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All-Time Favorite Books?

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All-Time Favorite Books?

#1

Post by St. Gloede » April 23rd, 2018, 10:30 am

Though we are predominally a collection of film buffs, I know many are lovers of the cinematic art's perhaps greatest rival, the novel. What are your favorite written works?

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#2

Post by St. Gloede » April 23rd, 2018, 10:36 am

Full disclosure, I don't read anywhere near as much as I should, perhaps because my career is already writing focused, where I usually watch hundreds of films a year, I usually read less than 10 books. I am however trying to rectify this.

I would say my current "favorite" book is The Age of Innocence, but that is only about an 8.5/10, and I have never read anything so far I could genuinely call brilliant, which is just sad. Looking forward to seeing your picks.

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#3

Post by Gershwin » April 23rd, 2018, 10:52 am

Nice idea for a thread!

I happen to have a list of favourite books on Goodreads. Twenty books so far, unranked.
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#4

Post by clemmetarey » April 23rd, 2018, 11:01 am

Your shelf is private Gershwin.

I do not read as much as I should either, but books I really loved were Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Un homme qui dort/A Man Asleep, and The Brothers Karamazov .

I read the first two because of the films.

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#5

Post by funkybusiness » April 23rd, 2018, 11:16 am

you said books and then you said novels, so I'm cheating.

Moby-Dick
Ulysses
Post-almost-capital-punished Dostoyevsky (cheating)
Mason & Dixon
Gravity's Rainbow
Don Quixote
Complete Sherlock Holmes (in 2 vol.) (cheating?)
The Portable Dante (tl. L. Binyon)
Underworld
If Not, Winter (Sappho tl. by Anne Carson)
Van Gogh Complete Paintings
The Complete Little Nemo
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy Trilogy in Five Parts (not cheating, my copy is 1 volume)
The Recognitions
Edith Wharton Library of America set (okay, cheating)
Autobiography of Red
From Hell
The King Arthur canon (from the HGB to de Troyes and the Mabinogion, to the Provençal tales and Parzival, from Le Morte dArthur to The Faerie Queene, on thru Tennyson, The Waste Land, and TH White CHEAAATING)
The Making of the Atomic Bomb
Blood Meridian
Penguin Dictionary of Symbols
Paterson

there are probably a few I'm forgetting at the moment and will post later.

(and this book(s) on Stalin I'm reading might go up there as well, eventually, weird as that sounds).
Last edited by funkybusiness on April 23rd, 2018, 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#6

Post by Onderhond » April 23rd, 2018, 11:56 am

I used to be very much into books, but that changed around my 16th year. It's kinda ironic that my favorite book kind of turned me off of books in general, simply because it stood out so much from all the rest I had read that I felt other books were just too plain.

My clear favorite is Jeff Noon's Vurt, both very scifi and very poetic, but in a modern way. Noon has a way with words that makes them almost visual. It's no wonder then that I switched to cinema, which is actually visual.

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#7

Post by mightysparks » April 23rd, 2018, 12:33 pm

I also have a small list on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/7 ... t=position

I try to aim for 10 books a year but I rarely do it. I'm still making my way through the NPR sci-fi and fantasy list which I've been working on for like 10 goddamn years but there was some interesting ones mentioned that I'm gonna put on my read list. I've really only read a few mainstream classics, mostly sci-fi so I'm looking forward to reading more once uni is done.
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#8

Post by Gershwin » April 23rd, 2018, 12:37 pm

clemmetarey on Apr 23 2018, 05:01:09 AM wrote:Your shelf is private Gershwin.

I do not read as much as I should either, but books I really loved were Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Un homme qui dort/A Man Asleep, and The Brothers Karamazov .

I read the first two because of the films.
You're right. But I managed to export them!

