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The Twin Peaks Lounge

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The Twin Peaks Lounge

#41

Post by blocho » July 7th, 2017, 6:08 am

Cynical Cinephile on Jul 6 2017, 05:55:42 PM wrote:I figured that this was the appropriate place to post this

Painters that inspired David Lynch (VIMEO)
My guesses, without having seen the video: Francis Bacon, El Greco, and Dali.

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#42

Post by outdoorcats » July 7th, 2017, 4:16 pm

Cynical Cinephile on Jul 6 2017, 05:55:42 PM wrote:I figured that this was the appropriate place to post this

Painters that inspired David Lynch (VIMEO)
Great video! There's a lot more where that came from I imagine. Also some of the imagery in Episode 8 recalled short experimental films by Man Ray (such as The Return to Reason) or Bruce Conner (like Mea Culpa)

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#43

Post by RedHawk10 » July 8th, 2017, 2:36 am

Bacon seems to have had the biggest influence on "The Return" among those painters. Interesting stuff.

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#44

Post by blocho » July 8th, 2017, 3:37 am

Having seen the video now, what's crazy to me is that Hopper painting where the woman is wearing the EXACT same thing as the radio station receptionist in episode 8. That can't be coincidence.

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#45

Post by RedHawk10 » July 10th, 2017, 3:48 am

Really, really loved Part 9. I thought some of the humor was really nice after the pretty much non-stop chaos and horror of the last episode.

And man, I loved the scenes with Bobby. His dad always believing in him was such a great moment.
Last edited by RedHawk10 on August 4th, 2017, 1:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#46

Post by blocho » July 10th, 2017, 5:30 am

Can anyone explain the last scene in episode 9? Who were the two women and what were they talking about? Something was messed up with the audio on my tv.

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#47

Post by Kasparius » July 10th, 2017, 5:36 am

More importantly, one of the girls from Au Revoir Simone is beautiful.

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#48

Post by Cynical Cinephile » July 10th, 2017, 10:29 am

A lot of funny moments with Gordon in this one.
- Try to keep your voice down

-WHAT!!!!???
- ALBERT, LET'S THINK OUT LOUD!
And the whole sequence with him, Tammy and Diane awkwardly waiting for Albert to finish up.
blocho on wrote:Can anyone explain the last scene in episode 9? Who were the two women and what were they talking about? Something was messed up with the audio on my tv.
I don't know who they were, but most of the stuff they were talking about was nonsensical. The brunette asks the blonde if she knows that "zebra's out again", then they talk how they haven't seen each other in a while, after which the blonde tells how she got fired which was weird because "you can't fuck up serving burgers". She got a job serving burgers again, across the street and contemplates if her being high at work was what got her fired, but she still think it's unfair because she did the work. It ends with the blonde asking the brunette if she's "seen that penguin". The brunettes is initially surprised, but then they laugh it off.

I hope that helps, but I have no idea who the girls are and, probably more importantly, who the zebra and the penguin are.

Btw, William Hastings' website actually exists and it was last updated in November 2015. It gives a good estimate of the exact time in which this season is set.

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#49

Post by blocho » July 10th, 2017, 2:12 pm

Cynical Cinephile on Jul 10 2017, 04:29:25 AM wrote:I hope that helps, but I have no idea who the girls are and, probably more importantly, who the zebra and the penguin are.
Maybe it was just a closing head-scratcher from Lynch to make up for an episode that was actually straightforward and narratively comprehensible.

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#50

Post by Carmel1379 » July 10th, 2017, 11:04 pm

blocho on Jul 10 2017, 08:12:01 AM wrote:
Cynical Cinephile on Jul 10 2017, 04:29:25 AM wrote:I hope that helps, but I have no idea who the girls are and, probably more importantly, who the zebra and the penguin are.
Maybe it was just a closing head-scratcher from Lynch to make up for an episode that was actually straightforward and narratively comprehensible.
Two penguins were walking across an iceberg. One penguin turned to the second penguin and said, "You look like you're wearing a tuxedo." And the second penguin said, "Maybe I am."

Image



My guess is the conversation between the two girls was tender banter that the viewers will never understand analytically, don't have to, and can only access through sensitivity (like most of Lynch's moments).
Last edited by Carmel1379 on July 10th, 2017, 11:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?


