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What are you reading at the moment?

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papyrusbeetle
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What are you reading at the moment?

#1041

Post by papyrusbeetle » March 18th, 2017, 8:55 pm

I'm starting to read P.G.WODEHOUSE. (HEAVY WEATHER, for example)
I had to watch the tv-movie about his life (mis-cast but informative).
He had a rough time of it.
He is lots of fun.

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#1042

Post by mightysparks » March 19th, 2017, 3:27 am

Although I've seen almost every film on all my unit viewing lists I've read almost none of the books. I'm currently reading Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, the latter of which I have to write an essay on (well the first 4 chapters). I'm enjoying both so far. I had a selection of texts for the essay and I read the first chapter of them all and Anna Karenina was the only one that really grabbed me. It seems surprisingly fresh and modern. Madame Bovary isn't an essential read for my unit but I want to read all the recommended stuff too. We discussed it in class the other day and it was hard to get a sense of the novel from just the one chapter she gave us to read.
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#1043

Post by themagician » March 19th, 2017, 12:37 pm

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06. A Pale View of Hills (1982) (Finnish translation) by Kazuo Ishiguro - 201 pages - 4/5

The only reason I'm giving it 4/5 is because it's too short. I might bump it up to 5 later though. What a lovely book. In a way so much is experienced yet not much seems to happen. One could say it is as transient as cherry blossoms. This book reminds me of Ozu and many of the slow Japanese films.

The book feels genuinely Japanese though the author has lived in England since he was five. It tells about Etsuko and her family when she still lived a quiet life in Nagasaki and the little things that happened there. It has few characters, they feel genuinely real and they're all well developed. You can feel being there, observing everything, from their facial expressions and the way they sit to their slightest movements. I felt a little sad when the book ended. I still wanted to learn more about these characters. But it is what it is, a slice of life.

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#1044

Post by Leopardi » March 19th, 2017, 9:17 pm

themagician on Mar 19 2017, 06:37:45 AM wrote:Image

06. A Pale View of Hills (1982) (Finnish translation) by Kazuo Ishiguro - 201 pages - 4/5

The only reason I'm giving it 4/5 is because it's too short. I might bump it up to 5 later though. What a lovely book. In a way so much is experienced yet not much seems to happen. One could say it is as transient as cherry blossoms. This book reminds me of Ozu and many of the slow Japanese films.

The book feels genuinely Japanese though the author has lived in England since he was five. It tells about Etsuko and her family when she still lived a quiet life in Nagasaki and the little things that happened there. It has few characters, they feel genuinely real and they're all well developed. You can feel being there, observing everything, from their facial expressions and the way they sit to their slightest movements. I felt a little sad when the book ended. I still wanted to learn more about these characters. But it is what it is, a slice of life.
This looks fantastic. I'm not sure why I've never sought out Ishiguro's work before (I love the film adaptation of The Remains of the Day), but he's now firmly on my radar. Thanks!

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#1045

Post by Leopardi » March 20th, 2017, 12:00 am

mightysparks on Mar 18 2017, 09:27:15 PM wrote:Although I've seen almost every film on all my unit viewing lists I've read almost none of the books. I'm currently reading Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, the latter of which I have to write an essay on (well the first 4 chapters). I'm enjoying both so far. I had a selection of texts for the essay and I read the first chapter of them all and Anna Karenina was the only one that really grabbed me. It seems surprisingly fresh and modern. Madame Bovary isn't an essential read for my unit but I want to read all the recommended stuff too. We discussed it in class the other day and it was hard to get a sense of the novel from just the one chapter she gave us to read.
:thumbsup: Glad you're enjoying them both - hope it continues. What translations do you have for them, incidentally?

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#1046

Post by themagician » March 22nd, 2017, 6:27 pm

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07. Notes from Underground (1864) (Finnish translation) by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - 165 pages - 3/5

I own three by Dostoyevsky: The Idiot, Crime & Punishment, and this. I started with this because it's the shortest. After reading this book Goodreads says I'm only 1 book behind my 40 books this year challenge schedule which is good.