Here's a completely randomly ordered list of the books I happened to mark as favourites:
  • In Cold Blood - Truman Capote
  • Black Box - Amos Oz
  • The Book of Job - Anonymous
  • De dood als meisje van acht - Jacq Firmin Vogelaar
  • The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • The Nose - Nikolai Gogol
  • Der Tod in Venedig - Thomas Mann
  • Perlmanns Schweigen - Pascal Mercier
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude - Gabriel García Márquez
  • Everything Is Illuminated - Jonathan Safran Foer
  • JPod - Douglas Coupland
  • The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Milan Kundera
  • Blindness - José Saramago
  • Immortality - Milan Kundera
  • Tender Is the Night - F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Power and the Glory - Graham Greene
  • The Story of Film - Mark Cousins
  • A Tale of Love and Darkness - Amos Oz
  • Onder professoren - Willem Frederik Hermans
  • Lolita- Vladimir Nabokov
Last edited by Gershwin on April 23rd, 2018, 12:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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#9

Post by nimimerkillinen » April 23rd, 2018, 12:42 pm

Ive read very very few books so far

1984
Les Miserables
Ham on Rye
Fahrenheit 451
The Buddha Said...: Meeting the Challenge of Life's Difficulties
Cutting Trough Spiritual Materialism
Awareness: Conversations with the Masters
Food of the Gods - Mckenna
Last edited by nimimerkillinen on April 23rd, 2018, 12:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#10

Post by beavis » April 23rd, 2018, 1:10 pm

I made this top10 a long while back, but since I'm reading one (max two) book(s) a year, it should still hold up

1. Crash - J.G. Ballard (1973)
2. The Dharma Bums - Jack Kerouac (1958)
3. Plateforme: Au Milieu du Monde - Michel Houellebecq (2001)
4. Glamorama - Bret Easton Ellis (1999)
5. The Liar - Stephen Fry (1991)
6. Il Pendolo di Foucault - Umberto Eco (1988)
7. L'Étranger - Albert Camus (1942)
8. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? - Philip K. Dick (1968)
9. A Philosophical Investigation - Philip Kerr (1993)
10. Umibe no Kafuka - Haruki Murakami (2002)

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#11

Post by brokenface » April 23rd, 2018, 1:22 pm

We did do this thread before and I think my list from there still stands, I can't think of anything I've read in the last few years that would get on ahead of these.

viewtopic.php?t=1091&1/
I can't rank. but if was going away and could only keep 10 books from my shelf (and sticking to fiction) I think they'd be:

Leo Tolstoy - Anna Karenina
Fernando Pessoa - The Book of Disquiet
Joseph Heller - Catch-22
J.G. Ballard - Complete Short Stories
Raymond Chandler - The Big Sleep/Farewell My Lovely/The Long Goodbye (I have these in one volume :P )
George Orwell - 1984
Gabriel Garcia Marquez - One Hundred Years of Solitude
Kurt Vonnegut - Galapagos
Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Notes From Underground
Vladimir Nabokov - Lolita

wait shit I haven't even got Philip K Dick or Graham Greene or Evelyn Waugh or Douglas Adams or... :'(
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#12

Post by cinephage » April 23rd, 2018, 1:24 pm

I'm limiting myself to 1 book per writer, but in each of these cases, I've gone through most of whatever their authors have written, and loved most of it...

Voyage au bout de la nuit, by Louis Ferdinand Celine
Belle du seigneur, by Albert Cohen
Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
The sound and The Fury, by William Faulkner
Dalva, by Jim Harrison
Use of weapons, by Iain M. Banks
The Emperor God of Dune, by Frank Herbert
Neuromancer, by William Gibson
Ubik, by Philip K. Dick
The Aleph, by Jorge Luis Borges

I would easily add a few titles by Isaac Asimov, James Ellroy, J.G. Ballard, Will Self, China Mieville, Marcel Proust, Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Giraudoux, Howard Phillips Lovecraft...
If I should add poetry, I'm fond of Charles Baudelaire, Alfred de Musset, and René Char.

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#13

Post by nimimerkillinen » April 23rd, 2018, 1:55 pm

beavis on Apr 23 2018, 07:10:32 AM wrote:1. Crash - J.G. Ballard (1973)
2. The Dharma Bums - Jack Kerouac (1958)
oh yeah, forgot these!