Well here he is skidded out onto the Zone like a planchette on a Ouija board, and what shows up inside the empty circle in his brain might string together into a message, might not, he'll just have to see.

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#51

Post by blocho » July 10th, 2017, 11:14 pm

Any thoughts on the Woodsmen's use of blackface?

Yeah, I'm 99 percent sure it's supposed to be smoke or soot on their faces like they've come through a forest fire, but I'm surprised I haven't seen anyone mention it (here or in other forums).

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#52

Post by Cynical Cinephile » July 11th, 2017, 12:22 am

Carmel1379 on Jul 10 2017, 05:04:55 PM wrote:
blocho on Jul 10 2017, 08:12:01 AM wrote:
Cynical Cinephile on Jul 10 2017, 04:29:25 AM wrote:I hope that helps, but I have no idea who the girls are and, probably more importantly, who the zebra and the penguin are.
Maybe it was just a closing head-scratcher from Lynch to make up for an episode that was actually straightforward and narratively comprehensible.
Two penguins were walking across an iceberg. One penguin turned to the second penguin and said, "You look like you're wearing a tuxedo." And the second penguin said, "Maybe I am."

Image



My guess is the conversation between the two girls was tender banter that the viewers will never understand analytically, don't have to, and can only access through sensitivity (like most of Lynch's moments).
You have good memory (or did you see it recently again? I think you did)

Good call on that. Honestly, I didn't think about it at all, that is I didn't until blocho asked. Even then, I only contemplated on the meaning behind it while I was constructing my answer.
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#53

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » July 11th, 2017, 12:52 am

blocho on Jul 10 2017, 05:14:58 PM wrote:Any thoughts on the Woodsmen's use of blackface?

Yeah, I'm 99 percent sure it's supposed to be smoke or soot on their faces like they've come through a forest fire, but I'm surprised I haven't seen anyone mention it (here or in other forums).
The burnt hobo woodsmen demons are explained by reference to the Convenience Store where, presumably as a result of the opening of the abyss, a host of spirits accompanied the birth of Bob. Burnt, because of they are the “fire demons” we spoke of, hobos because they are dank ass hobos who just need a light, and woodsmen because they are the spirits we’ve seen many times now, especially in Fire Walk With Me. While the “woodsmen” might seem odd, they are eerily reminiscent of Crowley as a “mountain man,’ with burnt face, after attempting to climb K2.

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Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on July 11th, 2017, 12:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#54

Post by Carmel1379 » July 11th, 2017, 1:00 am

Cynical Cinephile on Jul 10 2017, 06:22:49 PM wrote:
Carmel1379 on Jul 10 2017, 05:04:55 PM wrote:
blocho on Jul 10 2017, 08:12:01 AM wrote:Maybe it was just a closing head-scratcher from Lynch to make up for an episode that was actually straightforward and narratively comprehensible.
Two penguins were walking across an iceberg. One penguin turned to the second penguin and said, "You look like you're wearing a tuxedo." And the second penguin said, "Maybe I am."

Image



My guess is the conversation between the two girls was tender banter that the viewers will never understand analytically, don't have to, and can only access through sensitivity (like most of Lynch's moments).
You have good memory (or did you see it recently again? I think you did)

Good call on that. Honestly, I didn't think about it at all, that is I didn't until blocho asked. Even then, I only contemplated on the meaning behind it while I was constructing my answer.
When I was listening to the lovely song (again), since it starts with the end of the conversation (the penguin line), the Cooper's joke came to my mind (and someone in the comment section remembered it too, so I could immediately copy-paste), which I recalled thanks to PdA, who posted the penguin joke on some game thread a couple of months ago. I'm not sure if I had remembered it otherwise (I rewatched the series end of April), I guess we'll never know now.

I doubt there will be any future reference to the rash, burgers, a zebra and a penguin, but I hope that both Karolina Wydra and the blonde girl will come back, they were extremely charming. And if not, I guess that's okay too, that would reinforce the uniqueness of the moment/setting/dialogue.
Last edited by Carmel1379 on July 11th, 2017, 1:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
IMDb, letterboxd
Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?


