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Architecture

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blocho
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Architecture

#1

Post by blocho »

This is a new topic to discuss all matters architectural.

One of my favorites: Henry Hobson Richardson's Trinity Church, 1877, Boston)
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OldAle1
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#2

Post by OldAle1 »

That is nice. The way the stairway almost seems like a gaping wound in the side of the house - but a beautiful gaping wound of course.

The Xanadu building in Alcante, Spain, visible in several films

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blocho
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#3

Post by blocho »

OldAle1 wrote: April 13th, 2021, 6:32 pm Yah, both fairly ugly buildings all in all. Universities - at least the ones I'm most familiar with - seem to have gone from mostly Gothic or Victorian styles straight into late modernism and alas I don't usually find either all that entrancing.
And how! I immediately thought of the University of Edinburgh, where I spent a semester studying. The central campus around George Square is a bit of an atrocity. Half of the Georgian architecture in that area was torn up in the 1960s and replaced with brutalist monstrosities. You can see a juxtaposition of the two styles below:
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Appleton Tower at the University of Edinburgh is one of the two ugliest buildings I've ever seen. This is how it appeared when I attended, though it's been renovated since and looks better now. At the time, there was a student campaign to get it entered into a contest for ugliest building in the UK.
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The other ugliest is the Standard Hotel in New York:
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blocho
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#4

Post by blocho »

OldAle1 wrote: April 13th, 2021, 6:50 pm That is nice. The way the stairway almost seems like a gaping wound in the side of the house - but a beautiful gaping wound of course.
It's pretty rare to see a staircase that is also an arcade. Here's an image of Trinity Church from the front:
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I did a research paper on HH Richardson in college and focused on his train stations. He designed 12 in all. The few that survived, unfortunately, are not usually in good condition. Here's one in disrepair, though I think it's possible to see how good it would have looked when new:
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blocho
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#5

Post by blocho »

OldAle1 wrote: April 13th, 2021, 6:50 pm The Xanadu building in Alcante, Spain, visible in several films
Never heard of this building or architect before. Very interesting.
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xianjiro
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#6

Post by xianjiro »

oh, fun! I too am interested in architecture as public art. I'll join in when I have a bit more time to hunt for some stunning buildings' glamour shots.
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Knaldskalle
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#7

Post by Knaldskalle »

OldAle1 wrote: April 13th, 2021, 6:32 pm Universities - at least the ones I'm most familiar with - seem to have gone from mostly Gothic or Victorian styles straight into late modernism and alas I don't usually find either all that entrancing.

I guess we should start an architecture thread or something already.
Indeed. My alma mater:

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It's nicknamed "Rust-burg." The student newspaper was simply called "Rust." Apparently the building was inspired by a Mexican University, but instead of using wood they used raw iron plates to simulate wooden planks. Of course, someone somewhere made a mistake in calculating just how thick the metal plates need to be to withstand the corrosion, so the plates corrode through and have to be replaced every 10 years or so at a price of $150 apiece. And to make matters worse, the architectural firm that designed the place has a clause in the contract that no modifications to the building can be made without their prior approval - including interior changes. That's why the walls inside are grey despite everyone hating it. The firm said no to painting them white. :finger:


They've since added to the original building and kept it raw concrete and glass.
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peeptoad
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#8

Post by peeptoad »

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Gaudi. Got to visit several of the buildings he designed and a park area that was way cool when I visited Barcelona years ago...
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#9

Post by peeptoad »

blocho wrote: April 13th, 2021, 6:51 pm
The other ugliest is the Standard Hotel in New York:
This one reminds me of the one of the buildings on the Mass Art campus in Boston (I see it every day I cut through there when I get off the train for work).
eta.this one:
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xianjiro
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#10

Post by xianjiro »

This is my alma mater (pffewie)

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I believe this was the first building to inspire the trend of Bhutan on the Border

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Modern images have palms which make it much more difficult to see the architectural theme.

I like these two comparisons, first Bhutan, second El Paso, Texas:

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And finally the explanation of "why":
One of the most important decisions in the University’s history was made by its first leader, Steve Worrell, who took his wife’s suggestion and requested that the buildings emulate the architecture found in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan. Kathleen Worrell had noted the beauty of Bhutanese architecture with its massive, sloping walls and deep, inset windows in an April 1914 issue of National Geographic Magazine. Almost every campus building has since followed that design.
from https://universityoftexas-elpaso.myuvn. ... hitecture/
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Knaldskalle
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#11

Post by Knaldskalle »

peeptoad wrote: April 14th, 2021, 8:10 pm
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Gaudi. Got to visit several of the buildings he designed and a park area that was way cool when I visited Barcelona years ago...
La Sagrada Familia was the highlight for me on a trip to Barcelona many years ago now. Love it and love his other buildings too.
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#12

Post by blocho »

xianjiro wrote: April 14th, 2021, 8:19 pm I believe this was the first building to inspire the trend of Bhutan on the Border
Bhutan on the border!!

What a great story. Thanks for sharing this.
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#13

Post by blocho »

Knaldskalle wrote: April 15th, 2021, 2:23 am
peeptoad wrote: April 14th, 2021, 8:10 pm
Spoiler
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Gaudi. Got to visit several of the buildings he designed and a park area that was way cool when I visited Barcelona years ago...
La Sagrada Familia was the highlight for me on a trip to Barcelona many years ago now. Love it and love his other buildings too.
I have to admit that I dislike Guadi's work generally, but the Sagrada Familia is an exception. It's an amazing building.
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#14

Post by tirefeet »

Krasznahorkai in his Seiobo, There Below notes down several buildings, one of them being Gaudi's Casa Mila. One of my favorite sections in the book is about Alhambra though, where he poses the question what just is it and is it accurate to address it as "Alhambra". Goes onto detail about how it came to be and also references academic material regarding "Girih", which are decorative geometric patterns used in Islamic architecture.

An example of Girih which is on the ceiling of the Ambassador's Room at Alcazar of Seville: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alc% ... 019-11.jpg
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