The book is split in two parts. In the first part a pitiful man rants about life which can offer some good advice, e.g. on how endless self-analysis can be so damaging. In the second he reminisces his youth. He loathes absolutely everyone around him seemingly driven by his "intellect". And when you loathe everyone you end up living a very lonely life indeed. He's offered opportunities he rejects because of this loathing, and at the end he realizes at least momentarily what he's missed and regrets it. Though I suppose he never did change. It can be a very frustrating read because of the way the protagonist is.

I also couldn't help but notice possible influence from Schopenhauer. The protagonist talks a lot about suffering and "the will" and how joy is temporal and suffering is eternal. All things Schopenhauer has said and talked about.

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#1047

Post by brokenface » March 22nd, 2017, 9:27 pm

Leopardi on Mar 19 2017, 03:17:12 PM wrote:
themagician on Mar 19 2017, 06:37:45 AM wrote:Image

06. A Pale View of Hills (1982) (Finnish translation) by Kazuo Ishiguro - 201 pages - 4/5

The only reason I'm giving it 4/5 is because it's too short. I might bump it up to 5 later though. What a lovely book. In a way so much is experienced yet not much seems to happen. One could say it is as transient as cherry blossoms. This book reminds me of Ozu and many of the slow Japanese films.

The book feels genuinely Japanese though the author has lived in England since he was five. It tells about Etsuko and her family when she still lived a quiet life in Nagasaki and the little things that happened there. It has few characters, they feel genuinely real and they're all well developed. You can feel being there, observing everything, from their facial expressions and the way they sit to their slightest movements. I felt a little sad when the book ended. I still wanted to learn more about these characters. But it is what it is, a slice of life.
This looks fantastic. I'm not sure why I've never sought out Ishiguro's work before (I love the film adaptation of The Remains of the Day), but he's now firmly on my radar. Thanks!
I'll second the recommend for this one. Also good is An Artist of the Floating World & Never Let Me Go. Still never read Remains of the Day; really should.

--

I'm currently reading Daphne Du Maurier's Rule Britannia, which is a strangely almost-topical 1970s novel about UK deciding to leave the EU and join a formal alliance with USA. Set in a small community in Cornwall where US troops arrive to smooth the transition... It's halfway between a dystopia and Cold Comfort Farm. Which is not something I'd expected..

Also recently read The Two Faces of January by Patricia Highsmith which involves her usual tasty brew of suspense, cynicism and fraudsters, playing around with similar ideas to Strangers on a Train & the Ripley novels. I'd seen the film already which wasn't anything special, the book is much more engrossing.

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#1048

Post by mightysparks » March 25th, 2017, 1:56 pm

Leopardi on Mar 19 2017, 06:00:46 PM wrote:
mightysparks on Mar 18 2017, 09:27:15 PM wrote:Although I've seen almost every film on all my unit viewing lists I've read almost none of the books. I'm currently reading Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina, the latter of which I have to write an essay on (well the first 4 chapters). I'm enjoying both so far. I had a selection of texts for the essay and I read the first chapter of them all and Anna Karenina was the only one that really grabbed me. It seems surprisingly fresh and modern. Madame Bovary isn't an essential read for my unit but I want to read all the recommended stuff too. We discussed it in class the other day and it was hard to get a sense of the novel from just the one chapter she gave us to read.
:thumbsup: Glad you're enjoying them both - hope it continues. What translations do you have for them, incidentally?
Um, I can't even remember now lol. I finished Madame Bovary and I really liked the writing, but I was more and more irritated by the characters as it went on. I still enjoyed it but didn't really love it.