Well here he is skidded out onto the Zone like a planchette on a Ouija board, and what shows up inside the empty circle in his brain might string together into a message, might not, he'll just have to see.

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#55

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » July 11th, 2017, 1:56 am

Did that final closeup of Ike "The Spike"...

Image

...make anyone else think of this other little fella?

Image

Especially because of the combination of the pox and the bandage that the camera zooms in on so demonstratively. It could be that this is just how Lynch is prone to picture sickness and bandages, but age-wise it would fit and retroactively it would shed some light on what kind of deformity the Eraserhead baby really had. Of course Henry killed the baby but this never stopped Lynch from having characters come back, did it? With the woman's rash at the end of the episode I thought that maybe the whole world is slowly becoming sick, though. No wonder, with all the radiation that must go around (now that we know that Bob and the Woodsmen are "nuclear, baby") and what with plutonium rods being violently thrown onto asphalt to have it cause a reaction...
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on July 11th, 2017, 1:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#56

Post by RedHawk10 » July 11th, 2017, 1:56 am

I'd be surprised if the rash was never addressed again.

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#57

Post by blocho » July 11th, 2017, 1:57 am

(TL;DR Lynch doesn't like people messing with nature. And what's the deal with the Woodsmen?)


On a different note, has anyone seen Lynch's Industrial Symphony No. 1: The Dream of the Brokenhearted? It features the first ever appearance of a "woodsman" character, in this case played by Michael Anderson (better known as The Arm or The Man from Another Place). He appears briefly sawing a log and later reads both sides of a conversation. What's especially strange about this theater piece (which I believe has only been performed twice) is that it includes connections to both Wild at Heart and Twin Peaks.

Episode 8 got me thinking a lot more about parallel themes in multiple Lynch works. I've been especially mulling over the Woodsmen. Why Woodsmen? I saw someone else describe them as cosmic hoboes, which seems as apt a description as Woodsmen. Are they lumberjacks or do they just live in the woods?

That got me thinking back to the original Twin Peaks run, which definitely had a minor obsession with wood. The opening credits focus to a great extent on the interplay between machine and nature--steel versus wood. We know Josie's spirit ended up trapped in the wood of the Great Northern. We know that the Log Lady's log seems to have achieved psychic transcendence.

I always thought Lynch was very ambivalent with nature. The dialectic between robins and insects in Blue Velvet seems to suggest that nature can be both a positive and a negative force. The Log Lady's log is a benign force, and few things seem to make Cooper happier than Douglas fir trees. On the other hand, the Bookhouse Boys are dedicated to fighting "the evil in these woods." And owls are a constantly ambiguous menace. (We know that they are not what they seem, but I can't even figure out what they seem like).

Trouble really emerges with the intersection of man and nature--look at what happens to the Packard saw mill or when Garland Briggs and Cooper go camping. This brings me back to episode 8, which revolves around a single moment in history. The Trinity test, in Lynch's cosmology, I think represents the ultimate mastery of man over nature. And there can be little doubt that he regards this development with horror and dread.

That brings me back to the Woodsmen. Most people think they are spirits of the Black Lodge (where they were briefly seen in Fire Walk with Me). But so much more remains unknown. Beyond the obvious questions regarding their motivations, their penchant for unlit cigarettes, and their pernicious skull-crushing habits, what does their existence indicate regarding Lynch's preoccupation with nature? And why do they only show up 11 years after the Trinity blast?

Sorry for the rambling post. I'm just trying to get some thoughts out there.

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#58

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » July 11th, 2017, 2:32 am

My thought is that the Woodsmen could be victims of nuclear bomb tests, either directly from a test that was conducted in or near a forest or victims of nuclear fallout from the Trinity test that came down over a forest and transported the few people who lived there into the other dimension, and when they themselves fell from the sky in 1956 New Mexico they wanted more people to join them by drinking the bad water from the area ("This is the water and this is the well. Drink full and descend.").
Last edited by Perception de Ambiguity on July 11th, 2017, 2:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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#59

Post by Carmel1379 » July 11th, 2017, 2:55 am

"The horse is the white of the eyes and dark within." line made me think of the white horse vision Sarah Palmer had a few times, when Leland-Bob was about to attack someone. At the end of Part 8, when the Woodsman recedes into the night / becomes the night itself, one can hear the sound of a horse in the background. With this whole "message" transmitted by radio to society, the Woodsman is very much a Horseman of the Apocalypse figure, an ominous entity slumbering across the world and horrifying those ordinary people lacking a light or courage.