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#14

Post by Mysterious Dude » April 23rd, 2018, 2:16 pm

1. Les Misérables (1862, Victor Hugo)
2. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (1824, James Hogg)
3. Frankenstein (1818, Mary Shelley)
4. The Catcher in the Rye (1951, J.D. Salinger)
5. A Confederacy of Dunces (1980, John Kennedy Toole)
6. Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949, George Orwell)
7. The Stranger (1942, Albert Camus)
8. The Master and Margarita (1967, Mikhail Bulgakov)
9. Notes from Underground (1864, Fyodor Dostoyevsky)
10. The Sound and the Fury (1929, William Faulkner)

11. Our Lady of the Flowers (1943, Jean Genet)
12. As I Lay Dying (1930, William Faulkner)
13. The Tin Drum (1959, Günter Grass)
14. Naked Lunch (1959, William S. Burroughs)
15. Dead Souls (1842, Nikolai Gogol)
16. Lord of the Flies (1954, William Golding)
17. Hunger (1890, Knut Hamsun)
18. Call It Sleep (1934, Henry Roth)
19. Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953, James Baldwin)
20. We (1921, Yevgeny Zamyatin)

21. Other Voices, Other Rooms (1948, Truman Capote)
22. Crime and Punishment (1866, Fyodor Dostoyevsky)
23. Slaughterhouse-Five (1969, Kurt Vonnegut)
24. Moravagine (1926, Blaise Cendrars)
25. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971, Hunter S. Thompson)
26. Fifth Business (1970, Robertson Davies)
27. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884, Mark Twain)
28. The Painted Bird (1965, Jerzy Kosiński)
29. Germinal (1885, Émile Zola)
30. Dune (1965, Frank Herbert)

31. Nip the Buds, Shoot the Kids (1958, Kenzaburo Oe)
32. Things Fall Apart (1958, Chinua Achebe)
33. The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967, William Styron)
34. Fahrenheit 451 (1952, Ray Bradbury)
35. Camel Xiangzi (1937, Lao She)
36. Last Exit to Brooklyn (1964, Hubert Selby Jr.)
37. Flowers for Algernon (1966, Daniel Keyes)
38. The Forever War (1974, Joe Haldeman)
39. A Clockwork Orange (1962, Anthony Burgess)
40. Light in August (1932, William Faulkner)

41. Zombie (1995, Joyce Carol Oates)
42. In Cold Blood (1966, Truman Capote)
43. Pather Panchali (1929, Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay)
44. Solaris (1961, Stanisław Lem)
45. The Time Machine (1895, H.G. Wells)
46. Brave New World (1932, Aldous Huxley)
47. The Goldfinch (2013, Donna Tartt)
48. Dream Story (1926, Arthur Schnitzler)
49. The Handmaid’s Tale (1985, Margaret Atwood)
50. The Satyricon (c. 100 AD, Petronius)

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#15

Post by RedHawk10 » April 23rd, 2018, 8:14 pm

I'm pretty inexperienced as much as I love reading. Here's my (now updated) top five though:

1. Infinite Jest
2. Gravity's Rainbow
3. Underworld
4. Blood Meridian
5. Lord of the Flies
Last edited by RedHawk10 on January 7th, 2019, 6:47 am, edited 3 times in total.

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#16

Post by sebby » April 23rd, 2018, 9:08 pm

Martin Eden

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#17

Post by Coco LaBerge » April 23rd, 2018, 10:37 pm

Midnight's Children
Lolita
The Trial
Frankenstein
The Stranger
Crime and Punishment
The Great Gatsby
Zorba the Greek
Catch 22
End of the Affair
Wide Sargasso Sea
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Fahrenheit 451
My Name is Red
Siddhartha
A Passage to India
The Painted Bird
The Lord of the Rings
The Count of Monte Cristo
Never Let Me Go
Atonement
Money - Martin Amis

Some I've liked in a rough order. The first 5 or so are strong favourites. 1 is my favourite book, I highly recommend it. I'm a bit lazy on writing author names sorry. Shakespeare is the boss ofc, but they're best seen as actual plays. Just reading them I'm not so keen on.

Some others will pop to mind soon I guess. I've been a bit slack on reading the past few years.

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#18

Post by outdoorcats » April 24th, 2018, 12:32 am

My favorite book is Norwegian Wood. Some other favorites off the top of my head are Les Misérables, To the Lighthouse, The Bell Jar, Don Quixote, Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, Invisible Man, Bleak House, Blood Meridian, Song of Solomon, The Lord of the Rings, Catch 22, Gravity's Rainbow, Moby Dick, Native Son, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Jane Eyre, and Housekeeping.
Last edited by outdoorcats on April 24th, 2018, 1:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#19