Still reading Anna Karenina. I've started on my essay which is about how realism operates in the first four chapters, so I've read those first 4 chapters so many times now lol but they are just so good I'm happy to keep reading them. I'm hoping I enjoy the rest of the novel as much, but I really want to get this essay done before I'm influenced too much by later parts of the novel.
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#1049

Post by Knaldskalle » March 25th, 2017, 6:04 pm

I just finished reading Iain Banks' debut novel The Wasp Factory. It caused a minor scandal when it came out in 1984 due to its graphic nature (lots of animal killings and other mayhem), but it does seem a little tame today. It was still interesting, though, even if the main character doesn't seem quite coherent (which is a big part of the point of the book, but still).

Started reading Steven Erikson's Toll The Hounds (Malazan Book of the Fallen, vol. 8).
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#1050

Post by Coco LaBerge » March 25th, 2017, 6:23 pm

Knaldskalle on Mar 25 2017, 12:04:22 PM wrote: Started reading Steven Erikson's Toll The Hounds (Malazan Book of the Fallen, vol. 8).
Is it good that series then? someone lent me one, but wasn't sure whether to give it a go or not. Assume you're into it if you've already read 7 of them :lol:

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#1051

Post by Knaldskalle » March 27th, 2017, 12:42 am

pjim on Mar 25 2017, 12:23:34 PM wrote:
Knaldskalle on Mar 25 2017, 12:04:22 PM wrote: Started reading Steven Erikson's Toll The Hounds (Malazan Book of the Fallen, vol. 8).
Is it good that series then? someone lent me one, but wasn't sure whether to give it a go or not. Assume you're into it if you've already read 7 of them :lol:
It's a guilty pleasure for me, but I'm reluctant to recommend them without caveats. If you can get through the first one, Gardens of the Moon, you're good to go for the rest of the series. The first volume just plops you down in the middle of everything without explaining anything and assumes you'll just catch on at some point. Many readers never do and there's very little hand-holding by the author. On top of that it's a hugely complex tale with an active cast in the hundreds - as you'd expect from a book series in ten volumes, each volume being somewhere between five hundred and a thousand pages long.

I found this blog post on tor.com to be quite accurate. If none of that has scared you off, I'd say go for it, but be prepared to spend years of your life reading these books. After I'd read the third volume in the series, I decided that I'd buy them all in hardback because its complexity requires a re-read. I just recently bought the last volume and I'm still not done with the first read! It takes me months to get through a volume (I'm a slow reader) and I started reading this in... 2004! Still not done, but enjoying the voyage tremendously.

:geek:
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#1052

Post by RedHawk10 » March 27th, 2017, 5:33 pm

pjim on Mar 25 2017, 12:23:34 PM wrote:
Knaldskalle on Mar 25 2017, 12:04:22 PM wrote: Started reading Steven Erikson's Toll The Hounds (Malazan Book of the Fallen, vol. 8).
Is it good that series then? someone lent me one, but wasn't sure whether to give it a go or not. Assume you're into it if you've already read 7 of them :lol:
I've read the whole series, and would cautiously recommend it. I've always loved very "epic" stories with lots of characters, subplots, and whatnot, but this one is almost too much at times. And I'm not sure how popular this opinion is, but for me the last four books were a bit of a bloated mess.

I pretty much loved the first six though (even if the first one is a bit of a rocky start). I'd take those over most other fantasy I've read any day.

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#1053

Post by Coco LaBerge » March 27th, 2017, 10:12 pm

Ah interesting, think I might give volume one a go then. I do like fantasy, it's not always well written, but it's can be very entertaining.

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#1054

Post by themagician » April 4th, 2017, 5:34 pm

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08. The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984) (Finnish translation) by Milan Kundera - 390 pages - 4/5

The other Kundera I've read is Identity which I liked very much as well. Not much to say about this one. Overtly sexual story without trying to arouse. Really liked the writing and found the book captivating.