Thanks for that link btw, PdA, I'll look into those Crowley, Madame Blavatsky and other "heroes of hyperstition" references.

@blocho - Obviously this idea of the existence of a "darker world" underneath ordinary reality, common conceptions of "good" and what angels represent, is one of the most distinct motifs running throughout Lynch's oeuvre, each of his films deal with it in various respects. I can imagine people have tried cataloguing the economy of images he used to represent either extreme, although obviously there are many ambivalent and ambiguous symbols too. This "darker world" exists across all levels too - psychological, sociatal-technological and natural, where those 3 strata intersect and tangle.

I'd never go so far as saying Lynch "doesn't like people messing with nature" (nature itself, as you even mentioned, is a dark dark stratum, so what humans contribute to it, even with an atomic bomb, only reflects the proclivities of a higher, cosmic "order" as it's reflected in Lynch's own Stargate/Enter the Void sequence), but there's something to this. Even the portrayal of (relatively harmless) (communication) technology in conjunction with the older generation in "The Return" is quite prominent, many jokes rely on this awkward interaction.

In 'Inland Empire' there's someone sawing wood as well, btw, but I think that was merely a minor frame at the ending power party.
Last edited by Carmel1379 on July 11th, 2017, 4:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
IMDb, letterboxd
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whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?


Well here he is skidded out onto the Zone like a planchette on a Ouija board, and what shows up inside the empty circle in his brain might string together into a message, might not, he'll just have to see.

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#60

Post by Perception de Ambiguity » July 11th, 2017, 3:25 am

Oh, I forgot, also note the weird moan Ike "The Spike" makes in this moment, which also is somewhat reminiscent of:

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#61

Post by funkybusiness » July 11th, 2017, 3:48 am

spoilers for The Secret History of Twin PeaksShow
The Secret History of Twin Peaks is the book Mark Frost wrote to cover the period between S2 and S3. He considers it canon. David Lynch hadn't read the final copy at the time of its publication. Take that for what you will.

Anyway, it's about a dossier discovered during an unnamed, recent FBI investigation, given by Gordon Cole to Tamara Preston to decipher/verify information/thoroughly dismantle/&c. The author of the book within the book, the dossier itself, is later revealed to be Colonel Briggs. The dossier is, as the title of the book details, the secret history of Twin Peaks and the oddness surrounding it, from Lewis and Clark (Lewis seems to have discovered Owl Cave and possibly entered either Lodge with a native guide. also he was assassinated by the Illuminati (many references to an Illuminati v. Freemason centuries-long feud for supremacy)) on thru the pre-history of Twin Peaks the show (and its characters) and into the events of its finale and its consequences (who dies in the bank explosion, &c.)

Briggs outlines quite explicitly that Douglas Milford, brother of Dwayne (mayor of Twin Peaks), husband of Lana (wanna-be Miss Twin Peaks, also later revealed to possibly be an assassin!?), as a man in black, secret agent for the government, dealing, initially with covering up nuclear leakage in SE Washington, using the famous 40s/50s UFO sightings as the cover. He also references Milford as possibly connected to the three tramps(!!) arrested on the grassy knoll shortly after the JFK assassination. Lynch loves his hitmen. There is also a section on Crowley, L. Ron Hubbard and Jack Parsons, a quite interesting individual. Basically, every US-centric conspiracy theory is wrapped up in Twin Peaks, somehow. (Remember, Twin Peaks, the show's, origin was as a movie script about Marilyn Monroe and the Kennedy brothers.)

Colonel Briggs also seems to have definitely known about Cooper's doppelganger, post S2 finale.

