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Favourite Books?

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brokenface
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Favourite Books?

#161

Post by brokenface » June 13th, 2015, 9:30 am

Nuclearplanet on Jun 12 2015, 07:15:39 PM wrote:started reading We have always lived in the castle by Shirley Jackson. Really good book so far. Anyone ever read it? thoughts?
Yeah it's really good, I like her style. She has some great short stories too

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#162

Post by Nuclearplanet » June 16th, 2015, 7:10 pm

sebby on Jun 12 2015, 08:03:22 PM wrote:
Nuclearplanet on Jun 12 2015, 07:15:39 PM wrote:started reading We have always lived in the castle by Shirley Jackson. Really good book so far. Anyone ever read it? thoughts?
Looks interesting. I'll give it a read this weekend.
It is, very Tim Burton like story aswell

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#163

Post by Pretentious Hipster » June 21st, 2015, 3:50 am

One man drove across 30 states, and 19695 km throughout America to write a message with his GPS. His message?

Image
My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#164

Post by Jay Mars » June 21st, 2015, 3:58 am

ArthurYanthar on Jun 20 2015, 09:50:42 PM wrote:One man drove across 30 states, and 19695 km throughout America to write a message with his GPS. His message?

Image
So does this suggest that Ayn Rand makes her readers dumber or does Ayn Rand attract readers who are already dim? I hope the latter because I have already read her and I hope it doesn't cause the type of long term damage that this poor fellow is exhibiting.

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#165

Post by zuma » June 21st, 2015, 3:58 am

ArthurYanthar on Jun 20 2015, 09:50:42 PM wrote:One man drove across 30 states, and 19695 km throughout America to write a message with his GPS. His message?

Image
Thanks for ruining my evening.

You should get that on a shirt! ;)

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#166

Post by Pretentious Hipster » June 21st, 2015, 4:00 am

zuma on Jun 20 2015, 09:58:50 PM wrote:Thanks for ruining my evening.

You should get that on a shirt! ;)
Ironic clothing can only go so far.

I would never wear something Ayn Rand related, or read one of her books. Watching The Fountainhead was enough :yucky:
My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#167

Post by Leopardi » June 21st, 2015, 4:07 am

ArthurYanthar on Jun 20 2015, 09:50:42 PM wrote:One man drove across 30 states, and 19695 km throughout America to write a message with his GPS. His message?

Image
We should go on a road trip and write 'No thanks' across Canada. This needs to be done.

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#168

Post by Pretentious Hipster » June 21st, 2015, 4:08 am

:lol:
My father didn’t have the skill of a professional cameraman. The result? Avant-garde cinema.

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#169

Post by sebby » June 21st, 2015, 5:47 am

Nuclearplanet on Jun 16 2015, 01:10:29 PM wrote:
sebby on Jun 12 2015, 08:03:22 PM wrote:
Nuclearplanet on Jun 12 2015, 07:15:39 PM wrote:started reading We have always lived in the castle by Shirley Jackson. Really good book so far. Anyone ever read it? thoughts?
Looks interesting. I'll give it a read this weekend.
It is, very Tim Burton like story aswell
I liked it well enough, but it felt like a short story fluffed and extended to novel/la length. It didn't need to be 146 pages.

Reading The Haunting of Hill House now and liking it quite a bit. This one feels much richer than Castle.

I had only read Jackson's short stories before, so it's interesting to have a go at her longer work. I think I'll tackle Life Among the Savages next.

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#170

Post by funkybusiness » June 21st, 2015, 6:38 am

Leopardi on Jun 20 2015, 10:07:51 PM wrote:We should go on a road trip and write 'No thanks' across Canada. This needs to be done.
if not for the image, that would've gone straight in the signature. solid gold.

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#171

Post by Nuclearplanet » June 21st, 2015, 11:49 pm

reading Charlie & The Chocolate Factory :D read it when I was around 12, it's still such a fun read

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#172

Post by Nuclearplanet » June 21st, 2015, 11:51 pm

sebby on Jun 20 2015, 11:47:21 PM wrote:
Nuclearplanet on Jun 16 2015, 01:10:29 PM wrote:
sebby on Jun 12 2015, 08:03:22 PM wrote:Looks interesting. I'll give it a read this weekend.
It is, very Tim Burton like story aswell
I liked it well enough, but it felt like a short story fluffed and extended to novel/la length. It didn't need to be 146 pages.