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09. Radikaali Paha: Paha Eurooppalaisessa Perinteessä (2004) by Immanuel Kant - 295 pages - 4/5

Title: "Radical Evil: Evil in the European Tradition"

A short writing by Kant on "Radical Evil" followed by 13 far more interesting essays by Finnish authors. Though some of the essays are lost in their academic style making them completely incomprehensible to the general public: the very target audience of this book.

I find it unbelievable that Kant truly believed that citizens of a state should accept the state laws, no matter how unjust, without criticism. The Law is The Law and it shall not change. Many of the articles of course deal with Auschwitz with that in mind. But they also range from Nietzsche to Foucault to Derrida to psychology and other subjects.

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#1055

Post by themagician » April 7th, 2017, 9:36 am

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10. Critique of Practical Reason (1788) (Finnish translation) by Immanuel Kant - 240 pages - 4/5

This book was slightly easier to understand than his magnum opus though it still had difficult ideas in it. In this book Kant ponders the moral law within us and where it comes from. To put it simply he concludes that it is based on obligation which comes from the human condition within our personality. This obligation as opposed to e.g. happiness as a goal like in the Epicurean philosophy. Similarly he disputes Stoicism. This would definitely benefit from a second read because once again it had a lot of things to say but I had to read it quickly because it's a new book and I have to return it to the library very soon.

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#1056

Post by themagician » April 11th, 2017, 10:43 pm

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11. The Republic (380 BCE) (Finnish translation) by Plato - 428 pages - 5/5

In Finland Plato's works have been published in a series of seven books and the 4th in the series is The Republic. This particular edition is actually from my library's storeroom because the newer (prettier) edition is never available.

I loved this book so much for the way it's presented (as a dialogue) and how much thinking about different things is going on in this book. In the book Plato attempts to envisage a republic through the character of Socrates who is the great teacher educating his disciples in the book. And the whole thing starts from trying to answer whether just people are happier than unjust people. The republic he envisages is actually a really awful place. It is worse than North Korea and Nazi Germany combined due to its extreme censorship and dictating who can (highest) and can't (lowest) have children and how in Plato's republic all people live for the state. But the thinking process that is revealed is worth a read, I'd say it's mandatory reading actually.

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#1057

Post by slylingual24 » April 13th, 2017, 6:35 pm

Just finished rereading Murakami's "South of the Boarder, West of the sun." Still amazing, if not more so the second time around. But then again, i find the majority of what I read by Murakami to be amazing. Which next tho is the question.

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#1058

Post by themagician » April 13th, 2017, 7:26 pm

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12. Plato's Republic (2006) (Finnish translation) by Simon Blackburn - 208 pages - 4/5

This is a first: I finished a book the same day I started reading it. This was an extremely easy read (despite every page looking like this) even when the author is a professor of philosophy in Cambridge. The book does say he is known as a popularizer. Usually when professors write books or articles they are way too academical.

The author says he's never thought of Plato as a very nice man. This is evident throughout the book. He seems to point out each and every thing wrong with The Republic, almost like he despises it. He doesn't have very many positive things to say about it. At least that's my impression. It's like when Nagisa Oshima said "My hatred for Japanese cinema includes absolutely all of it" and then went on to make a "Best Japanese films" documentary. But it all does seem thoughtful in a critical way.

One thing the author could've avoided is going on, even if short, tangents or remarks on the then current US politics.

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#1059

Post by Coco LaBerge » April 16th, 2017, 9:44 am

themagician on Apr 13 2017, 01:26:22 PM wrote:Image

12. Plato's Republic (2006) (Finnish translation) by Simon Blackburn - 208 pages - 4/5

This is a first: I finished a book the same day I started reading it. This was an extremely easy read (despite every page looking like this) even when the author is a professor of philosophy in Cambridge. The book does say he is known as a popularizer. Usually when professors write books or articles they are way too academical.