It's an interesting book. I'm not quite done with it yet tho. There's secret shit you can see with old anaglyph 3-D glasses even!
Last edited by funkybusiness on July 11th, 2017, 3:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#62

Post by Carmel1379 » July 11th, 2017, 4:55 am

Perception de Ambiguity on Jul 10 2017, 07:56:00 PM wrote:Especially because of the combination of the pox and the bandage that the camera zooms in on so demonstratively. It could be that this is just how Lynch is prone to picture sickness and bandages, but age-wise it would fit and retroactively it would shed some light on what kind of deformity the Eraserhead baby really had. Of course Henry killed the baby but this never stopped Lynch from having characters come back, did it? With the woman's rash at the end of the episode I thought that maybe the whole world is slowly becoming sick, though. No wonder, with all the radiation that must go around (now that we know that Bob and the Woodsmen are "nuclear, baby") and what with plutonium rods being violently thrown onto asphalt to have it cause a reaction...
The Arm has evolved, so maybe the baby can too... It's an interesting theory. I think you jokingly mentioned somewhere before that The Elephant Man is the Eraserhead baby grown up. It would make sense for Lynch to think back within the context of his earlier work, since he's doing all the sound design too it's likely many similarities could emerge. And like we talked before, he does have this consistent string of interests, ambiguous conceptions, so perhaps (I can imagine that could be the case) both the baby and The Spike emerged for him from the same ideas-source in his mind (from a "small fish"). But if I had to picture the Eraserhead baby grown up, a proneness to violence and heavy drinking wouldn't be the first things on my mind, but it's possible that all the genetic abnormalities, sicknesses and shouting parents cutting up its insides, did traumatically contribute to such an extent to make it an effective killing machine.
IMDb, letterboxd
Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?


Well here he is skidded out onto the Zone like a planchette on a Ouija board, and what shows up inside the empty circle in his brain might string together into a message, might not, he'll just have to see.

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#63

Post by RedHawk10 » July 17th, 2017, 4:38 am

Cooper's face when he was eating that cake was amazing.

edit - this episode is also 10x better on rewatch.
Last edited by RedHawk10 on January 23rd, 2018, 4:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#64

Post by blocho » July 17th, 2017, 7:43 am

RedHawk10 on Jul 16 2017, 10:38:23 PM wrote:Part 10 was decent. Maybe my least favorite episode of the season so far, but it still had some pretty good moments.

Cooper's face when he was eating that cake was amazing.
A lot of humor, though tonally the whole thing was weird.

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#65

Post by Cynical Cinephile » July 17th, 2017, 1:08 pm

It's difficult to top episode 8. I think that's why I feel that both 9 and 10 were somewhat underwhelming. Hopefully, things will start picking up again soon. Btw, it's high time for Cooper to snap out of this whole Dougie thing, or at least to be found by FBI. I'm starting to worry that we won't see the real Cooper until the last couple of episodes.
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#66

Post by RedHawk10 » July 24th, 2017, 3:46 am

Part 11 - this was the best episode so far. Easily.

That woman in the car screaming at Bobby about being late for dinner before going into total freak-out mode when her kid sits up and starts acting like a zombie was one of the absolute best moments in this new season. It was the perfect blend of disturbing and fucking hilarious. I can't get over how well done it was.
Last edited by RedHawk10 on August 4th, 2017, 1:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

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#67

Post by metaller » July 24th, 2017, 10:40 pm

RedHawk10 on Jul 23 2017, 09:46:15 PM wrote:That woman in the car screaming at Bobby about being late for dinner before going into total freak-out mode when her kid sits up and starts acting like a zombie was one of the absolute best moments in this new season. It was the perfect blend of disturbing and fucking hilarious. I can't get over how well done it was.
I laughed more at that then I do during most comedy programs. That scene was pure gold.
I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.

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#68

Post by Carmel1379 » July 25th, 2017, 1:09 am

Loved Part 11. My favourite after Part 8, alongside Parts 2 & 3. That's all.
IMDb, letterboxd
Image
whom shall we find
Sufficient? who shall tempt with wand’ring feet
The dark unbottom’d infinite Abyss,
And through the palpable obscure find out
His uncouth way, or spread his aerie flight,
Upborn with indefatigable wings,
Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive
The happy Ile?


Well here he is skidded out onto the Zone like a planchette on a Ouija board, and what shows up inside the empty circle in his brain might string together into a message, might not, he'll just have to see.