Post by RBG » April 24th, 2018, 12:44 am

cien años de soledad - garcía márquez
pale fire - nabokov
moby dick - melville
creation - vidal
crime & punishment - dostoyevsky
jane eyre - c. brontë
narcissus & goldmund - hesse
i, claudius - graves
the once and future king - white :thumbsup:
LOTR - tolkien (i read this at least 5 times as a kid :geek: )

shakespeare's history plays and a bunch of other stuff
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#20

Post by Leopardi » April 24th, 2018, 4:07 am

I'll copy out my list from the thread brokenface provided above:

1. Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche)
2. Les Miserables (Victor Hugo)
3. The Stranger (Albert Camus)
4. Martin Eden (Jack London)
5. Sister Carrie (Theodore Dreiser)
6. The Hobbit (J.R.R. Tolkien)
7. David Copperfield (Charles Dickens)
8. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (Victor Hugo)
9. Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol)
10. The complete Sherlock Holmes mysteries (Sir Arthur Conan Doyle)
11. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)
12. Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy)
13. The Way of All Flesh (Samuel Butler)
14. Moby Dick (Herman Melville)
15. An American Tragedy (Theodore Dreiser)
16. The Razor's Edge (W. Somerset Maugham)
17. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)
18. The Nether World (George Gissing)
19. The Jungle (Upton Sinclair)
20. The Pickwick Papers (Charles Dickens)
21. The Grapes of Wrath (John Steinbeck)
22. Jennie Gerhardt (Theodore Dreiser)
23. The Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkien)
24. Journey to the Center of the Earth (Jules Verne)
25. Germinal (Emile Zola)

This list was made in early 2013, and since then possibly the only title I've read that might make it onto the list is John Williams' Stoner. Don Quixote and The Belly of Paris are contenders, too.

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#21

Post by Gershwin » April 24th, 2018, 9:31 am

Leopardi on Apr 23 2018, 10:07:38 PM wrote:(...)

This list was made in early 2013, and since then possibly the only title I've read that might make it onto the list is John Williams' Stoner.
Thanks for reminding me that this should be among my favourites as well. :thumbsup:
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#22

Post by funkybusiness » April 24th, 2018, 10:40 am

RBG on Apr 23 2018, 06:44:21 PM wrote:cien años de soledad - garcía márquez
pale fire - nabokov
moby dick - melville
creation - vidal
crime & punishment - dostoyevsky
jane eyre - c. brontë
narcissus & goldmund - hesse
i, claudius - graves
the once and future king - white :thumbsup:
LOTR - tolkien (i read this at least 5 times as a kid :geek: )

shakespeare's history plays and a bunch of other stuff
DID WE JUST BECOME BEST FRIENDS


I haven't read Creation but it sounds great.

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#23

Post by flaiky » April 24th, 2018, 10:47 am

Not a big reader, unfortunately...I did go through a phase a few years ago where I would always read on the commute to work, but now I live close enough to walk. When I'm at home, internet/TV/films always take priority so it just doesn't happen. I'd like to try and fix that because reading a book often is more satisfying than any of those.

Fiction: Catch-22 (followed by A Farewell to Arms)
Non-fiction: Jane Fonda, My Life so Far (followed closely by Charlie Chaplin, My Autobiography...Both books are fascinating).
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#24

Post by RBG » April 24th, 2018, 1:55 pm

funkybusiness on Apr 24 2018, 04:40:04 AM wrote:
RBG on Apr 23 2018, 06:44:21 PM wrote:cien años de soledad - garcía márquez
pale fire - nabokov
moby dick - melville
creation - vidal
crime & punishment - dostoyevsky
jane eyre - c. brontë
narcissus & goldmund - hesse
i, claudius - graves
the once and future king - white :thumbsup:
LOTR - tolkien (i read this at least 5 times as a kid :geek: )

shakespeare's history plays and a bunch of other stuff
DID WE JUST BECOME BEST FRIENDS


I haven't read Creation but it sounds great.
i need to read some pynchon :) props on getting through ulysses. i'll try it again someday
The Way of All Flesh (Samuel Butler)
i read a ridiculous amount as a kid and i specifically remember my mother confiscating this book based on the title (she thought it was some kind of pornography i expect). never got to finish it. should pick it up again. 19th century novels rock - dickens, hardy, balzac etc B) and stevenson!
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#25

Post by matthewscott8 » April 24th, 2018, 2:24 pm

Below are some very precious books. I read less than I'd like as I have no-one to talk to books about and reading can make me lonely. One work per author, particularly saves listing more than one Simenon.