The author says he's never thought of Plato as a very nice man. This is evident throughout the book. He seems to point out each and every thing wrong with The Republic, almost like he despises it. He doesn't have very many positive things to say about it. At least that's my impression. It's like when Nagisa Oshima said "My hatred for Japanese cinema includes absolutely all of it" and then went on to make a "Best Japanese films" documentary. But it all does seem thoughtful in a critical way.

One thing the author could've avoided is going on, even if short, tangents or remarks on the then current US politics.
Yeah Simon Blackburn is a good writer and a bit of a populariser, but a good philosopher too, he's got some other popular things floating around, one called "Think" or something like that .

It's easy and fair enough note issues in The Republic as it's overflowing with them, though it's often more interesting to look at it from a history of ideas perspective. There's a lot more to be gained in that way usually, and it's more interesting; to see how these ideas fit together and changed over time. Plato was probably an ass though sure, he was about as elitist as a person could be.

If you've got an interest in philosophy it's worth reading just fragments of original texts sometimes, then listening to some discussion. The podcast A Partially Examined Life is really good for this. Philosophy is great though, it's fascinating.

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#1060

Post by themagician » May 3rd, 2017, 10:41 pm

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13. Stoalaisuus &#8210; Tiedon, tunteiden ja hyvän elämän filosofia (2004) by Various - 382 pages - 5/5

Title: Stoicism - A philosophy of knowledge, feelings and good life

I read several books recently that touched on stoicism and I was actually very ignorant on the subject so grabbed this from the library. It first of all is the first major work on stoicism in Finnish. It is a collection of essays by professors of philosophy and theology and whatnot. But most importantly it contains translations of Seneca's "On Anger", Epictetus' "Enchiridion", as well as translated surviving excerpts from the founders of stoicism and a kind of a summary of stoicism by Guillaume du Vair. The earliest works have actually been lost and they only survive in other authors' works.

Stoicism itself seems to be a very complicated subject indeed: it differs based on era and philosopher. But what it is is a way to control one's emotions and desires (especially those out of your control), or rather, as a stoic wise would, to suppress them as they are seen as childish and against reason. But more than that it is a framework on which to build your life, basically like a Bible except more reasonable. Now I'm not sure if I would label myself as a stoic but what especially Seneca had to say about Anger and the negative emotions I do believe they are mandatory reading and the world would be a better place if everyone read it.

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#1061

Post by themagician » May 9th, 2017, 11:12 am

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14. How Could This Happen: Explaining the Holocaust (2014) (Finnish translation) by Dan McMillan - 276 pages - 5/5

This book is a must read for anyone who wants to know what circumstances led to the holocaust. It does an excellent job at explaining every aspect of those horrendous years of massacre while being an easy read. How Hitler came to power, how people accepted antisemitism, how he found the murderers to do the job, did we know? It answers so many questions I had always wondered. Recommended.

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15. Utilitarianism (1861) / Remarks on Bentham's Philosophy (1833) (Finnish translation) by John Stuart Mill - 150 pages - 3/5

Utilitarianism says that the morally correct action is the one that has most 'utility', or happiness, for all involved. I'm not entirely convinced since evaluating what each action results in can be very subjective and sometimes even a wild guess at best so it can be very hindsight-ish philosophy. Also not sure how it works for running governments when you can't always satisfy everyone.

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#1062

Post by AdamH » September 5th, 2017, 7:11 pm

I have barely read for years (something I'm not proud of) but, recently, I've started reading again. So far, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and To Kill a Mockingbird.

I'm looking for more books to read now. I wish there was an iCheckBooks. Crazy idea, perhaps, but I wonder if we could make one in the long term...

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#1063

Post by maxwelldeux » September 5th, 2017, 7:24 pm

Wife and I have started in on Sue Grafton's Kinsey Millhone series. I'm a total sucker for the mystery/thriller genre (I grew up on the Hardy Boys), and this has been a fun diversion from other stuff. Wife is one book ahead of me (I just finished C is for Corpse), but we both plan to read the full A-Z series.