Reading The Haunting of Hill House now and liking it quite a bit. This one feels much richer than Castle.

I had only read Jackson's short stories before, so it's interesting to have a go at her longer work. I think I'll tackle Life Among the Savages next.
I actually learned about Shirley Jackson through the film Set Fire To The Stars, she really seemed like an interesting and eccentric character, read the books and really plays up how Shirley Henderson played her in the film.

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#173

Post by Knaldskalle » June 22nd, 2015, 5:34 am

Leopardi on Jun 20 2015, 10:07:51 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Jun 20 2015, 09:50:42 PM wrote:One man drove across 30 states, and 19695 km throughout America to write a message with his GPS. His message?

Image
We should go on a road trip and write 'No thanks' across Canada. This needs to be done.
Or just a big DON'T right above the 49th parallel.
ImageImageImageImage

Please don't hurt yourself, talk to someone.

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#174

Post by Cippenham » June 22nd, 2015, 5:58 am

Jay Mars on Jun 20 2015, 09:58:00 PM wrote:
ArthurYanthar on Jun 20 2015, 09:50:42 PM wrote:One man drove across 30 states, and 19695 km throughout America to write a message with his GPS. His message?

Image
So does this suggest that Ayn Rand makes her readers dumber or does Ayn Rand attract readers who are already dim? I hope the latter because I have already read her and I hope it doesn't cause the type of long term damage that this poor fellow is exhibiting.
Her way of thinking would be alien to British conservative thinking which believes in the Queen the Church of England and drinking tea :) but it is amazing how many of her books are still sold every year, the critics panned them even when released apparently, I did not know much about her to be honest
Turning over a new leaf :ICM:

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#175

Post by Rich » June 22nd, 2015, 6:11 am

Play Bioshock and you'll learn about her and how her ideas don't work.

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#176

Post by Leopardi » December 23rd, 2017, 4:21 am

I thought I'd put together a list of my favourite three books (including fiction and non-fiction, prose, poetry, drama, etc.) first published in each decade. Lots of painful omissions in the sweet spot of world literature (the 1860s through the 1920s, as far as I'm concerned - these could/should all be expanded to a top ten list, I would say). And no, I don't have terrible taste in contemporary books, I'm just ignorant and have actually only read three from the 2010s (only City of Fortune deserves to be on this list, a great introductory history book on Venice in my opinion). I haven't read a lot of books beyond about 1960, actually, so I welcome any recommendations you might have.

I was only intending on going back to 1800, but then wondered how far back I could go, so most decades before then are pretty sparse, with some only having three titles that could be added. I clearly need to read more books before 1650, since they only have one or two titles per decade, at least until Shakespeare saves the day.

My Goodreads page was helpful in putting this list together, as was this Wiki page, but no doubt I've missed a title here or there and will have to update from time to time. All in all a pretty boring list with not a lot of surprises before the 60's as I usually stick to canon before then.

EDIT: I've read a few more books from this decade since the original post so the 2010s list has firmed up a bit
Favourite Books by Decade: A Work in ProgressShow
2010s
1. City of Fortune: How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire (Roger Crowley)
2. A Very Capable Life: The Autobiography of Zarah Petri (John L. Walters)
3. Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood (Trevor Noah)

2000s
2. Alexander Hamilton (Ron Chernow)
3. Conquest of the Useless: Reflections from the Making of Fitzcarraldo (Werner Herzog)
3. Capillarity and Wetting Phenomena: Drops, Bubbles, Pearls, Waves (Pierre-Gilles de Gennes)

1990s
1. Intermolecular and Surface Forces: With Applications to Colloidal and Biological Systems (Jacob N. Israelachvili)
2. The Mother Tongue: English and How It Got That Way (Bill Bryson)
3. Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (James Gleik)

1980s
1. Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character (Richard Feynman)
2. The Oxford Book of English Ghost Stories (Michael Cox & R.A. Gilbert (eds.))
3. It (Stephen King)

1970s
1. The Shining (Stephen King)
2. Helter Skelter (Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry)
3. The World According to Garp (John Irving)

1960s
1. Stoner (John Williams)
2. A Clockwork Orange (Anthony Burgess)
3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Ken Kesey)

1950s
1. The Lord of the Rings (J. R. R. Tolkien)
2. Invisible Man (Ralph Ellison)
3. Farenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)

