White by Bret Easton Ellis

He talks a lot about movies in this. Starting with the horror films he grew up with in the 70s and how different it is for kids now with technology and internet. And then onto actors and how it changes the sharing of opinion. I expected it to carry on with more opining about generational divides and how American Psychos have taken over politics but there's just as much movie and culture talk overall so far, and autobiography type stuff about being generation Xer. But then it does come back to it; how things have become too accessible and throwaway. How easy it is to rate things now, kind of how I'm feeling getting overloaded now with how quick and easy it is to rate or click like things!

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#1118

Post by mightysparks » April 26th, 2019, 11:04 am

I finished reading Spin last night. My dad recommended it to me and I quite enjoyed it. I didn't really like the characters much and felt they were kind of just puppets to the story, but the concept was really interesting (the stars disappear one night and it turns out the Earth has been trapped in a 'bubble' where time moves normally and filters out radiation etc, as the rest of the universe moves at 3 years a second) and I liked the way it looked at the bigger implications of such a thing happening (political, social, personal, religion.. al?) though it felt like it quickly just wrapped everything up at the end but it was still satisfying. My dad said I had to read the rest of the books in the series to get the full picture but I need to move on to something else for now.
"I do not always know what I want, but I do know what I don't want." - Stanley Kubrick

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#1119

Post by PirateJenny » May 1st, 2019, 10:44 am

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This is one hell of a bildungsroman. I read The Killer Inside Me a while ago but planning to go on a Thompson binge (films and books) as he's such a great writer. I had a choice between this and Machines Like Us by Ian McEwan which would have been my first by him, and it seems as I expected reading the first few pages, soft sci fi with a bit of humour. So maybe after I finish a few Thompson books I'll move on to that.

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#1120

Post by blocho » May 1st, 2019, 3:08 pm

I love Jim Thompson. I've read three by him: The Nothing Man, The Kill-Off, and The Transgressors. And his books have been made into some great movies, most notably Coup de Torchon and Serie Noire. Looking at his wiki page right now, I didn't know he worked with Kubrick on The Killing and Paths of Glory.

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