I use Goodreads to track what I've read. They don't have "official top lists", but there's no shortage of quality lists of books on there...

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#1064

Post by blueboybob » September 5th, 2017, 7:30 pm

Finished the Huey Long Biogarphy. Reading yet another history of the supreme court -- https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/252 ... reme-court

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#1065

Post by funkybusiness » September 5th, 2017, 9:00 pm

Adam, are you only interested in books with birds in the title? Limits the search for good books a bit...

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#1066

Post by AdamH » September 5th, 2017, 9:13 pm

funkybusiness on Sep 5 2017, 03:00:01 PM wrote:Adam, are you only interested in books with birds in the title? Limits the search for good books a bit...
I think I'll read The Raven next.

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#1067

Post by Carmel1379 » September 5th, 2017, 9:15 pm

Goodreads is the way to go (books database + rating system wise), there exists even an [for all purposes dead] iCM Forum group over there, with recognisable profiles of some forum members.
IMDb, letterboxd, tumblr
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#1068

Post by maxwelldeux » September 5th, 2017, 10:40 pm

Carmel1379 on Sep 5 2017, 03:15:42 PM wrote:Goodreads is the way to go (books database + rating system wise), there exists even an [for all purposes dead] iCM Forum group over there, with recognisable profiles of some forum members.
Wait - really? What's the name of the group? I'd be for resurrecting it if others are in...

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#1069

Post by Carmel1379 » September 5th, 2017, 10:48 pm

maxwelldeux on Sep 5 2017, 04:40:29 PM wrote:
Carmel1379 on Sep 5 2017, 03:15:42 PM wrote:Goodreads is the way to go (books database + rating system wise), there exists even an [for all purposes dead] iCM Forum group over there, with recognisable profiles of some forum members.
Wait - really? What's the name of the group? I'd be for resurrecting it if others are in...
https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/11 ... vies-forum. Apart from the thread I also made on here, nothing happened there since 2014.
Last edited by Carmel1379 on September 5th, 2017, 10:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
IMDb, letterboxd, tumblr
Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
Close the world. ʇxǝu ǝɥʇ uǝdO.
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#1070

Post by maxwelldeux » September 5th, 2017, 11:03 pm

Carmel1379 on Sep 5 2017, 04:48:07 PM wrote:
maxwelldeux on Sep 5 2017, 04:40:29 PM wrote:
Carmel1379 on Sep 5 2017, 03:15:42 PM wrote:Goodreads is the way to go (books database + rating system wise), there exists even an [for all purposes dead] iCM Forum group over there, with recognisable profiles of some forum members.
Wait - really? What's the name of the group? I'd be for resurrecting it if others are in...
https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/11 ... vies-forum. Apart from the thread I also made on here, nothing happened there since 2014.
Thanks for the link! I've sent my join request...

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#1071

Post by insomnia » September 6th, 2017, 11:59 am

The list system on Goodreads is very frustrating though. Every topic is always the same couple of popular authors being voted in because everyone can vote on every list. Not at all useful.

I too often wish there was something like ICM for books.

Would love a bunch of lists that are authoritative on their subjects for different decades/countries/topics and a good general canon one.

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#1072

Post by AdamH » September 7th, 2017, 6:33 pm

I do think that an iCBooks site would work well. Would be pretty simple to do. I mean in terms of gathering lists rather than everything that goes into setting up and running the website. The concept itself is simple and easy.

Maybe funky had a point when he said I'm only reading books about birds. I've expanded now but I'm staying in the animal/bird etc. kingdom. Animal Farm. I'm then thinking of Lord of the Flies after that.