1940s
1. The Stranger (Albert Camus)
2. Cannery Row (John Steinbeck)
3. The Razor's Edge (W. Somerset Maugham)

1930s
1. The Hobbit (J. R. R. Tolkien)
2. The Grapes of Wrath (John Steinbeck)
3. Burmese Days (George Orwell)

1920s
1. An American Tragedy (Theodore Dreiser)
2. The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Conan Doyle)
3. Main Street: The Story of Carol Kennicott (Sinclair Lewis)

1910s
1. Jennie Gerhardt (Theodore Dreiser)
2. The Valley of Fear (Arthur Conan Doyle)
3. The Financier (Theodore Dreiser)

1900s
1. Sister Carrie (Theodore Dreiser)
2. Martin Eden (Jack London)
3. The Jungle (Upton Sinclair)

1890s
1. Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy)
2. Dracula (Bram Stoker)
3. The Sorrows of Satan (Marie Corelli)

1880s
1. Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche)
2. Germinal (Émile Zola)
3. A Tramp Abroad (Mark Twain)

1870s
1. Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy)
2. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)
3. Roderick Hudson (Henry James)

1860s
1. Les Misérables (Victor Hugo)
2. Journey to the Center of the Earth (Jules Verne)
3. The Innocents Abroad (Mark Twain)

1850s
1. David Copperfield (Charles Dickens)
2. Moby-Dick (Herman Melville)
3. The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins)

1840s
1. Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol)
2. A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)
3. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Frederick Douglass)

1830s
1. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (Victor Hugo)
2. The Pickwick Papers (Charles Dickens)
3. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (Edgar Allan Poe)

1820s
1. Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex (Owen Chase)
2. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (James Hogg)
3. Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott)

1810s
1. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)
2. The Manuscript Found in Saragossa (Jan Potocki)
3. Zastrozzi (Percy Bysshe Shelley)

1800s
1. Faust, Part One (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
2. The Watsons (Jane Austen)
3. Elective Affinities (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)

1790s
1. Caleb Williams (William Godwin)
2. Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D (James Boswell)
3. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Mary Wollstonecraft)

1780s
1. The 120 Days of Sodom, or the School of Licentiousness (Marquis de Sade)
2. Mary: A Fiction (Mary Wollstonecraft)
3. The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (Ann Radcliffe)

1770s
1. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Edward Gibbon)
2. The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
3. The Old English Baron (Clara Reeve)

1760s
1. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (Laurence Sterne)
2. The Castle of Otranto (Horace Walpole)
3. The Vicar of Wakefield (Oliver Goldsmith)

1750s
1. The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia (Samuel Johnson)
2. Candide (Voltaire)
3. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (Thomas Gray)

1740s
1. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (Henry Fielding)
2. Zadig (Voltaire)
3. Pamela (Samuel Richardson)

1730s
1. A Treatise of Human Nature (David Hume)
2. Letters on the English (Voltaire)
3. Manon Lescault (Abbé Prévost)

1720s
1. A Journal of the Plague Year (Daniel Defoe)
2. Captain Singleton (Daniel Defoe)
3. Memoirs of a Cavalier (Daniel Defoe)

1710s
1. Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe)
2. Pope's Iliad (Alexander Pope)
3. Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (George Berkeley)

1700s
1. One Thousand and One Nights (various [1st English translation])
2. The Storm (Daniel Defoe)
3. A Tale of a Tub (Jonathan Swift)

1690s
1. The Unfortunate Happy Lady (Aphra Behn)
2. Incognita; or, Love and Duty Reconcil'd: A novel (William Congreve)
3. The Choice (John Pomfret)

1680s
1. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Sir Isaac Newton)
2. The Life and Death of Mr. Badman (John Bunyan)
3. Don Tomazo, or The Juvenile Rambles of Thomas Dangerfield (Thomas Dangerfield)

1670s
1. Paradise Regained (John Milton)
2. The Pilgrim's Progress (John Bunyan)
3. The Imaginary Invalid (Molière)

1660s
1. Paradise Lost (John Milton)
2. Maxims (François, duc de La Rochefoucauld)
3. The Blazing World (Margaret Cavendish)

1650s
1. Leviathan or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil (Thomas Hobbes)
2. Natures Pictures Drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life (Margaret Cavendish)
3. The Princess Gloria; Or, The Royal Romance (selections) (Percy Herbert)

1640s
1. Meditations on First Philosophy (René Descartes)
2.
3.