Savage Night - Jim Thompson
Red Harvest - Dashiell Hammett
The Green Child - Herbert Asquith
The Count of Monte Cristo - Alexandre Dumas Pere
The Invention of Morel - Adolfo Bioy Casares
Good Morning, Midnight - Jean Rhys
The Mahé Circle - Georges Simenon
The Quest of the Holy Grail - Anonymous (13th Century)
The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood
Tristan - Béroul (12th Century)
Cities of the Red Night - William Burroughs
The Story of Venus and Tannhauser - Aubrey Beardsley
A Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
White Jazz - James Ellroy
Alone in Berlin - Hans Fallada
Solar - Ian McEwan
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#26

Post by 3eyes » April 24th, 2018, 3:48 pm

I don't read much serious fiction anymore and am too old to sift through my faves
(Dostoevsky, Nabokov, Jens Bjørneboe, Jane Austen, Trollope, George Eliot, loom large, Dumas Pere was a childhood favorite).

But I will single out PALE FIRE as a book that hit me very hard and if RBG or anyone wants to discuss it, I'd be delighted.
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#27

Post by Leopardi » April 25th, 2018, 3:48 am

Gershwin on Apr 24 2018, 03:31:00 AM wrote:
Leopardi on Apr 23 2018, 10:07:38 PM wrote:(...)

This list was made in early 2013, and since then possibly the only title I've read that might make it onto the list is John Williams' Stoner.
Thanks for reminding me that this should be among my favourites as well. :thumbsup:
:thumbsup:

I have a friend who knows two people that both loved Stoner and yet preferred Butcher's Crossing (despite not especially being fans of western-themed novels). This boggles my mind, but launches BC to the top of my must-read list. Since I haven't read it myself I can't recommend it, per se, but wanted to put it on your radar all the same - lots of potential there, apparently!

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#28

Post by Leopardi » April 25th, 2018, 4:16 am

RBG on Apr 24 2018, 07:55:42 AM wrote:
The Way of All Flesh (Samuel Butler)
i read a ridiculous amount as a kid and i specifically remember my mother confiscating this book based on the title (she thought it was some kind of pornography i expect). never got to finish it. should pick it up again. 19th century novels rock - dickens, hardy, balzac etc B) and stevenson!
It was scandalous in its day, no doubt, but nothing we can't handle these days, as you might guess. :lol: Still, a fantastic book and maybe the greatest bridge between the Victorian era and the 20th century literature, as far as I'm concerned!

And yeah, there are so many 19th century novels that kick some serious ass. Join in on the Read the Books thread and we can pick some titles for each other!

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#29

Post by Leopardi » April 25th, 2018, 4:41 am

My list of titles I'm most interested in reading from the books above (not ordered, going from the beginning of the thread to the end):

Un homme qui dort
The Brothers Karamazov
Mason & Dixon
Vurt
A Game of Thrones
Blindness
Ham on Rye
Foucault's Pendulum
The Book of Disquiet
Voyage au bout de la nuit
The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner
Other Voices, Other Rooms
Infinite Jest
Zorba the Greek
The Bell Jar (my partner just read this and adored it)
Native Son
Crime and Punishment
Narcissus & Goldmund
Creation
My Autobiography (Chaplin)
Tristan (Béroul - loved Strassburg's version)
Pale Fire

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#30

Post by Coco LaBerge » April 25th, 2018, 10:16 am

Leopardi on Apr 24 2018, 10:41:31 PM wrote:My list of titles I'm most interested in reading from the books above (not ordered, going from the beginning of the thread to the end):
Yeah picking up a few from here, now I'm reading a lot again. The Bell Jar is one I fancy too, I've seen it in the second hand bookshop as well which is nice. I'm getting sick of reading on the phone all the time. Pale Fire, Infinite Jest and the rest of Dostoevsky are on my list.

A Game of Thrones is worth reading though A Song of Ice and Fire really drops off after the third book I thought. It's a shame as those first three are great, especially A Storm of Swords, so good that book.