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#1073

Post by brokenface » September 7th, 2017, 6:39 pm

AdamH on Sep 7 2017, 12:33:01 PM wrote:I do think that an iCBooks site would work well. Would be pretty simple to do. I mean in terms of gathering lists rather than everything that goes into setting up and running the website. The concept itself is simple and easy.
could call it readit

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#1074

Post by Kowry » September 10th, 2017, 10:31 am

Aside from the books mentioned in the "Read the books..." thread, I've been reading Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. Remember that I read the first two books as a kid (thought it was somewhat blasphemous then!). Liked both books this time around, good, entertaining "young adult" fiction. Still need to read the third part.

It's fun to read fiction for a change, though now I again feel like I should return to reading something "more substantial",

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#1075

Post by AdamH » September 11th, 2017, 9:34 pm

Really happy that I'm finally reading books again. This feels like when I first got into films (when I started watching seriously and got into classics, foreign films etc. through the IMDb top 250 initially). Feels like I have a blank slate right now with all of the classics ready to be read.

I read Animal Farm in a couple of days as it is very short. I started The Hobbit today.

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#1076

Post by funkybusiness » September 11th, 2017, 11:25 pm

AdamH on Sep 7 2017, 12:33:01 PM wrote:Maybe funky had a point when he said I'm only reading books about birds. I've expanded now but I'm staying in the animal/bird etc. kingdom. Animal Farm. I'm then thinking of Lord of the Flies after that.
:lol:


re: an "iCheckBooks" website, it's not exactly the same but http://thegreatestbooks.org/ has something of a similar flavor. Top page is a weighted average compilation, but click a book and you can access the lists that feature that specific book (or just click a list on the side of the top page).

But since you're just getting into the classicz, Adam, I wouldn't recommend starting at 1. Don Quixote and working your way down. That's... too hardcore.

I was in the middle of writing something about each of the top 10 but stopped myself. Of the top 10, I'd say go for either The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain or The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Those are pretty good ones to start out with re: classicz. People also seem to really enjoy One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, but I haven't read it, so, no opinion from me.

Also, don't be afraid to branch out into whatever might interest you, even if it's not some oft-studied, well-regarded classic, and on the flip-side, don't bother with anything you're not interested, that you might be forcing yourself to read just because it's on a best-of-list, or, a bigger problem for me, feel like you can't drop a book because you've started it and feel an obligation to complete it. Reading can be very time-consuming, and why waste time on something you don't like?

Oh and I'm almost finished reading The Complete Sherlock Holmes for the first time, and it's very recommendable (but if you go for it, skip Part Two of the first novel, A Study in Scarlet, where it shifts perspective to Utah. it's garbage and will make you want to drop Holmes immediately. just skip to the last chapter for the wrap-up and then get on with the good stuff).

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#1077

Post by albajos » September 12th, 2017, 12:02 am

I've started reading Edda, which is basically norse mythology. The stories was written in the 1200s on Iceland.

So Loki is the father of Jörmungandr, Fenrir and Hel... Not exactly Marvel.

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#1078

Post by funkybusiness » September 12th, 2017, 12:20 am

Groovy, I've got Carolyne Larrington's translation of the Poetic Edda on my to-read stack. You're from Norway, right? Are you reading it in the original? Or is it like an update from Old Norse to Norwegian? How different is Old Norse from modern Norwegian? Is it kind of like The Canterbury Tales in Middle English? Strange, but you can make out the gist of it? (The edition I have of the Canterbury Tales is in Middle English with glosses along the margin for obscure words or those that have evolved to have a different meaning in modern English.)

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#1079

Post by albajos » September 12th, 2017, 12:27 am

I'm not reading norse no. But it's very old norwegian half translated to "new norwegian"

Norse is closer to islandic. We can't really read it here (nor can they).


I have the Odyssey in old english, and verily the biggest obstacle are to get through the sentences. Verily verily. So reading norwegian inspired by norse is kind of the same thing. They just put in some extra endings and letters in some of the words, but they are recognizable.

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#1080

Post by funkybusiness » September 12th, 2017, 12:30 am

Ah, interesting. thanks

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