1630s
1. Discourse on Method (René Descartes)
2. Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Relating to Two New Sciences (Galileo Galilei)
3.

1620s
1. Urania (Book I only) (Lady Mary Wroth)
2.
3.

1610s
1. The Tempest (William Shakespeare)
2. The Winter's Tale (William Shakespeare)
3. Henry VIII (William Shakespeare)

1600s
1. Macbeth (William Shakespeare)
2. Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra)
3. Hamlet (William Shakespeare)

1590s
1. Julius Caesar (William Shakespeare)
2. Richard III (William Shakespeare)
3. The Faerie Queene (Edmund Spenser)
Last edited by Leopardi on June 28th, 2018, 2:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PGonzalez
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#177

Post by PGonzalez » May 7th, 2020, 12:16 am

Leopardi wrote:
December 23rd, 2017, 4:21 am
I thought I'd put together a list of my favourite three books (including fiction and non-fiction, prose, poetry, drama, etc.) first published in each decade. Lots of painful omissions in the sweet spot of world literature (the 1860s through the 1920s, as far as I'm concerned - these could/should all be expanded to a top ten list, I would say). And no, I don't have terrible taste in contemporary books, I'm just ignorant and have actually only read three from the 2010s (only City of Fortune deserves to be on this list, a great introductory history book on Venice in my opinion). I haven't read a lot of books beyond about 1960, actually, so I welcome any recommendations you might have.

I was only intending on going back to 1800, but then wondered how far back I could go, so most decades before then are pretty sparse, with some only having three titles that could be added. I clearly need to read more books before 1650, since they only have one or two titles per decade, at least until Shakespeare saves the day.

My Goodreads page was helpful in putting this list together, as was this Wiki page, but no doubt I've missed a title here or there and will have to update from time to time. All in all a pretty boring list with not a lot of surprises before the 60's as I usually stick to canon before then.

EDIT: I've read a few more books from this decade since the original post so the 2010s list has firmed up a bit
Favourite Books by Decade: A Work in ProgressShow
2010s
1. City of Fortune: How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire (Roger Crowley)
2. A Very Capable Life: The Autobiography of Zarah Petri (John L. Walters)
3. Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood (Trevor Noah)

2000s
2. Alexander Hamilton (Ron Chernow)
3. Conquest of the Useless: Reflections from the Making of Fitzcarraldo (Werner Herzog)
3. Capillarity and Wetting Phenomena: Drops, Bubbles, Pearls, Waves (Pierre-Gilles de Gennes)

1990s
1. Intermolecular and Surface Forces: With Applications to Colloidal and Biological Systems (Jacob N. Israelachvili)
2. The Mother Tongue: English and How It Got That Way (Bill Bryson)
3. Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (James Gleik)

1980s
1. Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character (Richard Feynman)
2. The Oxford Book of English Ghost Stories (Michael Cox & R.A. Gilbert (eds.))
3. It (Stephen King)

1970s
1. The Shining (Stephen King)
2. Helter Skelter (Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry)
3. The World According to Garp (John Irving)

1960s
1. Stoner (John Williams)
2. A Clockwork Orange (Anthony Burgess)
3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Ken Kesey)

1950s
1. The Lord of the Rings (J. R. R. Tolkien)
2. Invisible Man (Ralph Ellison)
3. Farenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)

1940s
1. The Stranger (Albert Camus)
2. Cannery Row (John Steinbeck)
3. The Razor's Edge (W. Somerset Maugham)

1930s
1. The Hobbit (J. R. R. Tolkien)
2. The Grapes of Wrath (John Steinbeck)
3. Burmese Days (George Orwell)

1920s
1. An American Tragedy (Theodore Dreiser)
2. The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Conan Doyle)
3. Main Street: The Story of Carol Kennicott (Sinclair Lewis)

1910s
1. Jennie Gerhardt (Theodore Dreiser)
2. The Valley of Fear (Arthur Conan Doyle)
3. The Financier (Theodore Dreiser)

1900s
1. Sister Carrie (Theodore Dreiser)
2. Martin Eden (Jack London)
3. The Jungle (Upton Sinclair)

1890s
1. Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy)
2. Dracula (Bram Stoker)
3. The Sorrows of Satan (Marie Corelli)

1880s
1. Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche)
2. Germinal (Émile Zola)
3. A Tramp Abroad (Mark Twain)