Nur dein Auge – ungeheuer / Blickt michs an, Unendlichkeit!
t o B e c o n t i n u e d

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#69

Post by blocho » July 25th, 2017, 2:39 am

I'm sorry to see Bill Hastings go. Hopefully, he and Ruth can go scuba diving in heaven.

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#70

Post by Cynical Cinephile » July 25th, 2017, 10:54 am

I liked the episode a lot too, particularly the ending, that piano music and the odd behavior of everyone around the table made it strangely cool.
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#71

Post by GruesomeTwosome » July 26th, 2017, 3:52 am

Oh, how I love Gordon. Lynch's deadpan delivery of "...he's dead!" after staring at the exploded head was perfect. :lol:
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#72

Post by RedHawk10 » July 26th, 2017, 10:14 pm

I can't believe how good this season has been, and we haven't even entered the third act yet.

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#73

Post by blocho » July 27th, 2017, 5:09 am

GruesomeTwosome on Jul 25 2017, 09:52:03 PM wrote:Oh, how I love Gordon. Lynch's deadpan delivery of "...he's dead!" after staring at the exploded head was perfect. :lol:
Lynch has been keeping half of the best lines of the season for himself. "He's dead" was an instant classic. But consider the following:

"Albert, we're in South Dakota. Cossacks are in Russia."

"I don't appreciate your language, colonel. Oh, a place. Buckhorn, South Dakota."

"I told all your colleagues, those clown comics, to fix their hearts or die."

Through the first few episodes of this season, I thought Lynch was doing Twin Peaks without the comedy. But now I see that he's just changed the comedy slightly. The old Twin Peaks had some farce, some comedy of manners: Andy getting hit in the head with a rock, Cooper going on and on about the Douglas Firs. The new Twin Peaks finds comedy in the manifestly absurd (Wally Brando and Jacoby's rants) or in small moments of schtick. What's most interesting to me is that the comedy sometimes goes hand in hand with horror. The traffic jam scene from last week's episode was pure Lynchian grotesquerie. But there was something about that screaming lady that was also hysterical.

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#74

Post by Cynical Cinephile » July 31st, 2017, 12:06 pm

It was nice seeing Audrey again, but who the fuck are Billy, Chuck and Tina? I'm not good with names, so I don't know if they have already appeared on the show, or if they were at least mentioned.
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#75

Post by blocho » July 31st, 2017, 2:34 pm

Cynical Cinephile on Jul 31 2017, 06:06:34 AM wrote:It was nice seeing Audrey again, but who the fuck are Billy, Chuck and Tina? I'm not good with names, so I don't know if they have already appeared on the show, or if they were at least mentioned.
I feel like the show keeps adding new characters and story lines without regard for deepening our understanding of those characters and story lines we already know.

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#76

Post by Bob Brooker » August 3rd, 2017, 1:57 am

Episode 12 was a charmer.

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#77

Post by RedHawk10 » August 4th, 2017, 1:52 am

I loved the scenes with Sarah in Part 12 - the rest of it was kind of meh. Bit of a clunker for me.

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#78

Post by blocho » August 9th, 2017, 5:19 am

I loved the last episode (spoilers warning). The entire Montana section with Bad Cooper was extremely eerie and intense with a side dose of absurdity. (What sort of a gang hangs out in a massive, empty warehouse in rural Montana and adheres to an arm-wrestling based hierarchy?). Meantime, I want the Mitchum Brothers and Dougie Coop to go on an extended three-man comedy tour. And as for the Roadhouse, I would say that was the most shocking scene of the entire season: James Hurley singing that fucking song again.

Good times

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#79

Post by maxwelldeux » August 11th, 2017, 12:29 am

As someone who lives in a small Washington town, watching things like Twin Peaks and First Blood makes me distrust everyone who lives around me.

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#80

Post by RedHawk10 » August 11th, 2017, 5:51 am

blocho on Aug 8 2017, 11:19:44 PM wrote:And as for the Roadhouse, I would say that was the most shocking scene of the entire season: James Hurley singing that fucking song again.

Good times
Yeah, it took a bit for my brain to process that scene actually happening. I thought it was hilarious and I'm glad that random girl is into James.

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