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#31

Post by funkybusiness » April 25th, 2018, 11:12 am

RBG on Apr 24 2018, 07:55:42 AM wrote:
funkybusiness on Apr 24 2018, 04:40:04 AM wrote:
RBG on Apr 23 2018, 06:44:21 PM wrote:cien años de soledad - garcía márquez
pale fire - nabokov
moby dick - melville
creation - vidal
crime & punishment - dostoyevsky
jane eyre - c. brontë
narcissus & goldmund - hesse
i, claudius - graves
the once and future king - white :thumbsup:
LOTR - tolkien (i read this at least 5 times as a kid :geek: )

shakespeare's history plays and a bunch of other stuff
DID WE JUST BECOME BEST FRIENDS


I haven't read Creation but it sounds great.
i need to read some pynchon :) props on getting through ulysses. i'll try it again someday
The Way of All Flesh (Samuel Butler)
i read a ridiculous amount as a kid and i specifically remember my mother confiscating this book based on the title (she thought it was some kind of pornography i expect). never got to finish it. should pick it up again. 19th century novels rock - dickens, hardy, balzac etc B) and stevenson!
similarly (or oppositely) I was a youth (well, 15th birthday) when I was gifted Ulysses by my grandmother (I think she had seen it atop the Modern Library list of the best novels of the 20th century) who, after purchasing it was on her way back home and flipped thru the book and landed on either a. Bloom shitting, b. Bloom masturbating to a girl on the beach or c. Cunty Kate in the whorehouse (probably this last one, flipping thru the book this section stands out graphically) and asked my mother "...should I take it back or...?" and my mother was like "nah, who cares." so. that's how Ulysses ended up in my life.

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Gershwin
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#32

Post by Gershwin » April 25th, 2018, 1:28 pm

Leopardi on Apr 24 2018, 09:48:23 PM wrote:
Gershwin on Apr 24 2018, 03:31:00 AM wrote:
Leopardi on Apr 23 2018, 10:07:38 PM wrote:(...)

This list was made in early 2013, and since then possibly the only title I've read that might make it onto the list is John Williams' Stoner.
Thanks for reminding me that this should be among my favourites as well. :thumbsup:
:thumbsup:

I have a friend who knows two people that both loved Stoner and yet preferred Butcher's Crossing (despite not especially being fans of western-themed novels). This boggles my mind, but launches BC to the top of my must-read list. Since I haven't read it myself I can't recommend it, per se, but wanted to put it on your radar all the same - lots of potential there, apparently!
Ha, that one immediately goes on my to-read list indeed. Thanks!

Also, great story, Funky! :lol: That's another one of those classics that have been on my list for too long. It's about time I finished TSPDT (or all official iCM lists tehe ), so I can pick up reading a bit more intensively.
RokP 250

Profiles: Untappd - Last.fm - iCM

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#33

Post by Mysterious Dude » April 25th, 2018, 1:53 pm

funkybusiness on Apr 25 2018, 05:12:35 AM wrote:similarly (or oppositely) I was a youth (well, 15th birthday) when I was gifted Ulysses by my grandmother (I think she had seen it atop the Modern Library list of the best novels of the 20th century) who, after purchasing it was on her way back home and flipped thru the book and landed on either a. Bloom shitting, b. Bloom masturbating to a girl on the beach or c. Cunty Kate in the whorehouse (probably this last one, flipping thru the book this section stands out graphically) and asked my mother "...should I take it back or...?" and my mother was like "nah, who cares." so. that's how Ulysses ended up in my life.
Is it bad that I read the book two years ago and don't remember any of that?

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#34

Post by funkybusiness » April 25th, 2018, 8:26 pm

Mysterious Dude on Apr 25 2018, 07:53:52 AM wrote:
funkybusiness on Apr 25 2018, 05:12:35 AM wrote:similarly (or oppositely) I was a youth (well, 15th birthday) when I was gifted Ulysses by my grandmother (I think she had seen it atop the Modern Library list of the best novels of the 20th century) who, after purchasing it was on her way back home and flipped thru the book and landed on either a. Bloom shitting, b. Bloom masturbating to a girl on the beach or c. Cunty Kate in the whorehouse (probably this last one, flipping thru the book this section stands out graphically) and asked my mother "...should I take it back or...?" and my mother was like "nah, who cares." so. that's how Ulysses ended up in my life.
Is it bad that I read the book two years ago and don't remember any of that?
there are ten thousand other things that happen in the book as well, so, probably not.

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#35

Post by Lonewolf2003 » April 26th, 2018, 11:33 am

I read less than I would want to also. Unfortunately there are only a limited ammount of hours in a day.