1870s
1. Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy)
2. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)
3. Roderick Hudson (Henry James)

1860s
1. Les Misérables (Victor Hugo)
2. Journey to the Center of the Earth (Jules Verne)
3. The Innocents Abroad (Mark Twain)

1850s
1. David Copperfield (Charles Dickens)
2. Moby-Dick (Herman Melville)
3. The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins)

1840s
1. Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol)
2. A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)
3. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Frederick Douglass)

1830s
1. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (Victor Hugo)
2. The Pickwick Papers (Charles Dickens)
3. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (Edgar Allan Poe)

1820s
1. Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex (Owen Chase)
2. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (James Hogg)
3. Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott)

1810s
1. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)
2. The Manuscript Found in Saragossa (Jan Potocki)
3. Zastrozzi (Percy Bysshe Shelley)

1800s
1. Faust, Part One (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
2. The Watsons (Jane Austen)
3. Elective Affinities (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)

1790s
1. Caleb Williams (William Godwin)
2. Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D (James Boswell)
3. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Mary Wollstonecraft)

1780s
1. The 120 Days of Sodom, or the School of Licentiousness (Marquis de Sade)
2. Mary: A Fiction (Mary Wollstonecraft)
3. The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (Ann Radcliffe)

1770s
1. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Edward Gibbon)
2. The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
3. The Old English Baron (Clara Reeve)

1760s
1. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (Laurence Sterne)
2. The Castle of Otranto (Horace Walpole)
3. The Vicar of Wakefield (Oliver Goldsmith)

1750s
1. The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia (Samuel Johnson)
2. Candide (Voltaire)
3. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (Thomas Gray)

1740s
1. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (Henry Fielding)
2. Zadig (Voltaire)
3. Pamela (Samuel Richardson)

1730s
1. A Treatise of Human Nature (David Hume)
2. Letters on the English (Voltaire)
3. Manon Lescault (Abbé Prévost)

1720s
1. A Journal of the Plague Year (Daniel Defoe)
2. Captain Singleton (Daniel Defoe)
3. Memoirs of a Cavalier (Daniel Defoe)

1710s
1. Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe)
2. Pope's Iliad (Alexander Pope)
3. Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (George Berkeley)

1700s
1. One Thousand and One Nights (various [1st English translation])
2. The Storm (Daniel Defoe)
3. A Tale of a Tub (Jonathan Swift)

1690s
1. The Unfortunate Happy Lady (Aphra Behn)
2. Incognita; or, Love and Duty Reconcil'd: A novel (William Congreve)
3. The Choice (John Pomfret)

1680s
1. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Sir Isaac Newton)
2. The Life and Death of Mr. Badman (John Bunyan)
3. Don Tomazo, or The Juvenile Rambles of Thomas Dangerfield (Thomas Dangerfield)

1670s
1. Paradise Regained (John Milton)
2. The Pilgrim's Progress (John Bunyan)
3. The Imaginary Invalid (Molière)

1660s
1. Paradise Lost (John Milton)
2. Maxims (François, duc de La Rochefoucauld)
3. The Blazing World (Margaret Cavendish)

1650s
1. Leviathan or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil (Thomas Hobbes)
2. Natures Pictures Drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life (Margaret Cavendish)
3. The Princess Gloria; Or, The Royal Romance (selections) (Percy Herbert)

1640s
1. Meditations on First Philosophy (René Descartes)
2.
3.

1630s
1. Discourse on Method (René Descartes)
2. Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Relating to Two New Sciences (Galileo Galilei)
3.

1620s
1. Urania (Book I only) (Lady Mary Wroth)
2.
3.

1610s
1. The Tempest (William Shakespeare)
2. The Winter's Tale (William Shakespeare)
3. Henry VIII (William Shakespeare)

1600s
1. Macbeth (William Shakespeare)
2. Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra)
3. Hamlet (William Shakespeare)

1590s
1. Julius Caesar (William Shakespeare)
2. Richard III (William Shakespeare)
3. The Faerie Queene (Edmund Spenser)

A very interesting list, and there are some names that mine would clearly share (though, other than Stoner, I don't think I read anything from your list from the 1960s onward). I must also admit that I didn't know Theodore Dreiser, but after a quick search I became quite interested. I'll try to see if I can find any of his books when the libraries reopen :)

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Leopardi
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#178

Post by Leopardi » May 10th, 2020, 10:11 pm

PGonzalez wrote:
May 7th, 2020, 12:16 am
Leopardi wrote:
December 23rd, 2017, 4:21 am
I thought I'd put together a list of my favourite three books (including fiction and non-fiction, prose, poetry, drama, etc.) first published in each decade. Lots of painful omissions in the sweet spot of world literature (the 1860s through the 1920s, as far as I'm concerned - these could/should all be expanded to a top ten list, I would say). And no, I don't have terrible taste in contemporary books, I'm just ignorant and have actually only read three from the 2010s (only City of Fortune deserves to be on this list, a great introductory history book on Venice in my opinion). I haven't read a lot of books beyond about 1960, actually, so I welcome any recommendations you might have.

I was only intending on going back to 1800, but then wondered how far back I could go, so most decades before then are pretty sparse, with some only having three titles that could be added. I clearly need to read more books before 1650, since they only have one or two titles per decade, at least until Shakespeare saves the day.

My Goodreads page was helpful in putting this list together, as was this Wiki page, but no doubt I've missed a title here or there and will have to update from time to time. All in all a pretty boring list with not a lot of surprises before the 60's as I usually stick to canon before then.

EDIT: I've read a few more books from this decade since the original post so the 2010s list has firmed up a bit
Favourite Books by Decade: A Work in ProgressShow
2010s
1. City of Fortune: How Venice Won and Lost a Naval Empire (Roger Crowley)
2. A Very Capable Life: The Autobiography of Zarah Petri (John L. Walters)
3. Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood (Trevor Noah)

2000s
2. Alexander Hamilton (Ron Chernow)
3. Conquest of the Useless: Reflections from the Making of Fitzcarraldo (Werner Herzog)
3. Capillarity and Wetting Phenomena: Drops, Bubbles, Pearls, Waves (Pierre-Gilles de Gennes)

1990s
1. Intermolecular and Surface Forces: With Applications to Colloidal and Biological Systems (Jacob N. Israelachvili)
2. The Mother Tongue: English and How It Got That Way (Bill Bryson)
3. Genius: The Life and Science of Richard Feynman (James Gleik)

1980s
1. Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! Adventures of a Curious Character (Richard Feynman)
2. The Oxford Book of English Ghost Stories (Michael Cox & R.A. Gilbert (eds.))
3. It (Stephen King)

1970s
1. The Shining (Stephen King)
2. Helter Skelter (Vincent Bugliosi and Curt Gentry)
3. The World According to Garp (John Irving)

1960s
1. Stoner (John Williams)
2. A Clockwork Orange (Anthony Burgess)
3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (Ken Kesey)

1950s
1. The Lord of the Rings (J. R. R. Tolkien)
2. Invisible Man (Ralph Ellison)
3. Farenheit 451 (Ray Bradbury)

1940s
1. The Stranger (Albert Camus)
2. Cannery Row (John Steinbeck)
3. The Razor's Edge (W. Somerset Maugham)

1930s
1. The Hobbit (J. R. R. Tolkien)
2. The Grapes of Wrath (John Steinbeck)
3. Burmese Days (George Orwell)

1920s
1. An American Tragedy (Theodore Dreiser)
2. The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes (Arthur Conan Doyle)
3. Main Street: The Story of Carol Kennicott (Sinclair Lewis)

1910s
1. Jennie Gerhardt (Theodore Dreiser)
2. The Valley of Fear (Arthur Conan Doyle)
3. The Financier (Theodore Dreiser)

1900s
1. Sister Carrie (Theodore Dreiser)
2. Martin Eden (Jack London)
3. The Jungle (Upton Sinclair)

1890s
1. Tess of the d'Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy)
2. Dracula (Bram Stoker)
3. The Sorrows of Satan (Marie Corelli)

1880s
1. Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche)
2. Germinal (Émile Zola)
3. A Tramp Abroad (Mark Twain)

1870s
1. Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy)
2. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne)
3. Roderick Hudson (Henry James)

1860s
1. Les Misérables (Victor Hugo)
2. Journey to the Center of the Earth (Jules Verne)
3. The Innocents Abroad (Mark Twain)

1850s
1. David Copperfield (Charles Dickens)
2. Moby-Dick (Herman Melville)
3. The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins)

1840s
1. Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol)
2. A Christmas Carol (Charles Dickens)
3. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Frederick Douglass)