Some of my favorites, I probably forgot some, in random order:
-Almost anything by Murakami. But favorites are Kafka on the Shore, the Wind-up Bird Chronicle, Hard-boilded Wonderland and The End of the World and Norwegian Wood.
-Freedom by Franzen
-On the Road, and The Dharma Bums by Kerouac.
-The Catcher in the Rye by Sallinger
-A Heartbreaking Work of a Staggering Genius by Eggers
-Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Pirsig
-LOTR by Tolkien
-De uitvreter, Titaantjes en de Dichter by Nescio.
-Crime and Punishment by Dostoyevsky.
-A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. And The Dubliners by Joyce.
-The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald.
-The Marriage Plot by Eugenides.
Last edited by Lonewolf2003 on April 26th, 2018, 11:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#36

Post by Eve-Lang-El-Coup » April 26th, 2018, 1:16 pm

Well, I have to echo most others sentiment.

My favourites with only the first being in order:

The Three Cornered World by Natsume Soseki
The Disinherited By Benito Peros Galdos
The Case Worker by George Konrad
Vainglory by Geraldine McCaughrean
Schopenhauers Telescope by Gerard Donovan
Good Morning, Midnight by Jean Rhys
Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata
The Ridge and The River by T.A.G. Hungerford
Hunting The Ghost Dancer by A.A. Attanasio
The Scapegoat by Daphne Du Maurier
My Father's Glory & My Mother's Castle by Marcel Pagnol

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rnilsson19
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#37

Post by rnilsson19 » April 26th, 2018, 5:02 pm

Heart of Darkness
The Stranger
On the Road
A Season in Hell
Play the Piano Drunk Like a Percussion Instrument Until the Fingers Begin to Bleed a Bit

I plan on gradually laying off movies a little and start reading more once I hit 30. Hopefully...
Last edited by rnilsson19 on April 26th, 2018, 11:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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#38

Post by matthewscott8 » June 18th, 2018, 11:03 am

Eve-Lang-El-Coup on Apr 26 2018, 07:16:14 AM wrote:Good Morning, Midnight by Jean Rhys
I feel absurdly happy that I now know someone else who loves this book.

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#39

Post by Cynical Cinephile » June 18th, 2018, 2:33 pm

I'm not a big reader, mostly because I never reacted to books in the same way I've reacted to films. Maybe I've been reading wrong books. There have been, however, exceptions to the rule that pretty much blew me away. You'll find 3 of those cases (first that came to mind) and I'll provide a quote from each of them.

1984 by George Orwell
Quote: “The choice for mankind lies between freedom and happiness and for the great bulk of mankind, happiness is better.”

The Bridge on the Drina by Ivo Andric
Quote: “Forgetfulness heals everything and song is the most beautiful manner of forgetting, for in song man feels only what he loves.
So, in the kapia, between the skies, the river and the hills, generation after generation learnt not to mourn overmuch what the troubled waters had borne away. They entered there into the unconscious philosophy of the town; that life was an incomprehensible marvel, since it was incessantly wasted and spent, yet none the less it lasted and endured 'like the bridge on the Drina'.”

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
Quote: “It's necessary to have wished for death in order to know how good it is to live.”
The truth is you're Donny, and I'm Walter. But I'm tryin', Ringo, I'm tryin' real hard to be The Dude.

:ICM: :letbxd: :imdb:

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#40

Post by PirateJenny » April 13th, 2019, 6:50 pm

Here goes..

The Castle (Kafka)
The Great Circle (Aiken)
The Tree of Knowledge (Baroja)
The Old Man and The Sea (Hemingway)
Island of the Blue Dolphins (ODell)
The Stranger (Camus)
Under The Volcano (Lowry)
Heart of Darkness (Conrad)
Lolita (Nabokov)
Dead Souls (Gogol)
Rabbit Run (Updike)
The Maltese Falcon (Hammett)
Strangers on a Train (Highsmith)
Project For a Revolution in New York (Robbe-Grillet)
Tales of Soldies and Civilians (Bierce)
Ragtime (Doctorow)
Post Office (Bukowski)
Of Walking in Ice (Herzog)
Portnoy's Complaint (Roth)
Ubik (Dick)
THe Black Dahlia (Elroy)
Betty Blue (Djian)
Kim (Kipling)
Casino Royale (Fleming)
Complete Short Stories (Poe)

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