1830s
1. The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (Victor Hugo)
2. The Pickwick Papers (Charles Dickens)
3. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket (Edgar Allan Poe)

1820s
1. Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex (Owen Chase)
2. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (James Hogg)
3. Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott)

1810s
1. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley)
2. The Manuscript Found in Saragossa (Jan Potocki)
3. Zastrozzi (Percy Bysshe Shelley)

1800s
1. Faust, Part One (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
2. The Watsons (Jane Austen)
3. Elective Affinities (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)

1790s
1. Caleb Williams (William Godwin)
2. Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D (James Boswell)
3. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Mary Wollstonecraft)

1780s
1. The 120 Days of Sodom, or the School of Licentiousness (Marquis de Sade)
2. Mary: A Fiction (Mary Wollstonecraft)
3. The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (Ann Radcliffe)

1770s
1. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Edward Gibbon)
2. The Sorrows of Young Werther (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe)
3. The Old English Baron (Clara Reeve)

1760s
1. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (Laurence Sterne)
2. The Castle of Otranto (Horace Walpole)
3. The Vicar of Wakefield (Oliver Goldsmith)

1750s
1. The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia (Samuel Johnson)
2. Candide (Voltaire)
3. Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (Thomas Gray)

1740s
1. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (Henry Fielding)
2. Zadig (Voltaire)
3. Pamela (Samuel Richardson)

1730s
1. A Treatise of Human Nature (David Hume)
2. Letters on the English (Voltaire)
3. Manon Lescault (Abbé Prévost)

1720s
1. A Journal of the Plague Year (Daniel Defoe)
2. Captain Singleton (Daniel Defoe)
3. Memoirs of a Cavalier (Daniel Defoe)

1710s
1. Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe)
2. Pope's Iliad (Alexander Pope)
3. Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (George Berkeley)

1700s
1. One Thousand and One Nights (various [1st English translation])
2. The Storm (Daniel Defoe)
3. A Tale of a Tub (Jonathan Swift)

1690s
1. The Unfortunate Happy Lady (Aphra Behn)
2. Incognita; or, Love and Duty Reconcil'd: A novel (William Congreve)
3. The Choice (John Pomfret)

1680s
1. Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Sir Isaac Newton)
2. The Life and Death of Mr. Badman (John Bunyan)
3. Don Tomazo, or The Juvenile Rambles of Thomas Dangerfield (Thomas Dangerfield)

1670s
1. Paradise Regained (John Milton)
2. The Pilgrim's Progress (John Bunyan)
3. The Imaginary Invalid (Molière)

1660s
1. Paradise Lost (John Milton)
2. Maxims (François, duc de La Rochefoucauld)
3. The Blazing World (Margaret Cavendish)

1650s
1. Leviathan or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common-Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil (Thomas Hobbes)
2. Natures Pictures Drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life (Margaret Cavendish)
3. The Princess Gloria; Or, The Royal Romance (selections) (Percy Herbert)

1640s
1. Meditations on First Philosophy (René Descartes)
2.
3.

1630s
1. Discourse on Method (René Descartes)
2. Discourses and Mathematical Demonstrations Relating to Two New Sciences (Galileo Galilei)
3.

1620s
1. Urania (Book I only) (Lady Mary Wroth)
2.
3.

1610s
1. The Tempest (William Shakespeare)
2. The Winter's Tale (William Shakespeare)
3. Henry VIII (William Shakespeare)

1600s
1. Macbeth (William Shakespeare)
2. Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra)
3. Hamlet (William Shakespeare)

1590s
1. Julius Caesar (William Shakespeare)
2. Richard III (William Shakespeare)
3. The Faerie Queene (Edmund Spenser)

A very interesting list, and there are some names that mine would clearly share (though, other than Stoner, I don't think I read anything from your list from the 1960s onward). I must also admit that I didn't know Theodore Dreiser, but after a quick search I became quite interested. I'll try to see if I can find any of his books when the libraries reopen :)
Thanks! I haven't read a lot from the 70's onward so those sections are pretty weak overall, but I'm looking forward to build them up in the years ahead as I try more of the modern stuff (NYRB is a godsend here). Dreiser isn't for everybody, I"ve heard people complain about his tendency to sermonize, but somehow he hits just the right spot for me, probably my favourite 20th century writer, definitely top three at least. If you start with Sister Carrie, make sure to go with the University of Pennsylvania Press edition, as editions before then (all the way up to 1980) were pretty heavily censored!

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